Podcast

Economist Radio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodes

  • Money Talks: In recovery?

    Jul 07 2020

    As some lockdown measures lift, governments hope they can get their economies back on track. Which will have the strongest recovery? Also, meal-delivery wars heat up as Uber gobbles up rival Postmates in an all-stock deal worth over $2.6bn. And, the importance of building a more resilient food-supply chain. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer____________________  See acast.c...more

  • Off like a shot: the race for a covid-19 vaccine

    Jul 07 2020

    A British team is leading the race for the one innovation that could, in time, halt the coronavirus crisis. But once a vaccine is approved, who would get it, where, and how fast? An Ethiopian musician’s murder has inflamed the ethnic tensions that threaten the country’s transition to democracy. And a rollicking tale of sloppy spycraft in Fiji.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy ...more

  • Attention deficit: China’s campaign against Uighurs

    Jul 06 2020

    Unparalleled surveillance, forced labour, even allegations of ethnic cleansing: atrocities in Xinjiang province carry on. Why are governments and businesses so loth to protest? The field of economics is, at last, facing up to its long-standing race problem. And how covid-19 is scrambling Scandinavians’ stereotypes about one another.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy...more

  • Editor’s Picks: July 6th 2020

    Jul 05 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Joe Biden: Retro or radical? (9:34), the world is not experiencing a second wave of covid-19—it never got over the first (15:25), and a phoney referendum shows that Putin’s legitimacy is fading. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Monuments men

    Jul 03 2020

    President Trump is celebrating July 4th with four revered forerunners at Mount Rushmore. Anti-racist protests have brought down dozens of smaller monuments in the past month. The president says the left wants to “vandalise our history.” But Americans have never felt less proud of their national identity, according to Gallup. What is the political impact of this national soul-searching? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Was...more

  • Into left field? America's chief justice

    Jul 03 2020

    Recent Supreme Court rulings might seem like a leftward shift. But Chief Justice John Roberts is leaving loopholes for future conservative challenges. China’s video-sharing social network TikTok was wildly popular in India, until the government pulled the plug this week. And why high-end Bordeaux wines are so (relatively) cheap.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...more

  • The Economist Asks: David Malpass

    Jul 02 2020

    The Economist Asks: David MalpassThe president of the World Bank talks to host Anne McElvoy and Henry Curr, our economics editor, about how to stop covid-19 undoing decades of progress on global poverty. A veteran of the Trump and Reagan administrations, David Malpass argues that the private sector needs to step up. And what role should China play, as the biggest lender to most of the world’s poorest countries—is it guilty of “debt-trap diplomacy”?Please subscribe to The Economist for full acces...more

  • Unsettled question: Israel’s annexation threat

    Jul 02 2020

    A once-fringe position on annexing the West Bank is now a real prospect. But both international support and opposition are lukewarm; not even Israelis think it a priority. For years, war-crimes allegations hung over Kosovo’s president. Now a court has weighed in—undercutting long-running territorial talks with Serbia. And why flashy homes in Sierra Leone’s capital are taxed the same as tin-roofed shacks.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.eco...more

  • Babbage: Predicting pandemics

    Jul 01 2020

    As covid-19 continues to devastate the world and scientists race to develop therapeutics and vaccines, Alok Jha investigates how to get ahead of the curve and prevent the next pandemic. Scientists explain how studying the relationship between animals and humans, and finding and genetically sequencing the millions of as-yet-undiscovered animal viruses in the wild, could stop future disease outbreaks becoming global health catastrophes. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to pri...more

  • Two systems go: a new law grips Hong Kong

    Jul 01 2020

    A sweeping new national-security law deeply undermines Beijing’s “one country, two systems” approach in the territory; under it, arrests have already been made. What next for Hong Kong’s activists and its businesses? Malawi’s overturned election is a ray of hope that democracy can survive both incumbents’ strongman tactics and covid-19. And the varied successes of pro- and anti-Trump tell-all books. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.ec...more

  • Money Talks: Unfriending Facebook

    Jun 30 2020

    Companies including Unilever, Coca-Cola and Verizon are pulling their ads from Facebook because of its content-moderation policies. Does this spell trouble for the social-media giant? Also, why investors’ love of commercial property is being tested. And, e-sports v traditional sports. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informat...more

