Podcast

Cato Daily Podcast

The Cato Daily Podcast allows Cato Institute scholars and other commenters to discuss relevant news and libertarian thought in a conversational, informal manner. Hosted by Caleb O. Brown. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Episodes

  • Before Punishing ‘Bias’ in Social Media, Let’s Define It First

    Aug 11 2020

    Is regulating "bias" on internet speech platforms a proper role for Congress? Will Duffield comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Coronavirus vs. One-Size-Fits-All Education

    Aug 10 2020

    The coronavirus has inspired some widely varying schooling decisions for parents. How do public bureaucracies need to adapt? Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Federal Task Forces Reduce Police Accountability

    Aug 08 2020

    When is your local cop not a local cop? When he's deputized as a federal agent. That can pose problems for state and local police accountability. Simone Weichselbaum of The Marshall Project and Patrick Jaicomo of the Institute for Justice comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Worries over the World's Reserve Currency

    Aug 07 2020

    Is the dollar's status as the world's reserve currency at risk? George Selgin discusses the concern. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Combating Neo-Malthusianism in India and China

    Aug 05 2020

    Chelsea Follett is author of "Neo‐​Malthusianism and Coercive Population Control in China and India: Overpopulation Concerns Often Result in Coercion." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Decidedly Interventionist Foreign Policy of Joe Biden

    Aug 04 2020

    Would the Joe Biden brand of foreign policy be an improvement? John Glaser evaluates the Biden track record. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Pandemic Pod for Every Child?

    Aug 03 2020

    Seeking to mitigate risks associated with the coronavirus and the current decision paralysis in many school districts, parents and teachers are opting out in favor of what's being called "pandemic pods." Kerry McDonald discusses how they work. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Austrian Economics: An Introduction

    Aug 01 2020

    Every time we embark on a given plan of action, big or small, we make a choice. Whereas many economists model people’s behavior using idealized assumptions, economists of the Austrian School don’t. The Austrian School of Economics takes people as they are and constructs economic theories by examining the logical structure of the choices they make. Steve Horwitz discusses Austrian Economics: An Introduction. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Terrible, Terrible Quarter for GDP

    Jul 31 2020

    How bad was the last quarter? What are the prospects for a reasonably quick recovery? Jeremy Horrpdahl of the University of Central Arkansas comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Deregulating Housing or "Destroying" the Suburbs?

    Jul 30 2020

    President Trump fears that a President Biden would "destroy" the suburbs of the United States. How true is that? Nolan Gray of the Mercatus Center discusses the federal role in local housing and zoning decisions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Understanding Federal Police Surges in American Cities

    Jul 29 2020

    What do we know about the federal police surges planned for several American cities? There are important distinctions among the agencies tasked with federal police action in American cities. Patrick Eddington and Walter Olson comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The U.S. Response to Probable Chinese Espionage

    Jul 28 2020

    What are the risks of Chinese espionage in the United States? Did the U.S. respond appropriately? Brandon Valeriano comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tens of Thousands of Employers Harmed by Trump Immigration Restrictions

    Jul 25 2020

    The Trump Administration doesn't care for immigration even apparently if tens of thousands of employers are harmed in the process of putting up immigration hurdles. David Bier comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Testing the "China Shock"

    Jul 24 2020

    Were economists and others wrong about China with respect to trade? Cato's Scott Lincicome is author of "Testing the 'China Shock.’" See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Case against The Jones Act

    Jul 23 2020

    The Jones Act, little studied but incredibly costly to Americans, has been on the books for 100 years. A new Cato Institute book, The Case against the Jones Act, takes aim at this destructive protectionist policy. Colin Grabow and Inu Manak are the book's editors. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Scrutinizing Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of (Special) Rights

    Jul 22 2020

    In many states, law enforcement officers accused of misconduct get special protections from the criminal justice system. Those protections harm efforts to hold police accountable. Cato's Walter Olson explains how it works. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Civil Liberties vs. Federal Cops in Portland

    Jul 21 2020

    Federal police authority to "protect monuments" has instead delivered a substantial challenge to civil liberties. Patrick Eddington discusses the current federal police action in Portland, Oregon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Commutes Roger Stone’s Sentence & May Try to Pardon Himself

    Jul 17 2020

    Notorious political dirty trickster and federal inmate Roger Stone got a commutation from the President. Was it corrupt? Is the pardon power truly plenary? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Commutes Roger Stone’s Sentence & May Try to Pardon Himself

    Jul 17 2020

    Notorious political dirty trickster and federal inmate Roger Stone got a commutation from the President. Was it corrupt? Is the pardon power truly plenary? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Local, State, and Federal Rules that Make Your House More Expensive

    Jul 16 2020

    People concerned about housing costs should look to government at every level for regulations and restrictions that contribute to the high cost of housing. Cato's Scott Lincicome comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Schools Reopening and New Evidence on COVID-19

    Jul 14 2020

    How will schools adapt to an ongoing viral pandemic? What flexibility should parents be given to make different choices? Cato's Jeff Singer and Neal McCluskey comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Engagement versus Belligerence with China

    Jul 13 2020

    The pendulum of U.S. engagement with China is swinging back to confrontation. What's a better path forward? Eric Gomez and John Glaser comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Understanding Oklahoma’s New (Old) Indian Country

    Jul 10 2020

    McGirt v. Oklahoma may shift a great deal of how we think about "Indian Country" in the U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's opinion in the case was a big win for Native American interests. Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Puts International Students and Cautious Universities in a Bind

    Jul 09 2020

    If universities go online-only in the Fall, many international students will have to leave the country. It’s all thanks to a directive from the Trump White House. Alex Nowrasteh explains why this could be a costly mistake. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • SCOTUS: States May Punish "Faithless" Electors

    Jul 08 2020

    The Supreme Court vigorously agrees that states may fine or otherwise punish Electoral College electors who "go rogue." The court added that there are limits to the restrictions. Walter Olson comments on the context and history of the decision. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Russian Bounties on U.S. Soldiers Should Spur Quicker Exit from Afghanistan

    Jul 07 2020

    If claims of Russian-paid bounties on U.S. soldiers turn out to be true, an obvious response should be to exit our decades-long failed war in Afghanistan. Cato's John Glaser makes the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Seila Law v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

    Jul 06 2020

    It wasn't one of the blockbuster Supreme Court cases of the term, but it will shape how power is vested in federal agencies. Cato's Diego Zuluaga and Will Yeatman comment on Seila Law v. CFPB. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Colorado Acts on Police Accountability While Congress Dithers

    Jul 04 2020

    Congress has yet to make clear changes of policy with respect to police brutality, but Colorado has moved in a big way. Leslie Herod is a Democratic state representative in Colorado. Her proposals to reform use of force and liability for police officers is now law in Colorado. She describes how states can replicate Colorado’s efforts to hold police accountable to the public. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Is Florida Still Pushing Prostitution Charges for Robert Kraft?

    Jul 03 2020

    The owner of the New England Patriots is pushing a strong defense against solicitation charges filed against him, and what first looked like a big win for prosecutors against a high-profile defendant is now looking more like a major headache. Elizabeth Nolan Brown of Reason says that the Robert Kraft case should highlight what happens to people charged with victimless crimes who don’t happen to be fabulously wealthy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An Early Evaluation of the Paycheck Protection Program

    Jul 03 2020

    The Paycheck Protection Program was meant to help firms maintain payrolls during economic disruption caused by the coronavirus. How has it worked out? Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • School Choice, Religious Freedom at the Supreme Court

    Jun 30 2020

    The Supreme Court has dealt a blow to private school choice programs that exclude parents who would send their children to religious school. Cato's Ilya Shapiro, director of the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies, and Neal McCluskey, director of the Center for Educational Freedom, comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Would A Biden Administration Tackle Trade?

    Jun 30 2020

    Among the challenges that might face a Biden Administration, restoring trading relationships should probably be high on the list. Simon Lester comments on where a President Biden might land on the freedom to trade. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Mortgage Markets and COVID-19

    Jun 26 2020

    What have been the effects of COVID-19 on the housing and mortgage markets? Will Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac continue to move toward exiting conservatorship? Mark Calabria directs the Federal Housing Finance Agency. We discussed mortgages and changes in the housing landscape driven by a global pandemic. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • For States Trying to Relaunch Their Economies, Some Mixed COVID-19 Facts

    Jun 25 2020

    In April and May, states embarked on what now appear to be ambitious plans to reopen thanks to a resurgence of COVID-19 cases. Jeff Singer discusses the mistaken search for a single answer to a complicated problem. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unprecedented Quirks in Economic Data Thanks to COVID-19

    Jun 24 2020

    Economist Bruce Yandle suggests that for the last several months, the U.S. has largely been a command economy. That's thanks largely to the coronavirus and the subsequent government interventions. He discusses recent economic data and some of its quirks. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Assessing Economic Damage from Trump's Latest Immigration Ban

    Jun 23 2020

    The Supreme Court has ended one tactic by the Trump White House to end Obama-era protections for some immigrants. A new proclamation from the President aims to broadly suspend many more workers from coming to the U.S. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FDA, CDC, and Managing Knowledge in a Pandemic

    Jun 22 2020

    Federal agencies charged with the management of, creation of, and dissemination of knowledge have performed poorly in this pandemic. Does it have to be this way? Peter Van Doren, editor of Regulation, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cops, Reporters, and "the Exonerative Tense"

    Jun 19 2020

    Reporters who want to clearly detail the level of police professionalism to the public must first contend with the linguistic flourishes present in police reports. Radley Balko of The Washington Post calls it "the exonerative tense." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Drug War’s Perverse Effects on Policing

    Jun 18 2020

    Joe Biden might pick Senator Kamala Harris as his runningmate, the President issues an executive order on policing, and we should all remember, according to Cato's Trevor Burrus, that the Drug War broke policing. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reading the Relevant Statute in Bostock vs. Clayton County, Georgia

    Jun 17 2020

    The Supreme Court finds that the 1964 Civil Rights Act does pertain to firing workers merely for being transsexual. Walter Olson says there are good reasons to support Justice Gorsuch's interpretation of the relevant law. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Peril and Promise for the Push to #DefundPolice

    Jun 16 2020

    ibertarians have long wanted to radically reduce the level of police involvement in our lives. But what does #DefundPolice mean to the broad range of people currently protesting police abuse? And what might be the risks of rapidly and emotionally making radical changes to police funding or abolishing police departments outright? Jonathan Blanks of the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • High Court Rejects Qualified Immunity Challenges

    Jun 15 2020

    The Supreme Court has swept away all current challenges to qualified immunity, effectively keeping the doctrine's attendant problems alive for the time being. Cato's Jay Schweikert calls the decision a "dereliction of duty." He and Cato's Clark Neily comment on what can and should come next. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pandemic Contact Tracing As A New Police Power

    Jun 15 2020

    Will contact tracing for COVID-19 inevitably become a new police power to be used to track or generate criminal suspects? Patrick Eddington and Matthew Feeney comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Was the Warrant That Ended in Breonna Taylor's Death Illegal?

    Jun 13 2020

    The police killing of 26-year-old EMT Breonna Taylor has rocked Louisville, Kentucky. Radley Balko argues that the warrant used to enter her home was illegal. Louisville has since banned the use of no-knock warrants. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • COVID-19 Takes State Pensions for a Ride

    Jun 12 2020

    State pensions typically rely on stock market returns to fund the benefits to retirees, and fall back on taxpayers when stocks are down. What about when taxpayers are also down, in a sense, because of a viral pandemic? AEI's Andrew Biggs comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Getting Cities Back to Work

    Jun 11 2020

    The coronavirus pandemic has knocked big holes in the budgets of cities across the United States. What are the cheapest ways for cities to get the economic engines humming again? Patrick Tuohey of the Better Cities Project makes his case See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • American Society of Journalists and Authors v. Becerra

    Jun 10 2020

    The punishment dealt by the coronavirus was bad enough, but many journalists and other creators have been doubly sandbagged by a California law that limits their ability to work on a freelance basis. The Cato Institute has filed a brief in the case of American Society of Journalists and Authors v. Becerra. Trevor Burrus, one of the author's of Cato's brief, describes what's at issue. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lessons from Gezi Park Protests for Americans

    Jun 09 2020

    Protests against government abuse sometimes ultimately serve to strengthen existing regimes. Mustafa Akyol details what American protestors can learn from the Gezi Park protests in Turkey. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lessons from Gezi Park Protests for Americans

    Jun 09 2020

    Protests against government abuse sometimes ultimately serve to strengthen existing regimes. Mustafa Akyol details what American protestors can learn from the Gezi Park protests in Turkey. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trouble with Trump’s Trouble with Inspectors General

    Jun 08 2020

    President Trump has fired numerous inspectors general of federal agencies. A few of those are problematic. Will Yeatman explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • White House Continues Deregulatory Push

    Jun 06 2020

    As federal revenues falter, economic growth after the COVID-19 pandemic matters more than ever. The White House appears keenly aware of that fact. Will Yeatman comments on the "deregulate to stimulate" agenda on paper and in practice. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Truth about Coercive Plea Bargains

    Jun 05 2020

    As federal revenues falter, economic growth after the COVID-19 pandemic matters more than ever. The White House appears keenly aware of that fact. Will Yeatman comments on the "deregulate to stimulate" agenda on paper and in practice. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Wants to Use the MIlitary to Forcibly End Protests

    Jun 03 2020

    Under what circumstances can a U.S. President use the military to put down protests in American cities? Gene Healy explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Supreme Court Again Kicks the Can of Qualified Immunity

    Jun 02 2020

    The Supreme Court has again delayed the possibility of accepting a case challenging qualified immunity, a doctrine invented by the High Court that practically protects cops from the consequences of abuse. Clark Neily and Jay Schweikert comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and Protest Movements That Get Things Done

    Jun 01 2020

    The relationships between police and communities are as thin as they've ever been. How do protest movements that achieve concrete ends actually do it? Fabio Rojas is a sociologist at Indiana University. We discussed recent high-profile killings and how protestors can maximize their impact. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Needs A Factcheck on How Twitter, the First Amendment, and Section 230 Operate

    May 30 2020

    The President and several U.S. Senators seem not to understand how key provisions of federal law protect social media platforms and other websites from their unwanted advances. Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • China Seizes Greater Control of Hong Kong

    May 29 2020

    China has continued to assert greater control of Hong Kong. What is the appropriate U.S. response? Doug Bandow comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Community Reinvestment Act and Subsidized Gentrification

    May 28 2020

    The Community Reinvestment Act is supposed to correct inequities in mortgage lending to low-income Americans. A new regulatory rule adopted recently made some changes. Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The COVID-19 Lockdown in Ecuador

    May 27 2020

    There have been massive government errors and bureaucratic bungling in the COVID-19 response in the U.S. How does Ecuador compare? Gabriela Calderon de Burgos comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Visions of Liberty: The War on Drugs

    May 26 2020

    What would the U.S. look like 15 years after the end of the War on Drugs? Trevor Burrus explores this question in his chapter of the new book, Visions of Liberty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Innovation Works: And Why It Flourishes in Freedom

    May 23 2020

    Understanding how innovation happens is crucial to keeping it going. Matt Ridley is author of How Innovation Works. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Italy's Unfortunate Policy Responses to COVID-19

    May 22 2020

    Some policy choices made by the government in Italy had consequences that would have been hard to predict. Others, like price controls, tend to deliver predictable results. Alberto Mingardi comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Italy's Unfortuate Policy Responses to COVID-19

    May 22 2020

    Some policy choices made by the government in Italy had consequences that would have been hard to predict. Others, like price controls, tend to deliver predictable results. Alberto Mingardi comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Should Fall 2020 Look Like on College Campuses?

    May 20 2020

    Thanks to the disruption of COVID-19, universities may have an opportunity to reshape education to deliver greater value to students. How will they do it? Where should they look for guidance? Emily Chamlee-Wright of the Institute for Humane Studies comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Where Does Unemployment Go from Here?

    May 19 2020

    The unemployment picture looks grim right now for tens of millions of Americans. Cato's Ryan Bourne comments on what idled workers expect and what the future might hold for ramping employment back up. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trouble with ‘Make China Pay’ over Coronavirus

    May 18 2020

    Are trade and foreign policy good ways to exact a price from China over COVID-19? Doug Bandow and Simon Lester comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Immigration Restrictionists on the March

    May 16 2020

    The rationales new and old for limiting immigration, even in a pandemic, collapse upon scrutiny. David Bier explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Even in A Pandemic, Elective Surgery Doesn't Mean Nonessential

    May 15 2020

    Elective surgeries aren't necessarily frivolous. In a pandemic, delaying elective surgery can create an emergency for those who need treatment. Jeff Singer comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reining in Unwarranted Surveillance of Americans

    May 13 2020

    The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court is under scrutiny for its failures to properly check overzealous federal authorities. Republican Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky says the court is not constitutional, but he's still offering reforms. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Senator Hawley’s Muddled Case against the World Trade Organization

    May 13 2020

    Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri wants the U.S. to exit the World Trade Organization, but it's not clear how Americans would benefit. Dan Ikenson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is the Supreme Court Ready to End Qualified Immunity?

    May 12 2020

    The Supreme Court this week will examine cases involving qualified immunity for a possible oral argument. Reuters recently examined more than 500 appellate decisions involving qualified immunity and found courts favoring the government more regularly in recent years. Clark Neily and Jay Schweikert believe it is likely the court will take one or more of the thirteen cases they'll consider this week. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Politicization of Disaster Relief

    May 11 2020

    Is the President moving disaster relief from less politically advantageous to those that will help him politically? If so, is that new? Steven Horwitz discusses his upcoming article in Regulation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Homeschooling Authoritarian?

    May 08 2020

    Harvard Magazine's depiction of homeschooling as authoritarian stands at odds with reality. Kerry McDonald explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Facebook and Credible Content Oversight

    May 06 2020

    Cato's John Samples will join Facebook's new oversight board. We discussed what content moderation looks like for big speech platforms today and what governance institutions might look like going forward. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FDA Approves At-Home Coronavirus Test, But It's Already Banned in Some States

    May 05 2020

    When state law bans an at-home test for coronavirus before it's even approved, maybe it's time to be less aggressive. Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • For States, Is It Bailout or Bankruptcy?

    May 04 2020

    Should the feds bail out states or maybe just states with better fiscal management? Is bankruptcy really on the table for cash-strapped states? Jonathan Williams of the American Legislative Exchange Council says it would be largely unprecedented. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Identifying #NeverNeeded Regulation after COVID-19

    May 02 2020

    Many of the regulations suspended during this outbreak aren’t needed at all. Identifying and eliminating those regulations systematically is the critical task. Matt Mitchell of the Mercatus Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Threat Perception and COVID-19

    May 01 2020

    How does a global pandemic reshuffle priorities given the threats that we face? Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Supreme Court Considering Challenges to Qualified Immunity

    Apr 30 2020

    The Supreme Court has been reluctant to take a case challenging qualified immunity, a doctrine that protects police from the consequences of violating Americans' rights. That may change soon, according to Cato's Jay Schweikert. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Role of Science During Pandemic

    Apr 29 2020

    Why have some Asian nations performed so well relative to the United States in containing the coronavirus without nearly the devastating economic fallout? Terence Kealey argues that it comes down to prevailing attitudes about the role of science. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evasive Entrepreneurs and the Future of Governance

    Apr 28 2020

    nnovators who don’t always conform to social or legal norms are using new technological capabilities to circumvent traditional regulatory systems. Adam Thierer is author of Evasive Entrepreneurs and the Future of Governance. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Asserting the Right to Know Your COVID-19 Status

    Apr 27 2020

    The right to know your own health status is no less important in a pandemic, and yet pre-emptive prohibitions on some kinds of tests can prevent you from exercising that right. Jeff Singer comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pandemic Lockdowns and Valuing Lives

    Apr 24 2020

    Economist David Henderson believes the lockdowns in response to COVID-19 need to end sooner than later. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Declares 'Total' Authority over Governors, Backs Down Almost Immediately

    Apr 24 2020

    It would be hard to misunderstand federalism more, particularly if you're the President of the United States. Gene Healy discusses a week in new and erroneous executive power claims amid the coronavirus outbreak. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Trump Immigration Ban Would Slow Economic Recovery

    Apr 22 2020

    Even if an immigration ban made sense at this point in a global pandemic, it would harm the economic recovery while doing very little to stem the spread of the coronavirus. Alex Nowrasteh discusses the President's forthcoming executive order. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Negative Oil? Really?

    Apr 21 2020

    The bumpy ride for oil markets is far from over. How does the dramatic demand shock in the oil market change relations among large and influential oil-producing countries? Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Regime Uncertainty for Developers of Coronavirus Tests

    Apr 19 2020

    When the FDA takes action against developers of diagnostic tests, it seems to come primarily during times when new tests are desperately needed. Will Rinehart of the Center for Growth and Opportunity discusses the problem. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pandemic Spurs States, Feds to Liberate Telemedicine

    Apr 18 2020

    Allowing medical services to cross state lines more easily may prove crucial during this stressful time for our medical system. Many states and the feds are wisely getting out of the way. Jeff Singer comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will Sweden Prove to be a Model for Coronavirus Response?

    Apr 17 2020

    We won't know the truth for some time, but there are reasons to believe that Sweden's light touch in response to COVID-19 may ultimately be less costly than lockdowns and other harsh government mandates. Johan Norberg comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Some Bad Ideas for Fighting COVID-19”

    Apr 16 2020

    The Christmas tree that was the relief package that moved through Congress recently did manage to avoid some particularly bad ideas in its final form. Still, those ideas will be back, according to Diego Zuluaga. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Surveillance and Civil Liberties in a Pandemic

    Apr 15 2020

    Is there a role for government surveillance during a pandemic? And if so, does the genie go back in the bottle when the threat has passed? Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pointless Partisanship over Potential COVID-19 Treatments

    Apr 14 2020

    The struggle over how best to address COVID-19 has become increasingly partisan. The public fight over the value of hydroxychloroquine as a helpful treatment should be (but isn't) driven by the evidence, according to Cato's Jeff Singer. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Conservative Nationalism’s Next Steps?

    Apr 13 2020

    Adrian Vermeule argues that traditional conservative views of the Constitution ought to be replaced. What he believes ought to replace it is pretty troubling if you care about liberty. Stephanie Slade of Reason Magazine comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Can the President Quarantine States?

    Apr 11 2020

    The President tossed out a tweet suggesting he might quarantine whole states where COVID-19 has hit especially hard. Is that constitutional? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What's the Value Proposition for Higher Ed Now?

    Apr 10 2020

    The pandemic sweeping the globe has temporarily shuttered in-person higher education. Does the mass adoption of online education reduce the stigma long associated with institutions of higher learning that exist only online? Cato’s Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Noble Lies and COVID-19

    Apr 09 2020

    Lying for noble reasons is still lying, but those lies harm the credibility of people who are supposed to be experts. Alex Nowrasteh argues that noble lies about the coronavirus carry substantial costs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Defense Spending Priorities and COVID-19

    Apr 08 2020

    What's the military's role in a global pandemic? How should spending priorities change in response? Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Does Oversight Mean for That Sudden $2-Trillion in New Spending?

    Apr 07 2020

    What are the oversight structures built into the massive relief package recently approved by Congress? Will Yeatman describes the multiple layers of oversight included. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • States Suspend Certificate-of-Need Laws to Address COVID-19

    Apr 06 2020

    Which states are standing in the way of a better pandemic response? Angela Erickson of the Pacific Legal Foundation discusses why some states have relaxed health care certificate-of-need requirements while others are effectively preventing a more robust private sector response to the crisis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • China’s Confused Coronavirus Response

    Apr 04 2020

    There are many reasons to be skeptical of the adequacy of China's response to the coronavirus outbreak. How does that impact relations among countries? Eric Gomez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Federalism vs. Federal Power in a Pandemic

    Apr 03 2020

    What prevents a federally ordered national lockdown as a response to COVID-19? Federalism, for one. Walter Olson explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Homeschooling's Past, Present, and Future

    Apr 02 2020

    Parents were caught flatfooted with respect to schooling during a pandemic. Kerry McDonald discusses modern homeschooling's origins and what learning outside a conventional classroom might look like when normalcy returns. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tariffs in a Pandemic Are Taxes on Lifesaving Goods

    Apr 01 2020

    The Trump Administration will delay the collection of some tariffs, but won't lower the taxes that Americans pay to receive foreign goods. Simon Lester explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Online Resources for New Homeschoolers

    Mar 31 2020

    How are public school officials making the compelled transition to homeschooling easier? What online resources are out there to help families? Kerry McDonald comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Key Tax Provisions in Massive Economic Relief Bill

    Mar 30 2020

    That massive relief bill passed by Congress last week contains some provisions that affected businesses will appreciate. Nicole Kaeding with the National Taxpayers Union comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evaluating Federal Reserve Moves amid Coronavirus Outbreak

    Mar 27 2020

    The Fed apparently understands the nature of this recession far better than many members of Congress, but Cato’s George Selgin argues that the central bank runs the risk of blurring the lines between monetary and fiscal policy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Emergency Powers and Civil LIberties During a Pandemic

    Mar 26 2020

    Vigilance toward overweening government is no less important during a pandemic. Cato's Patrick Eddington discusses some federal efforts to claim emergency powers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Pandemic Recession Is Different

    Mar 25 2020

    Understanding the nature of recessions caused by pandemics is critical to crafting a policy response. Ryan Bourne explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Containing Coronavirus after FDA Missteps

    Mar 25 2020

    Bureaucratic errors made containing the novel coronavirus considerably more difficult. Michael Cannon details some important next steps. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • COVID-19, Supply Shocks and Stimulus

    Mar 25 2020

    Congress may misunderstand the nature of the economic downturn spurred by the novel coronavirus. Chris Edwards comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Facilitating a Smooth Election amid Pandemic

    Mar 24 2020

    Election days are an opportunity for COVID-19 to spread widely among vulnerable populations. Kentucky is among states that have delayed primaries while evaluating what changes to the election process may be necessary. Republican Michael G. Adams is the Secretary of State for Kentucky. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Foes of Suspicionless Surveillance Score a Small Win

    Mar 23 2020

    Amendments will finally be offered to the broad federal surveillance powers granted by Congress. Patrick Eddington discusses what that means for liberty and privacy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • We Are All Homeschoolers Now

    Mar 21 2020

    Thanks to COVID-19, many parents find themselves with kids at home all day. What's the best way to keep them engaged in their educations? Kerry McDonald, author of Unschooled, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Coronavirus, Oil Markets, and Foreign Policy

    Mar 20 2020

    What do current historic lows for the price of oil mean for foreign policy in a time of pandemic? Cato's Emma Ashford explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • COVID-19 Spurs Suspension of Regulations That Were #NeverNeeded

    Mar 19 2020

    Just what has Congress done to fight COVID-19? What powers are unlocked for the President in a pandemic-driven emergency? What are the mechanics of relaxing or ending regulations that otherwise would stymie this fight? William Yeatman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Courts Shift Gears as COVID-19 Spreads

    Mar 19 2020

    When you are incarcerated, the criminal justice system has assumed total responsibility for your life. What changes in a pandemic? Clark Neily comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Even in a Pandemic, Trade Is Cooperation

    Mar 17 2020

    In a global pandemic, trade is more important than ever. Simon Lester gauges the trade-related response to the spread of this coronavirus. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Pandemic Travel Bans

    Mar 16 2020

    Do restrictions on travel into the United States make sense during a pandemic? Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Solvency, Liquidity, and Help for the Cash-Strapped During Pandemic

    Mar 16 2020

    Banks will no longer face certain regulatory scrutiny for helping cash-strapped people during this pandemic. Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The EARN IT Act and the Integrity of the Internet

    Mar 12 2020

    An effort to crack down on material that sexually victimizes young people effectively would put internet platforms under the thumb of the federal government. Eric Goldman argues that the proposal won't solve its targeted problem. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Correction on Deference and SCOTUS

    Mar 11 2020

    It turns out that the Supreme Court isn't as deferential to executive agencies than the court's recent moves might indicate. Will Yeatman comments.Related podcast: Why Did the Supreme Court Turn Away This Case on Regulatory Overreach? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Clearview and the Cops

    Mar 10 2020

    A tech company promises to link up photos of unknown people with their presence on the web for private clients and police. What does that mean for privacy, and for how police do their jobs? Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Billionaires Bloomberg, Steyer Spent Big Money to Win and Came Up Empty

    Mar 06 2020

    Billionaires spent big to win the White House this election cycle and failed spectacularly. What's the lesson for policymakers? Scott Blackburn of the Institute for Free Speech comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bernie Sanders and the Cuban Literacy Programs

    Mar 05 2020

    It's an odd defense for an authoritarian regime like Cuba, but Bernie Sanders presented the country's literacy programs to rebut details of the regime's harsh treatment of Cubans. Ian Vasquez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Takeaways from Super Tuesday

    Mar 04 2020

    Did Bernie Sanders have an exaggerated expectation about how much Democratic voters wanted a socialist nominee for President? David Boaz comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Counterintuitive Impacts of Better Missile Defense

    Mar 04 2020

    Missile defense should be an easy sell politically, but a better missile defense can make some nuclear arms negotiations more fraught. Eric Gomez explains how. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An End to Our Longest War?

    Mar 03 2020

    There is a glimmer of hope that the United States may soon be able to exit its longest war. What stands in the way? Chris Preble and John Glaser explain. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Where Are the Republican YIMBYs?

    Mar 02 2020

    People who want dynamism in housing markets and urban development ought of find common ground with Republicans, so why do there seem to be so few Republican YIMBYs? Nolan Gray of the Mercatus Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A White House Intelligence Problem

    Feb 28 2020

    The ongoing uncertainty over who will fill a high-level White House intelligence position illustrates a larger problem with how the chief executive handles inconvenient information. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Did the Supreme Court Turn Away This Case on Regulatory Overreach?

    Feb 28 2020

    A case that looked tailor made for Supreme Court review of aggressive regulatory agencies won't get High Court review. Will Yeatman explains a few possible reasons why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cops Partner with Ring to Deliver Doorbell Surveillance

    Feb 26 2020

    Amazon’s Ring provides handy surveillance of the front porches of many Americans. What happens when localities partner with the company to make it easier for cops to get the footage? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Disrupt, Discredit, and Divide: How the New FBI Damages Democracy

    Feb 25 2020

    How did the FBI turn into a domestic intelligence agency? How does the FBI do its job today? Mike German is author of Disrupt, Discredit, and Divide: How the New FBI Damages Democracy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Seeking Accountability for Cops in Brownback v. King

    Feb 25 2020

    James King was cornered and beaten by members of a joint task force after he was falsely identified as a fugitive. Police are seeking to avoid accountability for the officers involved. Patrick Jaicomo of the Institute for Justice is representing King in Brownback v. King. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Association for Community Affiliated Plans v. Treasury

    Feb 20 2020

    Congress has exempted some short-term insurance from the statutory requirements otherwise applicable to individual health insurance plans. A new lawsuit might end those plans entirely. Why does that matter? Michael Cannon explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jarchow v. State Bar of Wisconsin

    Feb 19 2020

    A case awaiting acceptance by the Supreme Court challenges required fees paid by attorneys to State Bar of Wisconsin. Much of that money then goes to fund extensive lobbying. Trevor Burrus and Andrew Grossman comment.Related material:Cato Institute brief in Jarchow v. State Bar of Wisconsin See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An Effort to Reform Warrantless Surveillance

    Feb 18 2020

    Ending longstanding warrantless surveillance of Americans has long been a desire of libertarians. So how do Senators Steve Daines (R-MT) and Ron Wyden (D-OR) plan to accomplish it? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Individuality and Intersectionality

    Feb 15 2020

    Your intersections are part of what make you, the individual. So why do so many individualists cringe at the notion of examining intersectionality? Historian Anthony Comegna comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Another Big Spending Trump Budget Proposal

    Feb 14 2020

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Indian Child Welfare Act and Brackeen v. Bernhardt

    Feb 13 2020

    How does the Indian Child Welfare Act change the rules that would otherwise govern the removal of children from homes? What does a case now before the Fifth Circuit mean for native children and tribal sovereignty? Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Utah Wants State-Based Worker Visas

    Feb 12 2020

    States should have more flexibility to accept immigrants to accommodate the needs of employers. So says Gary Herbert, the Republican Governor of Utah. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Big Change to Mortgage Lending Rules

    Feb 11 2020

    What will a change to mandates in mortgage lending mean for borrowers and the market for mortgage credit? Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will Free Trade Suffer after Brexit?

    Feb 10 2020

    The United Kingdom is out of the European Union, so how does that impact the freedom to trade? Simon Lester comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Make Congress Great Again!

    Feb 07 2020

    Congress doesn't like doing oversight, but it's a critical function that should keep the administrative state at bay. How can it be fixed? William Yeatman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Elizabeth Warren Has A Plan to Criminalize Some Online Election Lies

    Feb 06 2020

    Elizabeth Warren would seek to make certain online election‐​related speech subject to criminal and civil penalties. What speech could bring those penalties? Matthew Feeney explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Did Impeachment Matter?

    Feb 05 2020

    Does impeachment without removal merely inoculate the President against future complaints from Congress? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bernie Sanders and the Disastrous Rent Control Plan

    Feb 04 2020

    There isn't much disagreement among economists about what a national rent control policy would do to harm renters, housing prices, housing stock, and the incentive to build new housing. Nonetheless, Bernie Sanders persists. Ryan Bourne comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In Impeachment Trial, Democrats Exaggerate National Security Threats

    Feb 03 2020

    Is Ukraine's security really America's security? In the impeachment trial, Democrats presented the defense of Ukraine as a vital national security interest. Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tolerance and School Choice

    Jan 31 2020

    What does tolerance demand of us in the realm of school choice? Cato's Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Brexit Day!

    Jan 30 2020

    It may still be too early to say how Brexit will impact trade and other international relations, but the ever-changing details of the Brexit plan took an unlikely path to deliver a big win for Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Ryan Bourne comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • National Environmental Policy Act: "An unlimited license to write papers"

    Jan 28 2020

    The Trump Administration plan to roll back regulatory review for large government infrastructure projects won't have much of an impact on environmental quality. Peter Van Doren explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Malthus: Cautious Optimist?

    Jan 27 2020

    Was Thomas Robert Malthus almost completely misunderstood? Ross Emmett of the Center for the Study of Economic Liberty at Arizona State University explains why Malthus might ought to be viewed as a type of optimist. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Principles of Harm Reduction

    Jan 24 2020

    Cato's Jeff Singer and former U.S. Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders discuss harm reduction in the contexts of drug use and sex education. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Feds Mull Restrictions on Homesharing

    Jan 23 2020

    Many states and localities are placing restrictions on home sharing. Now the feds are considering a move that would worsen the landscape for renters and rentees alike. Romina Boccia of the Heritage Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Scholarship Tax Credits in Pennsylvania

    Jan 22 2020

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Citizens United at 10

    Jan 21 2020

    The fight over Citizens United free speech ruling has raged on years after the Supreme Court weighed in. Scott Blackburn of the Institute for Free Speech explains why the case's detractors are so very mistaken. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reasons for Concern in Two New Trade Deals

    Jan 21 2020

    Between the "starter" trade deal with China and the revamped North American trade deal just approved by the U.S. Senate, there are still reasons to be concerned that this administration will again launch trade wars. Simon Lester and Inu Manak comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Immigrants Remain Less Likely to Use Means-Tested Welfare

    Jan 20 2020

    When it comes to means-tested welfare programs, immigrants continue to be less likely than native-born Americans to take advantage. Alex Nowrasteh explains how and why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Population Flows out of High-Tax States

    Jan 19 2020

    New data highlights the flow of residents from high-tax states to low-tax states. Chris Edwards provides details. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • "Iran is burning."

    Jan 17 2020

    The unrest in Iran in recent months is indicative of more than just recent violence with the U.S. It indicates a much larger failure of the Iranian regime. So says Cato's Mustafa Akyol. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Voting Rights for Former Felons and Continuing Controversy over Clemency

    Jan 16 2020

    Legal researcher Guy Hamilton-Smith was among the thousands of people in Kentucky whose voting rights were restored last month. We discuss his story and the continuing controversy over pardons issued by former Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Zoning, Discrimination, and State Constitutions

    Jan 15 2020

    Zoning has long been used for less than public spirited purposes. Constitutional litigator Maurice Thompson of the 1851 Center details a useful case of pointless local zoning in Ohio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • As State Lawmakers Get Back to Work, What Happens to Excess Revenue?

