Playlist

The Atlantic

The Atlantic covers news and analysis on politics, business, culture, technology, national, international and life on the official site of The Atlantic Magazine.

by Audiosearch

    The Atlantic

    Dec 18 2016

  • Things That Come Out of Your Mouth

    Tell Me Something I Don’t Know takes science and wraps it up in a glittering game-show package. The creator and showrunner Stephen J. Dubner, of Question of the Day and Freakonomics, asks contestants to tell the judges something that they don’t know—like, say, how finding a few pounds of ambergris will make you tens of thousands of dollars richer. In the end, the judges crown a winner based on how much they are awed by the presentation. The show plays out like a happy hour before anyone’s sloppy...more

  • Thursday Afternoon Monday Morning Podcast 11-24-16

    Even people who’ve never listened to Monday Morning Podcast have probably heard the host Bill Burr’s rants about owning a home. Propelled by an inexhaustible amount of scathing, hilarious monologues, Monday Morning Podcast tramples popular culture, the right and the left, athletes, political correctness—everything. It’s a vulgar, irreverent form of egalitarian comedy that never slows down. A YouTube cottage industry has formed around cutting audio from his podcast and mixing it with video from w...more

  • #29 You Can’t Go Home Again

    The host of Millennial, Meghan Tan, pilots listeners through the many kinds of indecisiveness (about career, love, money) that young people tend to grapple with on the way to middle adulthood. When it comes to her feelings on these subjects, Tan is willing to share them all. While the show’s main narrative arc is ostensibly her pursuit of a job in radio, her frank emotional communion with the audience goes beyond fans wanting her to get a big break. She almost always connects with listeners in a...more

  • #16 Double Life

    The host of Millennial, Meghan Tan, pilots listeners through the many kinds of indecisiveness (about career, love, money) that young people tend to grapple with on the way to middle adulthood. When it comes to her feelings on these subjects, Tan is willing to share them all. While the show’s main narrative arc is ostensibly her pursuit of a job in radio, her frank emotional communion with the audience goes beyond fans wanting her to get a big break. She almost always connects with listeners in a...more

  • Confronting the Past

    Sidedoor arrived this winter at the same time that a rash of poorly veiled self-promotional audio entered the already flooded podcast universe. In the case of Sidedoor, however, the show has figured out how to remind listeners that the Smithsonian is an endless well of treasures—through trivia told in fun and even sexy ways. Topics range from the archives of Phyllis Diller’s comedy; the parasite that turns tiny crabs into zombies; and how the museum is preparing an orangutan for parenthood. In o...more

  • Special Delivery

    Sidedoor arrived this winter at the same time that a rash of poorly veiled self-promotional audio entered the already flooded podcast universe. In the case of Sidedoor, however, the show has figured out how to remind listeners that the Smithsonian is an endless well of treasures—through trivia told in fun and even sexy ways. Topics range from the archives of Phyllis Diller’s comedy; the parasite that turns tiny crabs into zombies; and how the museum is preparing an orangutan for parenthood. In o...more

  • Prisoner of Zion

    Home of the Brave is the independent podcast from the auteur Scott Carrier, a lone wolf who calls Salt Lake City home and spends much of his life on the road capturing nature on tape and interviewing hitchhikers, activists, sectarians, prophets, and doomsayers. Carrier records the people and landscapes he encounters exactly as they would sound in real life, and he never goes for the easy interview. (Recently, he traveled to North Dakota to talk to protesters at Standing Rock.) He’s also a hell o...more

  • The Man In The Road

    Stylistically, Love + Radio resembles almost nothing you’ve heard. The caliber of each episode—the high-quality production, unnerving soundtrack, and meticulous attention to detail in storytelling—never wavers, but the episodes toy with your senses in distinct ways. This is a show that will scar you from time to time. Take the episode most frequently cited as a primer for the series, “The Wisdom of Jay Thunderbolt,” from several years back—it’s a black-comedy thriller with a big scare. On this y...more

  • Episode 82 (The Wheel)

    Producing a history podcast is a delicate thing. Dramatizing the past when there isn’t anyone left alive to speak their truth means that the written material must be tight. The Memory Palace, a compact piece of entertainment that rarely runs over 20 minutes, manages to thrill and educate you without talking you to death. The creator Nate DiMeo mixes in ambient sounds and quiet pauses so that he can use voice to evoke the bygone eras that consume him. Listen to the The Memory Palace, and you’ll b...more

  • Episode 81 (Below, from Above)

    Producing a history podcast is a delicate thing. Dramatizing the past when there isn’t anyone left alive to speak their truth means that the written material must be tight. The Memory Palace, a compact piece of entertainment that rarely runs over 20 minutes, manages to thrill and educate you without talking you to death. The creator Nate DiMeo mixes in ambient sounds and quiet pauses so that he can use voice to evoke the bygone eras that consume him. Listen to the The Memory Palace, and you’ll b...more