    Jan 14 2020

    When state governments run surpluses, the temptation to spend is almost irresistible. Rea Hederman of the Buckeye Institute describes what should happen to those excess tax dollars. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Executive Power Claims and the Soleimani Strike

    Jan 13 2020

    Under what legal authority did the President order the killing of Iranian general Qasem Soleimani? Apparently the public isn't entitled to know. Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Unions Won’t Let Employers Say

    Jan 12 2020

    How does labor law restrict communications between workers and employers? Ken Girardin of the Empire Center in New York discusses some of the "Dos and Don'ts" in public sector labor law. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Long Does the Third Party Doctrine Have Left?

    Jan 11 2020

    Courts routinely have trouble keeping up with technology, so how long before the Third Party Doctrine is radically altered or eliminated? Billy Easley analyzes tech policy at Americans for Prosperity. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is the Cato Institute under Deep State Surveillance?

    Jan 10 2020

    Cato's Patrick Eddington wants Congress to make clear if domestic policy groups are among those currently targeted for federal surveillance. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Are Big Banks Bad Banks?

    Jan 09 2020

    What are the costs and risks associated with banking consolidation? Should it be concerning that the biggest banks decades ago are still the biggest? Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Rounds of U.S./Iranian Attacks on Pause

    Jan 09 2020

    What ought to follow hostilities between Iran and the United States after Iran's military response to the death of a high ranking general? Chris Preble and John Glaser comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump's Major Escalation against Iran

    Jan 06 2020

    By killing Iranian leader Qassem Soleimani in Iraq, the Trump Administration has undertaken a major escalation of hostilities in the region. Cato's Emma Ashford and John Glaser comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reforming the Community Reinvestment Act

    Jan 03 2020

    Some proposed reforms to the Community Reinvestment Act come directly from research conducted by Cato's Diego Zuluaga. He describes why, short of getting rid of the law, reform is so essential. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Antiquities Act, Protecting Land, and Executive Authority

    Jan 01 2020

    What is the proper balance to protecting natural resources while respecting the value of those lands for alternative uses? Jonathan Wood with the Pacific Legal Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sphere: Should Drug Prohibition Be Ended Nationwide?

    Dec 31 2019

    In the first episode of Sphere we ask the simple question: Should drug prohibition be ended nationwide? Our commenters are Trevor Burrus of Cato, Paul Larkin of the Heritage Foundation, and Jonathan Rauch of Brookings. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Getting Honest on Bail Reform

    Dec 30 2019

    What is bail for? What is pretrial detention for? How do we fix bail for the benefit of society and defendants? Josh Crawford with the Pegasus Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Understanding Models of Legal Sex Work

    Dec 28 2019

    Sex work is only legal in parts of Nevada, and there it is highly restricted. What are some of the other models for legal sex work, and which models best respect the individuals involved? Kaytlin Bailey is with Decriminalize Sex Work. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Local Governments and Basic Checkbook Transparency

    Dec 27 2019

    What do local governments owe the people in terms of transparency? Patrick Ishmael directs government accountability at the Show-Me Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Big Numbers Behind Economic Development Freebies

    Dec 26 2019

    The staggering sums that states and localities spend on economic development subsidies rarely deliver the benefits promised. John Mozena directs the Center for Economic Accountability. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Civil Forfeiture Disenfranchises the Poor

    Dec 25 2019

    No one suffers more from civil forfeiture than people too poor to fight it. Alan Clemmons is a Republican lawmaker in South Carolina working to impose the most basic level of oversight on the process. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Poverty Eradication vs. Reducing Income Inequality

    Dec 24 2019

    The confusion between policies designed for poverty eradication versus reducing income inequality is widespread and mistaken. Orphe Divounguy of the Illinois Policy Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump's Decent Record on Regulation (So Far)

    Dec 23 2019

    For those concerned about the size of the administrative state, there are reasons to be cheerful about the regulatory record of the Trump Administration. Will Yeatman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Highly Restrictive North American Trade Pact

    Dec 22 2019

    The USMCA trade agreement among the U.S., Mexico, and Canada is moving forward, but forward into what? Simon Lester and Dan Ikenson discuss the deal's terms. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When the Fed Runs out of Moves

    Dec 21 2019

    There are good reasons to be concerned about monetary stability in our current economic good times. Economist Eric Sims makes the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • “A Secretive Court’s Rebuke of the FBI over Foreign Intelligence Warrants

    Dec 20 2019

    Julian Sanchez details some of the structural problems in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court after a rare rebuke of the FBI's mishandling of warrant applications. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • From Impeachment to Senate Trial

    Dec 19 2019

    The House has impeached President Trump, but there are still sticking points about the terms of a Senate trial. What new information might be produced in the trial? Gene Healy looks ahead at the likely outcomes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Copyright and Georgia v. PublicResource.org

    Dec 18 2019

    A case argued recently before the U.S. Supreme Court takes aim at a state that allows a private company to hold and enforce the copyright on the state's "annotated code." Trevor Burrus describes what's at issue. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Parsing the Articles on #ImpeachmentEve

    Dec 17 2019

    A day ahead of an impeachment vote in the U.S. House, why these particular articles of impeachment? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • States Nudge NCAA to Give Student Athletes a Break

    Dec 16 2019

    First California did it, and now Florida is looking at ways to give student athletes a way to profit from their own likenesses and names, rejecting NCAA rules. Sal Nuzzo of the James Madison Institute details the idea. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Elizabeth Warren, Trust Buster

    Dec 15 2019

    Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren wants to break up big tech firms and impose new regulation on firms with high revenues. Walter Olson discusses what that might look like in practice. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Protecting Liberty with State Constitutions

    Dec 14 2019

    State constitutions continue to serve as powerful and underappreciated protectors against overweening government. Rick Esenberg of the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jones Act and Hawaii

    Dec 13 2019

    The shipping regulation known as the Jones Act turns 100 next year. It's long past time for it to go according to Keli'i Akina of Hawaii's Grasroot Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Bernie Plan to Regulate Labor Markets

    Dec 12 2019

    Bernie Sanders has a series of labor market interventions he'd like to see, including ending at-will employment. Ryan Bourne says it's a terrible idea. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Long Lie about Afghanistan

    Dec 11 2019

    Newly revealed interviews show the misrepresentations and frustrations over a U.S.-led war in Afghanistan that went badly awry. John Glaser argues that one clear lesson is to stay skeptical of government justifications for war. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Politics, Fed Independence, and Paul Volcker

    Dec 10 2019

    The Federal Reserve is nominally independent, but the enormous pressure often aimed at Fed chairs past indicates that it's not that simple. Sir Paul Tucker is author of Unelected Power: The Quest for Legitimacy in Central Banking and the Regulatory State. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Allure of Profits and Forest Restoration

    Dec 09 2019

    Forest restoration bonds issued by some self-interested private firms are delivering benefits for forests, communities, and investors. Holly Fretwell comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is the Best Inflation Target Zero?

    Dec 07 2019

    What does the Constitution say about money? And how should that inform the work of the Federal Reserve? Economist Judy Shelton comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sports Betting Regulation and State Revenues

    Dec 06 2019

    What are some best practices as states begin to more broadly adopt legal sports betting? Doug Kellogg is with Americans for Tax Reform. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve

    Dec 05 2019

    How do markets evaluate the interplay between Congress and the Federal Reserve? Mark Spindel is coauthor of The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Unsung Scourge of Home Equity Theft

    Dec 04 2019

    When the government takes your home to pay a fine, they should at least give you back the rest of the value of your home. In many states, that's not how it works. Christina Martin with the Pacific Legal Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Fed’s Dual Mandate Is a Gift to Congress

    Dec 02 2019

    It's not clear that the Federal Reserve's dual mandate (concern for both inflation and unemployment) helps workers. It definitely helps Congress, though. So says economist Peter Ireland. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Natural Language Processing versus FedSpeak

    Nov 30 2019

    How can natural language processing keep the Fed from using obfuscating language? Charles Calomiris comments See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tuttle Twins, Free Market Rules, and Teaching Families Economics

    Nov 29 2019

    How can families engage with basic economic concepts in ways that give young people a solid footing in how markets work? Connor Boyack, author of the Tuttle Twins books, has a few ideas. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Disagreeing Productively

    Nov 28 2019

    What's the audience for libertarian ideas? Do libertarians know how to communicate them? Jennifer Thompson directs the Center for the Study of Liberty in Indianapolis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Doing Business North America

    Nov 27 2019

    A new data-driven project aims to help researchers find out how easy it is to do business in American cities, and why some cities outperform others. Stephen Slivinski directs the Doing Business North America project. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian

    Nov 27 2019

    James Grant is author of Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian.Cato Book Forum: Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Politics of Making Cities Work

    Nov 25 2019

    Is the partisan divide between cities and everywhere else simply intractable? Patrick Tuohey directs policy at the Better Cities Project. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Are Government Workers Aware of Their Rights?

    Nov 23 2019

    Since the Janus ruling freed millions of state and local government workers from the fees associated with public sector unions, are those workers aware of their rights? Joe Lehman of the Mackinac Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Week of Impeachment Hearings

    Nov 22 2019

    What have we learned after presidential impeachment testimony of Donald Trump's ambassador to the European Union? Do any of the claims rise to the level of maladministration or violation of public trust? How have the President's Republican defenders performed? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Do We Need Hate Speech?

    Nov 21 2019

    "Hate speech" is not a legal category, and banning it wouldn't stand up to scrutiny. Lou Perez is the producer of a new short film, Five Reasons We Need Hate Speech. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • State Occupational Licensing Reform in 2020

    Nov 20 2019

    Even as some presidential candidates are talking about occupational licensing, state governments must take the lead in driving reform. Erica Jedynak of Stand Together provides reasons to be optimistic about reform in 2020. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Evolution of School Choice in North Carolina

    Nov 19 2019

    How does the public school establishment view the innovative choice options for parents in North Carolina? Bob Luebke of the Civitas Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How State Lawmakers Can Curb Overreaching Local Regulators

    Nov 18 2019

    Few people pay much attention to local regulation, but it's where some of the most substantial infringements on liberty occur. Christina Sandefur of the Goldwater Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Impeachment Inquiry Begins

    Nov 16 2019

    Julian Sanchez addresses some common objections raised during the first week of presidential impeachment proceedings. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New Push to Ban "Hate Speech"

    Nov 15 2019

    Is a ban on hate speech a solution to any actual problem? Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sharing the "Freedom Philosophy" with Young People

    Nov 14 2019

    What works and what doesn't in trying to show young people the superiority of Leonard Read's "Freedom Philosophy" for organizing society? Zilvinas Silenas, the new president of the Foundation for Economic Education, explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Easy State-Level Immigration Fixes

    Nov 13 2019

    There's no reason states have to abide all of the federal restrictions on immigration. In fact, there are many policies states and localities can adopt to make immigrants welcome. Josh Smith with the Center for Growth and Opportunity comments.RELATED UPCOMING EVENT hbspt.cta.load(4957480, '50b2b076-672d-4ca0-b1c0-80b021cfd96e', {}); Featuring Gary Herbert, Governor of Utah; Rep. John Curtis (R-Utah); moderated by Alex Nowrasteh, Director of Immigration Studies, Cato Institute. February 7, 2020 9...more

  • Rust Buckets: How the Jones Act Undermines U.S. Shipbuilding and National Security

    Nov 12 2019

    The Jones Act prevents U.S. territories from buying U.S. products, and does almost nothing to protect the industries that advocates claim the law supports. Colin Grabow explains the implications in his new paper, "Rust Buckets." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Exploring Wealth Inequality

    Nov 11 2019

    What evidence is there that disparities between rich and poor harm the poor, the economy, and our political system? Chris Edwards and Ryan Bourne are authors of the new paper, "Exploring Wealth Inequality." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Kentucky Puts the Kibosh on Entrepreneurial Freedom

    Nov 09 2019

    Kentucky wants a would-be entrepreneur to get permission from his would-be competitors to operate in the commonwealth. Larry Salzman of the Pacific Legal Foundation details the case of Phillip Truesdell and Legacy Medical Transport. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Citizen Activism vs. Missouri Regulators

    Nov 08 2019

    Ron Calzone wins a round in court. A federal appeals court says the independent Missouri activist doesn't have to register as a lobbyist to talk to lawmakers. Zac Morgan of the Institute for Free Speech details the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Innovation and Choice Remain Critical to Environmental Improvement

    Nov 07 2019

    The innovations that markets deliver also create efficiencies that clean the environment. Todd Myers of the Washington Policy Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reforming Parole and Probation

    Nov 06 2019

    What are some steps to save taxpayers money and achieve better outcomes for people on parole and probation? Marc Levin of the Texas Public Policy Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Celebrating the New Nobel Laureates with One Caveat

    Nov 05 2019

    The new Nobel laureates in economics deserve the prize, but it's important to understand the limits of some findings. So says Swami Aiyar. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Road Diets and Pedestrian Deaths

    Nov 04 2019

    What's a "road diet"? Randal O'Toole comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How to Be a Dictator

    Nov 02 2019

    How to be a Dictator tells the stories of unique individuals who gained power and held it with typically disastrous results. Frank Dikötter is the book's author. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jones Act, Liquid Natural Gas, and Russia

    Nov 01 2019

    When Puerto Rico wants to buy liquified natural gas, it's pointless to buy from America. Thank the Jones Act. Colin Grabow comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Poverty and Freedom: Case Studies on Global Economic Development

    Oct 30 2019

    What are the alternatives to foreign aid? Matt Warner is editor of Poverty and Freedom: Case Studies on Global Economic Development. Warner is president of the Atlas Network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The SHIELD Act and Free Speech

    Oct 28 2019

    New legislation aimed at curbing foreign influence in U.S. elections also appears to be aimed at curbing Americans' influence in U.S. elections. Scott Blackburn of the Institute for Free Speech comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Big Brother in the Exam Room: The Dangerous Truth about Electronic Health Records

    Oct 25 2019

    If not for doctors or patients, for whom do the complicated electronic health records exist? Twila Brase explains in her book, Big Brother in the Exam Room: The Dangerous Truth about Electronic Health Records. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool

    Oct 24 2019

    Economist Emily Oster’s new book, Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, from Birth to Preschool, cuts through the alarmist rhetoric and fearmongering that surrounds modern-day parenting with a cool-headed look at the data. She spoke at the Cato Institute in September. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Seemingly Small Change to Federal Regulating

    Oct 22 2019

    Ike Brannon details why a small change from the Office of Management and Budget holds big implications for federal regulation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Case Study in Whistleblowing

    Oct 21 2019

    Cato's Patrick Eddington details the adventure he and his wife Robin undertook that ended with startling revelations about what came to be known as Gulf War Syndrome. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Rediscovery of Tobacco: Smoking, Vaping, and the Creative Destruction of the Cigarette

    Oct 18 2019

    While it's generally agreed that vaping is far safer than cigarette smoking, it's been swept up in a new prohibitionist frenzy where e-cigarettes are viewed as similar enough to cigarettes to warrant identical treatment. Is there a path back to tolerance for smokers and vapers? Jacob Grier is author of The Rediscovery of Tobacco: Smoking, Vaping, and the Creative Destruction of the Cigarette. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fuel to the Fire: How Trump Made America's Broken Foreign Policy Even Worse (and How We Can Recover)

    Oct 18 2019

    John Glaser and Trevor Thrall detail the new Cato book, Fuel to the Fire: How Trump Made America's Broken Foreign Policy Even Worse (and How We Can Recover). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Turks, Kurds, and the U.S. Role in Reconciliation

    Oct 16 2019

    If not a direct military role, what role can the U.S. play in reducing violence among Turks and Kurds? Mustafa Akyol notes that the two groups were not always enemies. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Medicare for All and the Vermont Experience with Single Payer

    Oct 15 2019

    What does Vermont's experience with single payer healthcare have to tell us about how much the Bernie Sanders "Medicare for All" proposal might cost? Peter Suderman of Reason comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Can the President ‘Decline’ an Impeachment Inquiry?

    Oct 14 2019

    The President will not play along with a House impeachment inquiry. What now? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How the Other Half Learns: Equality, Excellence, and the Battle Over School Choice

    Oct 11 2019

    What makes a entire network of charter schools perform so far above average? What demands are placed on parents to help get that performance? Robert Pondiscio is author of How The Other Half Learns: Equality, Excellence, and the Battle Over School Choice. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Survey of State-Level Criminal Justice Reform

    Oct 10 2019

    Robert Alt of the Buckeye Institute details his examination of state-level criminal justice reform in the last two years. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An Introduction to Constitutional Law: 100 Supreme Court Cases Everyone Should Know

    Oct 09 2019

    Reducing the Supreme Court's jurisprudence to just 100 cases is quite a challenge. Josh Blackman is coauthor of An Introduction to Constitutional Law: 100 Supreme Court Cases Everyone Should Know. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How the Feds Impede Evidence-Based Opioid Treatments

    Oct 08 2019

    What can the federal government do to foster evidence-based opioid treatments? Cato’s Jeff Singer explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Vaping-Related Deaths and Harm Reduction

    Oct 07 2019

    Understanding the causes of vaping-related deaths has massive implications for public health. Jeff Singer comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is It Important That the Government Know Identity of Whistleblower

    Oct 04 2019

    Whistleblowing in the national security sphere is complicated and difficult. Irvin McCullough of the Government Accountability Project says the current Ukraine whistleblower is a poster child for following the rules. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Crisis of Conscience

    Oct 03 2019

    Why do whistleblowers do it? It's not like they're in for immediate adulation. It's a very difficult and stressful decision, and a long and difficult road. Tom Mueller is author of Crisis of Conscience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Consistent Challenge of Delivering Accountability for War Crimes

    Oct 02 2019

    Among countries that report to no higher authority for their actions, assuring that war crimes are punished properly remains a serious challenge. John Glaser comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Is and Is Not Required of Whistleblowers?

    Oct 01 2019

    A claim that has made the rounds this week in conservative media goes like this: Until recently, would-be whistleblowers needed firsthand knowledge of wrongdoing in order to see their claims advanced. The problem with the claim is this: It's wrong. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bernie Sanders Wants to Boost Your Credit Score

    Sep 30 2019

    Bernie Sanders wants to create a public credit scoring system. What does that mean for understanding borrowers' ability to repay? Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Politics and Criminal Justice Reform Since the First Step Act

    Sep 27 2019

    States still lead the way on criminal justice reform, but what bright spots exist at the federal level? John Malcolm of the Heritage Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • House Launches Impeachment Inquiry

    Sep 26 2019

    Gene Healy discusses the U.S. House impeachment inquiry launched this week. Healy is author of Indispensable Remedy: The Broad Scope of the Constitution’s Impeachment Power. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Yes, in Fact, There Are Laws When You Are Drinking White Claws

    Sep 25 2019

    The official boozy bubbly of this Summer was White Claw. Why didn't this happen sooner? Cato's Will Yeatman discusses the tax implications of spiked seltzer. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trumpian Conservatives and the Fever Swamps

    Sep 24 2019

    Conservatives’ tolerance for illiberal views needs to end sooner than later. Do libertarians have a similar problem? David Boaz makes his case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Are A Disproportionate Number of Federal Judges Former Prosecutors?

    Sep 23 2019

    Would prosecutors object if they faced more judges who'd spent their earlier careers working for the defense? Clark Neily comments on his new study. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cashless Stores vs. Congressional Action

    Sep 20 2019

    Congress is considering a ban on cashless stores. What does that mean for businesses that already don't take cash? Cato's Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Should States Start to Protect Privacy?

    Sep 19 2019

    State-level changes can protect the privacy of residents from the prying eyes of governments. So how should states do it? Jonathon Hauenschild of the American Legislative Exchange Council comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Political Corruption from Beyond the Grave?

    Sep 18 2019

    When you die, there are few benefits you can receive for a political donation. Why does that matter? Attorney Alan Gura is challenging some recent changes to rules for political donations. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Perverse Effects of Banning Flavored Vaping Products

    Sep 17 2019

    Would a prohibition on flavored vaping products be a net-negative in reducing smoking-related illness? Jeffrey Miron discusses the apparent White House plan to ban flavors of vaping products. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Attack in Saudi Arabia Inspires U.S. Drumbeat for War with Iran

    Sep 16 2019

    The attack on a Saudi oil facility has many in the Trump Administration pushing for a U.S. response. John Glaser and Doug Bandow say the U.S. ought to stay out of another Saudi-led war. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump White House Mulls Monitoring the Mentally Ill for Future Violence

    Sep 16 2019

    The White House’s potential plan to use consumer tech to monitor those deemed mentally ill for potential violence already has some bipartisan support. The problem is that it won't work. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • San Francisco Deems NRA a Terrorist Group

    Sep 13 2019

    Why take seriously San Francisco's declaration that the National Rifle Association is a domestic terror group? Walter Olson explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Do Democrats Running for President Want from Criminal Justice Reform?

    Sep 12 2019

    A few Democratic candidates running for President have flagged the police protection known as qualified immunity as worthy of reform. Clark Neily discusses the various criminal justice proposals offered by Democratic White House hopefuls. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Challenging the Friends of Endless War

    Sep 11 2019

    Ending or sharply curtailing U.S.-led wars across the globe has popular support. How should that energy translate to action? Stephen Wertheim is a cofounder of the new Quincy Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bolton Ends Tenure as National Security Advisor

    Sep 10 2019

    What opportunities for better foreign policy emerge in John Bolton's departure from the White House? Eric Gomez and Chris Preble comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Case for Worrying about America’s Low Fertility Rates

    Sep 10 2019

    Lyman Stone argues that, yes, even libertarians should care about the policies that affect fertility rates. Stone is a senior fellow at the Institute for Family Studies. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • School Choice and Segregation

    Sep 06 2019

    Are school choice advocates indifferent to segregation? Neal McCluskey counters the new/old argument against school choice. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will Changes to Overtime Pay Actually Help Workers?

    Sep 05 2019

    There may be some benefit to expanding the pay rates at which workers are eligible for overtime, but Ryan Bourne argues those benefits will be short term. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Can the President Order Companies to Stop Doing Business in China?

    Sep 05 2019

    A presidential tweet ordered American companies to begin looking away from China for trade. What's the legal basis for such a claim? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Conservative Evaluation of Conservative Nationalism

    Sep 03 2019

    What do conservatives think of the emerging nationalist conservatism that rejects much of recent decades of conservative and libertarian thinking? Richard Reinsch of Law and Liberty gives his assessment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Property Rights as a Foundation for Conservation

    Sep 02 2019

    Are property rights the enemy of conservation? Holly Fretwell of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Johnson & Johnson, Opioids, and Public Nuisance Law

    Aug 31 2019

    Johnson & Johnson went to court to fight claims of its contribution to the "public nuisance" of the opioid crisis. They lost. Walter Olson discusses what public nuisance torts mean for future litigation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Federal Rules and Housing Affordability

    Aug 30 2019

    Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson has altered Obama-era federal housing rules. What does that mean for making housing more affordable and plentiful? Emily Hamilton of the Mercatus Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Galling Push for a Student Debt Bailout

    Aug 29 2019

    Leading Democratic presidential contenders want the feds to bail out students with school debt. What about the young people who made more modest choices? Christian Barnard of the Reason Foundation comments.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s "Flimsy" Steel Tariffs Challenged

    Aug 28 2019

    A case in federal court challenge the Trump Administration over steel tariffs. Cato's Simon Lester and Will Yeatman comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Could Cause the Next Housing Crash?

    Aug 27 2019

    Are rules governing housing finance setting the stage for the next crash? If so, what ought to change? Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Farewell to the Cadillac Tax on Health Plans?

    Aug 26 2019

    Like the promise of Medicare cuts, the so-called "Cadillac Tax" on health plans was probably never going to last long. David Hyman explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Weak Conservative Case for Industrial Policy

    Aug 23 2019

    Nationalist conservatives like Oren Cass are pushing industrial policy. Ryan Bourne says the case for this manufacturing-focused industrial policy is weak. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • British MP: Give Hong Kongers British Citizenship

    Aug 22 2019

    A British Parlimentarian suggests giving British citizenship to people in Hong Kong. Is it a good idea, and what would be the likely impacts? Chris Preble and Alex Nowrasteh comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Do Protests in Hong Kong End?

    Aug 21 2019

    How might the protests in Hong Kong end? Can Hong Kong residents expect China to back down or accept reasonable protections for civil liberties? Doug Bandow comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Case Study in Warrants for Location Data

    Aug 20 2019

    An assault in Manhattan leads a prosecutor to get a warrant for cellphone location data from Google. Is this how it's supposed to work? Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Is and Isn’t Currency Manipulation?

    Aug 19 2019

    Are China's moves to prop up the RMB more than a reaction to Trump Administration tariffs? Cato's Dan Ikenson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • American-Style Nationalism Past and Present

    Aug 17 2019

    Nationalism largely rejects individualism, and conservative nationalism is no different. Historian Anthony Comegna argues that "national purpose" is at best a misnomer. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Name and Shame Politics in Action

    Aug 15 2019

    When public officials or those running for office call out the political donations of people they don't like, what's the goal? Is it merely to shame them? Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Immigration and the Perversion of the "Public Charge"

    Aug 14 2019

    The Department of Homeland Security finalized a regulation this week that bans “public charges” from receiving legal status in the United States, a sweeping change. David Bier comments on the likely consequences for immigration. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Exiting Afghanistan

    Aug 13 2019

    A new Cato policy analysis makes the case for ending America's longest war. John Glaser is co-author of that report. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Workplace Immigration Raids: Terrifying, Devastating, and Ineffective

    Aug 12 2019

    For the crime of working in the U.S. without relevant paperwork, workplace immigration raids are a great way for the feds to project power and punish consensual work arrangements. Problem is that they aren't very effective at dealing with illegal immigration. Cato's David Bier comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FBI vs. FTC vs. FB: Surveillance and Secure User Data

    Aug 10 2019

    The FBI, Facebook, and the Federal Trade Commission need to have a talk about what it means to "secure user data.” The FBI wants to engage in more surveillance and the FTC wants Facebook to do a better job protecting user data from outsiders. Matthew Feeney comments on a new fight over surveillance and Facebook user privacy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Important Are the Ideologies of Mass Killers?

    Aug 09 2019

    The ideologies that drove mass killings in Texas and Ohio are still not totally clear, but how valuable is it to know that information? Should all mass killings be characterized as terrorism? Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Gun Policy Is Hard

    Aug 08 2019

    Most neat and clean solutions to the problem of gun violence have significant problems. Trevor Burrus comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does "Addictive" Social Media Demand More Government?

    Aug 07 2019

    Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) says social media is addictive and Big Tech hasn’t done much for the public interest lately. What should that mean for government regulation of big tech? Ryan Bourne and Matthew Feeney comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Elizabeth Warren Trade Policy Checklist

    Aug 06 2019

    Elizabeth Warren's priorities for trade agreements may differ from the current President, but the final result may simply be less liberalized trade. Dan Ikenson and Simon Lester comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Congressional Delegation of Regulatory Authority and Time

    Aug 05 2019

    When Congress delegates its regulatory authority, the regulators take the ball and run. How should Congress reengage with its essential oversight functions with respect to regulation? Will Yeatman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Taking Conservative Nationalism Seriously

    Aug 03 2019

    The aims of national conservatism (or conservative nationalism) will differ based on who you ask, but it rejects a great deal of the conservatism of the last few decades, and libertarian thinking is among the ideologies in its crosshairs. Aaron Ross Powell and Stephanie Slade discuss why it should be taken seriously. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • PragerU and Ongoing Confusion over Anti-Conservative Bias

    Aug 02 2019

    What are the users of Google, Facebook, and Twitter due, exactly? If anti-conservative bias exists on big speech platforms, is federal law or the Constitution on the side of the conservatives? Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Makes a Qualified Director of National Intelligence?

    Aug 01 2019

    How does a Director of National Intelligence do a good job? Julian Sanchez discusses the new nominee for the job, Rep. John Ratcliffe. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Boris Johnson: Immigration’s Anti-Trump

    Jul 31 2019

    New British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has long supported relatively open immigration. The U.S. should take note. Alex Nowrasteh explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • America’s Nuclear Crossroads

    Jul 30 2019

    As the United States adjusts to a changing global balance of power, nuclear deterrence is poised to return to a level of importance in U.S. national security not seen since the end of the Cold War. What are the emerging issues in nuclear weaponry and global power that policymakers should consider? Caroline Dorminey and Eric Gomez are editors of America’s Nuclear Crossroads. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trophy Hunting and African Development

    Jul 29 2019

    The tensions between what wealthy westerners want for and from Africa and what actual Africans want is coming into increasing tension. Catherine Semcer of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Will North Korean Missile Launches Impact Diplomacy?

    Jul 26 2019

    What are the risks of downplaying North Korea's latest warning in the form of missile launches? As diplomacy with North Korea moves forward, how should the U.S. view the North's provocations? Eric Gomez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Will Trigger An American Debt Crisis?

    Jul 25 2019

    As the President and Congress push through another massive, debt-laden budget, deficits and debt continue to pile up. Chris Edwards discusses what might trigger an American debt crisis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bernie Sanders and Bad Justifications for Minimum Wage Hikes

    Jul 24 2019

    The tiff between workers for the Bernie Sanders campaign and the campaign leadership illustrates some of the tradeoffs inherent in mandating wage floors. Ryan Bourne is author of a new paper on minimum wage hikes and bad justifications for them. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Resisting the Drive to War with Iran

    Jul 24 2019

    Small incidents can magnify a tense U.S. situation with Iran. How should the Trump Administration proceed to lower tensions? Doug Bandow comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lofgren and Amash on Polarization, Civil Discourse, and Getting Things Done in Congress

    Jul 19 2019

    As civil discourse falters in the United States, House Democrat Zoe Lofgren and House independent Justin Amash discuss the process of lawmaking with Cato's Jeff Vanderslice. This was recorded on Capitol Hill at the Cato Institute's #SphereSummit held this week. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Grizzly Bears and Endangered Species Recovery

    Jul 18 2019

    Species recovery is a key goal of the Endangered Species Act. So why are recovering species so rarely removed from the list? Brian Yablonski of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Let Conservationists Compete for Use of Federal Lands

    Jul 17 2019

    Conservations are not a part of the conversation when it comes time to lease federal lands. Should that change? Shawn Regan of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Montana School Choice at SCOTUS

    Jul 16 2019

    Montana parents want to use a scholarship tax credit program to send their kids to religious schools. Montana’s high court says no. The Supreme Court will ultimately decide the issue this term. Erica Smith with the Institute for Justice comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • National Security, Freedom to Trade, and Huawei

    Jul 15 2019

    Chinese tech company Huawei is widely perceived to pose a threat to US national security. Considering the high costs of mitigating that threat the way US policy makers seem to be demanding, the US public first should be convinced that the threat is dire and that the prescribed measures are necessary. Dan Ikenson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Justin Amash and the Downtrodden Anti-War Conservatives

    Jul 12 2019

    Justin Amash's departure from the GOP means the continued fracturing of anti-war conservatives and libertarians. Jim Antle of The American Conservative comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Defining War Down

    Jul 11 2019

    There is no credible way to conclude that the United States is not at war. Ah, but "endless war" Is another thing altogether, right? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Community Reinvestment Act in the Age of Fintech and Bank Competition

    Jul 10 2019

    The Community Reinvestment Act should be scrapped wholesale. Failing that, it should be dramatically restructured. Diego Zuluaga is author of "The Community Reinvestment Act in the Age of Fintech and Bank Competition." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Auer Deference Truly Hobbled?

    Jul 09 2019

    The Kisor case decided recently by the Supreme Court reined in so-called "Auer deference," but what changes about regulating going forward? Will Yeatman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will 2020 Yield A Real Conversation about Educational Freedom?

    Jul 08 2019

    A Supreme Court challenge implicating state-level Blaine Amendments and Democrats' revival of school busing as an issue could force a real conversation about educational freedom. Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Conservative Sensibility

    Jul 05 2019

    Rights precede government. That's the core of the American founding, and George F. Will argues that it's worth preserving. His new book is The Conservative Sensibility. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Troubling Military Pageant in Washington

    Jul 04 2019

    The President's decision to flex military hardware at an Independence Day celebration is at odds with a commemoration of liberty. Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New Chicago Way: Lessons from Other Big Cities

    Jul 03 2019

    One of the ways Chicago is special is the way in which all power appears to flow out of the mayor's office. It causes massive and relatively intractable problems. It's not a problem of personalities, but of structure. Ed Bachrach and Austin Berg are authors of The New Chicago Way. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tyranny Comes Home: The Domestic Fate of U.S. Militarism

    Jul 02 2019

    In the land of the free, how has U.S. militarism changed domestic policing? Chris Coyne and Abigail Hall are authors of Tyranny Comes Home: The Domestic Fate of U.S. Militarism. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Who Wins in Opportunity Zones?

    Jul 01 2019

    Opportunity Zones are a part of the 2017 tax bill, but who benefits? And how is it appropriate to single out some places for special investment tax breaks? Chris Edwards comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sen. Hawley's Bad Answer to Anti-Conservative Bias: License Speech Platforms

    Jun 28 2019

    In an attempt to take on what he calls "censorship" on big speech platforms online, Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO) would prefer to effectively compel big tech firms to secure federal licenses to operate. John Samples comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Panic Attack: Young Radicals in the Age of Trump

    Jun 27 2019

    Many young protestors on college campuses appear intent on achieving something new: Ending campus debate on controversial ideas. Robby Soave is author of Panic Attack: Young Radicals in the Age of Trump. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Testing the Limits of Congressional Delegation in Gundy

    Jun 26 2019

    Congress can't just delegate all of its duties away. Where should the line be drawn? In Gundy, the Supreme Court turned away a challenge to one particular Congressional delegation, but new challenges are coming. Trevor Burrus and Ilya Shapiro comment on the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Growing Abuse of the National Security Rationale for Restricting Trade

    Jun 25 2019

    Many of the trade restrictions imposed by the White House have been accompanied by concerns over national security. Simon Lester is coauthor of a new paper detailing how this rationale can and has been abused. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Facebucks? Zuckercoin? Libra.

    Jun 24 2019

    A new currency offered by Facebook among others stands to be a substantial financial innovation, but important elements about the sort-of cryptocurrency have yet to be revealed. Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Double Jeopardy Alive and Well after Gamble

    Jun 21 2019

    The Supreme Court has given new life to a large exception to a Constitutional prohibition on double jeopardy. Ilya Shapiro and Clark Neily discuss the Gamble case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Dubious Legal Authority in the Push for War with Iran

    Jun 20 2019

    Nearly two decades ago, one Congress voted once to strike back against those who perpetrated 9/11. Now that same legal authority is enabling a push to take the U.S. to war with Iran. Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Public Access and Free Speech at SCOTUS

    Jun 19 2019

    In Manhattan Community Access Corporation v. Halleck, the Supreme Court affirms that private platforms are not state actors, and are therefore not subject to First Amendment constraints. Trevor Burrus comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Growing Green Card Backlog

    Jun 18 2019

    Legal immigration is becoming more challenging. David Bier explains how in a new paper. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is This Time Different? Schumpeter, the Tech Giants, and Monopoly Fatalism

    Jun 17 2019

    Remember MySpace? What about Kodak? These companies seemed to be unstoppable monopolies. So what happened? Ryan Bourne is author of the new Cato paper, "Is This Time Different? Schumpeter, the Tech Giants, and Monopoly Fatalism." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Is Postal Banking?

    Jun 14 2019

    Postal banking offered in financial reform legislation is a solution to a problem created by current interventions in the banking sector. So says Cato's Todd Zywicki. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jones Act Spikes the Price of Hawaiian Rum

    Jun 13 2019

    Bob Gunter's Koloa Rum is extremely expensive to ship to the mainland U.S., all thanks to the Jones Act.Learn more about the Jones Act See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • More from The Wealth Explosion

    Jun 12 2019

    What makes modernity persist? When do efforts to perfect modernity undermine it? Stephen Davies is author of The Wealth Explosion. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The SEC's New Enforcement Action against Kin Cryptocurrency

    Jun 11 2019

    When does the SEC make a decision to go after a particular cryptocurrency offering? What standards apply? The case of Kik and its related crypto offering, Kin, isn't yielding any answers. Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Arabic Numerals and Open Societies

    Jun 10 2019

    What are the important lessons from Islam's inward turn centuries ago? Mustafa Akyol comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A New Presidential Power Grab over Mexican Tariffs

    Jun 08 2019

    Is the president's assertion of authority to unilaterally lay a five-percent tariff on all Mexican goods authorized under law and the Constitution? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Elizabeth Warren’s ‘Economic Patriotism’

    Jun 07 2019

    Senator Elizabeth Warren's presidential campaign has presented a broad economic plan that includes a shift in priorities for trade under the banner of "economic patriotism." Simon Lester comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Next Steps in Prison Reform

    Jun 06 2019

    Many federal inmates are about to be released under the First Step Act, but the road ahead for prison reform should focus more directly on putting fewer people in prison to begin with. Kevin Ring, president of FAMM Foundation, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When Regulators Are Also Competitors

    Jun 05 2019

    The Supreme Court turned away a challenge to Amtrak's regulatory power wherein the agency/company regulates its private sector rivals. What does that mean for competition between private and public entities in the future? William Yeatman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Parsing the Julian Assange Indictment

    Jun 05 2019

    How much of Julian Assange's alleged espionage was the kind of thing good reporters do every day? Patrick Eddington comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Kamala Harris and the Authoritarian Impulse

    Jun 03 2019

    The policy and professional choices of U.S. Senator and presidential hopeful Kamala Harris seem to be rooted in … no particular ideology. But her past uses of prosecutorial power show a willingness to abandon her own kinder and gentler public political commitments. Elizabeth Nolan Brown of Reason looked into the longtime prosecutor's statements and record. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Kamala Harris Plan to Address the Gender Pay Gap

    Jun 01 2019

    Would taxing big firms that fail to pay men and women the same achieve gender pay equity? Ryan Bourne comments on a new proposal from Senator Kamala Harris. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Threatens New Tariffs on Mexican Goods

    May 31 2019

    After the President threatens new tariffs on Mexican goods, other countries hoping to secure trade agreements with the U.S. may think twice. Simon Lester explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A New Model for Helping Students Assert Freedom of Speech

    May 30 2019

    When Speech First is the defendant, students who want to speak freely don't have to make themselves targets for harassment or ostracism. Nicole Neily is president of Speech First. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Warren and Sanders Plans for Student Loans and Free College

    May 29 2019

    Two Democratic U.S. Senators running for President have unveiled their plans for potential federal roles in managing the costs of college. Diego Zuluaga describes the plans and their problems. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Congress Sleeps While Trump Spends and Spends

    May 28 2019

    Congress should guard its power of the purse. In the case of handouts to farmers injured as a result of Trump tariffs, members of Congress are fighting to make sure their farmers get some. William Yeatman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Wealth Explosion and Why It Might Not Continue

    May 27 2019

    When parts of Europe began to develop faster economically than ever before, it was only unprecedented because that rapid development still hasn’t stopped. There are historical examples or rapid economic development that did stop, and Stephen Davies examines them all in his new book, The Wealth Explosion. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Punishment without Crime Examines Our Broken Misdemeanor System

    May 25 2019

    Alexandra Natapoff argues forcefully in Punishment without Crime that the misdemeanor system in the United States consistently fails low-income people and makes America more unequal. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Surge of Populism in Mexico

    May 24 2019

    Mexico’s President ALMO, as he is known, came to power pledging to raise living standards and lower the murder rate. How he’s going about it troubles Roberto Salinas-León, President of the Mexico Business Forum and Director of Atlas Network’s Center for Latin America. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New York City Takes a Gun Restriction to the Supreme Court

    May 23 2019

    The Supreme Court will weigh in on a curious gun restriction in New York City. Matthew LaRosiere comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sweeping Executive Privilege vs. Congressional Subpoenas

    May 22 2019

    The President asserts a broad executive privilege in fighting Congressional subpoenas. It's not a privilege rooted in the Constitution, so where does it come from? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Feds Should End Aid to States

    May 21 2019

    The feds don't just offer handouts to individuals and corporations, they also subsidize state and local activities. Chris Edwards explains why this should end in "Restoring Responsible Government by Cutting Federal Aid to the States.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Neoliberalism 101

    May 17 2019

    Neoliberalism has a long history, and yet neoliberals think about many issues very differently than libertarians do. Jeremiah Johnson directs policy at the Neoliberal Project. And yes, this is a crossover episode. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Congress Could Legalize Immigrants

    May 17 2019

    A new Cato paper details several ways Congress could legalize immigrants. Alex Nowrasteh and David Bier comment for the latest edition of Cato Audio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Facebook, Content Moderation, and Free Expression

    May 15 2019

    At the Cato Institute's city seminar in San Francisco last month, John Samples discussed the challenge of respecting the values of free expression while moderating content on a massive platform. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Bankrupt Plan to Cap Credit Card Interest

    May 14 2019

    A new proposal would likely sharply curtail the issuance of credit cards and the extension of unsubsidized credit to lower-income people. Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Watering the Tree of Liberty Today

    May 13 2019

    What does the struggle for liberty look like today? Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) discussed some of his ideas at the Cato Institute Benefactor Summit in April. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Considering the 'New START' for Nuclear Arms Reduction

    May 10 2019

    Will the Trump Administration have enough time, or interest, in nuclear arms reductions before 2020? Eric Gomez discusses what's driving the discussions surrounding the New START treaty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Blockchain, Cryptocurrencies, and the Regulatory Challenge

    May 09 2019

    At a live recording of the Cato Daily Podcast in San Francisco, Cato's Diego Zuluaga and Matthew Feeney explored the costs and benefits of a relatively unregulated cryptocurrency marketplace. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Does the U.S. Expect to Get with 'Maximum Pressure' on Iran?

    May 08 2019

    The "maximum pressure" being applied to Iran is definitely costly to the U.S. and its allies, so we should expect to get a lot out of the policy, right? Emma Ashford and John Glaser explain why that's less than clear. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Risk Analysis of Foreign and Native-Born Terrorists

    May 07 2019

    The Trump Administration has ratcheted up rhetoric on the threat of terrorism on U.S. soil, calling for costly policy changes to foil foreign-born terrorism. The data don't support the claims. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Threatens More Tariffs on Chinese Goods

    May 06 2019

    New threats of heightened tariffs may further complicate efforts to resolving trade relations with China. Dan Ikenson discusses what that means for Americans. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Politics on the Ground over School Choice

    Apr 30 2019

    As founder and head of schools of Capital Prep schools, Steve Perry knows how school choice works, and the bankrupt politics that inhibit educational freedom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Telegraph As Technological Singularity

    Apr 29 2019

    The telegraph was supposed to liberate humanity. So what happened? Historian Anthony Comegna explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Donald Trump: Standing on the Shoulders of Tyrants

    Apr 25 2019

    How does the Trump record of aggrandizing the Oval Office compare to his predecessors? Cato's Gene Healy details his case in a new article in Reason. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Congress Should Consider Impeachment More Often

    Apr 24 2019

    Impeachable offenses aren't merely what members of the House agree they are. It's a substantial authority with some clear guidelines. One problem is, according to former Obama White House Counsel Bob Bauer, Congress is too afraid to launch inquiries. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Mueller Report Is Out (Mostly)

    Apr 23 2019

    The long-awaited Mueller report into Russian meddling in U.S. elections is now available in a redacted form. Julian Sanchez discusses what's new in the report and how Congress could use the information. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Imposes A Bad Deal on Major League Baseball

    Apr 19 2019

    A deal that would have made it easier for Cuban baseball players to join MLB has been nixed by the Trump Administration. Dara Lind, a senior correspondent at Vox, discusses the change. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Educational Freedom, Teacher Sickouts, and Bloated Higher Ed

    Apr 18 2019

    At the Cato Institute's Benefactor Summit, Neal McCluskey and Corey DeAngelis discussed the bloat and expense of modern higher ed, the data on school choice options, and why choice is second-best to educational freedom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Devin Nunes Has a Cow

    Apr 17 2019

    California Congressman Devin Nunes is suing Twitter for facilitating what he calls defamatory comments about him. He's also suing political strategist Liz Mair. Mair says Nunes doesn't understand how civil liberties work. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Antitrust and Big Tech

    Apr 16 2019

    The benefits and rationale for subjecting large tech firms to antitrust claims seem less clear than the costs, according to Kristian Stout with the International Center for for Law and Economics. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump's Planned Drawdown in Afghanistan Is a Good Sign

    Apr 15 2019

    Between the start of talks with the Taliban and moving forward with plans to draw down U.S. troops in Afghanistan, Donald Trump deserves some credit. Emma Ashford explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Do Doctors Think about Harm Reduction?

    Apr 13 2019

    Harm reduction isn’t an alien concept for doctors. The problem in the context of opioids is that the feds and states won’t get out of the way to let it happen. Jeff Singer comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A New Day Dawns for Trade in Africa

    Apr 12 2019

    A new trade deal will dramatically reduce tariffs among participating countries in a new African trade zone. Alexander C. R. Hammond of African Liberty discusses the upside for regional trade. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Eisenhower’s Relevance to Peace, War, and Liberty Today

    Apr 11 2019

    Eisenhower's presidency still has enduring lessons for prospects for peace and liberty today. Chris Preble, author of the forthcoming book, Peace, War, and Liberty: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy, offers his thoughts.Related podcast: Peace, War, and Liberty: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Mark Zuckerberg Is Mistaken to Welcome Federal Regulation of Facebook

    Apr 09 2019

    John Samples is author of the new Cato paper, "Why the Government Should Not Regulate Content Moderation of Social Media." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Governments Seize Guns with 'Red Flag Laws'

    Apr 08 2019

    Red flag laws are aimed at getting guns away from people who are at risk of suicide or crime. David Kopel explains the due process implications of these preemptive gun seizures.Related testimony: "Red Flag Laws: Examining Guidelines for State Action." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cannabis and Opioid Overdoses

    Apr 07 2019

    Can cannabis become a key player in stemming the tide of opioid overdoses? Adrianne Wilson-Poe is a neuroscientist who studies the potential of cannabis in the opioid overdose epidemic. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Big-Spending Divided Congress

    Apr 05 2019

    Will a divided Congress yield lower spending? Jonathan Bydlak of the Coalition to Reduce Spending comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Supervised Injection Works for Heroin Users

    Apr 04 2019

    Some heroin users have never injected the drug themselves, and other heroin users know nothing about how to inject safely. Darwin Fisher runs a supervised injection facility, Insite, in Vancouver, BC. He explains why safe injection matters. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Counting the Costs of a Trump Border Shutdown

    Apr 03 2019

    The president says it would be a "money making operation" to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border, but that's simply not true. The costs would be enormous. Dan Ikenson and David Bier make the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Does Heroin-Assisted Treatment Work?

    Apr 02 2019

    Addiction to and dependence on heroin can create a cycle that consumes other parts of a person's life. Scott MacDonald is the lead physician at the Crosstown Clinic in Vancouver, Canada. The clinic provides, among other services, heroin-assisted treatment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Opioid Crisis Is Driven by Prohibition

    Apr 01 2019

    Dr. Daniel Ciccarone says that in order to understand opioid use and abuse, we need to understand today's users in real time. Prohibition makes that understanding more difficult. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Prisoners of Politics: Breaking the Cycle of Mass Incarceration

    Mar 29 2019

    How does our criminal justice system fail, and why does it seem to do so systematically? Rachel Elise Barkow is author of Prisoners of Politics: Breaking the Cycle of Mass Incarceration. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Data Privacy Protection for the Future

    Mar 28 2019

    Data privacy is important, so why don't we treat it that way? Would more civil action against tech firms that misuse or fail to secure data help? Lindsey Barrett of the Georgetown University Law Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Gullible Superpower: U.S. Support for Bogus Foreign Democratic Movements

    Mar 27 2019

    Over the last forty years, there is a distressing history of foreign insurgent groups being able to manipulate U.S. policymakers and opinion leaders into supporting their cause. Cato's Ted Galen Carpenter discusses his new book, Gullible Superpower. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • To Make Better Cities, Drop the Big Plans

    Mar 26 2019

    To make cities thrive, what's the proper role for elected officials? How, precisely, should they get out of the way of entrepreneurship and development? Greg Brooks is president of the new Better Cities Project. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Mueller Report Arrives (Sorta)

    Mar 25 2019

    Attorney General William Barr has released a brief description of the findings of Robert Mueller in his investigation into Russian meddling in U.S. elections. Many questions remain. Julian Sanchez comments. RELATED hbspt.cta.load(4957480, '7ee0a7c1-5e68-4b09-846c-7da02db705aa', {}); It’s dangerous to speculate about the unknown unknowns. There are likely aspects of the investigation that aren’t even on the public’s radar... hbspt.cta.load(4957480, 'd8c55c26-600...more

  • Social Media's Content Challenge

    Mar 25 2019

    Moderating content in a polarized political climate while also respecting the value of free speech is a challenge still vexing social media companies. Thomas Kadri of the Yale Information Society Project comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Development Economics and 'The Outsider's Dilemma'

    Mar 23 2019

    What helps the world's poor to become prosperous? Matt Warner, president of the Atlas Network, describes some of the problems of development economics, the aid industry, and provides some hope for the future. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lessons from the Great Recession, Part 2317

    Mar 23 2019

    A decade later, we're still discovering lessons from the Great Recession. Economist Vincent Reinhart discussed a few at the Cato Institute Monetary Conference in 2018. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Rent Control Goes Statewide in Oregon

    Mar 21 2019

    A new Oregon law is a first-of-its-kind statewide rent control regime. It’s effects may be fairly weak, given its provisions. Ryan Bourne discusses the winners and losers in the new regime. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does Mass Transit Help Low-Income Workers?

    Mar 20 2019

    The case for transit would seem to rest on its ability to cheaply get low-income Americans to work. Randal O'Toole argues that it's not that simple. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does Marsy’s Law Protect Cops from Accountability?

    Mar 19 2019

    Many states are pushing so-called Marsy's Laws as a way to protect victims of crime from some of elements of the criminal justice system. How might police use these laws to escape accountability? Jonathan Blanks comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trade and American Leadership: The Paradoxes of Power and Wealth from Alexander Hamilton to Donald Trump

    Mar 18 2019

    Does the U.S. retreat from freer trade have political implications? How should trade policy adjust to the shrinking U.S. share of the global economy? Craig VanGrasstek is author of Trade and American Leadership. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Peace, War, and Liberty: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy

    Mar 16 2019

    Christopher A. Preble is author of Peace, War, and Liberty: Understanding U.S. Foreign Policy. This is a special presentation from the March 2019 edition of Cato Audio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trump Foreign Policy and Its Trump Administration Opponents

    Mar 15 2019

    Is it too rich to hear former Vice President Cheney complain about the Trump foreign policy? Was the Pentagon really caught unawares by the President's decree that the U.S. leave Syria? Jim Antle is editor of The American Conservative magazine. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Threat Inflation Season Is Appropriation Season

    Mar 14 2019

    How much do we know about the ratio between foreign-born and American-born terrorist threats? Does it matter? Patrick Eddington comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Regulation Cripples Online Political Speech

    Mar 13 2019

    Online political speech is often dramatically different from the speech presented via terrestrial broadcasting. That difference is critical to protecting speech in the face of one-size-fits-all regulatory regimes. Attorney Allen Dickerson with the Institute for Free Speech comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jones Act Repeal Lands in the Senate

    Mar 12 2019

    Legislation is now on the table to end the Jones Act. Colin Grabow discusses its likely prospects. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Anyone's Game: Sports-Betting Regulations after Murphy v. NCAA

    Mar 11 2019

    A big Supreme Court case has fundamentally altered the landscape of sports betting. So what comes next? Patrick Moran comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse

    Mar 09 2019

    The 2016 election revealed a great deal about how rural America functions and how it doesn't. Tim Carney makes a case in Alienated America that there may be ways to bridge growing divisions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Voluminous Congressional Attack on Free Political Speech

    Mar 06 2019

    A massive new plan unveiled by Democrats is a wish list of restrictions on free political speech. Luke Wachob of the Institute for Free Speech comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • If Sex Workers Are Victims, Why Charge Them with Felonies?

    Mar 05 2019

    The police raids on massage parlors in Florida initially promised a blockbuster story of sex trafficking. So far, the story hasn't panned out. Elizabeth Nolan Brown, an associate editor at Reason magazine, explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Criminal Immigrants in 2017: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin

    Mar 04 2019

    For all the bluster about immigration, the idea that immigrants pose a unique crime problem still doesn't show up in the data. Alex Nowrasteh discusses his new paper. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Customs and Border Patrol in the "Constitution-Free Zone"

    Mar 01 2019

    What grants border patrol agents more invasive powers in a 100-mile wide band around the edges of the United States? Chris Montoya is a former longtime Customs and Border Patrol agent. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Medicare at 50 Would Double Down on Failure

    Feb 28 2019

    A new proposal would expand Medicare to include Americans as young as 50. It's a throw-money-at-it solution to problems largely caused by government intervention in health care, according to Cato’s Michael Cannon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Kim and Trump, Together Again

    Feb 26 2019

    Will the diplomatic push between the U.S. and North Korea produce more substantive agreement? Will South Korea get on board with the long-held goal of U.S. troops departing the peninsula? Eric Gomez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Dramatic Growth of Higher Ed Bureaucracy

    Feb 25 2019

    What are all these university administrators doing, exactly? Cato senior fellow Todd Zywicki doesn't know, either. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Dignity in Work Requires Value in Work

    Feb 22 2019

    Dignity and productivity are strongly linked, but it's easy to misunderstand. Ryan Bourne comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cato Sues the SEC Over Gag Orders: A CatoAudio Roundtable

    Feb 21 2019

    On the new CatoAudio, we devote our roundtable to the new lawsuit the Cato Institute has filed against the Securities and Exchange Commission policy of imposing gag orders on settling defendants. Cato's Clark Neily and Bob McNamara of IJ comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does the FCC’s "Public Interest" Mandate Extend to E-Cigarette Ads?

    Feb 20 2019

    A dispute among members of the FCC indicates that there is an appetite on the commission for banning e-cigarette ads in the name of the "public interest." Commissioner Brendan Carr says he stands with the First Amendment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When Sweetheart Economic Development Deals Fail

    Feb 20 2019

    Between the pullback of FoxConn's commitments to Wisconsin and Amazon's HQ2 withdrawal from New York, it's worth examining taxpayer-provided incentives for economic development. John Mozena is president of the Center for Economic Accountability. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evaluating the President's Legal and Factual Justifications for a "National Emergency"

    Feb 18 2019

    Massive delegations of authority may strengthen the President's claim of a "national emergency" at the southern border. The facts of the emergency are not on his side. Will Yeatman and Alex Nowrasteh comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How the U.S. Failed to Adjust to China's Economic Rise

    Feb 15 2019

    What should the U.S. do to adjust to China's rise? Tariffs and shattering the global trading system aren't the answer, according to Scott Lincicome. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Would You Tax Wealth?

    Feb 14 2019

    A proposal to tax wealth runs into Constitutional problems, but how would it work otherwise? Michael Tanner comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evaluating Modern Monetary Theory

    Feb 13 2019

    Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) hinges critically on government having sole dominion over money. George Selgin discusses some of the new and old ideas MMT encapsulates. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jack Bogle and the Small Investor

    Feb 12 2019

    Vanguard founder Jack Bogle revolutionized American investing on behalf of the little guy. Diego Zuluaga comments on his passing. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Syria Withdrawal and Complicating Factors

    Feb 11 2019

    The announced removal of U.S. troops from Syria was a long time coming. So, what now? John Glaser comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Green New Deal: Sprawling & Sparse

    Feb 08 2019

    The Green New Deal may just be a resolution or a wish list, but the challenges would be massive and the benefits less than clear. Peter Van Doren discusses the initial draft of the Green New Deal. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • U.S. Dietary Advice Takes Another Hit

    Feb 07 2019

    A new meta-analysis points to the notion that U.S. dietary advice has been fatally flawed for more than four decades. Terence Kealey explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • As Brexit Deadline Looms, Agreement Seems Ephemeral

    Feb 06 2019

    A no-deal Brexit could be devastating on a number of fronts. Where do things stand now? Ryan Bourne and Emma Ashford comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Maduro, Venezuela, and the U.S. Role in Transition

    Feb 05 2019

    Is there anything the U.S. should do to support Venezuelans who want to reassert their liberties? Juan Carlos Hidalgo comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Happiness Curve: Why Life Gets Better After 50

    Feb 04 2019

    Why does life improve in your 50s, 60s, and beyond? Jonathan Rauch makes his case in The Happiness Curve: Why Life Gets Better After 50. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Challenge to Conventional Narratives on Opioid Overdoses

    Jan 31 2019

    New data is revealing that the doctor-centered narratives on opioid addiction and overdose are, at best, severely flawed and possibly entirely wrong. Jeffrey A. Singer describes why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unprofitable Schooling: America's Broken Ivory Tower

    Jan 30 2019

    Complaints about higher education in the U.S. are ubiquitous. College costs are up as student debt loads become more unsustainable, while criticisms of the quality of university education mount. Todd Zywicki is co-editor of the forthcoming book, Unprofitable Schooling. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Wild West of CBD Is Now

    Jan 29 2019

    CBD is a chemical derived from cannabis, and its legal status is still not totally clear. Mike Riggs of Reason details how the drug is being treated by various federal agencies. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Transparent Medical Pricing and the $89,000 Snake Bite

    Jan 28 2019

    After Eric Ferguson was treated for a venomous snake bite, he received a bill including an $80,000 charge for $750 in antivenom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Toward a Less Disruptive Government Shutdown

    Jan 27 2019

    Government shutdowns don't need to be so disruptive. Chris Edwards argues the key is devolving a great deal of federal control. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Nonstarter Compromise on DACA

    Jan 26 2019

    A White House compromise plan to change the Delayed Action on Childhood Arrivals program (in exchange for funding for a wall at the border) was hardly a compromise at all. Instead, it would have stripped protection from many “Dreamers." David Bier comments on what a compromise measure ought to look like. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is the U.S. A Force for Good in Venezuela?

    Jan 25 2019

    The United States has a long history of involvement in overthrowing governments in the Americas. Is this round of support for opposition leaders in Venezuela different? John Glaser comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Redacted Manafort File

    Jan 24 2019

    What we still don't know about what former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort told prosecutors is telling. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Should Mail (or Tweet) in the State of the Union

    Jan 23 2019

    The State of the Union is a blustery and vacuous ritual, and it doesn't have to be that way. Nancy Pelosi has offered Donald Trump a great opportunity to mail it in. Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How "Market Failure" Arguments Lead to Misguided Policy

    Jan 22 2019

    What makes a 'market failure'? Ryan Bourne is author of the new paper, "How ‘Market Failure’ Arguments Lead to Misguided Policy.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An Overdue Pardon for the 'Groveland Four'

    Jan 18 2019

    Gilbert King's Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America details the decades-old wrongful arrest of four young black men on rape charges in Florida and the work of Thurgood Marshall and other attorneys to assert basic Constitutional rights on behalf of the defendants. The last of the Groveland Four died in 2012, but thanks in large part to the book, they have now been officially pardoned. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Myth of the Cyber Offense

    Jan 17 2019

    Do cyber operations among rival states achieve their stated objectives? What are the escalation risks? Brandon Vareriano is co-author of the new Cato paper, "The Myth of the Cyber Offense: The Case for Restraint." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Defining 'National Emergency' Down

    Jan 16 2019

    What does the Constitution have to say about national emergencies, both real and imagined? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Case for an Immigration Tariff

    Jan 15 2019

    As a pressure valve against our broken immigration system, why not let immigrants pay for the privilege? Alex Nowrasteh makes his case in a new Cato paper. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Dark Money and 'Lawless Prosecutions'

    Jan 14 2019

    A new documentary showcased by PBS presents Montana as a success story of campaign finance reform and Wisconsin's John Doe investigations as a failure. Steve Klein of the Pillar of Law Institute details some omissions in the Dark Money documentary. Related podcasts: Wisconsin’s ‘John Doe’ Raids Two Years Later October 2, 2015 “John Doe” Prosecutors Lose Big in Wisconsin October 6, 2016 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pharmaceutical Freedom: Why Patients Have a Right to Self Medicate

    Jan 11 2019

    The right to self medicate has a long history. It's time Americans rediscovered it. Jessica Flanigan makes her case in the new book Pharmaceutical Freedom: Why Patients Have a Right to Self Medicate. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Excessive Fines and Timbs v. Indiana

    Jan 10 2019

    What makes a government fine excessive? Timbs v. Indiana, now before the U.S. Supreme Court, may provide some important clarification. Sam Gedge is an Institute for Justice attorney representing Tyson Timbs before the high court. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Wisconsin's State-Run Butter Taste Test

    Jan 09 2019

    Tasting butter is a matter of, well, taste. In Wisconsin, certified butter tasters are a part of the normal regulatory process. Anastasia Boden of the Pacific Legal Foundation is handling an ongoing legal case on behalf of a small butter maker. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Simple State-Level Reform for Prescription Drugs

    Jan 08 2019

    One big cost associated with prescription drugs is going to a doctor for a prescription. Naomi Lopez Bauman of the Goldwater Institute describes one reform that could drive those costs down. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Drives Drug Prices? What Should Change?

    Jan 07 2019

    Prescription drug prices continue moving up. What can discipline the process of setting drug prices? Charles Silver is coauthor of the Cato Institute book, Overcharged. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How States Can Protect Data Privacy

    Jan 04 2019

    The feds have a poor record of protecting data privacy, but there are moves that states can make to do so. Connor Boyack discusses one such effort in Utah. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Monetary and Fiscal Policy Errors and Corrections

    Jan 04 2019

    Why is it so hard to get monetary and fiscal policy right in troubled economic times? Jeffrey Frankel of Harvard's Kennedy School comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Are American-Made Ships So Expensive?

    Jan 02 2019

    The Jones Act is supposed to protect U.S. shipbuilders. So why does the industry fail to compete globally? Economist Thomas Grennes comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Abusive Market Concentration in the Jones Act

    Dec 31 2018

    Manuel Reyes, head of the Puerto Rico Food Marketing, Industry and Distribution Chamber, argues that the costs of the Jones Act have accelerated. We spoke during Cato's conference on the Jones Act this month. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Academic Freedom and Freedom of Speech on Private College Campuses

    Dec 30 2018

    When private universities pledge to enshrine academic freedom and freedom of speech, how much teeth does that promise have? Rick Esenberg is with the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When Unions Want to Stop Paying Dues

    Dec 30 2018

    When a local union wants to escape the expense of its state affiliate, what recourse do they have? David Osborne is with the Fairness Center. He discusses the case of a firefighter's union in Pennsylvania that has had enough. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • If You're Middle Class, Are You in Poverty?

    Dec 28 2018

    What does it mean for policy and welfare programs when the definition of poverty creeps up into the middle class? Jarrett Skorup of the Mackinac Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • False Promises of the Jones Act

    Dec 27 2018

    How does the Jones Act make some American industries less competitive? Bryan Riley of the National Taxpayers Union comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Radical Weirdness and the English Civil War

    Dec 26 2018

    We can trace some powerful advances in human freedom to the ideas pushed by marginalized people and groups. Anthony Comegna walks us through the weirdos who stood up for freedom during the English Civil War. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Stoicism for Troubled Times

    Dec 26 2018

    Control what you can control and don't let the rest trouble you. The great stoics of centuries past have much to offer our contemporary lives. Ryan Holiday comments on engaging with what matters. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Trump Changed Political Comedy

    Dec 24 2018

    Donald Trump has altered political comedy, and not for the better. Comedian and satirist Andrew Heaton argues that it may be a short-term phenomenon, but it's up to comedians to adjust. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Judicial Deference and Kisor v. Wilkie

    Dec 23 2018

    A new case headed to the Supreme Court may challenge a great deal of deference courts currently afford federal agencies. Andrew Grossman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Federal Reserve's Ongoing Mission Creep

    Dec 21 2018

    What problem was the Federal Reserve meant to solve? How does that compare with its assumed mandate today? Jeffrey Lacker is a former head of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. He discusses the original Fed charter and the powers it now claims. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Exiting Syria is the Right Move

    Dec 20 2018

    American participation in the conflict in Syria was never approved by Congress, and the benefits of being involved are far from clear. The President has ordered an end to U.S. participation in the conflict. Cato's John Glaser and Chris Preble believe it’s the right move. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FIRST STEP Act Passes the Senate

    Dec 20 2018

    What makes the FIRST STEP Act the most significant criminal justice reform in years? Shon Hopwood teaches law at Georgetown University. He discusses what he believes ought to be the next steps in criminal justice reform. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Legalizing Marijuana Is Securing the Border

    Dec 19 2018

    How effective would a border wall be against drug smugglers? The answer can tell us a lot about how effective it would be against illegal migrants. Cato's David Bier is author of a new policy analysis on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Home-Based Businesses and the Long Arm of the Law

    Dec 18 2018

    As home-based businesses grow, regulators should try to get out of the way. Christina Sandefur of the Goldwater Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jamal Khashoggi, Saudi War in Yemen, and Modern Journalism

    Dec 17 2018

    The death of a U.S. journalist may have been the last straw for members of the Senate in considering the U.S-Saudi relationship. Spencer Ackerman of The Daily Beast discusses journalism and its risks in fraught times. We spoke at the 2018 Cato Institute Surveillance Conference. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Creativity in Advancing Liberty

    Dec 15 2018

    Data, numbers, charts, and white papers are fine, but advancing liberty in the future will require humor, creativity, and art in crafting compelling stories. John Papola comments on art as a tool to advance freedom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Human Freedom Index 2018

    Dec 14 2018

    The Human Freedom Index continues to show the strong relationship between economic freedom and political and social freedom. Ian Vasquez discusses the latest edition of the report. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New York Response to Janus

    Dec 13 2018

    The Janus ruling curtailing union power is not self-executing. Ken Girardin of The Empire Center discusses how New York has reacted to the ruling. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FDA's Overcaution Carries Deadly Consequences

    Dec 11 2018

    When the FDA sets out to evaluate a potential new drug, the agency's overcaution makes the exercise more expensive and potentially deadly from patients who might benefit. Mark Flatten of the Goldwater Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Inclusive Economy: How to Bring Wealth to America's Poor

    Dec 07 2018

    The Inclusive Economy, the new book by Cato’s Michael Tanner, examines welfare from the perspective of how government keeps many Americans poor. The book is available now. You can support the Cato Daily Podcast and the Cato Institute by becoming a Podcast Sponsor. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Simon Abundance Index

    Dec 06 2018

    Are we measuring resource availability properly? The Simon Abundance Index is an attempt to give the world a clearer picture of the abundance that surrounds us. Marian Tupy comments. You can support the Cato Daily Podcast and the Cato Institute by becoming a Podcast Sponsor. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bank Stability Ten Years after the Financial Crisis

    Dec 05 2018

    How has the banking system performed a decade after the financial crisis? Are there still reasons to worry? Tobias Adrian is Director of the Monetary and Capital Markets Department of the International Monetary Fund. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Open Police Complaints

    Dec 04 2018

    It's difficult to file a complaint with many police departments. In some cases, it's hard to know even how to file one. Steve Silverman of Flex Your Rights discusses the group's new project, Open Police Complaints, which aims to smooth the process and bring transparency to the process of registering a complaint against cops.You can support the Cato Daily Podcast and the Cato Institute by becoming a Podcast Sponsor. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt...more

  • What Is Classical Liberal History?

    Nov 30 2018

    History isn't merely a set of facts and events, and history doesn't emerge from a singular perspective. Michael J. Douma is co-editor of What is Classical Liberty History? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New Mexico Begins Innovative Fix to Occupational Licensing

    Nov 29 2018

    It outgoing New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez has her way, New Mexicans will soon have a much bigger say in which businesses are allowed to serve them. Paul Gessing of the Rio Grande Foundation discusses the beginnings of a new and substantial occupational licensing reform. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Daunting Brexit Sales Pitch

    Nov 28 2018

    A Brexit deal is on the table. How ugly could it be? Ryan Bourne discusses the challenging sales pitch and complicated politics of Britain leaving the European Union. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In Weyerhaeuser, the Frog Never Had a Chance

    Nov 27 2018

    The Weyerhaeuser decision handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court was nominally about protecting a frog's (potential) habitat. Holly Fretwell of the Property and Environment Research Center says protecting endangered species requires a deeper dive into the workings of the Endangered Species Act. We spoke in October before the decision was handed down. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Understanding the Real Rate of Interest

    Nov 26 2018

    How should we think about the real rate of interest? What changes can alter or obfuscate it? Claudio Borio of BIS comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Teacher Outrage, Teacher Compensation

    Nov 23 2018

    Do the claims that drove teacher protests in 2018 bear scrutiny? Victor Riches is President of the Goldwater Institute. He discusses some of the data on teacher compensation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Dental Therapy and Health Care Monopolies

    Nov 22 2018

    Dental therapy offers a way to extend dental care to more Americans. Why isn't it more available? Sal Nuzzo of the James Madison Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In the Pursuit of Self Government, Does Quality News Matter?

    Nov 21 2018

    How much does quality newsgathering matter if the goal is self government? Anthony Comegna says it's not as important as we might hope. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Wild Horses, Property Rights, and Public Lands

    Nov 20 2018

    Wild horses don't care who owns the land under their hooves, but the apparent conflict between horses and property owners isn't as intractable as you might think. Hannah Downey of the Property and Environment Research Center explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bail Reform and Public Safety

    Nov 20 2018

    Criminal defendants sometimes pose a risk to the public and should not be released, but that risk often doesn't correlate with bail that a judge might set. Daniel Dew of the Buckeye Institute comments on how bail works in courtrooms and how it might be reformed. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Impeachment of Andrew "Tennessee" Johnson

    Nov 16 2018

    The impeachment of Andrew Johnson might offer a few lessons for today. Gene Healy is author of "Indispensable Remedy: The Broad Scope of the Constitution’s Impeachment Power.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Disciplining China's Trade Practices at the WTO

    Nov 15 2018

    China's trade practices are questionable, but are tariffs the proper response? Simon Lester is author of the new Cato paper, "Disciplining China's Trade Practices at the WTO: How WTO Complaints Can Help Make China More Market-Oriented." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Endorses Serious Sentencing Reform

    Nov 15 2018

    President Trump has endorsed legislation that would make some federal drug sentencing reform retroactive. Molly Gill of Families Against Mandatory Minimums discusses the proposal and what a new Congress should focus on in the next term. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Debt, Credit, and Consumer Protection

    Nov 13 2018

    Some of the large drivers of financial problems facing consumers are the regulators who are trying to protect us. New Cato senior fellow Todd Zywicki comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Social Media and the Pipe Bomber

    Nov 12 2018

    Before Cesar Sayoc sent pipe bombs to prominent Democrats, he threatened Cato adjunct scholar Ilya Somin. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sex Worker Freedom in Nevada Holds Steady

    Nov 09 2018

    Voters in Lyon County, Nevada rejected a proposal to ban brothels there. Meanwhile, brothel owner Dennis Hof won election to state office despite his death weeks earlier. Alice Little, a sex worker in Nevada, describes what's next for defending and advancing sex worker freedom.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The 'Protectionist Moment' That Wasn’t

    Nov 08 2018

    Donald Trump's protectionist tendencies may have reached their natural limit. Scott Lincicome discusses his new trade bulletin on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jeff Sessions "Fired for Doing the Right Thing"

    Nov 07 2018

    Jeff Sessions has resigned as Attorney General, a move that opens up many questions about the future of investigations into the White House and harsh federal law enforcement. Trevor Burrus and Alex Nowrasteh comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Divided Government Won in 2018

    Nov 07 2018

    Democrats will run the U.S. House and Republicans will hang onto the Senate. What does that mean for limited government? What were the bright spots for liberty at the state level? Michael Tanner comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New Polling on Pre-Existing Conditions Coverage Costs and Benefits

    Nov 06 2018

    Democrats have pinned some of their hopes on protecting Americans from pre-existing conditions from losing certain coverage mandates. What does polling have to say about it? Emily Ekins comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Does the U.S. Get out of New Sanctions on Iran?