  • Episode 51: Money Tree

    The true-crime genre brings with it some ethical controversy—namely, when its practitioners create entertainment from other people’s pain. Criminal manages to uphold high journalistic standards instead of trafficking in monster stories or gory details. It does fresh reporting and avoids being a sound-bite aggregator, instead shining a light on the bizarre shadowy interplay between the law and outlaws. For instance, a tiger that lives at a truck stop in Louisiana is really a story about activists...more

  • Episode 44: One Eyed Joe

    The true-crime genre brings with it some ethical controversy—namely, when its practitioners create entertainment from other people’s pain. Criminal manages to uphold high journalistic standards instead of trafficking in monster stories or gory details. It does fresh reporting and avoids being a sound-bite aggregator, instead shining a light on the bizarre shadowy interplay between the law and outlaws. For instance, a tiger that lives at a truck stop in Louisiana is really a story about activists...more

  • #64 On the Inside

    People live in two nearly indistinguishable worlds now, one made up of flesh and one piped in from broadband lines and cell-phone towers. By making sense of the two, Reply All reveals the source of its greatness—the hosts have old souls, despite only being in their 30s, and they know everything about the young web. The show finds stories buried deep down Reddit rabbit holes and in the weeds of a Craigslist posting. One popular segment has their middle-aged boss asking them the meaning of a tweet...more

  • #77 The Grand Tapestry Of Pepe

    People live in two nearly indistinguishable worlds now, one made up of flesh and one piped in from broadband lines and cell-phone towers. By making sense of the two, Reply All reveals the source of its greatness—the hosts have old souls, despite only being in their 30s, and they know everything about the young web. The show finds stories buried deep down Reddit rabbit holes and in the weeds of a Craigslist posting. One popular segment has their middle-aged boss asking them the meaning of a tweet...more

  • More Perfect presents: Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl

    “We the People of the United States, in order to for a more perfect union ... ” are the opening words of the preamble of the Constitution from which this Radiolab spinoff derives its name. The audio revolutionary Jad Abumrad and his team became interested in the Supreme Court after working on a story about a complex adoption case involving the Indian Child Welfare Act. The story, as does each More Perfect episode, zooms out to reveal how nine justices shape our everyday lives in unexpected—and, ...more

  • Episode 5: White Like Me

    In a year of widespread polarization, The United States of Anxiety rose up from the cracks, cataloging and responding to a nation’s election fears as they played out in real time. USA premiered during the height of campaign frenzy and, each week, eased people’s fears about “the other side” with a specific kind of medicine: information. By offering historical context (say, stats about the cortisol levels of conservatives versus liberals), explaining how one-time Obama voters found themselves scre...more

  • Episode 1: How Did We Get Here and Where Are We Going?

    In a year of widespread polarization, The United States of Anxiety rose up from the cracks, cataloging and responding to a nation’s election fears as they played out in real time. USA premiered during the height of campaign frenzy and, each week, eased people’s fears about “the other side” with a specific kind of medicine: information. By offering historical context (say, stats about the cortisol levels of conservatives versus liberals), explaining how one-time Obama voters found themselves scre...more

  • #2 Gregor

    Heavyweight explores the tricky business of redemption and estrangement by starting with the premise that to make something right, you have to first get over the idea that someone is at fault. You also have to laugh, to the point of tears, as much as possible. Each episode finds the host Jonathan Goldstein moderating a fraught moment intensified by years of distance: a time when someone broke a promise, or another person’s heart. The hurt is still there—sometimes for everyone, sometimes for just...more

  • Episode 1: Sisters in Death

    Though it has the potential to create the same hysteria as Serial or Making a Murderer, Stranglers certainly has its own thing going. The show focuses on guilty parties who may still be on the loose—specifically, the Boston Strangler(s) of the 1960s. And while it sets a serious tone, Stranglers isn’t just blood and guts. Fun production cues (a rotary phone noise signifies a phone call, a typewriter sound indicates an old news clipping) assuage the difficulty of hearing graphic details, as does t...more

  • Episode 2: Fear in Boston

    Though it has the potential to create the same hysteria as Serial or Making a Murderer, Stranglers certainly has its own thing going. The show focuses on guilty parties who may still be on the loose—specifically, the Boston Strangler(s) of the 1960s. And while it sets a serious tone, Stranglers isn’t just blood and guts. Fun production cues (a rotary phone noise signifies a phone call, a typewriter sound indicates an old news clipping) assuage the difficulty of hearing graphic details, as does t...more