    Nov 05 2018

    What benefits does the U.S. derive from new sanctions on Iran? Iranian leaders have long said they are willing to negotiate, and the U.S. has already poked holes in its own hard line toward the regime. John Glaser and Emma Ashford comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Threat of Creeping Overcriminalization

    Nov 02 2018

    Shon Hopwood is both a former felon and a professor of law at Georgetown. At Cato Club 200, he detailed his case for sweeping criminal justice reform.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Walling Off Liberty

    Nov 02 2018

    Federal tactics aimed at enforcing immigration law should be very concerning to law-abiding American citizens. Matthew Feeney discusses the findings of his new paper. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Do Parents Think of Private School Choice?

    Oct 31 2018

    A large survey of parents who make use of private school choice in Florida reveals that, yes, parents really do like school choice. Jason Bedrick of EdChoice comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Claims Power to End Birthright Citizenship

    Oct 30 2018

    The President may not understand the substantive requirements to alter the Constitution, but his desire to end birthright citizenship with a mere executive order is wrongheaded for a number of other reasons, as well. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Regressive Regulation and Economic Opportunity

    Oct 29 2018

    Regulations that disproportionately harm the poor should get special scrutiny. Cato's Ryan Bourne and Vanessa Brown Calder joined Diane Katz of the Heritage Foundation for a live Cato Daily Podcast at Cato Club 200. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • U.S. Plans to Abandon Nuclear Treaties

    Oct 26 2018

    Nuclear nonproliferation has long been viewed as an admirable goal. Is there a security benefit to casting aside agreements that limited the U.S. nuclear arsenal? Caroline Dorminey and Eric Gomez discuss the likely end of some longstanding limits on nuclear weapons. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Impeach Kavanaugh?

    Oct 25 2018

    What's the history of impeachment of judges, specifically justices of the Supreme Court? And what are the specific claims people would use to impeach Brett Kavanaugh? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does Trump Have a Trade Strategy?

    Oct 24 2018

    It's hard to figure just what the White House believes are the long-term benefits of trade protectionism and stunted trade deals? Simon Lester comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Have Republicans Given Up on Limited Government?

    Oct 23 2018

    Given Congressional Republicans' abdication on the nuts and bolts of limited government, does the GOP deserve an electoral beat-down in November? Republican U.S. Representative Mark Sanford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Defending Free Speech in the 21st Century

    Oct 22 2018

    Big internet platforms for speech are privately owned, but those who would pressure private firms to restrict speech are often the same people who would substantially restrict the rights of people to speak. John Samples and Emily Ekins discuss how Americans think about free speech today and ways to defend it in the modern age. We spoke at Cato Club 200 in Middleburg, Virginia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Libertarian Case for Class-Action Lawsuits

    Oct 19 2018

    The class-action lawsuit should become a tool for people who have been wronged by their governments, according to Maurice Thompson of the 1851 Center in Ohio. We spoke last week in Salt Lake City. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FDA’s Roadblocks to Self-Driven Health Care

    Oct 18 2018

    If you want to try an unapproved drug in the United States, you must be wealthy or lucky. Naomi Lopez Bauman of the Goldwater Institute discusses some promising reforms. We spoke at the State Policy Network Annual Meeting. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jamal Khashoggi and the Necessary U.S. Divorce from Saudi Arabia

    Oct 17 2018

    The U.S./Saudi relationship should be under the microscope like never before following the probable death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Union Fees after Janus

    Oct 16 2018

    Unions will not go gently following the Janus Supreme Court decision. Robert Alt of the Buckeye Institute discusses a few cases that follow on the Janus ruling. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cannabis Reform Comes to Utah

    Oct 15 2018

    Utah is a conservative state, but the legislature is poised to begin the process of loosening restrictions on medical cannabis, a response to a medical marijuana ballot initiative voters will face this November. Connor Boyack of the Libertas Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The False Promise of Native American Tribal Sovereignty

    Oct 12 2018

    Just how sovereign are Native American tribal lands? Terry L. Anderson is a cofounder of the Alliance for Renewing Indigenous Economies and the author of Free Market Environmentalism. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Adam Smith: Father of Economics

    Oct 11 2018

    Is it proper to consider Adam Smith the father of social psychology as well as economics? Jesse Norman MP discusses his new book, Adam Smith: Father of Economics. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts

    Oct 10 2018

    Our ability to reason should guide our decisions, but too often our emotions get the better of our ability to make good choices. Annie Duke explains how to empower our reason in Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Missing Property Rights on Native American Lands

    Oct 09 2018

    On tribal lands, Native Americans are lacking key property rights. It's hindering development on those so-called sovereign lands. Adam Crepelle comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Romance of the Rails

    Oct 08 2018

    In Romance of the Rails, author Randal O'Toole details the rise and fall of trains as a mode of transportation why it's quite likely we can never go back to it. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Fourth Amendment in the Digital Age

    Oct 05 2018

    The U.S. could perform better at protecting the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures. For a live recording of the Cato Daily Podcast at Cato Club 200 event in Middleburg, Virginia, Matthew Feeney and Julian Sanchez explain how courts think about those rights in the digital age. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Fading Relevance of Mass Transit

    Oct 04 2018

    American mass transit systems face challenges from demographics, how people work, and ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft. Randal O'Toole discusses what agencies should do to respond. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Challenging the FAA’s Speed Limit in the Sky

    Oct 03 2018

    The FAA's longstanding ban on supersonic commercial air travel needs to go. Alan McQuinn of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation discusses the promise of high-speed commercial flight. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Canada Mulls Banning (Domestic) Paid Blood Plasma

    Oct 02 2018

    Why are Canadians considering prohibiting other Canadians from being paid for providing blood plasma? Peter Jaworski comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will the Feds Make Occupational Licensing Worse?

    Oct 01 2018

    While some states are leading the way in reforming occupational licensing that affects many millions of workers and would-be workers, the feds may get involved. Lee McGrath of the Institute for Justice says it's fraught with risk. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Philadelphia's 'Forfeiture Machine' Winds Down

    Sep 27 2018

    If a judge accepts the agreement, Philadelphia's process of seizing many millions of dollars in property from innocent owners will be dismantled. Darpana Sheth of the Institute for Justice explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How the Feds Spy on Reporters

    Sep 26 2018

    New information provides more context surrounding the circumstances and legal rationales for government spying on journalists. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Economic Freedom of the World 2018

    Sep 25 2018

    The long slide of the United States in economic freedom appears to have halted. Ian Vasquez comments on the new edition of Economic Freedom of the World. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Banned Books Week and Conflicts of Values

    Sep 24 2018

    The fight over banning books from school libraries is only worsened by the public school establishment. Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Double Game: Why Pakistan Supports Militants and Resists U.S. Pressure to Stop

    Sep 21 2018

    U.S. relations with Pakistan are strained not just by war in neighboring Afghanistan, but also by Pakistan's domestic concerns. Sahar Khan is author of "Double Game: Why Pakistan Supports Militants and Resists U.S. Pressure to Stop." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Brexit, Trade, and Regulatory Barriers in Great Britain

    Sep 20 2018

    How is Brexit going? What do British Conservatives think of Donald Trump's broad and punitive tariff hikes? Elizabeth Truss is a British MP and Chief Secretary to the Treasury. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • F.A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social Philosophy

    Sep 19 2018

    The project of F. A. Hayek had its historical context, and it’s worth exploring. Peter J. Boettke is author of F.A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social Philosophy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 'Professional Speech': a Distinction without a Difference

    Sep 18 2018

    The NIFLA Supreme Court case could undo a substantial amount of regulation governing "professional speech" in the coming years. Robert McNamara of the Institute for Justice comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Public Assistance a Subsidy or Tax to Employers?

    Sep 17 2018

    Senator Bernie Sanders believes that public assistance benefits provided to workers constitute subsidies to their employers. He couldn't be more wrong, according to Ryan Bourne.Related paper: "Government and the Cost of Living: Income-Based vs. Cost-Based Approaches to Alleviating Poverty," by Ryan Bourne See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Notions of (and Reactions to) Islam

    Sep 13 2018

    How have European countries responded to large inflows of Muslims? What makes America so special when it comes to assimilating people of different backgrounds? Mustafa Akyol comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 'Indispensable' Remedy: The Broad Scope of the Constitution's Impeachment Power

    Sep 12 2018

    Impeachment of a President is a substantial power handed to Congress. How has it been used in the past and how should it be used? Gene Healy discusses his new paper on the history and meaning of impeachment.“Indispensable Remedy: The Broad Scope of the Constitution’s Impeachment Power,” by Gene Healy, White Paper, September 12, 2018. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • None of My Business

    Sep 11 2018

    In his new book, P.J. O'Rourke takes on money, banking, retirement, investing and all the reasons neither you nor P.J. are rich. The book is None of My Business. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Elizabeth Warren Plan to Reorganize Public Companies

    Sep 10 2018

    Senator Elizabeth Warren would like to see employees of large publicly traded companies have a role in selecting some board members. What does that mean for corporate governance and competitiveness of those companies? Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • States Push to Hobble Short-Term Health Plans

    Sep 07 2018

    Short-term health plans have been freed from many restrictions, but now states are moving to restrict or outright prohibit this kind of coverage. Michael Cannon says by outlawing the plans, states will expose their own residents to high bills, poor access, and bankruptcy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Education Research and Correlation vs. Causation

    Sep 06 2018

    The dimensions along which parents choose schools for their children are never entirely captured by test scores. Corey DeAngelis examines a new piece of education research. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Coddling of the American Mind

    Sep 05 2018

    Whatever the benefits of protecting kids from all manner of emotional disturbances, the costs may be among others, robbing kids of their own sense of competence. Greg Lukianoff is co-author of The Coddling of the American Mind.The Coddling of the American Mind, Book Forum, October 1, 2018 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Government and the Cost of Living: Income-Based vs. Cost-Based Approaches to Alleviating Poverty

    Sep 04 2018

    What would market-based welfare reform look like? Embracing reforms to lower prices for many of the most basic essentials for living would have the added benefits of not further burdening taxpayers. Ryan Bourne details his new paper on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Two Sides of a Potential Stormy Impeachment

    Sep 03 2018

    How should we think about impeachment? Does it require a crime? What are the cases for and against a payoff to an adult film star being criminal and/or an impeachable offense? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Attorney-Client Privilege and the Crime-Fraud Exception

    Aug 31 2018

    When courts demand testimony, a large exception is carved out for attorneys representing their clients. What breaks that privilege? Paul Rosenzweig of the R Street Institute comments on the case of Donald Trump and Michael Cohen. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump vs. Google Searches

    Aug 30 2018

    The President says he is unhappy with the manner in which Google searches present information about him. John Samples comments on how the comments ought to be considered. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • U.S. Citizens Targeted by ICE

    Aug 29 2018

    New data shows that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) does a poor job making sure that U.S. citizens aren't caught up in harsh detention and deportation policies aimed at undocumented immigrants. David Bier has examined data from Texas. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Should Young People Learn History?

    Aug 28 2018

    How young people learn history today raises issues over what should be presented, but any history text privileges some information over others. Anthony Comegna discusses how and if young people should grapple with history. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Let Conservationists Lease Federal Lands

    Aug 27 2018

    Conservationists usually have one lever to pull to alter federal land use: lobbying. Why shouldn't those who want to conserve species be able to lease federal lands for that purpose? Holly Fretwell of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Off the Grid

    Aug 24 2018

    Productive ideological sparring should be rooted in honest disagreement. In Matt Kibbe's new film, he explores the values and unconventional life of Republican Kentucky Congressman Thomas Massie. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bootleggers, Baptists, and Retrograde Booze Laws

    Aug 23 2018

    Economist Jeremy Horpendahl discusses just how far some states lag behind in regulating alcohol, and why some of those arrangements are very difficult to fix. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tom Cotton Picking Fights over Sentencing Reform

    Aug 22 2018

    Federal sentencing reform is overdue, and many leading Republicans are now on board for change. Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, however, wants to stop it. Kevin Ring, President of FAMM, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Freedom in the 50 States 2018

    Aug 21 2018

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tomorrow 3.0: Transaction Costs and the Sharing Economy

    Aug 20 2018

    The sharing economy has the potential to create massive disruption. How we handle that disruption is of critical importance. Michael Munger is author of Tomorrow 3.0: Transaction Costs and the Sharing Economy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Faith, Libertarianism, and the Common Good

    Aug 17 2018

    How best to reconcile faith with the common good and libertarian thinking poses challenges. Stephanie Slade of Reason argues that those challenges are often merely in how other people perceive libertarian approaches to maximize human flourishing. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Big Private Platforms for Speech and Alex Jones

    Aug 16 2018

    Several big internet platforms removed or hobbled conspiracy slinger Alex Jones, but any concerns that raises do not implicate the Constitution. John Samples comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Feds Dial Back on Regulating Higher Ed

    Aug 15 2018

    Changing the way the feds oversee higher education may be helpful, but it's not clearly a win for liberty. Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 3-D Printed Guns and Freedom of Speech

    Aug 14 2018

    Distributing plans for 3-D printed guns and the attempt to restrain that distribution is a clear First Amendment issue. Josh Blackman is an attorney for Defense Distributed, the company currently mired in legal wrangling over gun blueprints. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • As Jones Act Hampers Puerto Rico Recovery, Congress Remains Confused

    Aug 13 2018

    Some in Congress seem mystified that the Jones Act, a law to stifle competition in shipping, is making recovery more difficult for Puerto Rico. Colin Grabow explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Al Qaeda, Yemen, and the U.S./Saudi Relationship

    Aug 10 2018

    If the United States has cut deals with Al Qaeda in the Saudi-led war in Yemen, what does that say about the corrosive nature of the relationship between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia? Sahar Khan and John Glaser comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New Target for Paid Family Leave Boosters: Social Security

    Aug 09 2018

    Proposals to turn Social Security into a bank for families wishing to take time off to care for new kids are flawed along a number of dimensions. Charles Blahous and Vanessa Brown Calder comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Obamacare Now Truly Optional?

    Aug 08 2018

    Several changes to the terms of the Affordable Care Act have enabled more substantial health care choices for millions of Americans. Michael F. Cannon explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Should Investors Pay an Inflation Tax?

    Aug 07 2018

    Congress can protect investors from bad fiscal and monetary policy changes by indexing capital gains taxes to inflation. Why won't they do it? Mattie Duppler of the National Taxpayers Union comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • If You Want to End Mass Incarceration, End the Drug War

    Aug 06 2018

    How do states take their cues from the feds when it comes to drug laws? And how has that driven the massive increase in prison population in the United States? Economist Daniel J. D'Amico comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • TSA Is Spying on Americans with "Quiet Skies" Program

    Aug 03 2018

    "Quiet Skies" monitors American travelers who are on a secret watchlist. Are you on the list? Matthew Feeney discusses the problems with this unwarranted surveillance. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How to #AbolishICE

    Aug 02 2018

    Immigration and Customs Enforcement is an agency that ought to go, but doing so would require removing the authorities granted to the agency by Congress. Alex Nowrasteh explains how best to #AbolishICE. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Even with a $32-Trillion Price Tag, Would 'Medicare for All' Save Money?

    Aug 01 2018

    A new estimate puts the cost of "Medicare for All" at more than $32-trillion over ten years. Charles Blahous says that estimate assumes that the program works according to plan. He and Michael Cannon discuss how it probably wouldn’t go according to plan. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An EU/US Ceasefire in the Trade War? Not Really.

    Jul 31 2018

    An agreement struck between the European Union and the United States over trade is less substantive than fans of free trade would hope. Simon Lester comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • POTUS Threatens Security Clearances & Misconstrues FISA Surveillance

    Jul 30 2018

    The President's threatened removal of security clearances for his public critics is a message to future whistleblowers, according to Patrick Eddington. He also discusses a recently released FISA warrant application. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Continuing Crackdown on Sex Work

    Jul 28 2018

    New federal laws are aimed at making communication more difficult for sex workers. Alice Little is a legal sex worker and sex educator in Nevada. She discusses the worlds of legal and illegal sex work. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New Leadership in Pakistan

    Jul 27 2018

    How will Pakistan's new leadership impact relations with the United States and security in the region? Sahar Khan comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Problem Is What They Know

    Jul 26 2018

    The private sector collects a lot of data about you. What are the implications for liberty when that data inevitably leaks? Charles Fain Lehman is author of a new essay at libertarianism.org, "The Problem Is What They Know."  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • NAACP v. Alabama and Associational Privacy

    Jul 25 2018

    What does a decades-old ruling on the First Amendment tell us about the right of associational privacy today. Bradley Smith of the Institute for Free Speech comments on the ongoing relevance on the 60th anniversary of NAACP v. Alabama. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Academic Renegades for Radical Free Speech

    Jul 23 2018

    At the Voice and Exit Conference in Austin, Thaddeus Russell and Bret Weinstein discussed free speech on campus, why most universities are basically the same, and how those schools must adapt to changing circumstances. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Enduring Allure of College Debt

    Jul 19 2018

    Despite the dramatic rise in college costs relative to the benefits, college debt remains an attractive option for students and their parents. Isaac Morehouse and T.K. Coleman of Praxis discuss why they believe parents and young people still make that big bet on student loans. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Kavanaugh and NSA Surveillance

    Jul 18 2018

    Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's record with respect to warrantless government surveillance of Americans is worthy of scrutiny. Matthew Feeney discusses Klayman v. Obama. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Losing Count: The Empty Case for 'High-Capacity' Magazine Restrictions.

    Jul 17 2018

    Bans or restrictions on so-called "high-capacity" magazines are at best ineffective, and at worst counterproductive. That's according to Matthew LaRosiere, author of "Losing Count: The Empty Case for 'High-Capacity' Magazine Restrictions." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • TrumPutin in Helsinki

    Jul 16 2018

    On a scale of "Tremendous" to "Treasonous," how did the Trump/Putin summit in Helsinki go? Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Next Round of Destructive Trump Tariffs

    Jul 13 2018

    The President is now considering levying additional tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars of Chinese goods, amping up trade-related antagonism. Dan Ikenson discusses the likely fallout for workers, consumers, and downstream producers in the United States. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Kavanaugh’s Record on Executive Power and Surveillance

    Jul 12 2018

    Brett Kavanaugh has extensive experience in federal executive branch matters, either as an investigator or staffer. What does his record show about how he might rule on executive power and federal surveillance if he is elevated to the Supreme Court? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Brett Kavanaugh’s Court Record Doesn’t Show

    Jul 11 2018

    Brett Kavanaugh, the new nominee to the Supreme Court, doesn't have a deep record when it comes to many areas libertarians care about. Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Brett Kavanaugh Nominated to Supreme Court

    Jul 10 2018

    Brett Kavanaugh is Donald Trump's pick to replace Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court. Cato adjunct scholar Andrew Grossman comments on Kavanaugh's record on the DC Circuit. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Does the Federal Government Issue Damaging Dietary Guidelines?

    Jul 10 2018

    Even when the federal government began issuing dietary guidance to Americans, it wasn't clear if the advice was sound. Terence Kealey's new Cato paper is "Why Does the Federal Government Issue Damaging Dietary Guidelines?" See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Feds' Demonization of Dietary Fat

    Jul 09 2018

    Why have the feds strongly encouraged Americans to avoid dietary fat for more than 40 years? Terence Kealey is author of the forthcoming Cato paper, "Why Does the Federal Government Issue Damaging Dietary Guidelines?" See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 'Professional Speech’ before SCOTUS

    Jul 06 2018

    Freedom of speech came before the Supreme Court in multiple ways this term. In National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Becerra, the court's opportunity was to address what crisis pregnancy centers are required to say by law. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Administration Aims to Reduce Legal Immigration

    Jul 05 2018

    Dramatically reducing legal immigration appears to be one of the primary ends of anything the Trump Administration calls reform. David Bier comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Vital Economics Lessons for Kids

    Jul 04 2018

    What are the essential lessons of economics that stick with kids? Connor Boyack has written several books detailing these lessons for children. We spoke at FEECon in Atlanta in June. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Leftist Populism Wins for Mexico's Next President

    Jul 03 2018

    How will the victory of Andrés Manuel López Obrador change relations with the U.S. or Mexico's approach to trade, the drug war, and other issues? Ian Vásquez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Surveillance after Carpenter

    Jul 02 2018

    Since the Supreme Court found recently that cops generally need a warrant to access certain data that gives away your location, how does surveillance change? Patrick Eddington and Matthew Feeney comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Habeas Data: Privacy vs. the Rise of Surveillance Tech

    Jun 30 2018

    In his new book, Habeas Data: Privacy vs. the Rise of Surveillance Tech, Cyrus Farivar details how courts have failed to update privacy protections for the digital age. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Greatest Hits (and Misses) of Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court

    Jun 29 2018

    Anthony Kennedy has a decidedly mixed record on the Supreme Court. Walter Olson and Roger Pilon discuss Kennedy's record as he steps down from the bench. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jones Act: A Burden America Can No Longer Bear

    Jun 28 2018

    The Jones Act was passed in response to worries about U.S. reliance on foreign shipping during World War I. Why is it still on the books, raising prices and damaging U.S. economic performance? Dan Ikenson discusses his new Cato paper on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Janus Case Affirms First Amendment Rights

    Jun 27 2018

    The Supreme Court holds that government "extraction of agency fees from nonconsenting public-sector employees violates the First Amendment" in the case of Janus v. AFSCME. Trevor Burrus comments on the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Should Cryptocurrencies Be Regulated like Securities?

    Jun 27 2018

    The rise of ICOs has raised the question of whether cryptocurrencies are securities. Is the nascent, but valuable technology deserving of that kind of treatment? Diego Zuluaga is author of a new Cato paper on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Supreme Court Finds Rational Basis in Trump Travel Ban

    Jun 26 2018

    The Supreme Court upholds the original Trump travel ban imposing restrictions on would-be immigrants from several majority-Muslim countries. Ilya Shapiro discusses the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Massive Increase in Military Spending

    Jun 26 2018

    How much security are we getting for a more-than $80 billion increase in military spending? Caroline Dorminey examines the new Pentagon budget.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trade War with China Escalates

    Jun 25 2018

    China and the United States continue to trade threats of tariffs. Where does this end? Colin Grabow and Simon Lester comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cops Need a Warrant (Usually) for Your Cell Data

    Jun 22 2018

    If the police want your cell-based location, they'll need to first get a warrant, at least most of the time. Cato's Ilya Shapiro and Julian Sanchez comment on the Supreme Court's decision in Carpenter v. United States. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • SCOTUS and Lucia v. SEC

    Jun 22 2018

    The newly clarified role and status of administrative law judges will drive litigation for years, now that the Supreme Court has weighed in. Walter Olson and Trevor Burrus comment on Lucia v. SEC. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Patriotism’s Nonexistent Heyday

    Jun 21 2018

    American patriotism now seems synonymous with fealty to the state and its military. But did patriotism ever have a moment that wasn't marred by ugly history? Historian Anthony Comegna comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Administration Policy Puts Kids in Cages

    Jun 20 2018

    Various new policies adopted by the Trump Administration have resulted in parents and children being separated at the U.S. border. Alex Nowrasteh discusses the problems created by the changes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • War State, Trauma State (Part Two)

    Jun 19 2018

    If the U.S. military had understood insights from psychology in 2001, the mission in Afghanistan might have been substantially smaller. Erik Goepner is author of the new Cato paper, "War State, Trauma State." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • War State, Trauma State (Part One)

    Jun 18 2018

    The U.S. mission in Afghanistan may have been compromised before it began. Decades of trauma visited upon people in Afghanistan may have left the country a poor candidate for reform. Erik Goepner is author of "War State, Trauma State,” a new Cato Institute paper. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Contracts Clause and Sveen v. Melin

    Jun 15 2018

    A case recently decided at the Supreme Court again chips away at the Contracts Clause in the Constitution. Roger Pilon discusses Sveen v. Melin. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • After the North Korea Summit

    Jun 14 2018

    The recent meeting between leaders of North Korea and the United States may help the Hermit Kingdom engage positively with a broader part of the world. Doug Bandow and Eric Gomez discuss what should come next. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Cost-Benefit Calculation for College

    Jun 13 2018

    Author Zak Slayback says too few young people seriously consider the costs and benefits of college versus other choices. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Florida’s Tone Deaf Rules on Hearing Aids

    Jun 12 2018

    The rules that Florida has imposed governing hearing aid sellers and customers are onerous and in conflict with federal law. Larry Salzman, a senior attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation, discusses a new lawsuit challenging those rules. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump's Bad Trade Economics

    Jun 11 2018

    The confusion over trade that continues to infect the White House has real consequences. Don Boudreaux discusses the latest round of errors following the G-7 talks. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cops (with the Help of Amazon) May Be Watching You

    Jun 07 2018

    Using Amazon's “Rekognition," a video and image analysis program, police in at least two cities have the ability to identify and track many people as they go about their business. Matthew Feeney comments on the implications. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • With Help from Kim Kardashian, Alice Johnson's Sentence Is Commuted

    Jun 06 2018

    Kim Kardashian's advocacy on behalf of Alice Marie Johnson earns a commutation from the President as uncontroversial Congressional legislation to reform prisons appears to be stalled. Molly Gill of FAMM comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Claims Power to Pardon Himself

    Jun 05 2018

    Can the President pardon himself? Donald Trump thinks so. Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Pursuit: Eminent Domain and Civil Forfeiture

    Jun 04 2018

    A new podcast from Libertarianism.org digs into the twin issues of civil forfeiture and eminent domain. Tess Terrible is the host and producer of the show. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • U.S. Allies Will Retaliate over Tariffs

    Jun 01 2018

    U.S. allies are preparing their retaliatory response to new tariffs on aluminum and steel. Colin Grabow and Simon Lester comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Devastated Puerto Rico Must Still Contend with the Jones Act

    May 31 2018

    Puerto Rico still struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria. And yet the Jones Act continues to stymie potential economic progress. Colin Grabow comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Student Loans Balances Explode and Taxpayers Are on the Hook

    May 30 2018

    Student loan balances in the United States recently crossed above $1.5 trillion. Should taxpayers be footing the bill for financing college education? Diego Zuluaga and Neal McCluskey comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • ZTE, Trump Tariffs, and Creeping Cronyism

    May 29 2018

    The special deal President Trump cut for Chinese tech firm ZTE challenges both concerns about national security and free, open trade with few exceptions. Dan Ikenson discusses how we can take security concerns seriously while promoting more free trade. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Overcharged: Why Americans Pay Too Much for Health Care

    May 28 2018

    Overcharged: Why Americans Pay Too Much for Health Care details, among other things, how Medicare fails and why it costs so much. Charles Silver is a coauthor of the book.Conference on June 8, 2018: Overcharged: Why Americans Pay Too Much for Health CareJoin the conversation on Twitter and stay tuned for updates with #OverchargedBook. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist: A True Story of Injustice in the American South

    May 25 2018

    Two medical professionals operated virtually unchecked to put defendants away for long prison terms. Their methods were dubious and their science was bad. Two cases of exoneration are featured in the new book, The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist by Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech

    May 24 2018

    What is the role of universities in defending freedom of speech? Keith Whittington makes his case in Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress

    May 23 2018

    Things are getting better, and The Enlightenment deserves a large amount of the credit. Steven Pinker's new book is Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Elephant in the Brain: Hidden Motives in Everyday Life

    May 22 2018

    We tell ourselves stories about what motivates us to do we do what we do. The reality is far more complicated. Robin Hanson is the coauthor of The Elephant in the Brain: Hidden Motives in Everyday Life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hate: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship

    May 21 2018

    How do well-meaning restrictions on so-called "hate speech" fail? How are the counterproductive? Nadine Strossen makes her case in Hate: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Operation Car Wash and Brazilian Corruption

    May 18 2018

    The corruption revealed in Brazil's Operation Car Wash scandal was widespread, brazen, and seemingly unstoppable. One of the judges who helped bring the scandal to light is Sérgio Moro. Moro was interviewed by Mary Anastasia O’Grady of The Wall Street Journal during the 2018 Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty dinner held in New York this week. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lessons from Europe on Freedom of Speech

    May 17 2018

    Freedom of speech is worth protecting, and Europe is offering the United States lessons in how not to protect it. Jacob Mchangama directs the Danish think tank, Justitia. He spoke at the Cato Institute in April. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Legal Authority Governing Torture Remains Unclear

    May 16 2018

    Questions remain about the White House Office of Legal Counsel and CIA attorneys over the approval of torture programs. Gina Haspel's nomination to head CIA was an opportunity to clear them up. Patrick Eddington makes his case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is There a Sequence for Success?

    May 15 2018

    If you make some specific choices in life, a life of poverty is not in the cards, or so goes the argument. How should we think about the so-called "sequence for success"? Michael D. Tanner comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Amalgamated Handouts in the Farm Bill

    May 14 2018

    The Farm Bill is a collection of handouts unlike any other. It's designed almost entirely to earn majority support for hundreds of billions of dollars in handouts. Chris Edwards comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Your Next Government?: From the Nation State to Stateless Nations

    May 11 2018

    It is becoming easier for many people around the world to make significant choices about the qualities of their government. Tom Bell is author of Your Next Government?: From the Nation State to Stateless Nations. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evidence on Immigration and the Welfare State

    May 10 2018

    Immigrants are still less likely than native born Americans to make use of welfare programs. Alex Nowrasteh details his new report. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How the Endangered Species Act Works (and Doesn’t)

    May 09 2018

    Some small changes to the Endangered Species Act could have a large impact on helping species emerge from the threat of extinction. Jonathan Wood of the Pacific Legal Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • U.S. Violates Iran Nuclear Deal

    May 08 2018

    The United States is leaving the Iran Nuclear Deal by violating its terms. Emma Ashford discusses the uncertainty it will foster in the region. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Are New Teacher Uprisings Justified?

    May 07 2018

    The fights in Oklahoma, Arizona, Kentucky, Colorado, and West Virginia are over money. How justified are the complaints? Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tariffs Not Only Impose Immense Economic Costs but Also Fail to Achieve Their Primary Policy Aims and Foster Political Dysfunction Along the Way

    May 04 2018

    The future of trade policy may be one in which American trading relationships falter as the rest of the world takes its business elsewhere. Scott Lincicome comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • If the Feds Were Serious about Spending Restraint …

    May 03 2018

    What would a credible challenge to ever increasing spending look like? Kurt Couchman, a Vice President at Defense Strategies, has written some of those kinds of plans for lawmakers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Long-Term Fiscal Outlook Worsens

    May 02 2018

    Tax cuts and spending hikes are worsening an already bleak fiscal picture. Ryan Bourne discusses the fragile future for U.S. fiscal policy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cross-Border Pollution As Local Nuisance

    May 01 2018

    Should pollution that crosses state and international borders be subject to nuisance regulation at the local level? Andrew Grossman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reasserting Article I Power on War and Everything Else

    Apr 30 2018

    For at least the last several decades, Congress has handed vast powers to the Executive Branch. Representative Warren Davidson (R-OH) discusses his hopes to get those powers back where they belong. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Putting "American Decline" in Perspective

    Apr 27 2018

    What does "American decline" look like? Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Prelude to Direct Talks with North Korea

    Apr 26 2018

    The "border summit" between North and South Korea sets the stage for direct high-level talks in a few months. Eric Gomez offers his thoughts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lucia v. Securities and Exchange Commission

    Apr 24 2018

    Administrative law judges tend to work in obscurity. In Lucia v. Securities and Exchange Commission, the proper role of these administrators is squarely before the U.S. Supreme Court. Andrew M. Grossman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: It’s Still Unaccountable

    Apr 23 2018

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is still a bureaucracy that is not accountable to Congress, and largely unaccountable to the President. Mick Mulvaney made that point before Congress. Cato's Diego Zuluaga discusses Mulvaney's appearance. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Little Pink House and Kelo

    Apr 21 2018

    The story of Kelo v. City of New London is now in theaters in Little Pink House. Scott Bullock argued the case before the U.S. Supreme Court. Courtney Balaker directed the film, which is now in theaters. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cannabis Prohibition’s Waning Days

    Apr 20 2018

    The President has quietly endorsed an end to federal interference in legal-cannabis states, former U.S. House Speaker John Boehner joins the cannabis industry, and the FDA is seeking input from the public on the plant. Trevor Burrus comments on the accelerating change of cannabis policy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • "Void for Vagueness" Returns in Sessions v. Dimaya

    Apr 19 2018

    When lawmakers hand to judges the power to determine the scope of a law, something has gone wrong. Clark Neily discusses the recently decided case of Sessions v. Dimaya. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Repeal, Don’t Replace, Trump’s War Powers

    Apr 18 2018

    The Constitution is supposed to make it difficult for a President to take the U.S. to war. Why would Congress want to make it easier? Gene Healy and John Glaser comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Extreme Vetting of Immigrants: Estimating Terrorism Vetting Failures

    Apr 17 2018

    In his new Cato Institute paper, David Bier details what works and doesn't in keeping likely terrorists out of the United States.Join the conversation on Twitter and stay tuned for updates with #CatoImmigration. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Bias to Action and Airstrikes on Syria

    Apr 16 2018

    The pull to "do something" about Syria is one that the current President did not resist, despite his warnings for years about the folly of engaging more directly in the Syrian conflict. Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Public Opinion and Counterterrorism Policy

    Apr 13 2018

    Why is the public so fearful about terrorism more than a decade after 9/11? John Mueller is coauthor of a new Cato paper, "Public Opinion and Counterterrorism Policy." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FOSTA and the Federal Seizure of Backpage.com

    Apr 12 2018

    A new law that's supposed to crack down on sex trafficking will likely make sex work less safe and compel internet forums to shut down or spy on their users. Elizabeth Nolan Brown of Reason comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Attorney-Client Privilege, Prosecutorial Accountability, and Overcriminalization

    Apr 11 2018

    The invasion of the relationship between client and attorney is a very big deal indeed, and should be reserved for only the most special cases. Clark Neily comments on the case of the president of the United States and his personal attorney. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checkpoint America: Monitoring The Constitution Free Zone

    Apr 11 2018

    Checkpoint America is a new website launched by the Cato Institute to detail the implications of a "Constitution-free zone" along the U.S. border. Patrick Eddington explains.Join the conversation on Twitter and stay tuned for updates with #CheckpointAmerica. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Congress Whiffs on Curbing Civil Forfeiture

    Apr 10 2018

    When Congress passed that big spending plan, an anticipated reform to civil forfeiture had been curiously abandoned. Darpana Sheth of the Institute for Justice comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • POTUS Lacks Authority to Strike in Syrian Quagmire

    Apr 09 2018

    The President lacks the authority necessary to undertake hostilities in the Syrian conflict. John Glaser explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Robert Mueller's Evidence "Fruit of the Poisonous Tree?"

    Apr 09 2018

    We don't know what evidence Robert Mueller has or how much of it was gathered, but critics of his investigation say much of it is already tainted. David G. Post says that argument is very likely exactly wrong. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Nobody Wins a Trade War

    Apr 06 2018

    Proposed tariffs are the responses that both China and the United States have chosen as the battle lines are being drawn in this trade war. Simon Lester and Inu Manak comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • From Statutes to Regulations to Guidance to Confusion

    Apr 05 2018

    Congressional action often leaves regulatory agencies a wide berth under which to issue rules, but sometimes those rules are less than clear. And the guidance to clarify those rules creates its own problems. Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cops Shoot Woman, SCOTUS Tells Her She May Not Sue

    Apr 04 2018

    The Supreme Court has told a woman that despite being shot by police eight times under questionable circumstances, no civil jury should ever hear her case. Clark Neily comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Cryptocurrency Its Own Asset Class?

    Apr 03 2018

    The "initial coin offering" has taken on the look and feel of an "initial public offering" for equity investors. Are cryptocurrencies equities or commodities? Are they something different entirely? Diego Zuluaga comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cambridge Analytica and the Trump Campaign

    Apr 02 2018

    Will regulation follow the revelations surrounding Cambridge Analytica's acquisition and use of Facebook data? Walter Olson and Julian Sanchez comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Big-Spending, Big-Borrowing Week in Washington

    Mar 31 2018

    Is there any way out of the federal spending binge? Jonathan Bydlak is creator of SpendingTracker.org. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Serious Proposals to Reduce Gun Deaths

    Mar 29 2018

    If lawmakers want to get serious about reducing gun deaths, the War on Drugs and suicide are the best places to start. Trevor Burrus evaluates the proposals from those who march against gun violence. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s Tariffs, Retaliation, and Trade Deficits

    Mar 28 2018

    The number of steel-exporting countries ensnared by the Trump tariffs on steel and aluminum has shrunk. The President also wants to take new action to shrink trade deficits with countries like China. Inu Manak describes the state of play. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New Fed, Same As the Old Fed?

    Mar 27 2018

    The Federal Reserve's new leadership may indicate changes in a few policies. Tate Lacey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • It's Bolton Time

    Mar 24 2018

    John Bolton, an effective communicator of extreme hawkish views, will become the President's new national security advisor. John Glaser and Sahar Khan argue that Bolton articulates views that almost entirely reject serious diplomacy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Awful Consensus in Washington

    Mar 23 2018

    What politicians agree on is more troubling than the partisan rancor, according to syndicated columnist George Will. He spoke at the Cato Institute's January Policy Perspectives in Naples, Florida. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Truth and Perception of Homeschoolers

    Mar 22 2018

    Homeschoolers aren't very ideological. At least, their ideologies vary widely. Author Zak Slayback says politicians should understand that they dismiss or mess with homeschoolers at their political peril. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Government (Sorta) Wants Your Input on Nutrition

    Mar 21 2018

    The feds are taking public comment on nutrition guidelines. Terence Kealey believes the current advice ought to be scrapped. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s Disappointing Approach to Opioids

    Mar 20 2018

    Donald Trump rolled out his approach to handling the opioid problem in the United States: treatment for addicts and execution for drug dealers. Cato's Jeffrey Singer says it's disappointing and almost entirely the wrong approach. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trouble with Paid Family Leave

    Mar 19 2018

    What can we learn from other countries with mandated paid family leave? Why do so many prominent Republicans view the idea as a conservative one? Vanessa Brown Calder comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Massive Numbers of Untested Rape Kits

    Mar 16 2018

    Why do police departments allow rape kits to go untested? Clark Neily comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #CatoConnects: NAFTA and the Trump Tariffs

    Mar 15 2018

    What impact with the Trump tariffs have on renewed negotiations over North American trade policy? Inu Manak and Simon Lester comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Abolition of Slavery and Libertarian Thought

    Mar 14 2018

    What does it mean for historical events to be regarded as victories of modern ideologies? Anthony Comegna comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #Rexit at State Department, Mike Pompeo, and Gina Haspel

    Mar 13 2018

    Mike Pompeo is expected to replace Rex Tillerson at the State Department, and Gina Haspel, a longtime intelligence agent who oversaw black sites for the CIA, may replace Pompeo at CIA. Chris Preble and Emma Ashford comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Risky Business: The Role of Arms Sales in U.S. Foreign Policy

    Mar 13 2018

    In just his first year in office, President Trump signed arms deals at a record pace. What are the costs and benefits of those sales of U.S. weaponry? Caroline Dorminey is author of "Risky Business: The Role of Arms Sales in U.S. Foreign Policy." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump to Meet with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un

    Mar 12 2018

    The White House seems substantially unprepared for a planned meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Doug Bandow and John Glaser comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A ‘Digital Muslim Ban’

    Mar 09 2018

    Did the President enact a "digital Muslim ban” in a now-withdrawn executive order? Rachel Levinson-Waldman and Alvaro Bedoya offer their thoughts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Criminal Immigrants in Texas

    Mar 08 2018

    What does new data in Texas tell us about the propensity of immigrants to commit crimes? Alex Nowrasteh is author of a new Cato Institute policy brief, "Criminal Immigrants in Texas." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Italian Elections Boost Populists

    Mar 07 2018

    The Five Star Movement and Northern League have shaken the political establishment in Italy, and both groups make protection, cultural and economic, a key element of their platforms. Alberto Mingardi comments on the changes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s Tariffs Will Intensify Trade War

    Mar 06 2018

    The Trump tariffs on steel and aluminum will punish American manufacturers and invite retaliation from trading partners. The national security rationale for the tariffs is also pretty flimsy. Dan Ikenson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Putin’s New Deadly Toys

    Mar 05 2018

    How does the announcement of a new breed of Russian nuclear weapons alter the calculus for defending against the nuclear threat? Emma Ashford and Eric Gomez comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Won’t Courts Question Qualified Immunity?

    Mar 02 2018

    Courts are loathe to take cases that might alter or weaken qualified immunity, the legal doctrine that protects police from some of the consequences of serious misconduct. Why? William Baude of the University of Chicago Law School comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Won't Someone Please Think of the Parents?!?

    Mar 01 2018

    Parents enmeshed in the child protective services system often are asked to prove a negative, that they've done nothing wrong, in order to get their children back. Dan Greenberg of Advance Arkansas Institute comments on recent legislative efforts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Case against Qualified Immunity

    Feb 28 2018

    "Qualified immunity" is a doctrine that protects police from misconduct that would send someone without a badge to jail. Clark Neily and Jay Schweikert discuss the controversy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Some Bad Reasons to Love/Hate Bitcoin

    Feb 27 2018

    When fans and detractors of cryptocurrencies talk, they need to understand the economic fundamentals behind what they're saying. Will Luther comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Minnesota Voters Alliance v. Mansky

    Feb 26 2018

    Can the state ban you from wearing any political message at the polling place? Wen Fa is an attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation. We discussed his case before the Supreme Court, Minnesota Voters Alliance v. Mansky. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Clashing over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy

    Feb 23 2018

    Trade plays a huge role in the wealth that Americans enjoy, so why has it been so controversial? Douglas A. Irwin is author of Clashing over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Realizing A Freedom Philosophy

    Feb 22 2018

    The struggle over ideas needs people to tell stories to make real the costs and benefits of putting those ideas into practice. Bob Chitester of the Free to Choose Network has spent decades working on this broad project. We spoke this weekend in Chicago. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Gerrymandered Battle Lines before SCOTUS

    Feb 21 2018

    The Supreme Court faces two cases of partisan gerrymandering this term. Why hasn't Congress dealt with this issue? Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Right to Try Unapproved Drugs and the Prohibition of Truth in Marketing

    Feb 20 2018

    You should be able to try any drug you want to save your own life. And doctors and drug companies should be allowed to converse honestly about potential drug benefits without the fear of jail. Christina Sandefur of the Goldwater Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Free-Range Kids vs. Fretful Mother Magazine

    Feb 19 2018

    How do give our children the autonomy they deserve without fear? Lenore Skenazy has a few ideas. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump and the GOP Congress Spend Big with Your Money

    Feb 16 2018

    Despite some substantial plans to privatize some infrastructure and cut other needless federal spending, the infrastructure and other spending plans by Donald Trump and the GOP Congress are substantial budget busters. Chris Edwards comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #CatoConnects: The Nunes Memo, Surveillance, and Secret Courts

    Feb 15 2018

    Intelligence experts have generally been skeptical of the conclusions of the "Nunes memo," but the fight over this document may do long-term damage to attempts to provide important oversight for the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. Julian Sanchez comments.View full event See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Frederick Douglass: Self-Made Man

    Feb 14 2018

    It's difficult to overestimate what Frederick Douglass overcame to become one of the greatest advocates for liberty in the 19th century. Timothy Sandefur is author of the new Cato book, Frederick Douglass: Self-Made Man. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Republic of Virtue: How We Tried to Ban Corruption, Failed, and What We Can Do about It

    Feb 13 2018

    What can be done to counter public corruption? Frank Buckley is author of The Republic of Virtue: How We Tried to Ban Corruption, Failed, and What We Can Do about It. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Unbelievable Case of McCoy v. Louisiana

    Feb 12 2018

    Is it unconstitutional for defense counsel to concede the defendant's guilt over that defendant's express objection? In McCoy v. Louisiana, the Supreme Court has an opportunity to affirm that a competent defendant may play an important role in his own defense strategy. Jay Schweikert comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lives of the Necromancers

    Feb 10 2018

    Politicians testing the credulity of Americans with outlandish statements is far from unprecedented. Anthony Comegna is editor of the new volume, Lives of the Necromancers by William Godwin. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Tax Bill Didn’t Kill Obamacare

    Feb 09 2018

    Obamacare lives. Sal Nuzzo of the James Madison Institute discusses what that means for states trying to make reforms. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cutting Aid and Cutting Remarks over Pakistan

    Feb 08 2018

    The President's rhetoric and tone don't bode well for getting cooperation from Pakistan, even on shared goals. Sahar Khan comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bad Math on Counterinsurgency

    Feb 06 2018

    Killing insurgents on the battlefield in Iraq and Afghanistan seems to end up giving us more of them. Erik Goepner comments on how that math does and doesn't add up. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Little Nukes, Big Deal

    Feb 05 2018

    Would expanding low-yield nukes in our nuclear arsenal make us safer? Eric Gomez comments on the new nuclear posture review from the Pentagon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fear of Terrorism Drives Anti-Immigrant Push

    Feb 02 2018

    Anti-immigration forces would like you to believe that immigrants pose an outsize risk with respect to terrorism. They don't. Alex Nowrasteh explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Vast Powers of Customs and Border Protection

    Feb 01 2018

    Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is imbued with vast powers, and evidence shows those powers are used without many of the checks that exist in other federal agencies. Alex Nowrasteh and Matthew Feeney comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Big-Spending, Flag-Waving State of the Union

    Jan 31 2018

    The State of the Union is a tradition that probably ought to go, but this one had the big spending plans Americans have come to expect. Cato's John Glaser, Chris Edwards, and Neal McCluskey comment on the substantive policy proposals. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New and Old Tech of Border Surveillance

    Jan 31 2018

    Technology to intercept illegal immigrants can also be used to hassle American citizens. Much of the new technology doesn't work as well as advertised. Meanwhile, the logistical problems with building a massive border wall have barely begun. Matthew Feeney and David Bier comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New National ID Systems

    Jan 30 2018

    A world where authorities no longer have to even ask for ID is a scary one, especially if you have no recourse in how that massive collection of data gets used. Jim Harper is author of "The New National ID Systems." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Immigration Plan Would Dramatically Reduce Legal Immigration

    Jan 30 2018

    The draconian restrictions on legal immigrants proposed by the Trump White House would exclude nearly 22 million people from the opportunity to immigrate legally to the United States over the next five decades. David Bier comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Puncturing Persistent Myths about Immigrant Crime

    Jan 29 2018

    If you're worried about crime, worry more about the criminality of your fellow Americans and less about the criminality of immigrants. Alex Nowrasteh discusses the data on immigrants and crime. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Who Pays the Price When You Don’t Get A Speedy Trial? You Do

    Jan 26 2018

    Why don't prosecutors and judges pay a price when the right to a speedy trial is violated? Clark Neily comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The 2017 Human Freedom Index

    Jan 25 2018

    "The Human Freedom Index” presents the state of human freedom in the world based on a broad measure that encompasses personal, civil, and economic freedom. It is co-published by the Cato Institute, the Fraser Institute, and the Liberales Institut at the Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom. Ian Vasquez is the report's co-author. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • That Memo, the Deep State, and the FISA Court

    Jan 24 2018

    An as-yet-undisclosed memo circulating in the House of Representatives promises to challenge the credibility of some elements in the FBI, but if the claims it contains are substantial, it may pose challenges for the secretive FISA court. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • This Year 'Big Content' Likely Won't Push to Extend Copyright

    Jan 24 2018

    Without action by Congress, a whole class of copyrighted works will fall into the public domain next year. And yet, Big Content isn't fighting to stop it. Timothy B. Lee of Ars Technica discusses why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Not to Subsidize Renewable Energy

    Jan 23 2018

    The renewable portfolio standard is meant to encourage the production of renewable energy in states. One side effect is higher energy costs for low-income people according to Dave Stevenson of the Cesar Rodney Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Public Benefit of Private Schooling

    Jan 22 2018

    What is the impact of private schooling in countries' quality of public schooling? Corey DeAngelis is author of "The Public Benefit of Private Schooling." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #CatoConnects: The Feds’ Retrograde War on Pot

    Jan 19 2018

    With more discretion given to U.S. Attorneys to enforce federal marijuana laws, what effects will it have on states that have legalized? Trevor Burrus discussed various elements of cannabis prohibition on #CatoConnects. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Opioid Crisis Is Really a Heroin Crisis

    Jan 18 2018

    Clearly understanding what’s driving the rise in drug overdoses is critical if we want to craft a credible policy response. Jeff Singer is author of the forthcoming Cato paper, "Abuse-Deterrent Opioids and the Law of Unintended Consequences." We spoke at the Cato Institute's State Health Policy Summit. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Campus Speech and the Libertarian Student Movement

    Jan 17 2018

    Do libertarians misunderstand the opponents of free speech on campus? Wolf von Laer is President of Students for Liberty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Antics of State Legislatures

    Jan 16 2018

    How do state legislatures obfuscate, trick, and leave the public in the dark? Jack McHugh watches state legislatures for the Mackinac Center. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

    Jan 15 2018

    What role did governments play in the segregating of America? Richard Rothstein describes the explicit policies that separated black and white America in The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Regulators Are Coming for Bitcoin

    Jan 13 2018

    As cryptocurrencies hit new highs, is federal regulation far behind? And if it is, can regulators really do anything to crack down on these decentralized networks? Jerry Brito of Coin Center offers an analysis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Still Waiting for Spending Cuts

    Jan 12 2018

    Republicans' desire to cut spending is sharp as a knife when they're in the minority. But facts don't do what they want them to now that the GOP runs Congress. Jonathan Bydlak of the Coalition to Reduce Spending discusses prime spending cuts their prospects in 2018. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New Changes May Ease Medicaid Costs for States

    Jan 11 2018

    States attempting to grapple with the costs of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act may welcome new changes to Medicaid. Rea Hederman of the Buckeye Institute offers his thoughts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Salvadoran Refugees Get the Trump Boot

    Jan 10 2018

    What does the end of "temporary protected status" for Salvadoran refugees mean for those families? Are they of any particular risk to Americans? Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New Signs of a Waning War on Cannabis

    Jan 09 2018

    A notorious outlaw industrial-scale marijuana farmer is about to get a fairly light sentence for his activities as U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions shows himself to be a somewhat toothless pot warrior. Jim Higdon is author of The Cornbread Mafia. He discusses the numerous signs pointing to the approaching end of marijuana prohibition. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fed Policymaker Musical Chairs in 2018

    Jan 08 2018

    The Federal Reserve policymaking body will change considerably this year. Tate Lacey comments on what that means and what it should mean for the unwinding of the Fed balance sheet. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • ‘Swatting’ and Police Accountability

    Jan 05 2018

    How can the public send a clear message to police that they, and not malicious tipsters, are ultimately responsible when cops kill innocent people? Clark Neily comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • American Foreign Policy in 2018

    Jan 04 2018

    As world leaders debate the relative size of their red buttons, what role should the U.S. play in skirmishes around the globe? Christopher A. Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Prime (Spending) Cuts Congress Should Put on the Chopping Block

    Jan 02 2018

    Tax reform is done. But without any Democratic support, bipartisan spending cuts may be a bridge too far. Chris Edwards says there are many spending cuts that could get bipartisan support. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cardiac Arrest: Five Heart-Stopping Years as a CEO on the Feds' Hit-List

    Dec 30 2017

    When the feds thought Vascular Solutions would be a good target for a fraud investigation, CEO Howard Root thought it was merely a shakedown. He was wrong. Howard Root is author of Cardiac Arrest: Five Heart-Stopping Years as a CEO on the Feds' Hit-List. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Inside Private Prisons

    Dec 29 2017

    What incentives govern private prisons? Are they fundamentally different from state-run facilities? Do private prison operators or the unions that represent prison workers hold undue sway over policymakers? Lauren-Brooke Eisen is author of Inside Private Prisons. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Look at Financial Reform in 2018

    Dec 28 2017

    Will elements of Dodd Frank and the Patriot Act that burden banks go away in 2018? Bert Ely discusses elements of financial regulation that might get changed. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Judicial Nomination Fights Blaze on

    Dec 27 2017

    You might hold higher hopes that the worst days are gone in the fight over judicial nominations. Ilya Shapiro says they may be poised to get more rancorous and bitter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Two Killings by Police, Strikingly Different Results

    Dec 26 2017

    The police killings of Walter Scott and Daniel Shaver provide more reason to change how laws punish bad and incompetent cops. Clark Neily comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In Trying Times, Take Lessons from the Stoics

    Dec 25 2017

    Author Ryan Holiday says it's no surprise that stoicism has a resurgence when times are tough. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Disney, Streaming, and Long Copyright

    Dec 23 2017

    Disney's vast catalog is about to expand with the acquisition of the assets of 20th Century Fox. How do decades-long copyright terms affect streaming companies' business models? Peter Van Doren discusses Disney's move. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Fate of Obamacare in 2018

    Dec 22 2017

    The Affordable Care Act's individual mandate will be zeroed out in 2019 when some provisions of the tax bill take effect. What is the likely fallout? Michael Cannon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • NSA, North Korea, and the WannaCry Attack

    Dec 21 2017

    An exploit known to the NSA was likely used by North Korean hackers to disrupt thousands of computer systems globally. Julian Sanchez discusses the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Toward a More Robust Tax Reform

    Dec 20 2017

    Ike Brannon describes the tax reform that didn't happen, but should have. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump on National Security Strategy

    Dec 19 2017

    How valuable are national security documents? And speeches about those documents? Trevor Thrall comments on the latest presidential speech on national security. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tax Cuts (Not Spending Cuts) Are on the Way

    Dec 19 2017

    The centerpiece of the Republican tax reform plan is a substantial cut in the corporate tax rate. Spending cuts will apparently have to wait. Chris Edwards comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Federal Reserve’s Unresolved Questions

    Dec 16 2017

    With the Federal Reserve likely to raise interest rates at this week’s FOMC meeting, another step will be have been taken in the Fed’s “Normalization” plan. The Fed will, however, enter 2018 facing many more issues. Tate Lacey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Peril and Promise in Facial Recognition Technology

    Dec 15 2017

    How governments and corporations make use of your face will grow in importance in the coming years. Protections for your privacy are currently hard to come by. Clare Garvie of the Georgetown Law Center on Privacy and Technology comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement

    Dec 14 2017

    How is policing being changed by new technology? Andrew G. Ferguson is author of The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Protecting the Prairie Dog and Federal Overreach

    Dec 13 2017

    Protecting species is often a complicated task. It doesn't help when the feds overreach. Reed Watson of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Liberating Telemedicine

    Dec 12 2017

    Many hurdles remain in place for innovation in the sphere of telemedicine. Shirley Svorny offers her thoughts in a new Cato paper, "Liberating Telemedicine: Options to Eliminate the State-Licensing Roadblock." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Finally, An Audit for the Pentagon

    Dec 11 2017

    Whatever turns up in a planned audit for the Pentagon won't address a larger problem: The U.S. military does too much in too many places. Still, it’s a good idea. Chris Preble discusses what an audit might reveal. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Proposed Ban on ‘Bump Stocks’ and State Reciprocity for Gun Permits

    Dec 08 2017

    A ban on so-called "bump stocks" earned a surprise endorsement from some Republicans. As Congress considers a bump stock ban and the creation of state reciprocity of gun permits, Dave Kopel offers his thoughts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Oral Argument in the Case of Masterpiece Cakeshop

    Dec 07 2017

    The arguments are varied in the case of the Masterpiece Cakeshop baker who refused a commission from a gay couple. What did the oral argument reveal? Ilya Shapiro comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will Tax Reform End the Individual Mandate?

    Dec 06 2017

    One casualty of tax reform may be the mandate that hides the costs of Obamacare. Michael F. Cannon discusses the change. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Police Snooping and Collins v. Virginia

    Dec 05 2017

    In Collins v. Virginia, the Supreme Court has an opportunity to reaffirm that your home is truly your castle. Jay Schweikert discusses the Cato Institute’s brief in the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Assessing the North Korea Threat

    Dec 04 2017

    Is North Korea ready to talk? Is the United States? Cato Senior Fellow Doug Bandow comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Flynn Plea

    Dec 02 2017

    What does it mean to be a "cooperating witness" in an FBI investigation, especially one looking into potential collusion between a campaign and the Russian government? Michael Flynn is finding that out. Clark Neily comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Proper Response to Russian Election Meddling

    Dec 01 2017

    What's the best way to handle the continuing attempts by foreign governments to destabilize American institutions with social media and mere advertising? Flemming Rose discusses the importance of not taking the wrong lessons. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trump Foreign Policy a Year Later

    Nov 30 2017

    A year later, what does the Donald Trump foreign policy look like? Cato's Sahar Khan and John Glaser comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Continuing Fight over the Throne at CFPB

    Nov 29 2017

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is less accountable than most federal agencies by design. That's in part why outgoing director Richard Cordray felt perfectly comfortable naming his own replacement. Thaya Brook Knight discusses the fight. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Water Rights, Water Fights in the American West

    Nov 28 2017

    In the American west, if you don't use your water rights, you can lose them. That's not a great plan for conserving water. Reed Watson of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Eliminate the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit

    Nov 27 2017

    The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit is a subsidy to developers, and it's a credit that creates many opportunities for mischief. Chris Edwards and Vanessa Brown Calder discuss their new report on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Narrow Path of Fixing Health Insurance and Complying with Obamacare

    Nov 24 2017

    Complying with Obamacare while innovating in health coverage is a difficult task, according Rea Hederman of the Buckeye Institute. We spoke at the State Policy Network annual meeting in San Antonio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Rent Was Too Damn High (1830s Edition)

    Nov 23 2017

    How did selective grants of corporate power culminate in a war on rent in New York in the 1830s and 1840s? Cato's Anthony Comegna explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • China’s Economic Slowdown and Institutional Change

    Nov 22 2017

    Economist Charles Calomiris examines the relative strength of the Chinese economy in light of the country's economic slowdown, capital controls, and continued broad central planning. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New State of Occupational Licensing

    Nov 21 2017

    Occupational licensing represents a potentially serious impediment to economic progress, and yet eliminating licenses is a long, laborious process. Lisa Knepper and Jennifer McDonald of the Institute for Justice discuss their License to Work report. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New Attempts to Restrict Bitcoin

    Nov 20 2017

    Bitcoin's turbulent times have been driven in part by technical considerations and government attempts to crack down on the cryptocurrency. Will Luther, a professor of economics at Kenyon College, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Demographics and Monetary Policy

    Nov 17 2017

    How do demographic trends interact with monetary policy? Would a change in the Fed's mandate change how the agency looks at demographics? Loretta J. Mester, President of the Cleveland Fed, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • With Cordray’s Departure, Can CFPB Be Scrapped?

    Nov 16 2017

    Richard Cordray will leave his post as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Does this mean the agency can finally be scrapped? Thaya Brook Knight comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #CatoConnects: The Science of Nutrition and Public Choice

    Nov 15 2017

    Are governments institutionally incapable of giving accurate nutrition advice? Cato Visiting Senior Fellow Dr. Terence Kealey is author of Breakfast is a Dangerous Meal. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Higher Education and Tax Reform

    Nov 14 2017

    How will elimination of education-related deductions and other tax changes affect higher education? Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Airlines Compete and How They’re Regulated

    Nov 13 2017

    Government control over air travel is still onerous, and that can limit both choice and the safety of travel. Gary Leff of the Mercatus Center and the blog View from the Wing discusses the latest fight over air travel. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evaluating Changes at the Federal Reserve

    Nov 11 2017

    Tate Lacey discusses the changes that are coming to the Federal Reserve. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Education Savings Accounts and Customized Education

    Nov 10 2017

    How do education savings accounts (ESAs) work? Jonathan Butcher of the Goldwater Institute and the Heritage Foundation discussed their merits at the State Policy Network Annual Meeting in San Antonio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What’s the Matter with Kansas (on Taxes and Spending)?

    Nov 09 2017

    When Kansas cut taxes and raised spending, state lawmakers make a serious (and obvious) error. Dave Trabert of the Kansas Policy Institute offers his thoughts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • POTUS’s Saudi Friends Shake up Government

    Nov 08 2017

    Donald Trump has alienated the leaders of many governments, but Saudi Arabia's leaders are not among them. Now, the Saudis are making radical changes in governance, economics, and traditions. Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Real Impact of Money on Elections

    Nov 07 2017

    There's too much money in politics, or so goes the chestnut. Economist Jeff Milyo offers some perspective. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Assessing Misconduct among Border Patrol Agents

    Nov 02 2017

    The data on misconduct and corruption among border patrol agents is especially murky, but we have some evidence available to us. Alex Nowrasteh is author of "Border Patrol Termination Rates," a new policy analysis from the Cato Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Asserting Liberty and the Power of 'No'

    Nov 01 2017

    In the long history of the ebb and flow of liberty, some examples stand out. Jim Otteson of Wake Forest University offered a few of those examples at Cato Club 200. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Architect of Prosperity: Sir John Cowperthwaite and the Making of Hong Kong

    Oct 31 2017

    How did Hong Kong rise to prominence as a hub of global commerce? Neil Monnery is author of Architect of Prosperity: Sir John Cowperthwaite and the Making of Hong Kong. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pay to Play on Public Lands

    Oct 30 2017

    Should you be subsidizing hikers and cyclists on public lands? Holly Fretwell of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Conservatism on the Rocks

    Oct 27 2017

    Conservatism has seen better days. Jeff Flake, Republican U.S. Senator from Arizona, discussed what he sees as problems in the conservative movement at Cato Club 200 in Laguna Beach, California. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unions vs. Home Health Care Workers in Pennsylvania

    Oct 26 2017

    Home health care workers in Pennsylvania are struggling to stay out of unions. David Osborne of the Fairness Center discusses his case to keep unions out of Pennsylvania homes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Guns, Cars, and Regulation

    Oct 25 2017

    Treating guns like cars might not end up with the kind of regulation that gun prohibitionists want. But thinking about guns like we think about cars might get us to a more productive conversation. Trevor Burrus comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Elections, Independence, and European Populism

    Oct 24 2017

    European populism is on the march, but it's less clear how sustainable the various movements are. Alberto Mingardi of the Istituto Bruno Leoni provides some perspective. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Case for Protecting Commercial Speech

    Oct 23 2017

    Should commercial speech receive diminished First Amendment protection? Martin Redish of Northwestern Law School made his case at the Cato Institute's conference on the First Amendment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Art of Being Free: How Alexis de Tocqueville Can Save Us from Ourselves

    Oct 20 2017

    What does Alexis de Tocqueville have to offer Americans today? James Poulos explains in his new book, The Art of Being Free: How Alexis de Tocqueville Can Save Us from Ourselves. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Local Zoning vs. State Economies

    Oct 19 2017

    Zoning mostly done at the local level, but should states take charge of the process in the name of economic efficiency? Emily Hamilton of the Mercatus Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Zoning, Land-Use Planning, and Housing Affordability

    Oct 18 2017

    Do federal housing subsidies end up subsidizing restrictive zoning at the local level? And how does zoning drive housing costs? Vanessa Brown Calder examines the relationship in a new Cato Policy Analysis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Examining the Ideological Divide over Free Speech

    Oct 17 2017

    What are the areas of agreement across the ideological spectrum when it comes to freedom of speech? Robert Bauer, White House counsel under Barack Obama, makes his case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Endless Distraction vs. Living the Good Life

    Oct 16 2017

    In a world of endless distraction, it's easy to avoid conscious growth. And, in a world of endless distraction, it's more important than ever to control ourselves. At Cato’s 40th anniversary celebration, Charles Murray discussed the good life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Continuing Challenge to Individual Rights on Campus

    Oct 13 2017

    2012 felt like a better year for individual rights on college campuses, according to Greg Lukianoff of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. Then things got much, much worse. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Bad New Days of Occupational Licensing

    Oct 12 2017

    States need a comprehensive way to judge which occupational licenses are justified and which aren't. Jarrett Skorup of the Mackinac Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Make a Federal Case out of College Sports?

    Oct 11 2017

    Why is the FBI involved in investigating college sports recruiting scandals? Ilya Shapiro comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Made the 1986 Tax Reform Happen?

    Oct 10 2017

    The last major tax reform was 30 years ago. How did it happen? Cato Institute Vice President John Samples comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Protecting Extremist Speech, Regulating ‘Fake News’

    Oct 09 2017

    Drawing a legal line around what might constitute "extremist" speech for the purpose of regulation or prohibition is virtually impossible. The same goes for "fake news." Flemming Rose comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Shredding Iran Nuclear Deal Is an Unforced Error

    Oct 06 2017

    Whatever you think of the Iran Nuclear Deal, the alternatives are worse. That’s according John Glaser and Emma Ashford, authors of the new Cato paper, "Unforced Error: The Risks of Confrontation with Iran." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Mandatory Union Fees Return to the Supreme Court

    Oct 05 2017

    How free should unions be to take fees from workers? When do those fees violate the First Amendment? Attorney Jacob Huebert discusses Janus v. AFSCME, which will soon go before the U.S. Supreme Court. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Assessing the New GOP Tax Plan

    Oct 04 2017

    Chris Edwards discusses the tax plan now circulating in Congress. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why the U.S. Should Welcome China’s Economic Leadership

    Oct 03 2017

    Colin Grabow is author of "Responsible Stakeholders: Why the United States Should Welcome China’s Economic Leadership." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Revises Travel Ban, Rejects More Refugees

    Oct 02 2017

    A new draft of Donald Trump's travel ban may be the most confusing yet. At the same time, the U.S. will take far fewer refugees than in years past. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Status Report on Renegotiating NAFTA

    Sep 30 2017

    Where does the desired renegotiation of NAFTA now stand? Inu Manak discusses the costs and benefits of reopening the massive trade deal. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • CFPB and the Equifax Breach

    Sep 29 2017

    Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter discusses the "unconstitutional structure" of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and possible litigation against Equifax. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An Afghanistan Strategy with No Measure of Success

    Sep 28 2017

    What would it mean for the war in Afghanistan to show improvement? Without metrics, it's hard to say. Chris Preble discusses why the war sits in a holding pattern. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Challenging a Powerful Exception to the Fourth Amendment

    Sep 27 2017

    When Customs and Border Patrol search your computer, what rights do you retain? Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A New Party in the Bundestag

    Sep 26 2017

    Marian Tupy comments on this week's German elections. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Failing Argument for Mandatory Minimums

    Sep 25 2017

    New research indicates that the role of mandatory minimums in reducing crime has been smaller than proponents would have you believe. Kevin Ring of Families Against Mandatory Minimums comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does Public Radio Have a Diversity Problem?

    Sep 23 2017

    Does public radio have a diversity problem? Jon Caldara, president of Colorado's Independence Institute, believes it does. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Next State to Adopt Scholarship Tax Credits Is …

    Sep 22 2017

    What's the record for scholarship tax credits and other school choice programs so far? Jason Bedrick of EdChoice discusses the most recent changes. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Big Government Crowds out Voluntary Disaster Relief

    Sep 21 2017

    How do the feds crowd out disaster relief from friends, neighbors, industry, and even other states? Chris Edwards comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Freedom of Religion vs. the War on Drugs

    Sep 20 2017

    Courts should defer to groups that want to use drugs in their religious practice. Eric Sterling of The Criminal Justice Policy Foundation provides a brief history of drug laws versus religious liberty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Americans Distrust Wall Street and Its Regulators

    Sep 19 2017

    Americans don't trust either financial firms associated with Wall Street or the regulators who are trying to control financial firms' activities. Thaya Brook Knight and Emily Ekins discuss the findings of a new Cato Institute survey. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • ‘Medicare for Some’ Isn’t Exactly Great

    Sep 18 2017

    It's not even clear that "Medicare for Some" is a good idea, let alone "Medicare for All.” Michael F. Cannon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Fiscal Pitch for State-Level Criminal Justice Reform

    Sep 15 2017

    The cost to public safety of reducing spending on criminal justice programs can be effectively zero. That's according to Sal Nuzzo of the James Madison Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why September 14, 2001 Matters

    Sep 14 2017

    After 16 years of war, it's time to reckon with the less-appreciated anniversary of September 14, 2001, when Congress gave the President a relatively open-ended power to make war. Gene Healy explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How States Should Respond to Opioid Crisis

    Sep 13 2017

    Is heavy-handed punishment a particularly good way to handle the opioid crisis? I spoke with Greg Newburn of Families Against Mandatory Minimums at the State Policy Network Annual Meeting in San Antonio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Other Monuments Problem

    Sep 12 2017

    The naming of national monuments creates a few underappreciated problems. Hannah Downey of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Market Anarchy in Utah (You Know, for Kids!)

    Sep 08 2017

    Utah has removed many of the pointless licensing requirements for businesses operated by minors. Connor Boyack of the Libertas Institute discusses the importance of giving kids a taste of truly free enterprise. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Resolving the Tullock Paradox

    Sep 07 2017

    Why is there so little rent seeking? Is rent seeking itself still misunderstood? Matthew Mitchell of the Mercatus Center discussed the issue at FEECon in June. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Fraught Case for Exiting the Iran Nuclear Deal

    Sep 06 2017

    United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley’s public pitch explaining the problems of the Iran nuclear deal spent precious little energy discussing what happens if the U.S. exits the deal. Emma Ashford evaluates the arguments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Will ‘Wind Down’ DACA

    Sep 05 2017

    The White House will end President Obama's Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals (DACA), but Jeff Sessions' defense of ending DACA on policy grounds misunderstands immigration almost entirely. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Coming Debt Fight

    Sep 01 2017

    Choosing the size of the national debt is a fight worth having. So why doesn't anyone want to have it? Michael Tanner comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Debt against the Living

    Sep 01 2017

    Ilan Wurman is author of A Debt against the Living. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Carpenter v. United States

    Aug 31 2017

    The Supreme Court has an opportunity to change how governments may track Americans. Jim Harper comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Moves to Accelerate Militarization of Cops

    Aug 29 2017

    The Obama White House narrowed the scope of military gear that could be distributed to local police forces. The Trump White House has undone those small restrictions. Clark Neily and Adam Bates discuss the change. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Balanced Threat Assessment of China’s South China Sea Policy

    Aug 28 2017

    What does the U.S. gain by risking war in the South China Sea? Not much, according to "A Balanced Threat Assessment of China’s South China Sea Policy," a new Cato Institute paper. John Glaser and Eric Gomez comment on the dispute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • End Pot (Research) Prohibition

    Aug 26 2017

    Marijuana is legal to consume in a handful of states. So why is researching marijuana virtually impossible? Trevor Burrus discusses the federal role in prohibiting pot research. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Paradox of Tolerance

    Aug 25 2017

    How do we tolerate intolerance? Jason Kuznicki comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Debasing Monuments to the Confederacy

    Aug 24 2017

    Should monuments to the Confederacy be removed or merely reframed? And where should that line of thinking stop? Walter Olson offers a few ideas. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump on Afghanistan: ‘No Nationbuilding’ in Name Only

    Aug 23 2017

    The Afghanistan strategy laid out by Donald Trump looks a lot like one that previous battlefield commanders have suggested is sorely wanting. Trevor Thrall and Erik Goepner comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Doomed to Repeat It: The Long History of America’s Protectionist Failures

    Aug 22 2017

    The successes of protectionism are grossly exaggerated. Scott Lincicome discusses his new paper, "Doomed to Repeat It: The Long History of America’s Protectionist Failures." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Neo-Nazis to One Side, Antifa to the Other

    Aug 19 2017

    A full-throated rejection of Nazism in its various forms doesn't compel anyone to ally with the strongly anti-liberal elements of the Antifa movement. Daniel McCarthy of The American Conservative discusses the sad events in Charlottesville. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • China Spells out Its (Limited) Commitments to North Korea

    Aug 18 2017

    China has presented to the U.S. and North Korea its perceived commitments if the two countries decide to tangle. Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evaluating the Practical War Power of Presidents

    Aug 17 2017

    What powers are granted to the President to make war? What are the costs and benefits of constraining it further? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • School Choice, Public Schools, and Bigotry

    Aug 16 2017

    The new attack on school choice appears to be claiming that proponents are bigoted in some way, or at least the roots of school choice arose from racist impulses. Neal McCluskey evaluates the bold claim. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Preserving the Iran Nuclear Deal: Perils and Prospects

    Aug 15 2017

    Since he started his bid for office, President Donald Trump has been a forceful detractor of the Iran nuclear deal, repeatedly vowing to dismantle it. But the nuclear deal affords the United States a number of opportunities. Ariane Tabatabai is author of "Preserving the Iran Nuclear Deal: Perils and Prospects." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Chicago Sues Feds over Immigration Mandates

    Aug 12 2017

    Chicago is suing the federal government over the withholding of funds if the city doesn't obey federal dictates on immigration. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Soul of the First Amendment

    Aug 11 2017

    What are the emerging threats to the rights enshrined by the First Amendment? Floyd Abrams' new book is The Soul of the First Amendment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The High Cost of Turning Local Cops into Immigration Cops

    Aug 10 2017

    The 287(g) program allows local cops to become deputy federal law enforcers for immigration and the Trump Administration is working to expand it. The program's effectiveness so far is less than stellar. Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Must E-Verify Go National?

    Aug 09 2017

    The flawed E-Verify program is voluntary so far, but making the program mandatory would balloon the technical errors and due process problems while threatening to throw millions of Americans out of work. David Bier makes the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Understanding the Opioid Crisis

    Aug 08 2017

    Some misconceptions persist around opioids, addiction, and chemical dependence. Jeffrey Singer comments on the opioid crisis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Applied Mainline Economics

    Aug 07 2017

    In Applied Mainline Economics, authors Peter J. Boettke and Matthew D. Mitchell provide some thoughts of particular use to the young economist. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Confirmation Bias and Democracy in Chains

    Aug 04 2017

    Why didn't Nancy MacLean speak with the scholars most familiar with the work of Nobel laureate James Buchanan when she wrote Democracy in Chains? Steve Horwitz comments on what he sees as errors in the book. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Second Amendment Victory in D.C.

    Aug 03 2017

    A federal court has thrown out a District of Columbia requirement for carrying a gun. What does that mean for the rights of District residents going forward? Alan Gura comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Ranking the States by Fiscal Condition

    Aug 02 2017

    The economic recovery is now showing up in state budgets, but massive threats still loom for state budgets. Chief among those threats is the pressure of state pensions. Eileen Norcross of the Mercatus Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Bipartisan Giveaway: The Low Income Housing Tax Credit

    Aug 01 2017

    The Low Income Housing Tax Credit is supposed to help low-income people secure housing, so why give the benefits directly to developers? Vanessa Brown Calder explains why it should go away. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Dictatorship on Schedule in Venezuela

    Jul 31 2017

    How should the U.S. respond to the arrival of true dictatorship in Venezuela? Juan Carlos Hidalgo comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Push and Pull of Innovation and Regulation

    Jul 29 2017

    Regulators sometimes have a hard time keeping up with innovation, and that poses problems for consumers and the broader public. Virginia Postrel of Bloomberg comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Should Regulators #BreakUpAmazon?

    Jul 28 2017

    Is Amazon a monopoly? And if so, should regulators begin the process of separating the massive retailer's operations? Walter Olson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How to End Warrantless Surveillance

    Jul 27 2017

    How can we end the federal government's warrantless snooping on Americans? Senators Ron Wyden and Rand Paul talk to Cato's Patrick Eddington. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Unserious 25th Amendment Solution

    Jul 26 2017

    A member of the U.S. House wants to have the President's head examined. It's far from an ideal response to an erratic chief executive. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Don’t Stop Impeachin’

    Jul 25 2017

    Impeachment isn't a dirty word. Gene Healy explains why Congress should consider it more often. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jeff Sessions Expands Civil Forfeiture

    Jul 24 2017

    The Attorney General has expanded the abuse of due process known as civil forfeiture. Clark Neily explains how the process harms low income and disenfranchised people. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Democracy in Chains and Methods of History

    Jul 22 2017

    Who inspired the young James Buchanan decades before he received a Nobel Prize? Nancy MacLean presents a few ideas in her book, Democracy in Chains. Economic historian Phil Magness believes her bold claims need some scrutiny. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Too Many Cooks in the Regulatory Kitchen

    Jul 21 2017

    The costs and benefits of regulations need more scrutiny and lawmakers should understand clearly that regulations aren't costless. Thaya Brook Knight comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Privatization for the Sake of Better Management

    Jul 20 2017

    The biggest reason to privatize much of the federal government is that the feds just don't manage those resources very well. Chris Edwards makes the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reforming the National Flood Insurance Program

    Jul 19 2017

    Federal flood insurance is effectively a subsidy to wealthy coastal homeowners. Ike Brannon believes it should be scrapped. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Medicalization of Psychedelics

    Jul 18 2017

    The drug MDMA - also known as ecstasy - is now entering Phase III trials as part of the FDA approval process for use as a treatment. How did we get here? Mike Riggs of Reason tells the story. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Drug Violence and Populism in Mexico

    Jul 17 2017

    Prohibition-related drug violence in Mexico may be fueling a growing populism. Ian Vasquez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Senate’s New Health Care Measure Is (Still) Fatally Flawed

    Jul 14 2017

    The Senate's new measure aimed at repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act still has deep flaws. Michael Cannon makes the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Can’t Stop Global Trade

    Jul 13 2017

    An emerging trade agreement between the European Union and Japan shows that Donald Trump's pronouncements on trade won't stop the rest of the world from lowering trade barriers. Simon Lester explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Henry David Thoreau at 200

    Jul 12 2017

    How important is Henry David Thoreau as a libertarian? And how important is he in American history? Anthony Comegna comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How the FDA Regulates (and Doesn’t Regulate) Supplements

    Jul 11 2017

    The manner in which the FDA regulates supplements leaves much to be desired and leaves customers perhaps too trusting. So says Peter Van Doren. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Stepping Back from the Failed War on Terror

    Jul 10 2017

    What price did the U.S. pay for a massive decade-long (and still ongoing) war on terrorism? Was it worth it? Trevor Thrall makes his case in his new report, "Step Back: Lessons for U.S. Foreign Policy from the Failed War on Terror." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Restarting Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC)

    Jul 08 2017

    Modernizing the military means closing extraneous bases. Christopher A. Preble discusses an effort to get that process started. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Democracy in Chains versus Public Choice

    Jul 07 2017

    The new book Democracy in Chains paints Nobel Laureate and Cato Distinguished Senior Fellow James Buchanan as the scholar who would help bring down democracy using the methods of public choice. Michael Munger of Duke University comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Overreaction Works in North Korea’s Favor

    Jul 06 2017

    North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un tested missiles on July 4th. Doug Bandow discusses what ought to be next steps for the United States. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Is Dark Money?

    Jul 05 2017

    Luke Wachob of the Center for Competitive Politics argues that the misnomer of "dark money" is hardly the scourge it's made out to be. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Do Libertarians Exist?

    Jul 04 2017

    How do we measure the number of libertarians? Why do those measures vary so widely? Emily Ekins offers some caution. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Canada, the U.S., and the 19th Century’s Fuzzy Borders

    Jul 03 2017

    What kind of libertarian are you? Anthony Comegna provides a history lesson that might help puzzle it out. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Weak Defense of Property Rights at the Supreme Court

    Jul 01 2017

    The Supreme Court's Murr decision may leave many future property owners in the lurch when local and state governments decide to change laws governing property. Roger Pilon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Was Trinity Lutheran a Big Win for School Choice?

    Jun 30 2017

    Neal McCluskey and Ilya Shapiro discuss the Supreme Court ruling in Trinity Lutheran. Was it as big a win for school choice as some people think? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Would More Government Infrastructure Spending Boost the U.S. Economy?

    Jun 29 2017

    Does the U.S. need a boost in infrastructure spending? Ryan Bourne explains that most American infrastructure, broadly defined, is private. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Time to Privatize Air Traffic Control

    Jun 28 2017

    Air traffic control privatization isn't unprecedented and could improve quality and safety. Chris Edwards makes the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jeff Sessions May Be Confused about the Drug War

    Jun 26 2017

    Is it drug trafficking or drug prohibition that is inherently violent? Adam Bates comments on the strange arguments from the Attorney General. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bitcoin Itself Isn’t the 'Main Event' of Bitcoin

    Jun 23 2017

    Bitcoin's new highs are no particular cause for celebration or alarm, says Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne. He discusses the blockchain, Whole Foods joining with Amazon, and the troubling trade agenda of the President. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pyongyang Changes and Stays the Same

    Jun 23 2017

    The death of a student who had been sentenced to decades of hard labor for a minor crime reveals that some things haven't changed in Pyongyang. Some things have changed. Cato’s Doug Bandow, fresh from his trip to North Korea, discusses the Kim Jong Un regime. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Senate Health Care Bill: Worse Than Doing Nothing

    Jun 22 2017

    The Senate's long-awaited health care bill is out. Michael F. Cannon says its provisions would be worse than doing nothing to repeal the Affordable Care Act. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Troubling Turn for U.S. Policy in Syria

    Jun 21 2017

    The civil war in Syria appears to be drawing the U.S. further into a costly no-win scenario. Emma Ashford discusses the latest incidents there. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Victory for Big Government in Kansas

    Jun 20 2017

    Did tax cuts "fail" in Kansas? Grover Norquist of Americans for Tax Reform comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bullish on Millennials, Bearish on Central Planners

    Jun 19 2017

    Glenn Jacobs is better known as Kane from WWE, but he's becoming known both as an outspoken advocate for liberty and a political commodity in his home of Tennessee. He discusses failure, millennials, and the cost of government at #FEECon held this weekend in Atlanta. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Federal Budgeting Process Is (Still) Broken (Again)

    Jun 16 2017

    The federal budgeting process hasn't worked for more than a decade. How should it be fixed? Bloomberg's Megan J. McArdle suggests that Congress should focus on programs, not broad signaling, and get back to legislating. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Social Security Won’t Save You from Yourself

    Jun 15 2017

    Gallup reports that a growing number of young people believe Social Security will form a primary source of retirement income. Mike Riggs of Reason worries that young people (and libertarians) aren't concerned enough about their own financial independence. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • ‘Big Ed’ and the Value of a College Degree

    Jun 14 2017

    Is the value of a college degree declining? Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Warrantless Surveillance, the Saudis, and Foreign Policy

    Jun 13 2017

    The warrantless surveillance of Americans authorized by the FISA Amendments Act needs reform sooner than later. That from Democratic U.S. Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Interchange Fees Credit Card Miles/Points/Bonuses

    Jun 12 2017

    What's happened since so-called "interchange fees" have been limited by federal law? Thaya Brook Knight explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Gulf States Reject Qatar

    Jun 10 2017

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • As Brexit Looms, Conservatives Lose Their Majority

    Jun 09 2017

    Prime Minister May called for elections ... and she got them, good and hard. Ryan Bourne describes the path forward for Brexit now that British Conservatives have lost their hold on Parliament. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • After the Comey Hearing (Part II)

    Jun 09 2017

    The wink-and-nudge questioning of former FBI director James Comey in the Senate seemed to indicate that there may be far more to the Russia election tampering probe than we now know. And yet, several important issues weren’t covered at all. Cato's Julian Sanchez and Patrick Eddington comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • After the Comey Hearing (Part I)

    Jun 08 2017

    Not much has changed (legally speaking) following the testimony of former FBI director James Comey before the intelligence committee in the Senate. So says Cato's Ilya Shapiro. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Before the Comey Hearing

    Jun 07 2017

    Former FBI Director James Comey will discuss conversations he had with President Trump with the Senate on Thursday. Julian Sanchez describes what we know now and why it matters See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Uncertainty Following U.S. Exit from Paris Climate Agreement

    Jun 06 2017

    The President has removed the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement. Ryan Maue comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lone Wolf Attacks and ISIS Desperation

    Jun 05 2017

    Lone wolf attacks for which ISIS claims credit should smack of desperation, not sophistication. Trevor Thrall explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Criminal Trial Evidence and Evidence.com

    Jun 02 2017

    What happens when gathering evidence is stymied by software and hardware terms and conditions? Matthew Feeney discusses the case of Evidence.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Paradox in Our Reactions to (Some) Deaths from Terrorism

    Jun 01 2017

    How we think about and respond to terrorist attacks depends a great deal, perhaps too much, on where they happen. Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Feds Make the Case for Ending Civil Asset Forfeiture

    May 31 2017

    Two reports from federal agencies help make the case for reforming, if not ending civil asset forfeiture. Darpana Sheth of the Institute for Justice comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s Big Trip Abroad

    May 30 2017

    What does Donald Trump's trip abroad reveal about his emerging foreign policy? Is there any chance for the U.S. to back away from regional conflicts on the other side of the globe? Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Really Good Day

    May 28 2017

    When attorney and author Ayelet Waldman was contemplating suicide, she chose instead to try tiny doses of LSD. Her book, A Really Good Day, details her experience. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Political Solution of CAFE Standards

    May 27 2017

    Federal fuel economy standards (CAFE) are effectively a tax on cars, but how is that tax distributed? Peter Van Doren comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Unveils Budget That Eventually Would Balance

    May 26 2017

    The federal spending plan offered by the White House would eventually balance the budget, and would do so largely with reductions in spending of several programs. Michael Tanner takes the good with the bad. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Real Spending Reform Means Cutting Spending

    May 25 2017

    Can Congress achieve real spending cuts without a credible cap on total spending? Jonathan Bydlak of the Coalition to Reduce Spending has some ideas. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Three Languages of Politics

    May 24 2017

    How we choose to talk about politics can explain a lot about what motivates our reasoning toward political issues. Arnold Kling is author of The Three Languages of Politics. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jeff Sessions Escalates the Drug War

    May 22 2017

    What does Attorney General Jeff Sessions want to get out of harsher prosecutions? Kevin Ring of Families Against Mandatory Minimums comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Misplaced Focus on Trump/Russia ‘Collusion’

    May 19 2017

    If the new investigation turns up no specific and explicit collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government, is that the end of the story? Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Travels to Saudi Arabia

    May 18 2017

    What do Trump and the Saudis have in common? Can Americans who oppose intervention hope for much out of this international trip? Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bill Nye and the Risks of Scientific Public Policy

    May 17 2017

    Science-driven public policy has the potential to run roughshod over ethical considerations and important values. Trevor Burrus comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FCC’s Legal Authority and Net Neutrality

    May 16 2017

    What should drive FCC policy regarding net neutrality? Berin Szoka of TechFreedom comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FCC to Vote on Net Neutrality and Title II Internet Regulation

    May 15 2017

    FCC Chairman Ajit Pai says the decision to roll back the 2015 internet regulations will mean greater infrastructure investment and better quality products. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Avoiding the Avoidable Conflicts with Iran

    May 13 2017

    Hardliners in the U.S. regarding Iran may empower the Iranian hardliners regarding the U.S. Emma Ashford and Ben Friedman comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Assessing the Iran Nuclear Deal So Far

    May 12 2017

    How has the Iran nuclear deal performed so far? Judging by rhetoric from the White House, it's done a decent job at keeping Iran's nuclear plans at bay. Ben Friedman and John Glaser comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Comey Fired from FBI, but the Rationale Seems Thin

    May 11 2017

    The reasons offered by the White House for removing James Comey from his perch at the FBI are remarkably weak. So says Julian Sanchez, a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How the Hell Did This Happen?

    May 10 2017

    The continued challenge posed by populism in the U.S. and across the globe is concerning, but history should temper that concern. P.J. O'Rourke is author of How the Hell Did This Happen? We spoke at the Cato Institute's 40th Anniversary Celebration. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does the President Know What It Means to Know Something?

    May 09 2017

    Some of the Donald Trump's problems should alarm Americans. That from syndicated columnist George F. Will. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Brief History of the Cato Institute: A Live #Cato40 Daily Podcast

    May 08 2017

    At the recent Cato40 celebration, Cato's David Boaz, Ian Vasquez and Roger Pilon discussed Cato's history and its role in promoting liberty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Failure: The Federal Misedukation of America's Children

    May 04 2017

    Has putting feds in the classroom done anything to improve American education? Vicki E. Alger, author of Failure: The Federal Misedukation of America's Children, says the Department of Education has achieved nothing, at best. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Men without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis

    May 03 2017

    The proportion of working-age men who aren't working has been in steady decline for decades? Why? Nicholas Eberstadt is author of Men without Work: America's Invisible Crisis. He spoke at the Cato Institute in January. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tax Reform Needs Universal Savings Accounts

    May 02 2017

    President Trump's tax reform plans should include a key benefit for savers: Universal Savings Accounts. Chris Edwards and Ryan Bourne comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Independent Political Speech, Then and Now

    May 01 2017

    The playing field for independent speech has improved, but there are challenges still for small groups that want to influence elections. Michael G. Adams and Neil Reiff are campaign finance attorneys in Washington. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump at 100 Days of Actual Foreign Policy

    Apr 29 2017

    Has Donald Trump been captured by conventional foreign policy thinking? Trevor Thrall comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Dictatorial Mandate of a "100 Days" Presidential Metric

    Apr 28 2017

    What does a successful first 100 days as President look like if not other branches of government rolling over? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • "Trumpism" and "Tylerism"

    Apr 27 2017

    What lessons does the accidental presidency of John Tyler have to tell us about the "Trumpism" emanating from the White House? Anthony Comegna comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis‎

    Apr 25 2017

    Can the public sector truly address the problem of modern poverty in the United States? J.D. Vance is author of Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis‎. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Do We Get for Federal Transportation Security Spending?

    Apr 24 2017

    Each layer of transportation security should be evaluated for its cost and contribution. John Mueller comments on which layers of security spending give us the biggest and smallest improvement. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fixing Elements of Medical Malpractice with Contract

    Apr 21 2017

    Typical medical malpractice reform efforts are aimed at lowering costs for physicians, but what if many problems associated with medical malpractice could be handled via contract? Walter Olson explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • To Protect and Serve: How to Fix America's Police

    Apr 20 2017

    Policing in America has often become insular and adversarial toward the communities police are supposed to protect and serve. Norm Stamper discusses his new book, To Protect and Serve: How to Fix America's Police. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Playground Fight: Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Pauley

    Apr 19 2017

    In Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Pauley, the Supreme Court considers to what extent a government giving used tires to a church playground can constitute a state establishment of religion. Trevor Burrus comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Politics of Perfection: Technology and Creation in Literature and Film

    Apr 19 2017

    What does pop culture have to tell us about our own hopes and fears about technology? Kimberly Hurd Hale is author of The Politics of Perfection: Technology and Creation in Literature and Film. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Drive to Mandate Paid Family Leave

    Apr 18 2017

    What can federally mandated unpaid family leave tell us about the likely impacts of a proposed mandate for paid family leave? Vanessa Brown Calder comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Welfare of Nations

    Apr 14 2017

    What damage is being done by failing welfare states? What lessons can be learned from the best welfare states? James Bartholomew is the author of The Welfare of Nations. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Homeland Security Wants Drones That Recognize Your Face

    Apr 13 2017

    The Department of Homeland Security wants border drones that can recognize faces and track individuals over long distances. Matthew Feeney discusses the implications for liberty and privacy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Should The Feds Put Social Security into Stocks?

    Apr 12 2017

    Putting Social Security revenues into the stock market and giving the feds control over those investments would be a big mistake. So says Michael Tanner. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s Grand Nonstrategy?

    Apr 11 2017

    What underlies Donald Trump's assault on Syria? Even if it's not a grand strategy, it might indicate a ready willingness to engage in further ill-advised conflict. John Glaser comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Russia, Trump, and Bombing Syria

    Apr 10 2017

    What does Russia get from backing Bashar al Assad in the face of U.S. throwing bombs at Syria? Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Attacks Syria without Congressional Approval

    Apr 07 2017

    President Trump has attacked Syria with apparently no support from Congress or other world leaders. Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Federal Dietary Advice and The Case Against Sugar

    Apr 05 2017

    Knocking down a scientific hypothesis is easier than knocking down a regulation built upon that hypothesis. Gary Taubes, author of The Case Against Sugar, argues there are big problems in how institutions conduct scientific inquiry today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Understanding the Urge to Muzzle Campus Speech

    Apr 04 2017

    Understanding the apparent surge in attempts to shut down speakers on college campuses is an important task. Steve Simpson of the Ayn Rand Institute offers his analysis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Regulation at 40

    Apr 03 2017

    Regulation Magazine celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. The magazine's editor, Peter Van Doren, details some of what we now know thanks to the magazine's continuing run.Related:Regulation at 40, by Peter Van Doren and Thomas A. Firey. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Combating the Hurdles and Hoops of Occupational Licensing

    Mar 31 2017

    The mindset of the regulator has overtaken so many professions by imposing licensing, but fighting back requires a strategy to re-engage the judiciary. Clark Neily of the Institute for Justice comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Election in Ecuador & New Fights over Free Trade

    Mar 30 2017

    This week Ecuador could remove President Correa from office. What might that mean for the country? And why are we fighting the same old fights over free trade? Mary Anastasia O'Grady of the Wall Street Journal comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Defending Free Speech in Uncertain Times

    Mar 29 2017

    Defending free speech amid cries of "fake news" from the highest levels of government is a unique challenge. Flemming Rose comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lee v. United States and Jury Nullification

    Mar 28 2017

    The Supreme Court takes up Lee v. United States today. The Cato Institute filed a brief in the case regarding the right to and rationality of defendants asking for a jury trial. Tim Lynch comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Smart Way to Repeal ObamaCare

    Mar 27 2017

    How should Congress repeal and replace ObamaCare now that the American Health Care Act has failed? Michael Cannon explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Driverless Cars Are Coming

    Mar 24 2017

    Driverless cars will change where you live, how you work, and will reshape whole industries. And they'll be here before you know it. Randal O'Toole comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s Border Wall Means Seizing Private Land

    Mar 23 2017

    Donald Trump's proposed border wall will require one of the largest seizures of private property in recent American history. Ilya Somin discusses the complicating factors. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why Have Supreme Court Nomination Hearings?

    Mar 22 2017

    What exactly did the public, much less the Senate, get out of the nomination hearings of Neil Gorsuch? Ilya Shapiro comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Clarity on Immigration and Crime Rates

    Mar 21 2017

    How do the crime rates of immigrants compare to native-born Americans? Alex Nowrasteh explains in his new paper, Criminal Immigrants: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Wikileaks CIA Dump and Domestic Surveillance

    Mar 20 2017

    Do any real safeguards assure that Americans' data isn't being collected by intelligence agencies? The new Wikileaks revelations about CIA hacking tools offer little comfort. Patrick Eddington comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Proposed Cut to HUD

    Mar 17 2017

    The proposed cuts to the Department of Housing and Urban Development amount to a tiny fraction of total federal welfare spending. Vanessa Brown Calder comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Real Regulatory Change Means Changing Statutes

    Mar 16 2017

    Peter Van Doren explains why substantive regulatory change will mean changing statutes, not merely reorganizing the executive branch. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does Trump Care about Spending Reform?

    Mar 15 2017

    The successful spending reforms of other countries may not yet be on the President's radar. They should be. Dan Mitchell explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unwarranted: Policing without Permission

    Mar 14 2017

    A great deal of government surveillance of Americans is done without a warrant. And asserting your right against such surveillance is often virtually impossible. Barry Friedman, author of Unwarranted, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Make Health Insurance Legal Again

    Mar 13 2017

    The focus of reforming health coverage should be to legalize more varieties of it. So says Dr. Jeffrey Singer, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • End the Federal Prohibition on Marijuana

    Mar 09 2017

    As long as the feds refuse to enforce marijuana laws uniformly across the United States, Rep. Thomas Garrett (R-VA) says it's time to end federal cannabis prohibition. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Disappointing Replacement Plan for ObamaCare

    Mar 08 2017

    Republicans had the better part of a decade to come up with a plan to replace the Affordable Care Act. The House leadership plan retains many of Obamacare's elements. Rep. Jim Banks (R-IN) comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The (Revised and Redacted) Trump Travel Ban

    Mar 07 2017

    The Trump travel ban covering several majority Muslim countries is a slight improvement, but contains many of the same flaws as the original. Alex Nowrasteh explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • White House Confusion on Wiretapping

    Mar 07 2017

    Julian Sanchez traces the origin and likelihood of a strange claim from the White House of wiretapping by the previous administration. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Regulators of Beer, Regulators of Speech

    Mar 03 2017

    The regulation of alcohol may be antiquated, but sometimes regulators cross into regulating commercial speech. Jim Caruso, CEO of Flying Dog Brewery, talks about regulation of beer and regulation of speech. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Quality of Care Changes Minds on Obamacare

    Mar 02 2017

    The linchpin of health care reform may be the impact Obamacare has on the quality of care. Michael Cannon and Emily Ekins comment on the law and new polling data on how to reform health care. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Feds Should Focus on Privatization over New Infrastructure Spending

    Mar 01 2017

    President Trump’s massive centrally planned infrastructure proposal misses the mark. Cato’s Chris Edwards argues that Trump should focus on devolving control of assets and privatize many currently public infrastructure projects. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Big Government Conservatism Returns

    Mar 01 2017

    With Donald Trump's plans for big spending on the military, entitlements, and infrastructure, big-government conservatism has returned to Washington. Michael Tanner comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Proposes Big Spending at the Pentagon

    Mar 01 2017

    The Pentagon has never really been audited and the strategic focus of our military is scattered, at best. So why increase the military budget? Ben Friedman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Consequences (and Repeal) of the Affordable Care Act

    Mar 01 2017

    What has the Affordable Care Act meant for health insurance coverage? What should repeal look like? Aaron Yelowitz comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Much Does Your Congress Critter Vote to Spend?

    Feb 27 2017

    SpendingTracker.org is a project aimed at giving citizens a clear idea about how much individual members of Congress vote to spend. Jonathan Bydlak of the Coalition to Reduce Spending discusses the project. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • If States Don't Play Ball, How Much Cash Can Feds Withhold?

    Feb 24 2017

    Feds often condition federal funds on state government behavior. But how much can the feds withhold if states don't play ball? That may be a critical question as President Trump seeks state help with his immigration plans. Josh Blackman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Pushes Expansive Immigration Enforcement

    Feb 23 2017

    What laws are enabling President Trump's stepped up immigration enforcement? Alex Nowrasteh explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Faith, Radicalism, and Islam without Extremes

    Feb 22 2017

    How do Islam and classical liberalism diverge? Can there be a reconciliation? Mustafa Akyol, author of Islam without Extremes, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Damning Words: The Life and Religious Times of H. L. Mencken

    Feb 21 2017

    H. L. Mencken's relationship with religion and religious people was complicated. D. G. Hart is author of Damning Words: The Life and Religious Times of H. L. Mencken. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Obama vs. Trump on Drug War Priorities

    Feb 20 2017

    Sean Dunagan, a former DEA researcher and now with Law Enforcement Action Partnership, discusses the Obama record and Trump Administration plans with respect to the ongoing War on Drugs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Left Should Want a Robust First Amendment

    Feb 16 2017

    Massive protests greeted Donald Trump upon his inauguration, but speaking out against the president will require a robust First Amendment. Will the American Left support it? Luke Wachob of the Center for Competitive Politics believes so. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Michael Flynn and the Value/Danger of Selective Intelligence Leaks

    Feb 15 2017

    The departure of Michael Flynn from the Trump Administration reveals more than just the problems of poorly timed phone calls to foreign officials. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Stingray: A New Frontier in Police Surveillance

    Feb 15 2017

    Stingrays trick your phone into giving data to the cops. Is that legal? Constitutional? Adam Bates comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bottleneckers: Gaming the Government for Power and Private Profit

    Feb 13 2017

    How do so-called "bottleneckers" restrict competition and harm the public? Dick Carpenter of the Institute for Justice discusses his new book, Bottleneckers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Libertarians, Trump, and Giving (Less) Credit to Politicians

    Feb 12 2017

    What does Donald Trump mean for the broad libertarian movement? And why shouldn't we give credit to politicians when they do things we like? Anthony Comegna comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Messes with Texas over Civil Asset Forfeiture

    Feb 11 2017

    When President Trump this week suggested destroying the career of a state lawmaker in Texas, he put civil asset forfeiture in the spotlight like never before. Texas State Senator Konni Burton is that lawmaker. She wants civil forfeiture to end entirely. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Executive Power Enables Trade War with China

    Feb 10 2017

    The delegation of trade authorities to the executive may end up allowing Donald Trump to instigate mischief in the trade realm. Dan Ikenson discusses a possible trade war with China. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s Framework for Financial Regulation

    Feb 09 2017

    New agency guidelines for future financial regulation are spelled out in President Trump's recent executive order. Thaya Brook Knight comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump Travel Ban Heads to Court

    Feb 08 2017

    As a federal court considers the travel ban on people from several majority Muslim countries, how many people have been affected? The figures presented by the White House seem to be way off. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Cracks in Trump’s Wall Plan

    Feb 07 2017

    Whoever pays for it, President Trump's plans for a wall separating the U.S. from Mexico is fatally flawed on a number of fronts. Dan Griswold explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Neil Gorsuch and the Nomination Process

    Feb 06 2017

    Neil Gorsuch's own writings raise at least one concern about how he would perform on the Supreme Court. Ilya Somin comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Iran Nuclear Deal vs. Team Trump

    Feb 03 2017

    Why do key members of the Trump Administration believe the Iran nuclear deal is so weak? How would other signatories to the deal respond to a U.S. withdrawal? John Glaser comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Should Libertarians Like about Neil Gorsuch?

    Feb 02 2017

    Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's pick for the Supreme Court, has much to recommend him to libertarians, according to Cato adjunct scholar Andrew Grossman. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Neil Gorsuch Nominated to Supreme Court

    Feb 01 2017

    Federal appellate judge Neil Gorsuch is President Trump’s pick to replace the late Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court. What do we know about his judicial opinions and philosophy? Ilya Shapiro comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Optimism on Immigration Reform

    Feb 01 2017

    From where does the U.S. receive refugees and why does that matter? And why be optimistic about prospects for immigration reform? Tim Kane of the Hoover Institution comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Close U.S. Military Bases around the Globe?

    Jan 31 2017

    Does the U.S. really need a military presence in dozens of countries around the globe? John Glaser comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fact and Fiction on Trump’s Immigration Order

    Jan 30 2017

    How fair are the criticisms of Donald Trump's order on immigration from seven majority Muslim countries? But the order is probably still illegal. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trouble(s) with Defunding Sanctuary Cities

    Jan 27 2017

    Generally speaking, there's nothing wrong with cities and states refusing to help enforce federal law. David Bier says the same is true for immigration. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Betsy DeVos and School Choice

    Jan 26 2017

    What should a Department of Education headed by a school choice advocate actually do? Neal McCluskey and Jason Bedrick comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Brexit, Trump, and Expanding Global Trade

    Jan 25 2017

    As Theresa May appears to work toward positioning Britain as a global hub for expanding trade, the U.S. turns inward. Tom Clougherty and Ryan Bourne comment on Brexit, the European Common Market, and Trumpian Protectionism. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • India's Devastating Crackdown on Cash

    Jan 24 2017

    When India suddenly told citizens to swap out their old cash for new cash, the impact was devastating. Jim Dorn explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Populist Parallels of Sanders and Trump

    Jan 23 2017

    President Donald Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders have some strong parallels in their populism. John Samples comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Obama Leaves ‘Loaded Weapon’ in the White House

    Jan 20 2017

    Barack Obama expressed concerns about "leaving a loaded weapon lying around" for future presidents to wield. And then he did exactly that. Gene Healy comments on the outgoing President’s aggrandizement of the Oval Office. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reflections on the Obama Foreign Policy

    Jan 19 2017

    What do we know about the costs and benefits of the Obama foreign policy as his time in the White House comes to an end? Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Obama Closes Sanctuary for Cuban Refugees

    Jan 18 2017

    A policy that gave Cubans help escaping Cuba has come to an end in President Obama's final days in office. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New Silk Road

    Jan 17 2017

    The 7,500 mile journey from China to London along the "new Silk Road" signals a new era of trade between those countries. U.S. officials should take the hint. Christine Guluzian comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Remembering Nat Hentoff

    Jan 16 2017

    The world lost the great civil libertarian, journalist, and Cato scholar Nat Hentoff last week. Scott Bullock comments on his several legacies. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump and Trade: Peril and Promise of a Border Adjustment Tax

    Jan 13 2017

    The "border adjustment tax" may be a move to head off a possible trade war undertaken by President-elect Trump. Dan Ikenson and Dan Mitchell discuss the risks and opportunities of such a plan, and alternatives that should be on the table. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump and Trade: Executive Power to Restrict Trade

    Jan 12 2017

    Without Congress, just what can a President do to disrupt trading relationships? How far can the President go toward raising the price of products that Americans want? Daniel J. Ikenson comments on executive power and international trade. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump and Trade: How Multinationals Make Decisions

    Jan 11 2017

    What makes firms decide where to locate new production facilities? What is the role of the American tax and regulatory environments in attracting production facilities? Dan Pearson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump and Trade: Threatening Toyota via Twitter

    Jan 10 2017

    Can the specter of a President-elect threatening companies with punitive taxes really make the U.S. a better place to invest? Simon Lester comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump and Trade: The Protectionist Triumvirate

    Jan 09 2017

    With Wilbur Ross at Commerce, Peter Navarro at the new National Trade Council, and Robert Lighthizer as U.S. Trade Representative, Donald Trump has assembled a team aimed at protecting U.S. industry from competition. Dan Ikenson and Dan Mitchell comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • All Obama’s Wars

    Jan 06 2017

    Barack Obama will have served as President during eight continuous years of war. Ben Friedman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unpopular Speech and the Terrorist Threat

    Jan 05 2017

    Banning speech doesn't stop terrorism, and for some people such bans can make radical, disfavored ideologies more attractive. Flemming Rose comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump’s Mixed Messages on Nukes

    Jan 04 2017

    President-elect Donald Trump makes many statements via social media and off-mic about America's plans for nuclear weapons, but it's not clear what they mean. Ben Friedman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What States Can Do about Obamacare

    Jan 03 2017

    How states choose to comply with the Affordable Care Act can make a difference for taxpayers. Sal Nuzzo of the James Madison Institute makes his case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sex Offender Registries at the High Court

    Dec 30 2016

    What are the constitutional issues raised when a government can put someone, even a registered sex offender, behind bars simply for making use of social media? David Post comments on the Packingham case that goes before the Supreme Court next year. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Occupational Licensing and Recidivism

    Dec 29 2016

    Does occupational licensing hamper ex cons who want to be productive members of society? Stephen A. Slivinski of Arizona State has some new research on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Eye Exam Startup vs. South Carolina

    Dec 28 2016

    How customers get eyeglasses in South Carolina could be undergoing a big change, but not if the incumbent industry can help it. Robert McNamara of the Institute for Justice discusses the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Monetary Methods and Election 2016

    Dec 27 2016

    How should the Federal Reserve clear the way for competitive currencies? Jim Grant is publisher of Grant's Interest Rate Observer. We spoke during Cato's monetary conference in November. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy

    Dec 26 2016

    Heather Ann Thompson discusses Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Taking Seriously the New Populist and Alt-Right/Fascist Thinkers

    Dec 25 2016

    Opposition to liberty isn't always rooted in mere ignorance. It's often rooted in a school of thought that opposes liberty. Tom G. Palmer discusses the new thinkers who are working to make intolerance respectable again. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Homesharing vs. Government

    Dec 24 2016

    Homesharing is facing increasing scrutiny from state and local governments. At the State Policy Network annual meeting, Christina Sandefur discusses the controversy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Missing Bridge to Vocational Education

    Dec 23 2016

    Why are public high schools so bad at preparing young people for so many real jobs in the private sector? Jim Stergios of the Pioneer Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Price of Water, California Edition

    Dec 22 2016

    Drought creates big problems in California. Bad water allocation makes those problems worse. Reed Watson of the Property and Environment Research center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Nelson v. Colorado

    Dec 21 2016

    When a court throws out a case against you after you've paid restitution, shouldn't you get your money back? David Post comments on the case of Nelson v. Colorado. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Federal Agencies Don’t Want You to Know about Forfeiture

    Dec 20 2016

    The IRS and Customs and Border Patrol are dragging their feet in providing basic information about their civil asset forfeiture programs. Lisa Knepper of the Institute for Justice explains why they've filed suit. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Libertarians and 'Unicorn Governance'

    Dec 19 2016

    How should libertarians broaden their understanding of the world beyond mere policy responses? Into what fields should libertarians extend methodological individualism? Anthony Comegna and Steve Horwitz comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Midnight Regulating ahead of a Trump Presidency

    Dec 18 2016

    The "midnight regulating" that marks the end of every presidential administration is in full swing. But even much of the regulating done over the past several months can be undone quickly in the opening weeks of a Trump Administration. Other regulatory changes may be more challenging. Susan E. Dudley directs the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trump Plan for American Infrastructure

    Dec 17 2016

    What infrastructure fixes would deliver the biggest economic boost? And why isn't that the focus of any revamp of American infrastructure? Randal O'Toole comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Attitudes about Policing in America

    Dec 16 2016

    How do our expectations about how police ought to do their jobs line up with how police actually do their jobs? Emily Ekins is author of "Policing in America." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trump Victory and European Populism

    Dec 15 2016

    European populists have been emboldened by a Trump victory in the U.S. Presidential race. Alberto Mingardi of Istituto Bruno Leoni says there is at least one bright spot for liberalism in Europe today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • ‘Keep Chicago Livable’ Challenges New AirBnB Rule

    Dec 14 2016

    Shorge Sato discusses his challenge to the new rule that would convert hundreds of private homes in Chicago into public accommodations. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Rex Tillerson, Exxon-Mobil, and America’s Chief Diplomat

    Dec 13 2016

    Rex Tillerson has been designated by Donald Trump as the next U.S. Secretary of State. Beyond his business interests, what would drive his tenure as chief diplomat for the United States? Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Right’s Troubling ‘Patriotic Correctness'

    Dec 12 2016

    Punishing your own ideological friends for using the wrong words is a problem of both left and right. Alex Nowrasteh describes the Right's trouble with "patriotic correctness.”The Right Has Its Own Version of Political Correctness. It’s Just as Stifling. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Wikipedia Works

    Dec 09 2016

    Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, discusses the site, how it's treated by governments, and how it's fueled by its users. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Federal Reserve Action Irrelevant to Inflation Expectations?

    Dec 08 2016

    When the Federal Reserve governors meet next week, will their decisions have any impact on the real economy? And could any Trump-selected Fed governors help? Jerry Jordan and Gerald P. O'Driscoll, Jr. comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Colorado Experience with Legal Pot (So Far)

    Dec 07 2016

    Colorado's experience so far with legal pot has meant more state revenues and Republicans claiming that the pot tax is "too high." Jon Caldara of the Independence Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Mistrial for Cop Who Shot Walter Scott in the Back

    Dec 06 2016

    The testimony of a camera was not enough to convince a juror in South Carolina that the police officer who shot and killed Walter Scott was guilty of murder. Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Vaping Tax in Pennsylvania

    Dec 05 2016

    Pennsylvania has imposed a 40% wholesale tax on e-cigarettes and related products. Bob Dick of the Commonwealth Foundation explains why it's poor policy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Taking Freedom to Young People with The Tuttle Twins

    Dec 02 2016

    Translating classic works of libertarian thinking like The Road to Serfdom for a very young audience is a challenge. Connor Boyack hopes his Tuttle Twins book series will do just that. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • More from Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future

    Dec 01 2016

    Johan Norberg discusses Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future at Cato Club 200 in October. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Power of Voter-Led Ballot Initiatives

    Nov 30 2016

    Since Colorado adopted a voter-led ballot initiative process, the results have been mostly positive. Jon Caldara discusses the state's experiment with the referendum process. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Human Freedom Index 2016

    Nov 29 2016

    How do different kinds of freedom interact around the world to produce the outcomes we value? Ian Vásquez is one of the authors of the new Human Freedom Index. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cuba after Castro's Dictatorship

    Nov 28 2016

    Juan Carlos Hidalgo discusses the next steps for Cuba now that longtime dictator Fidel Castro has died. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump and Free Political Speech

    Nov 27 2016

    The incoming Trump administration raises fears of further regulation of political speech. David Keating of the Center for Competitive Politics discusses the risks and opportunities. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Traficant: The Congressman of Crimetown

    Nov 26 2016

    James Traficant was a folk hero, but his story should provide some understanding of this very strange election year. Eric Murphy is producer of Traficant: The Congressman of Crimetown. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Libertarians, Class, and the Left

    Nov 25 2016

    Libertarians often find it difficult to talk about class, but understanding how the state creates permanent classes may be essential to engaging with other ideological groups. Anthony Comegna comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • After the Election, What You (and They) Should Read

    Nov 24 2016

    What should Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, Gary Johnson, and you be reading this Thanksgiving? Sarah Skwire makes a few suggestions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The DEA's Quiet War on Kratom

    Nov 23 2016

    Kratom is a plant the DEA wants banned, but it's far from clear that it poses any serious danger. Andrew Turner, a veteran with post-traumatic stress, is among those who say they benefit enormously from using kratom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sanctuary Cities, Secure Communities, and Trump Immigration Policy

    Nov 22 2016

    How will sanctuary cities fare with with a future Trump administration? Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Can Trump Make the U.S. a 'Global Subsidy Cop'?

    Nov 21 2016

    If the U.S. wants to end the practice of other countries subsidizing key industries, it would require the U.S. to clean up its own business giveaways. Scott Lincicome comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Women Are More Than Their Interactions with the State

    Nov 16 2016

    As many voters are licking their wounds after failing to elect the first female U.S. President, Anthony Comegna talks about how the important historical role of women on behalf of liberty is more than mere interactions with the state. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • More States Legalize and Tax Marijuana

    Nov 16 2016

    More states, most notably California, have moved to legalize and tax marijuana. Joseph Henchman of the Tax Foundation describes some of the wrinkles the remain in the tax treatment of cannabis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Undoing Executive Action in a Trump Presidency

    Nov 14 2016

    It may be a mixed bag on actual policy, but the Obama Administration's various executive actions may be swiftly undone as Donald Trump becomes President. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • President-elect Trump to Contend with Two Tribes of Foreign Policy Thinking

    Nov 11 2016

    Which factions will be duking it out as a Trump administration foreign policy is forged? Trevor Thrall explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • President-elect Trump and Financial Regulation

    Nov 10 2016

    Does a pending Trump presidency present opportunities to deregulate financial markets? Thaya Brook Knight comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • President-elect Trump and the Gift of Executive Power

    Nov 10 2016

    President-elect Trump will inherit all of the expansions of executive power given to him by his predecessors, most notably Barack Obama. Gene Healy says the one-time "thought experiment" is now a reality. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • President-elect Trump and Foreign Policy

    Nov 09 2016

    The foreign policy of President-elect Donald Trump remains a mystery, in part because so few foreign policy experts were willing to advise him during the campaign. Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Surprise Ending to Presidential Election 2016

    Nov 09 2016

    An unprecedented election ends in surprise, and more questions for President-elect Donald Trump's substantive policy. David Boaz comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Libertarian Women and the Dorr War

    Nov 08 2016

    The Dorr War failed, but it gave rise to many prominent women deserving of appreciation. Anthony Comegna comments.Related episode: The Dorr War in Rhode Island featuring Anthony Comegna. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is There a Silver Lining to Election 2016?

    Nov 07 2016

    The 2016 election for President features two of the most reviled candidates in the history of polling. Could that spur efforts to shift important powers back to Congress? Gene Healy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When (if Ever) Should Government Fund Science?

    Nov 04 2016

    Government should mostly take a hands-off policy toward scientific inquiry. Terence Kealey explains why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • You Have the Right to Remain Innocent

    Nov 03 2016

    Don't talk to the police, even if you want to help them solve a crime. James Duane says that's the advice police and lawyers give their own children. He explains why in his new book, You Have the Right to Remain Innocent. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Biting the Hands That Feed Us

    Nov 02 2016

    Why do governments fight the people fighting hunger? How does the government promote food waste? Baylen J. Linnekin explains in Biting the Hands that Feed Us: How Fewer, Smarter Laws Would Make Our Food System More Sustainable. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Criminal Justice Reform Really Dead?

    Nov 01 2016

    Federal criminal justice reform in 2016 isn't quite totally dead yet. Marc A. Levin, Policy Director for Right on Crime, Director of the Center for Effective Justice at the Texas Public Policy Foundation, comments on prospects for reform this year. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 'Brexit' and Freedom in Great Britain

    Oct 31 2016

    Daniel Hannan is a member of the European Parliament and a strong supporter of the Brexit referendum. He spoke at the Cato Institute's Cato Club 200 event in Park City, Utah. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Obamacare Premium Hikes and Bare-Bones Coverage

    Oct 28 2016

    The health insurance premium hikes aren't the worst surprise from the Affordable Care Act this year. Michael Cannon explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Washington State Eyes Another Minimum Wage Hike

    Oct 27 2016

    Why is the rest of Washington state considering closing the gap with Seattle's very high minimum wage? Chris Cargill of the Washington Policy Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bureaucratic Searches vs. the Fourth Amendment

    Oct 26 2016

    The Fourth Amendment is implicated when any government official wants to poke around in your house for no good reason. In Ohio, Maurice A. Thompson of the 1851 Center for Constitutional Law is trying to fight it. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Immigrants, Labor, and Welfare in Sweden

    Oct 25 2016

    Swedish writer Hanna Marie Björklund discusses some labor and welfare problems as Sweden attempts to assimilate recent immigrants. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Voting with Feet vs. Voting with Ballots

    Oct 24 2016

    The decisions we make in the voting booth tend to be less informed and less decisive than the votes we cast with our feet. Ilya Somin, author of Democracy and Political Ignorance, explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does Michael Moore ♥ Citizens United?

    Oct 21 2016

    Did the Citizens United decision make Michael Moore's new film possible? Trevor Burrus comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Defense of the Universal Basic Income

    Oct 20 2016

    The Universal Basic Income is an idea with many detractors. Charles Murray is not among them. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Of Dogs and Men

    Oct 19 2016

    The new film Of Dogs and Men details several episodes in which police shoot family dogs. The film's producer, Patrick Reasonover, says its all too common, but that police are beginning to recognize the scale of the problem. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future

    Oct 18 2016

    Johan Norberg says human progress isn't inevitable, but it's worth examining just how much freedom has improved life on the planet. His new book is Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Article I Powers and Election 2016

    Oct 17 2016

    Senator Mike Lee of Utah believes it's more important than ever that Congress begin reasserting the powers that it has long delegated to the executive. He comments on the Electoral College in 2016 and criminal justice reform. Recorded in Park City, Utah. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fostering a Chinese Free Market for Ideas

    Oct 14 2016

    The story of China's move toward capitalism is still not well understood. Ning Wang of the Ronald Coase Institute says the future of Chinese development will hinge critically on a free market in ideas. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 'Appeals Court Finds CFPB Structure 'Unconstitutional'

    Oct 12 2016

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was supposed to wield broad, relatively unaccountable powers on behalf of consumers. There's just one problem with that, according to a federal appeals court. Mark Calabria comments on the ruling. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Real Heroes: Inspiring True Stories of Courage, Character, and Conviction

    Oct 11 2016

    Lawrence W. Reed's new book details examples of how heroes are made. The book is Real Heroes: Inspiring True Stories of Courage, Character, and Conviction. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Finding Foreign Policy Substance in POTUS Debate

    Oct 10 2016

    There wasn't much, but the small bit of foreign policy substance in the second debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was illuminating. Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Gathering Storm in State Pensions

    Oct 08 2016

    "Denial" is the single word that the Reason Foundation's Peter Constant uses to describe the attitude many state governments have taken toward pension finance problems. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • "John Doe" Prosecutors Lose Big in Wisconsin

    Oct 07 2016

    A three-year fight over free political speech in Wisconsin has come to an end. Eric O'Keefe was among the so-called "John Does" under investigation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unraveled: Obamacare, Religious Liberty, and Executive Power

    Oct 05 2016

    The Affordable Care Act doubled down on the trend toward giving federal agencies broad latitude to determine what a statute actually means. Josh Blackman is author of Unraveled: Obamacare, Religious Liberty, and Executive Power. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Federal Criminal Justice Reform Focus Shifts to 2017

    Oct 04 2016

    Time has effectively run out on federal criminal justice reform in 2016. So says Greg Newburn of Families Against Mandatory Minimums. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Legal Wrinkle for Education Savings Accounts in Nevada

    Oct 03 2016

    Education Savings Accounts in Nevada are constitutional, but the funding mechanism is not. So says the Nevada Supreme Court. Jason Bedrick explains what should happen next. (Recorded September 30, 2016) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Who Needs Judicial Engagement?

    Sep 30 2016

    Evan Bernick is author of the lead essay in this month's Cato Unbound. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Do Local Police Use Data about You?

    Sep 29 2016

    Local police databases have their uses, but they've been abused, as well. Adam Bates comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Legal State of Drones and Other Surveillance

    Sep 28 2016

    Jay Stanley is a senior fellow at the American Civil Liberties Union's Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Dorr War in Rhode Island

    Sep 27 2016

    "The Dorr War" pitted the people of Rhode Island against a government they wished to abolish. It didn't go well. Anthony Comegna details the history. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • "Young Americans" and Cultural Nationalism

    Sep 26 2016

    A national purpose demands a large, expansive government. Anthony Comegna discusses the "Young Americans" and the rise of cultural nationalism. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Permission Society

    Sep 23 2016

    How does the "ruling class" turn rights into privileges? And what can be done to turn the tide? Timothy Sandefur explains in his book, The Permission Society. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Who Controls Your Health Care Spending?

    Sep 22 2016

    Are employers really shifting the burden of health care spending back to employees? Michael F. Cannon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Power of State Constitutions to Protect Liberty

    Sep 21 2016

    State constitutions often protect liberty better than the U.S. Constitution, and in many cases fighting the government in state court can be much easier. Clint Bolick, a justice on the Arizona Supreme Court, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Economic Freedom Marches On

    Sep 19 2016

    The lesson of economic freedom remains clear: Freedom and prosperity go hand in hand. Ian Vasquez comments on the new Economic Freedom of the World Index. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Collective Action and Evolutionary Psychology

    Sep 16 2016

    When groups have to decide, scale matters. Leda Cosmides comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Africa: A Hopeful Continent

    Sep 15 2016

    The people who have written off Africa as a "hopeless continent" should take another look. Marian Tupy comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Government Is a Lousy Lender

    Sep 14 2016

    The big government shift into allocating capital has made many problems worse. Ike Brannon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Assessing the Terrorism Risk of Immigrants

    Sep 13 2016

    How likely are you to be killed by a foreign-born terrorist inside the United States? The odds are vanishingly small. Alex Nowrasteh discusses the data. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Modern Zoning versus Microhousing

    Sep 12 2016

    Renters in Seattle are learning that the low-cost tiny apartments they'd like to occupy are being zoned out of existence. Vanessa Brown Calder comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What's a Faithful Electoral College Elector to Do?

    Sep 09 2016

    The Electoral College is meant to provide a check on mob rule. So what's a faithful elector to do in 2016? Andrew M. Grossman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Self-Control or State Control? You Decide

    Sep 08 2016

    Being responsible for your own happiness is an opportunity, not a burden. Tom G. Palmer is editor of the new book, Self-Control or State Control? You Decide. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Protectionist Impulse

    Sep 07 2016

    The benefits of trade may be all around us, but that doesn't mean we're naturally supportive of it. Dan Pearson explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Welfare Reform and Immigrant Outcomes

    Sep 06 2016

    How has welfare reform impacted the fates of immigrants to the United States? David Bier parses the data. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Paul Ryan's Focus on Poverty amid Political Season

    Sep 02 2016

    In a political season featuring divisive candidates, Paul Ryan has spent an inordinate amount of time promoting his own sketched out plans for reforming programs aimed at alleviating poverty. Michael Tanner comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Doubling Down on 'Trumpism'

    Sep 01 2016

    Donald Trump's photo-op in Mexico has done nothing to obscure his insistence on both building a wall at the southern border and deporting millions of undocumented immigrants. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Alabama's Odd Regulation on Talking to the Government

    Aug 31 2016

    Alabama requires both registration and an ethics course for anyone deemed a "lobbyist" by the state. Paul Sherman of the Institute for Justice is challenging the requirement. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Police 'Pre-search' and the Fourth Amendment

    Aug 31 2016

    Baltimore police have engaged in large-scale surveillance without any authorization. The implications for policing are troubling. Jim Harper comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Missing American Jury

    Aug 29 2016

    How has the role of the jury been diminished in American courts? Suja A. Thomas is author of The Missing American Jury. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Debunking Utopia: Exposing the Myth of Nordic Socialism

    Aug 26 2016

    How have the Nordic states fared compared to the glowing endorsements from the likes of Bernie Sanders? Nima Sanandaji is author of Debunking Utopia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • American Umpire at Home and Abroad

    Aug 25 2016

    How has the view of the United States as an "umpire" served U.S. foreign policy? Elizabeth Cobbs is author of American Umpire. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Let Civil Society Resettle Refugees

    Aug 24 2016

    Canada's program to allow private individuals and group to sponsor the resettlement of refugees should be a model for the U.S. So says Cato policy analyst David Bier. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is This the Obamacare Death Spiral?

    Aug 23 2016

    Major insurers have exited or curtailed their involvement in Affordable Care Act "exchanges," leaving many Americans with zero exchange-based health coverage options. Michael Cannon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Welfare Reform after 20 Years

    Aug 22 2016

    It's been two decades since Bill Clinton signed a large welfare reform act into law. How has it fared? And how should we think about welfare reform in the future? Michael D. Tanner comments at the Cato Institute's conference on welfare reform. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • More from Confounding Father: Thomas Jefferson's Image in His Own Time

    Aug 19 2016

    Robert McDonald discusses the polarizing figure of Thomas Jefferson at Cato University. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Searching for Substance in Trump's ISIS Rhetoric

    Aug 18 2016

    Taking Donald Trump at his word on policy matters is a tricky endeavor. Ben Friedman parses the Republican nominee's latest speech on fighting terrorism. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • America's Invisible War in Somalia

    Aug 17 2016

    The little-understood U.S. intervention in Somalia has delivered tragic results. Bronwyn Bruton of the Atlantic Council comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • NSA's Stolen Malware Now Up for Auction

    Aug 17 2016

    It appears a group of hackers stole NSA's own malware and now are offering the tools for auction. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Obama DEA Maintains Strict Cannabis Prohibition

    Aug 15 2016

    The Obama Administration's DEA has reaffirmed that it will not reschedule marijuana from the most restrictive category of controlled substances. Adam Bates comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unraveling a Party System, the 1850s and Today

    Aug 12 2016

    What do the elections and political party crackups have to tell us about the strange election year of 2016? Anthony Comegna comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Sparsely Detailed Trump Economic Plan

    Aug 11 2016

    The Trump economic plan contains tax cuts, but virtually no engagement with the larger problem of excessive federal spending. Michael Tanner comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Obama's Pardons and Commutations So Far

    Aug 10 2016

    Adam Bates discusses President Obama's record on pardons and commutations in his final year in office. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hillary Backed 9 of the Last 7 U.S. Military Interventions

    Aug 09 2016

    Hillary Clinton's long history as an advocate for war is hard to overstate. Christopher A. Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Human Cost of Welfare

    Aug 08 2016

    Lisa Conyers discusses her coauthored book, The Human Cost of Welfare: How the System Hurts the People It's Supposed to Help. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The GOP's Looming Dark Night of the Soul

    Aug 05 2016

    The rise of Donald Trump has clearly signaled the disconnect between voters and the GOP. Ben Domenech says a realignment of the parties may be well underway. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When Presidents Oppose Government Science

    Aug 04 2016

    Many past presidents have been outright opponents of government-supported science. Terence Kealey walks through the history. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bernie Drives Debate over Glass-Steagall

    Aug 03 2016

    A proposed return to Glass-Steagall financial regulation is now a part of both GOP and Democratic platforms. How did that happen? Would it prevent another financial crisis? Mark Calabria comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Haitian Coffee Grows on Trees

    Aug 02 2016

    What factors have led Haiti, once the world's leading coffee producer, to tumble into subsistence-level farming? And why does that industry repeatedly fail to return? Tate Watkins, author of Haitian Coffee Grows on Trees, discusses his work. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Which States Might End the Income Tax?

    Aug 01 2016

    A few states with demographic issues might be the next ones to end the dreaded income tax. Stephen Slivinski of Arizona State University predicts at least one state will soon end the personal income tax. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Confounding Father: Thomas Jefferson's Image in His Own Time

    Jul 29 2016

    What do the elections involving Thomas Jefferson have to tell us about the political culture of today? Robert McDonald, author of Confounding Father: Thomas Jefferson's Image in His Own Time, offers his thoughts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does Hillary Hate Uber?

    Jul 28 2016

    Hillary Clinton's public lionizing of entrepreneurs appears to stand at odds with various policies she'd like to see adopted. Jared Meyer of the Manhattan Institute says the sharing economy stands to lose a great deal. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When the Feds Pay Environmentalists to Sue Them

    Jul 27 2016

    There's a one-way street when environmentalists sue the federal government. When the groups sue and win, they often get their legal fees covered. Holly Fretwell of the Property and Environment Research Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Blockchain Revolution

    Jul 26 2016

    The bitcoin revolution hasn't quite delivered as promised, but the underlying technology may be far more revolutionary. Don and Alex Tapscott, authors of Blockchain Revolution, comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation

    Jul 25 2016

    The fight over climate change has focused primarily on mitigating emissions. Professor Matthew E. Kahn of USC argues that changes in the urban landscape has much to teach us about so-called adaptation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When Cops Use Robots to Kill

    Jul 21 2016

    The shooter in Dallas who killed several police officers was ultimately taken out with a robot and explosives. What can be done to assure that use of technology remains a last resort? Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Our Foreign Policy Choices: Rethinking America's Global Role

    Jul 20 2016

    "Our Foreign Policy Choices: Rethinking America's Global Role" details key lessons from the last two decades of American-led warfare. Christopher A. Preble puts those lessons in the context of our current election season. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Turkey's Coup Attempt and Crackdown

    Jul 19 2016

    Does U.S. militarism compromise NATO obligations? A. Trevor Thrall talks about the recent coup attempt in Turkey. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Political Party Shifts on Immigration, Guest Workers

    Jul 18 2016

    How have Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump tried to take advantage of changing views on immigration? Alex Nowrasteh and David Bier comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Polling on Crime and Punishment

    Jul 15 2016

    How have Americans changed their thinking on crime and punishment? Derek Cohen of the Texas Public Policy Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Challenging CBO Rosy/Dire Projections

    Jul 14 2016

    Congressional Budget Office numbers about the future of debt and deficits should be taken with more than a grain of salt. Dan Mitchell explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Citizens United and Electoral Reform

    Jul 13 2016

    Krist Novoselić is chairman of Fairvote.org. In his assessment of reforms to make changes to elections in the United States, he ranks overturning Citizens United at the bottom and argues that groups have free speech rights. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evaluating the Next British Prime Minister

    Jul 12 2016

    New British PM Theresa May doesn't have a record that should encourage people who support free markets and relatively free migration. Tom Clougherty comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Free Parking's High Cost to Transit

    Jul 11 2016

    Market pricing of on-street parking could save commuters time and energy, but locals don't like it. Ike Brannon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hillary Clinton's Free College Addendum

    Jul 08 2016

    Hillary Clinton has added more goodies to her plans for free college for young people. Neal McCluskey discusses some of the problems. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Alton Sterling, Body Cameras, and 'Proper Police Procedure'

    Jul 07 2016

    Body camera footage and witness recordings help investigators after police-initiated killings. In the case of Alton Sterling, killed by Baton Rouge police this week, will investigators ask the right questions? Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State

    Jul 07 2016

    The policies that have led to America's growing security state required the abdication of Congress and the courts. Karen J. Greenberg is author of Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Scalia and Criminal Defense

    Jul 06 2016

    The legacy of Antonin Scalia's years on the Supreme Court must include his support for the rights of the accused. Kevin A. Ring, author of Scalia's Court, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Prospects Dim for Freer Trade

    Jul 01 2016

    The likely inhabitants of the White House in 2017 would not be happy warrior on behalf of free trade. Phil Levy with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #CatoConnects: Brexit Happened. Now What?

    Jun 30 2016

    Brexit is now in progress. So what are the next steps and how will trade and migration be affected? Cato's Tom Clougherty and Marian Tupy take questions via Twitter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Specialization and Trade: A Re-Introduction to Economics

    Jun 29 2016

    The economics profession suffers from profound confirmation bias. Fixing that problem may require a profound shift in thinking. Arnold Kling attempts to re-introduce the field in his new book, Specialization and Trade. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 'Honest Services Fraud' at the High Court

    Jun 28 2016

    The Supreme Court has thrown out the conviction of former Virginia governor Bob McDonnell. Kevin Ring of Families Against Mandatory Minimums says it was a good ruling. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Does Brexit Matter?

    Jun 27 2016

    Brexit happened, but it's far from clear that the referendum was either particularly good or spells certain doom for the UK or the European Union. Tom Clougherty comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal

    Jun 24 2016

    Research into the therapeutic value of psychedelics has been prevented by decades of prohibition. Tom Shroder is author of Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Protecting Religious Liberty in Education

    Jun 23 2016

    Religious liberty and public schooling often come into conflict. Charles Glenn discusses how to protect religious freedom in education. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The State of Religious Liberty in Courts

    Jun 22 2016

    The history of protecting religious liberty at the courts is mixed, but there is hope. Douglas Laycock comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FAA Works to Shutter 'Uber for Planes'

    Jun 21 2016

    FlyteNow wants to let private pilots share empty seats on their planes. The FAA says it's illegal. Matt Voska is CEO of FlyteNow. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The ISIS Economy

    Jun 20 2016

    The RAND Corporation's Howard J. Shatz discusses how the so-called Islamic State sustains itself economically. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Right to Try Now Legal in 30 States

    Jun 17 2016

    The federal government could make it easier for doctors to allow terminal patients to try unapproved therapies. Starlee Coleman of the Goldwater Institute talks about why they should. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The 'Loaded Weapon' in the White House

    Jun 16 2016

    What powers will the next President inherit? What can Congress do to reassert its primacy as makers of law? Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) spoke at a Cato Institute Capitol Hill briefing in May. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Clarifying Questions about Mass Killers

    Jun 15 2016

    The motivations of mass killers matter when evaluating a proposed public policy response. Trevor Burrus comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • When Your Small Business Makes a 'Public Offering'

    Jun 14 2016

    Don't be surprised if the Securities and Exchange Commission comes knocking when you ask your friends to invest in your small business. Thaya Brook Knight comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Kneejerk Policy Prescriptions Following Tragedy

    Jun 13 2016

    Policy prescriptions offered in the immediate wake of tragedy can give people a sense of relief from the tragedy itself, but those proposed reforms would often sacrifice basic liberties. Adam Bates comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Whren and Racial Profiling

    Jun 10 2016

    The Whren case decided 20 years ago gave police wider latitude to detain people. It hasn't all been to the good. Jonathan Blanks explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Governor Cuomo's Twin Stabs at Free Speech and Association

    Jun 09 2016

    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo would have state agencies boycott those who would boycott Israel and he does his best to circumvent the Citizens United decision. David Keating of the Center for Competitive Politics comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hemp for Victory 2016

    Jun 08 2016

    The struggle for clearly delineating hemp from marijuana in federal law is a decades-long one. Eric Steenstra of Vote Hemp explains why virtually all hemp products in the U.S. must be imported. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Would Large Health Savings Accounts Work?

    Jun 07 2016

    The concept of "large HSAs" has landed on Capitol Hill. How would they work? Michael Cannon explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Happens When Congress Decides the Presidential Race?

    Jun 06 2016

    The Twelfth Amendment could be invoked in an election scenario where no electoral majority emerges. What does that look like? Ilya Shapiro explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will the FCC Unravel Telecom Reform?

    Jun 03 2016

    Telecom reform in the 1990s is considered a big success. So why is the FCC nibbling around the edges of undoing that reform? Larry Downes comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Gross Output (GO) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

    Jun 02 2016

    How does Gross Output compare with Gross Domestic Product in describing the economy? Economist Mark Skousen comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Do You Fit A Terrorist Profile?

    Jun 01 2016

    Federal intelligence agencies are enlisting new agents, and some of them could be people you already know. Patrick Eddington comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Courage is the Secret to Liberty

    May 26 2016

    In presenting the Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty to Danish newspaper editor Flemming Rose, former ACLU president Nadine Strossen discusses the importance of unfettered freedom of speech. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Flemming Rose Receives the 2016 Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty

    May 25 2016

    Flemming Rose is the 2016 recipient of the Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty and is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. Rose is the author of The Tyranny of Silence. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Conspiracies of the Ruling Class

    May 24 2016

    The struggle for limited government must contend with an entrenched foe: the ruling class, which carries with it an agenda for larger government. Lawrence B. Lindsey discusses his new book on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Would A Prediction Market Limit the Fed?

    May 23 2016

    Would targeting nominal GDP remove Federal Reserve discretion? Would it constrain fiscal policy? Economist David Beckworth comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Challenging Education Savings Accounts in Nevada

    May 20 2016

    A Nevada program aimed at giving parents more educational options for their children goes to court. Jason Bedrick comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump's Costly, Wasteful Plan for Domestic Drones

    May 19 2016

    Donald Trump needs drones to make his border security plans work. The problem is that it won't work. Matthew Feeney and Alex Nowrasteh comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Religious Liberty and Economic Liberty

    May 18 2016

    Economic liberty and religious liberty are often expressed by the same choices. Jay W. Richards comments on the current fights pitting economic and religious liberty against government power. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Incumbent Homeowners and Economic Growth

    May 17 2016

    Elite coastal cities appear at odds with businesses trying to bring in talent. Timothy B. Lee, a writer at Vox, discusses the housing issues that pit homeowners against the demands of industry. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • School Choice and Bathroom Mandates

    May 16 2016

    The new restroom mandate from the Obama White House would be rendered irrelevant if parents had more choices for their kids. Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Ten Years of the Cato Daily Podcast

    May 13 2016

    To mark the tenth anniversary of the Cato Daily Podcast, Cato Institute president Peter Goettler talks with host Caleb O. Brown. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Changing Conversations in Policy and Politics

    May 12 2016

    Rick Berman, founder of Berman and Company, discusses how to "change the conversation" and the myriad candidate missteps in the 2016 election season. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump v. Hillary: A Content-Free Election Year

    May 11 2016

    The 2016 election for president is at once full of anger and devoid of substantial discussions of the most serious problems of government. Ben Domenech, publisher of The Federalist, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • TSA's Regulatory Dance over Strip Search Machines

    May 10 2016

    The Transportation Security Administration doesn't care for rules, except the ones it imposes on travelers. Marc Scribner and Jim Harper comment on the TSA's effort to pat down its attempts to skirt the law. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Oklahoma Tightens Rules on Civil Asset Forfeiture

    May 09 2016

    Oklahoma has made it easier for victims of civil asset forfeiture to seek attorneys fees, but the practice continues. Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trademarks and Derby-Pie®

    May 07 2016

    Trademarks are a special kind of intellectual property, but just what do they punish and protect? Walter Olson explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • FDA Will Treat E-cigarettes as Tobacco

    May 05 2016

    The FDA has decided that e-cigarettes should be treated in the same manner as other tobacco products. That could mean bad things for former smokers who used e-cigarettes to quit. Terence Kealey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jane Jacobs at 100

    May 04 2016

    Jane Jacobs helped redefine the idea of how cities could thrive. Her book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, is a classic work detailing how vibrant city life emerges. Emily Washington of the Mercatus Center comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Assimilating Refugees into Labor Markets

    May 03 2016

    There are many ways to smooth the assimilation process for refugees. Alex Nowrasteh looks at the case of refugees from Syria. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Continuing Humanitarian Disaster in Venezuela

    May 02 2016

    The failure of government in Venezuela continues. Ian Vasquez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Cultural Revolution: A People's History

    Apr 29 2016

    Frank Dikötter discusses his new book, The Cultural Revolution: A People's History. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Our Republican Constitution

    Apr 28 2016

    What kind of constitution does the U.S. really have? Randy E. Barnett makes his case in Our Republican Constitution: Securing the Liberty and Sovereignty of We the People. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pot, Federalism, and Political Speech

    Apr 27 2016

    Representative John Yarmuth (D-KY) discusses possible changes to how the feds treat cannabis and elucidates his proposed amendment to alter the First Amendment's protections for political speech. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Growth, Entrepreneurship, and Housing

    Apr 27 2016

    What stands in the way of jumpstarting entrepreneurship? How should businesses' complaints about housing supply be addressed? Economist Edward L. Glaeser comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Obama's Gesture in Syria

    Apr 25 2016

    President Obama's pledge of 250 troops to fight ISIS in Syria seems to be designed mainly to placate domestic constituencies. Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Obama v. Brexit

    Apr 22 2016

    What does President Obama think about the possibility of "Brexit," Great Britain's possible departure from the European Union? Also, why should Britons care what he thinks? Tom Clougherty comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Regulators Hope to Use Blockchain

    Apr 21 2016

    Financial markets stand to benefit from distributed blockchain technology, but so do regulators. J. Christopher Giancarlo of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The 9/11 Report and U.S.-Saudi Relations

    Apr 20 2016

    Is it time to declassify key pages of the 9/11 Report? Emma Ashford discusses the complicated U.S.-Saudi relationship in light of the looming declassification. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Trouble with Cops Using Stingrays

    Apr 19 2016

    How do cops use so-called "stingrays" to intercept phone communication and why is it such a big secret? Adam Bates explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The European Reassurance Initiative

    Apr 19 2016

    Why must the U.S. spend still more billions to provide "reassurance" to European allies? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Feds Will Regulate Payday Lenders

    Apr 15 2016

    How might the CFPB regulate payday lenders? Thaya Brook Knight explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Steel Tariffs, Trump and Free Trade

    Apr 15 2016

    The policies that help drive companies to move production outside the U.S. are worth understanding, the convenient rhetoric of politicians notwithstanding. Dan Pearson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Business and the Blockchain

    Apr 14 2016

    How will the blockchain change business? Patrick Byrne, founder of Overstock.com, offers his thoughts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evaluating Bitcoin Regulation

    Apr 12 2016

    New York has led government efforts to regulate bitcoin, so how did they do it? Dana Syracuse and Peter Van Valkenburgh comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The MetLife Case and 'Systemic Importance'

    Apr 11 2016

    The designation of "systemically important financial institution" for MetLife would mean billions of dollars in costs that regulators never bothered to tally. Thaya Brook Knight comments on how MetLife, at least for now, gets to avoid additional federal control. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump's Erroneous Remittance Scheme

    Apr 07 2016

    Donald Trump wants to ban remittances back to Mexico. Problem is, says Alex Nowrasteh, such a plan might spur more illegal immigration to the U.S. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Citizens United and the Role of the FEC

    Apr 06 2016

    To what extent should the Federal Election Commission attempt to blunt the impact of the Citizens United decision? Allen Dickerson with the Center for Competitive Politics comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Panama Papers and Corrupt Governments

    Apr 05 2016

    The Panama Papers leak has revealed that many current and former heads of authoritarian governments hid money from taxation. But even if that money turns out to have been stolen, should that fact bring an end to financial privacy? Dan Mitchell comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Poverty, Inc.

    Apr 04 2016

    How most of us think about human flourishing could be all wrong. Mark Weber is a co-producer of the film, Poverty, Inc. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Right to Counsel at the Supreme Court

    Mar 31 2016

    One element of the right to counsel has been decided by the Supreme Court. Trevor Burrus comments on the justices' opinions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sentencing Reform Sticking Points

    Mar 30 2016

    Sentencing reform could come this year, but sticking points remain. Kevin Ring of Families Against Mandatory Minimums comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Law Enforcement Cheers the Return of Equitable Sharing

    Mar 29 2016

    The Department of Justice last year suspended its practice of providing kickbacks to local police engaged in civil asset forfeiture. Now it's back. Darpana Sheth of the Institute for Justice and Cato's Adam Bates comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Political Philosophy for Voters Who Don't Want It

    Mar 28 2016

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights

    Mar 25 2016

    American public schools often censor controversial student speech that the Constitution protects. Catherine J. Ross is author of Lessons in Censorship: How Schools and Courts Subvert Students’ First Amendment Rights. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How America Makes Invisible War

    Mar 25 2016

    America's military engagements overseas are often done without any public debate and sometimes without any public knowledge. New York Times correspondent Mark Mazzetti comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Challenges of Intellectual Property

    Mar 23 2016

    The consequentialist case for intellectual property demands some understanding of how any given rules play out. Richard Epstein comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Apple vs. FBI

    Mar 22 2016

    U.S. Representative Darrell Issa (R-CA) talks about encryption, the Apple case, "Operation Chokepoint," and other issues. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Battle Lines over "Brexit"

    Mar 21 2016

    What considerations should be given highest priority as Britons consider exiting the European Union. Tom Clougherty comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is It Time to Tyrant-Proof the White House?

    Mar 18 2016

    Whoever shows up on January 20, 2017 to occupy the White House, columnist Conor Friedersdorf says its time to tyrant-proof the executive branch. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Repair (or End) Judicial Nomination Hearings

    Mar 17 2016

    The Senate's judicial nomination hearings should focus on text and meaning of the Constitution, not platitudes about fealty to the law. Josh Blackman comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A New Supreme Court Nominee

    Mar 16 2016

    President Obama has named the person that he would like to see replace Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court. Ilya Shapiro comments on the nomination of Merrick Garland. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Affirmative Action and Academic Mismatch

    Mar 16 2016

    Affirmative action seems to go before the U.S. Supreme Court regularly. Gail Heriot discusses why this matters to the Fisher v. University of Texas case before the court. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Regarding the Common Law

    Mar 14 2016

    The common law deserves high regard from libertarians. Jim Harper comments.Related: https://www.cato.org/policy-report/marchapril-2016/remember-common-law See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Escaping the War on Drugs

    Mar 11 2016

    The failures of the War on Drugs have exacted a substantial toll. Author Don Winslow discusses his research and offers some hope for ending the failed experiment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Loco-Foco Movement and Lessons for Today

    Mar 10 2016

    Radicals seized control of the New York Democratic Party and instituted a set of principles that reoriented the party toward individualism. Anthony Comegna discusses the Loco-Focos. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fact and Fiction on the U.S. Border

    Mar 09 2016

    The U.S.-Mexico border is the subject of some strong feelings. Representative Beto O'Rourke (D-TX) talks about his city of El Paso, the benefits of cross-border trade, and the War on Drugs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Civil Asset Forfeiture Is Wrong

    Mar 08 2016

    When New Mexicans moved to eliminate civil asset forfeiture, their message was simple: Civil asset forfeiture is wrong. Hal Stratton, former New Mexico Attorney General comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump's Consistently Inconsistent Foreign Policy

    Mar 07 2016

    The foreign policy of Donald Trump leaves little indication what he might fight for if he becomes President. Trevor Thrall comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Poor Would Pay the Price for Trump's Protectionism

    Mar 04 2016

    Donald Trump's protectionist bombast has its defenders in Congress. Scott Lincicome discusses a key example. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Resolving Puerto Rico's Fiscal Failures

    Mar 03 2016

    Puerto Rico's massive debts are leading some in Washington to argue for a bailout. Ike Brannon says that would set a bad precedent for financially troubled states like Illinois. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Narconomics: How to Run a Drug Cartel

    Mar 02 2016

    Drug cartels face many of the same incentives and constraints faced by any other business. Tom Wainwright, author of Narconomics, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Learning from Making a Murderer

    Feb 29 2016

    The Netflix documentary series Making a Murderer raises important questions about how investigators and prosecutors do their jobs. Cato's Tim Lynch and Shawn Armbrust of the Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Inevitability of Federal-Land-Use Fights

    Feb 26 2016

    Without pricing the various uses of land, the feds manage to turn land-use disputes into bitter fights. Randal O'Toole comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Emissions and the Clean Power Plan

    Feb 24 2016

    The Supreme Court's stay of the President's Clean Power Plan complicates efforts to reduce emissions. Sen. James Inhofe, chairman of the Senate's Environment and Public Works Committee, comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Guantanamo Bay, Talking Points, and Endless War

    Feb 23 2016

    President Obama says closing Guantanamo Bay would nix a popular talking point for people hostile to America. Ben Friedman argues that not dropping so many bombs in foreign countries might be more effective. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Foreign Policy: #FeeltheBern vs. #MakeAmericaGreatAgain

    Feb 22 2016

    Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump hang their hats on the notion that they recognize the Iraq War as erroneous. Christopher A. Preble argues that foreign policy is more than just errors avoided. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Weighing the Record of Antonin Scalia

    Feb 19 2016

    There is much for libertarians to like in the opinions of Antonin Scalia. His full record is worth examining. Roger Pilon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Apple Will Fight Federal Conscription to Defeat Encryption

    Feb 18 2016

    Apple CEO Tim Cook wants customers to know that the company will fight a federal effort to compel the company to cripple its own security. Julian Sanchez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Scalia on Regulation and Criminal Justice

    Feb 17 2016

    Antonin Scalia's legacy in both regulation and criminal justice is a mixed one. Walter Olson and Tim Lynch comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court

    Feb 16 2016

    What broad constitutional legacy does Antonin Scalia leave? Ilya Shapiro comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Special Federal Scrutiny for Muslims Is Ineffective, Unconstitutional

    Feb 12 2016

    Federal agencies have singled out Muslims for special scrutiny when it comes to terrorism. Patrick Eddington argues that it's not just ineffective, it feeds terrorist narratives. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Free Political Speech under Fire in Colorado

    Feb 11 2016

    If you want to buy ads in Colorado urging people to vote, someone might drag you into court for it. Paul Sherman from the Institute for Justice comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Animates Trump (and Other) Voters?

    Feb 10 2016

    What values animates support for various candidates? Emily Ekins comments.Further reading:Donald Trump Supporters Think about Morality Differently than Other Voters. Here’s How. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Drive for Campus Speech Codes

    Feb 09 2016

    Campus speech and its censors received a great deal of attention in 2015. In a just-concluded debate at Cato Unbound, Greg Lukianoff argued that fear of regulators drives many campuses to restrict speech. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Remembering Andrew Coulson

    Feb 08 2016

    A fierce supporter of educational freedom even before his decade at the Cato Institute, Andrew Coulson passed away this week. His colleague Neal McCluskey discusses Andrew's contributions to understanding of market education and educational freedom. Further reading: Market Education: The Unknown HistoryAndrew Coulson's Biography See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Interventionism Wins in Rand Paul's Exit from POTUS Race

    Feb 05 2016

    With Rand Paul's exit from the race for the White House, a foreign policy of restraint becomes less likely. Chris Preble and John Samples comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Rights of the Dying: A Personal Story

    Feb 04 2016

    What are the rights of the dying? Barbara Mancini of Compassion and Choices discusses the end of her father's life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • SuperPACs #FeeltheBern Even as They Boost Bernie's Campaign

    Feb 03 2016

    Bernie Sanders hates SuperPACs even as they've helped his electoral prospects. Paul Sherman from the Institute for Justice comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is Free Trade with China A Bad Deal?

    Feb 02 2016

    Recent research indicates that labor markets may have trouble adjusting to robust free trade. Dan Ikenson comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Few Facts about the Pay Gap

    Feb 01 2016

    President Obama wants to compel many companies to begin reporting salary information to the federal government. Thaya Brook Knight comments.Correction: The proposal would not require companies to provide the information as part of their own tax filings, but would require them to use the information from employees’ Forms W-2 to compile the required disclosure, which would be made to the EEOC. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Measuring the Impact(s) of Immigration

    Jan 29 2016

    Beyond economics, what impacts do immigrants have on the United States? Benjamin Powell of Texas Tech University comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The American Criminal Justice System Needs an Overhaul

    Jan 28 2016

    Federal judge Alex Kozinski says the American criminal justice system needs more than minor tweaks to repair its gross injustices. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Understanding the Fight over GMOs

    Jan 27 2016

    Robert Fraley, Chief Technology Officer at Monsanto, discusses the promise of and resistance to genetically modified organisms. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • 2015's Big Advances in Educational Freedom

    Jan 26 2016

    2011 was supposed to be the "year of school choice." But last year has plenty to recommend it. Jason Bedrick runs down the impressive recent achievements in advancing educational freedom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #FeeltheBern: Higher Education Edition

    Jan 25 2016

    Bernie Sanders' pitch for tuition-free college wasn't supposed to be the biggest education story in the Presidential race. Neal McCluskey comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Executive Move on Immigration Goes to SCOTUS

    Jan 22 2016

    As policy, President Obama's 2014 action on immigration may be good. As a constitutional matter, it's highly questionable. Alex Nowrasteh and Ilya Shapiro comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • DHS Backs Down (Again) on REAL ID

    Jan 21 2016

    The Department of Homeland Security appears to have kicked the deadline for REAL ID compliance down the road once again. Jim Harper comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Can Spending Corrupt a Ballot Initiative?

    Jan 20 2016

    The Supreme Court has an opportunity to clarify that spending money to influence voters on a ballot initiative isn't a corrupting influence. Allen Dickerson with the Center for Competitive Politics and Cato's Trevor Burrus comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will Credit Rating Agencies #FeeltheBern?

    Jan 19 2016

    Bernie Sanders wants to turn credit raters into nonprofits. Mark Calabria comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What's Your “Threat Score”?

    Jan 13 2016

    Some police agencies are now using online data to assess the "threat score" of suspects. Jim Harper comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Government Workers and Friedrichs

    Jan 12 2016

    The Supreme Court is now weighting Freidrichs v. California Teachers Association. Mark Janus is the lead plaintiff in a near-identical case in Illinois. Jacob Huebert is his attorney. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Civil Asset Forfeiture Takes Another Hit

    Jan 11 2016

    The suspension of "equitable sharing" in the federal civil asset forfeiture program may have been done for the wrong reasons, but it was the right move. Adam Bates comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Power Wars: Inside Obama's Post-9/11 Presidency

    Jan 08 2016

    New York Times Washington correspondent Charlie Savage discusses his new book, Power Wars: Inside Obama's Post-9/11 Presidency. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Bad and Good of Obama's Executive Orders on Guns

    Jan 07 2016

    The President's executive orders on guns contain some relatively benign elements, but parts of the plan could violate the rights of many Americans. David B. Kopel evaluates the plan. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • TSA's New Push on REAL ID and Naked Body Scans

    Jan 06 2016

    The Transportation Security Administration is again pushing to reject some state IDs for air travel and compel more travelers to go through naked body scanners. Jim Harper comments on the law and politics. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Immigration Enforcement Losses and Wins

    Jan 05 2016

    Immigration enforcement can get easier with better immigration policy. Alex Nowrasteh explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Islamic Military Alliance

    Jan 04 2016

    A new Islamic military alliance has fewer members than initially claimed. Emma Ashford discusses why. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Presidential Power to Reschedule Marijuana

    Jan 01 2016

    The President's powers are limited, but the President could reschedule (or deschedule) marijuana to make it easier for entrepreneurs in states where federal and state law don't agree. Ilya Shapiro comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • U.S. Shouldn't Steal Spotlight in ISIS Fight

    Dec 31 2015

    Following meaningful gains against ISIS by Iraqi Security Forces, just how should American leaders respond to maximize the benefits? Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • States Will Begin Reporting Special Tax Preferences

    Dec 30 2015

    New guidance asks states to begin providing more details about who gets special tax deals. Will Freeland from the American Legislative Exchange Council comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Not-So-Smart Sanctions on Russia

    Dec 29 2015

    How well do so-called targeted sanctions on Russia work for effecting policy change? Emma Ashford offers her analysis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Challenge to Certificate of Need in Virginia

    Dec 28 2015

    Certificate of need laws can give entrenched providers a role in deciding which competitors are allowed to operate. Darpana Sheth of the Institute for Justice discusses the case of medical imaging in Virginia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Family Integrity, Prison and Obama's Clemency Record

    Dec 25 2015

    Family integrity is hard to maintain when an inmate is held hundreds of miles from home. Molly Gill of Families Against Mandatory Minimums talks about what it means for prisoner reintegration into society. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Thinking about Rights and the Founding Era

    Dec 24 2015

    The United States was a grand compromise, one created out of common views of rights and government power. Professor Rob McDonald of West Point discusses what that means. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An End for the DC Opportunity Scholarship?

    Dec 23 2015

    A popular voucher program may come to an end unless it is reauthorized -- something this year’s federal omnibus spending bill failed to do. Jason Bedrick offers his analysis. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Enduring Elite Consensus for Military Intervention

    Dec 22 2015

    Americans at present have little appetite for wars of choice, but debates among presidential candidates reflect a very different consensus. Chris Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Tortured Immigration Debate

    Dec 21 2015

    The current immigration debate has turned nativist. The new, uglier debate centers on barring immigration, not expanding it. Alex Nowrasteh and Bryan Caplan comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Fourth Branch of Government

    Dec 18 2015

    Concentrating power into administrative agencies creates something like a fourth branch of government. Jonathan Turley comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Tortured Logic Behind the Fed's Twin Rate Hikes

    Dec 17 2015

    The Federal Reserve raised its target for the federal funds rate and hiked actual interest paid on excess bank reserves. George Selgin comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Have We Hit 'Peak Carbon'?

    Dec 16 2015

    Is the 2015 dip in global carbon emissions the beginning of a sustained decline? Chip Knappenberger says it's not likely. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • ISIS and the Presidential Race

    Dec 15 2015

    The so-called Islamic State poses problems for Republican candidates trying to differentiate themselves from President Obama. Christopher A. Preble comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Turning Cops into Tax Collectors

    Dec 14 2015

    The criminal justice system has, in many ways, turned police officers into revenue officers. Grover Norquist explains why that's a serious problem. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Latin American Populism Gets the Cold Shoulder

    Dec 11 2015

    Latin American populism, at least for now, is on the wane. Ian Vasquez comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cigarette Smuggling Rolling Up in New York

    Dec 10 2015

    Excise taxes in New York and other states have given rise to cigarette smuggling. Michael D. LaFaive of the Mackinac Center explains the consequences. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Evolution of Everything: How New Ideas Emerge

    Dec 09 2015

    Matt Ridley discusses his new book, The Evolution of Everything: How New Ideas Emerge. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Evaluating the Arguments for Regulating Bitcoin

    Dec 08 2015

    There are several arguments for regulating bitcoin, but they need to face basic scrutiny. William J. Luther evaluates the claims. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • State-Level Health Care Reform Alive and Well

    Dec 07 2015

    Extending the promise of affordable, dependable health insurance at the state level is alive and well. Justin Owen of the Beacon Center of Tennessee discusses how states can improve health care. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Free to Booze (Except in Pennsylvania)

    Dec 04 2015

    Pennsylvania's alcohol laws seem designed to waste everyone's time and energy. Bob Dick from the Commonwealth Foundation offers his thoughts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Foster Care without Broken Families

    Dec 03 2015

    The foster care systems in the United States regularly break up families. Is there a way to prevent that? Andrew Brown with the Foundation for Government Accountability discusses one idea. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Zoning Rules!

    Dec 02 2015

    What are the economic impacts of zoning? William Fischel is author of Zoning Rules! The Economics of Land Use Regulation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Texas Doctors Organize against Innovation

    Dec 01 2015

    Telemedicine is a field in its infancy. In Texas, some physicians appear to want to keep it that way. John Davidson of the Texas Public Policy Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Repairing 'Mens Rea' Requirements

    Nov 30 2015

    Criminal law needs "mens rea" reform. So says Robert Alt of the Buckeye Institute in Ohio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Unclear Price of Handing Over Our Data

    Nov 27 2015

    Government surveillance aside, security expert Bruce Schneier says the price of ubiquitous corporate tracking is also unclear. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • General Warrants, Past and Present

    Nov 26 2015

    The general warrant, a relic of colonial America, could make a comeback. Georgetown Law's Laura Donohue discusses the history of general warrants. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Two Thanksgiving Dinner Arguments

    Nov 25 2015

    A special Thanksgiving Argument Edition of the Cato Daily Podcast. Duke University's Michael Munger discusses the bad choices of voters versus consumers and fears about the sharing economy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Protecting the Public from Police Drones

    Nov 24 2015

    State legislators should learn how cops plan to use drones for surveillance. Connor Boyack of the Libertas Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The New Eminent Domain Fight in Chicago

    Nov 23 2015

    A new fight over eminent domain is unfolding in Chicago. Hilary Gowins of the Illinois Policy Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #CatoConnects: Prospects for Criminal Justice Reform

    Nov 21 2015

    Will sentencing reform and other fixes to our broken criminal justice system come soon? Molly Gill of Families Against Mandatory Minimums and Cato's Adam Bates discuss the prospects. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Taking a Stand: Reflections on Life, Liberty, and the Economy

    Nov 20 2015

    Economist Robert Higgs discusses what he's learned over the years. His new book is Taking a Stand: Reflections on Life, Liberty, and the Economy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Power of Police Unions

    Nov 19 2015

    Do police unions protect bad cops? Are police unions a benefit to public safety? Derek M. Cohen of the Texas Public Policy Foundation comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Overhauling American Criminal Justice

    Nov 18 2015

    How would federal appeals court judge Alex Kozinski change the American criminal justice system? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Evolution of Everything

    Nov 17 2015

    The latest book from Matt Ridley is The Evolution of Everything, where he discusses changes in faith, government, technology and our own minds. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Attacks in Paris and Chasing Ghosts

    Nov 16 2015

    Programs designed to fight terrorism at home demand metrics to determine their effectiveness. All too often, these studies aren't conducted. John Mueller and Mark G. Stewart discuss their book, Chasing Ghosts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Excursions into Socialist Calculation

    Nov 13 2015

    This is a sample of the Excursions podcast from Libertarianism.org. In this episode, George H. Smith discusses the marginal utility revolution in economic thought. This revolution provided the foundation for Ludwig von Mises's argument that rational economic calculation is impossible in a socialist economy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Ohio's Crude Stab at Cannabis Legalization

    Nov 12 2015

    From the off-year election to the crude marketing and cronyist structure of the ballot initiative, perhaps Ohio's marijuana initiative was doomed to fail. Morgan Fox of the Marijuana Policy Project comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Anemic Recovery, Regulation and Taxation

    Nov 11 2015

    Robert Higgs discusses our most recent economic recovery and some thoughts on how Keynesians explain events in American economic history. Higgs is author of the new book, Taking a Stand. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Policing for Profit Proceeds Apace

    Nov 10 2015

    Civil forfeiture has grown tremendously in recent years. Lisa Knepper and Angela C. Erickson from the Institute for Justice discuss their new report, Policing for Profit. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Socialism, Oil and the Bolivarian Alliance

    Nov 09 2015

    Socialist-leaning countries in Latin America want to present themselves as a counter to U.S. power in the hemisphere, but without oil revenues, the movement may have trouble fueling its plans. Fergus Hodgson of the PanAm Post comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Policing the Speech Police in Wisconsin

    Nov 06 2015

    More than two years after pre-dawn raids on the homes of political activists in Wisconsin, there is good news for unfettered political speech. Eric O'Keefe was among those under investigation. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Speaker Ryan and Congress's Spending Addiction

    Nov 05 2015

    Congress is rarely willing to make the kind of tradeoffs necessary to freeze, let alone reduce spending. Will new House Speaker Paul Ryan change that? Jonathan Bydlak from the Coalition to Reduce Spending comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Without Congress, Obama Turns Two Wars into Three

    Nov 04 2015

    Congress hasn't authorized President Obama's new war in Syria. The executive branch claims Congress in 2001 already approved it. Gene Healy discusses Obama's new war. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Carbon Emissions and Economic Development

    Nov 03 2015

    The fight over carbon restrictions must be weighed against the value of helping poor countries develop. Richard Tol of the University of Sussex comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Working to Stay the EPA's Clean Power Plan

    Nov 02 2015

    The EPA's clean power plan is the subject of legal challenges, but those challenges may not ultimately matter. Andrew Grossman updates the status of the legal fight. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Watching the Watchmen: Police Body Cameras

    Oct 30 2015

    Police body cameras will not end police abuse, but they have the potential to give critical context to high-stakes police interactions. Matthew Feeney discusses the findings of his new report. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Date-onomics

    Oct 29 2015

    The relative supply and demand of romantic partners has profound implications for how we treat each other. Jon Birger, the author of Date-onomics, discusses what he learned by writing the book. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Megabank Internal Culture and Financial Crisis

    Oct 28 2015

    The cultures still operating within massive financial institutions will continue to bring the U.S. toward financial crisis. That's the claim of Boston College finance professor Edward Kane. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • More Evidence on Pre-K

    Oct 27 2015

    A new study on pre-kindergarten indicates what researchers have long seen: The benefits of pre-K do not appear to persist. Neal McCluskey discusses the research. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Expanding the Right to Try

    Oct 26 2015

    Two dozen states allow terminally ill patients to try unapproved drugs, but there are still impediments to a more expansive policy. Christina Sandefur of the Goldwater Institute comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Reckoning for Big Data

    Oct 23 2015

    Big data, both governmental and corporate, poses serious questions and risks for Americans' privacy and security. Bruce Schneier comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Surveillance Reform Past and Future

    Oct 22 2015

    Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) discusses surveillance reforms and the need for keeping pressure on Congress to continue to take warrantless spying seriously. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Perilous Partners

    Oct 21 2015

    American leaders have cooperated with regimes around the world that are, to varying degrees, repressive or corrupt. Ted Galen Carpenter discusses his new book, Perilous Partners. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Jeb Bush Offers Latest Version of 'Obamacare Light'

    Oct 20 2015

    Jeb Bush's proposed replacement for Obamacare relies heavily on government intervention to drive private health coverage decisions. Michael Cannon comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Democratic Socialism at the Democratic Debate

    Oct 19 2015

    Senator Bernie Sanders calls himself a "democratic socialist," but what does that mean in America today? Emily Ekins and Marian Tupy comment on the Democratic debate. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Strong Dollar and Troubled Currencies

    Oct 16 2015

    A strong dollar negatively impacts some currencies, with a few notable exceptions. Steve Hanke comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Military Adventures and the Democratic Debate

    Oct 15 2015

    Tuesday's Democratic debate featured less-than-satisfying answers about how the candidates might handle the next drumbeat for war. Emma Ashford and Chris Preble comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Big Bonus of Federal Employment

    Oct 14 2015

    Federal worker pay is far higher and growing faster than in the private sector, according to Chris Edwards. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • House Moves to Free Crude Oil for Export

    Oct 13 2015

    The House has voted to allow U.S. oil producers to export crude for the first time in many years, but President Obama may veto the plan. Emma Ashford discusses the implications for commerce and foreign policy. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Immigration Reform Past and Future

    Oct 12 2015

    Bill Richardson served as the Democratic governor of New Mexico from 2003 to 2011. He talks about the benefits of large-scale reform to immigration laws. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • U.S. Risking Proxy War in Syria

    Oct 09 2015

    Involvement by both U.S. and Russian forces on opposing sides of the Syrian civil war may draw the U.S. into deeper conflict. Emma Ashford comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Michigan Canned Film Subsidies

    Oct 08 2015

    Michigan is one of a handful of states to throw out subsidies to the film industry. Jarrett Skorup of the Mackinac Center explains how they did it. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Is the 'Fiduciary Rule' Obamacare for Your IRA?

    Oct 07 2015

    A proposed rule governing how brokers do business could create new barriers for small investors seeking quality affordable advice. Thaya Brook Knight comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unveiling the Trans Pacific Partnership

    Oct 06 2015

    To make the Trans Pacific Partnership more meaningful, China should be included sooner than later. So says Dan Ikenson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sentencing Reform Appears in the Senate

    Oct 05 2015

    A substantial sentencing reform bill has made its first appearance in the U.S. Senate. Molly Gill of Families Against Mandatory Minimums comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Wisconsin's 'John Doe' Raids Two Years Later

    Oct 02 2015

    Two years after Wisconsin executed nighttime raids against Wisconsin political activists, no charges have been filed and no property has been returned. Eric O'Keefe is one of those activists. He tells his story. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New Mexico Nukes Civil Asset Forfeiture

    Oct 01 2015

    A broad coalition of activists succeeded in bringing an end to civil asset forfeiture in New Mexico. Paul Gessing of the Rio Grande Foundation explains how they did. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Chicago Sheds Ban on Street Meat

    Sep 30 2015

    Chicago isn't quite done regulating small-time food entrepreneurs. Hilary Gowins of the Illinois Policy Institute comments from the State Policy Network's annual meeting. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Major (Minor) Welfare Reform Discussion

    Sep 29 2015

    A small change to a small federal welfare program may nonetheless be the biggest welfare reform in years. Charles Hughes comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Setting the Terms for the Next Bailout

    Sep 28 2015

    Portions of the Dodd-Frank financial reform rest on a big flaw. Mark Calabria comments.Related:Event: Reforming the Federal Reserve's Rescue Authority See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Retroactive Gift of Surveillance Powers

    Sep 24 2015

    The Bush Administration sought to boost federal surveillance powers retroactively after the Attorney General refused to authorize them. Julian Sanchez explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • "Heller 2" at the DC Circuit Court

    Sep 23 2015

    A powerful federal circuit court has struck down some of the District of Columbia's restrictions on private gun ownership. Dave Kopel comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Facts Trump Fear on China's Economy

    Sep 22 2015

    American fears over China's future economic power need to be tempered with some evidence. The same goes for hopes that low-value-added manufacturing that has left the United States will some day return. Gerald P. O'Driscoll, Jr. comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Syrians Seek Refuge in U.S.

    Sep 21 2015

    Tens of thousands of refugees from Syria will find new homes in the United States. Alex Nowrasteh discusses the implications. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Fight to End Conscription

    Sep 18 2015

    The fight to end conscription made strange bedfellows. Barry W. Lynn, author of God and Government, discusses the people and times that made it possible. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Delegation and 'The Amtrak Case'

    Sep 17 2015

    Just what can Congress delegate? Alexander "Sasha" Volokh discusses his article in the new Cato Supreme Court Review. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • #CatoConnects: Sound Science and Public Policy

    Sep 16 2015

    How do we get to a better debate about science? Trevor Butterworth, director of Sense about Science USA, has a few ideas. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hillary the Candidate vs. Hillary: The Movie

    Sep 15 2015

    Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton isn't a fan of Citizens United, both the Supreme Court case and the organization. No wonder. The Citizens United film, Hillary: The Movie, was deeply critical of her. Now she wants to overturn the case that made the movie famous. Trevor Burrus comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Partisanship and Anti-War Sentiment

    Sep 14 2015

    Where did the anti-war movement go? Michael T. Heaney discusses his new coauthored book, Party in the Street: The Antiwar Movement and the Democratic Party after 9/11. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Compelled Support for Unions on Trial

    Sep 11 2015

    Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association deals with more than one important element of how unions get their money. Andrew Grossman discusses the Cato Institute's brief in the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Skinny on Jeb Bush's Tax Plan

    Sep 10 2015

    There are many worthy provisions in presidential candidate Jeb Bush's plan for tax reform, says Dan Mitchell. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Running for President on Obamacare Light?

    Sep 09 2015

    Two Republican candidates for President appear to be running on a health care platform of "Obamacare Light," according to Michael Cannon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Center for Competitive Politics v. Harris

    Sep 08 2015

    California wants donor information from a nonprofit charity that aims to end unconstitutional restrictions on election activity. The Supreme Court will decide that issue this term. Ilya Shapiro comments on Cato's new brief in the case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Poor Record and Rich Funding of Alternative Medicine

    Sep 07 2015

    Alternative medicine has a poor track record, yet has earned billions in federal funding in recent years. Todd Krainin of reason.tv discusses his new film on the subject. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Wild West of Drone Policy

    Sep 04 2015

    The rules of how the authorities may use drones are largely unwritten, at least so far. Patrick Eddington comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lessig's Odd Campaign to Restrict Electoral Spending

    Sep 03 2015

    Lawrence Lessig likes to point to Eugene McCarthy's 1968 campaign as he argues for restrictions on election spending. It's just a really bad example. John Samples explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What Makes a Teacher Shortage?

    Sep 02 2015

    A plea of "teacher shortage" in Indiana isn't supported by the evidence, says Andrew Coulson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The GOP's Trouble with Birthright Citizenship

    Sep 01 2015

    Birthright citizenship is an issue that could both help certain candidates win primary voters and relegate the GOP to minority status. Alex Nowrasteh and Emily Ekins comment. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Carter Trumps Reagan on Deregulation

    Aug 31 2015

    One of Jimmy Carter's greatest presidential legacies may be one that talk radio pundits would be loathe to admit: deregulation of big parts of the U.S. economy. Peter Van Doren comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cultivating Your Own Willpower

    Aug 28 2015

    Willpower is finite in the short run and powerful in the long run. John Tierney explains how we can cultivate willpower to help ourselves and those around us get the most out of life.Excerpt taken from Cato University 2015. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • New York AG's Erroneous War on Dietary Supplements

    Aug 27 2015

    When New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman thought he'd uncovered a massive fraud in the dietary supplement market, scientists stepped in to explain his error. Walter Olson explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Little Sisters of the Poor v. Burwell

    Aug 26 2015

    Can the federal government's agencies pick and choose which religious groups are burdened by Obamacare? Josh Blackman, one of the authors of a Cato Institute brief in Little Sisters of the Poor v. Burwell, says no. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Work versus Welfare Tradeoff: Europe

    Aug 25 2015

    How do European governments stack up when it comes to promoting work over welfare? Charles Hughes and Michael D. Tanner take a look in their new Cato paper, "The Work versus Welfare Trade-Off: Europe." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An Existential Threat to Bitcoin?

    Aug 24 2015

    The possible transition to a new form of software for Bitcoin has been cast as an existential threat, though it's not clear that it is. Jim Harper comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trump's Zero-Sum Talk on Trade

    Aug 21 2015

    Donald Trump's talk on trade pits Americans against foreign trading partners. Dan Ikenson says Trump's rhetoric seriously misrepresents the benefits trade delivers to the parties involved. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Fed Tries to Stop Cannabis Credit Union

    Aug 20 2015

    The Federal Reserve is working to prevent the Fourth Corner Credit Union from providing cannabis entrepreneurs in Colorado with basic banking services. George Selgin comments.The Federal Reserve’s War on Drugs See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Regulation Drives Medical Tourism

    Aug 19 2015

    Massive savings can come to those who shop around for medical care, but the government stymies consumers who might want to reap those rewards. Michael Cannon explains. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Human Freedom Index

    Aug 18 2015

    Human freedom encompasses far more than economic matters. Ian Vasquez discuess the new Human Freedom Index. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Candidate Clinton's Big-Spending Higher Ed Plans

    Aug 17 2015

    Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton wants to spend another $350 billion on higher education over ten years. Neal McCluskey says the plan would effectively subsidize students with higher earning potential. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • War Is the Health of the State

    Aug 14 2015

    The Founding Era was a violent one, and yet the Framers of the Constitution took great pains to constrain the government's war power. Christopher A. Preble discusses modern rejoinders to the fear of an executive branch empowered to make war. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Dangers of Campus Speech Police

    Aug 13 2015

    The new speech police on college campuses aren't helping students become resilient people. Greg Lukianoff comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Subprime Lending Makes a Comeback

    Aug 12 2015

    Subprime lending was a key component of the financial crisis. Now that the dust has settled, it's back in a big way. Mark Calabria comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • SEC Takes a Stab at CEO Pay

    Aug 11 2015

    The SEC's new rule compelling public companies to report ratios of CEO pay to other workers may provide a toehold for further regulation of corporate compensation. Thaya Knight comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money without Coherence

    Aug 07 2015

    What's the road back to a rational monetary system? Judy Shelton offers her concerns and ideas for orderly money. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A Year (and Counting) of Unauthorized War

    Aug 06 2015

    The fight against ISIS began a year ago, but Congress has yet to take a vote on the war. That's despite thousands of airstrikes and thousands of U.S. soldiers on the ground. U.S. Senator Tim Kaine says it's past time for Congress to assert itself on war powers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Free Brazil Movement

    Aug 05 2015

    Scandal at high levels in Brazil's government may give rise to big political and policy changes. Fabio Ostermann and Kim Kataguiri are leaders of the Free Brazil Movement. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The EPA's New Kind of Power Grab

    Aug 04 2015

    The EPA's ability to compel states to do its bidding may not rely on having certain regulatory rules upheld in court. So says Andrew Grossman. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Adding Insult to Civil Asset Forfeiture Abuse

    Aug 03 2015

    The seizure of Rhonda Cox's truck at the hands of Arizona cops was just the beginning of her education in civil asset forfeiture. Attorney J Cabou discusses her case. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Power of Willpower

    Jul 31 2015

    Willpower may well be the greatest human strength. New York Times columnist John Tierney discusses how willpower can be used and abused. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Police Body Cameras and the Death of Samuel DuBose

    Jul 30 2015

    The truth about the death of Samuel DuBose at the hands of Ray Tensing in Cincinnati might never have come to light if not for Tensing's own body camera. Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sanders vs. Immigrants, Economics

    Jul 29 2015

    Senator Bernie Sanders wants to protect low-income Americans at the expense of the planet's poorest people, but there's not much evidence his plan would work. Alex Nowrasteh comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reducing Federal Mandatory Minimum Sentencing

    Jul 28 2015

    The U.S. criminal justice system is overdue for an overhaul. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI) and Rep. Bobby Scott (D-VA) hope to save taxpayers' money while reducing mandatory minimum sentences. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform in Congress

    Jul 27 2015

    The standards of evidence used to take innocent owners' property under civil asset forfeiture are too weak according to Representative Tim Walberg (R-MI). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The End of Doom

    Jul 24 2015

    Cancer rates are down in America. Lifespans are up all over. Food is more abundant. Poverty is in decline. Critical to this progress is technology. Ronald Bailey discusses how and why to keep that ingenuity coming in his new book, The End of Doom. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • De Blasio Flinches on Ridesharing Cap

    Jul 23 2015

    New York Mayor Bill De Blasio has backed away from plans to regulate services like Uber and Lyft. But he may revisit the issue soon enough. Matthew Feeney comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Character and Liberty

    Jul 22 2015

    Would an emphasis on character education give rise to political leaders who value liberty? or does liberty allow character to emerge? Foundation for Economic Education President Lawrence W. Reed comments. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Clearing Obstacles to Work

    Jul 22 2015

    Governments have a poor record of workforce development. Private philanthropy may hold the key to moving people from dependency to the middle class. Jo Kwong makes her case.Book: Clearing Obstacles to Work: A Wise Giver's Guide to Fostering Self-Reliance See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Mass Incarceration: Presidential Power vs. Rhetoric

    Jul 17 2015

    The President's recent commutations of drug convicts' sentences and efforts to highlight criminal justice problems are welcome news. Adam Bates says there's much more work to be done. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Immigrant Crime Wave That Isn't

    Jul 16 2015

    Are immigrants more likely to commit crimes than native-born Americans? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Conservatarian Manifesto

    Jul 16 2015

    The loose alliance among conservatives and libertarians needn't necessarily remain. Charles Cooke argues in The Conservatarian Manifesto for a conservative defense of free markets and limited government both robust and principled. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Congress Should Get Feds Out of Classrooms

    Jul 14 2015

    Now is as good a time as any to get the federal government entirely out of education, according to Neal McCluskey. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Reforming Regulatory Takings

    Jul 13 2015

    Regulatory takings, those that deny Americans certain uses of their property, don't receive enough attention, according to U.S. Rep. Tom Reed. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Selfie Vote

    Jul 10 2015

    How will millenials' politics shape elections to come? And why are Republicans so bad at courting them? Kristen Soltis Anderson tries to explain in her new book, The Selfie Vote. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The FBI versus Encryption

    Jul 09 2015

    What good is encryption if the FBI has its own key? It’s worse than useless, according to Patrick Eddington. See acast.com/priv