  • The next threat: confronting global risks

    Jun 30 2020

    Six months on from the first reports of the coronavirus, this special episode examines the catastrophic and even existential risks to civilisation. Work is already under way to head off future pandemics, but how to prepare—and who can take on preparing—for the gravest threats with the longest odds?For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World Ahead: Bus to the future

    Jun 29 2020

    What is the future of public transport in the wake of the covid-19 pandemic? Also, the United Nations’ Assistant Secretary-General on how countries should prepare for future disasters. And could a “carbon surveillance” system help save the planet? Tom Standage hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • States of alarm: America’s covid-19 surge

    Jun 29 2020

    An entirely predictable pattern is playing out: the states quickest to exit lockdowns are being hit hardest. Can the country get the virus reliably under control? The pandemic has led to staggering amounts of excess plastic waste, now washing up on shores near you. And the growing risks to South Korea’s tradition of bullfighting. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy a...more

  • Editor’s Picks: June 29th 2020

    Jun 28 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the next catastrophe and how to survive it; (9:40) the risks of annexation for Israel; (21:50) and the Wirecard scandal. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Bias beware

    Jun 26 2020

    Impartiality in political journalism is under scrutiny as never before. President Trump took a trademark pop at the “fakers” when he resumed his campaign rallies in Tulsa. Meanwhile the White House has begun decapitating state-funded global news agencies like Voice of America. Can fair-minded reporting survive hyper-partisan politics?John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. For access to The Econom...more

  • Council insecurity: the UN at 75

    Jun 26 2020

    The founders of the United Nations expected it would move with the times. It hasn’t. Can reforms keep all those nations united? The global focus on policing following George Floyd’s death has sparked a reckoning for television shows that distort Americans’ views of cops. And with this weekend’s Glastonbury festival long since postponed, we ask how live music will survive the pandemic. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/int...more

  • The Economist Asks: António Guterres

    Jun 25 2020

    Seventy-five years after the foundation of the United Nations, host Anne McElvoy and Daniel Franklin, The Economist’s diplomatic editor, ask Secretary-General Guterres whether the organisation still works. The dysfunctional relationship between its three dominant powers, America, China and Russia, has dangerous consequences—does the UN need to reinvent itself to work with them? And could the WHO’s relationship with China have undermined its efforts to stop the spread of the coronavirus?Please su...more

  • Rush to a conclusion: Latin America’s lockdowns

    Jun 25 2020

    After scattershot enforcement of lockdowns, the region has become the pandemic’s new focal point. But many countries are opening up anyway. America’s latest choke on immigration is aligned with the president’s politics—but not with the tech industry’s needs. And southern France faces a tourist season sans tourists.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out infor...more

  • Babbage: Track and trace

    Jun 24 2020

    Contact tracing is one of the tools being used against covid-19, but in the age of the smartphone, technology presents a new way to improve the process. Kenneth Cukier explores why contact-tracing apps have not yet delivered on their promise, how they can preserve privacy and what today’s decisions mean for the future of technology in society.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/...more

  • Leave in peace: Afghan-Taliban negotiations

    Jun 24 2020

    A withdrawal agreement struck with America has been damnably hard to implement, but the two sides may at last start talks to crimp nearly two decades of conflict. Wirecard, once the darling of Germany’s financial-technology scene, is now at the centre of a massive scandal—and plenty saw it coming. And big wins by national football teams in Africa help ease internecine violence.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffe...more

  • Money Talks: Can Amazon still deliver?

    Jun 23 2020

    The coronavirus has turned Amazon into one of the world’s essential firms. But while proving the company’s strengths, the pandemic-fuelled digital surge has also revealed its vulnerabilities. Tamzin Booth, The Economist’s technology and business editor, talks to insiders, critics and the competition, to find out whether Amazon can carry on dominating e-commerce and triumph in the coming cloud wars. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.e...more

  • Past its Prime? Amazon comes of age

    Jun 23 2020

    The pandemic has been great for sales; for profits, not so much. We examine the e-commerce giant’s prospects as it adapts to a changing world. Throughout history pandemics have helped to shape human conflicts, and covid-19 is no different. And reflecting on the life of an Amazonian storyteller, medicine man and unlikely film star.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy a...more

  • Isle be damned: Britain ravaged by covid-19

    Jun 22 2020

    Cosmopolitan, overweight, multi-ethnic: the country’s makeup has made the pandemic more deadly. But the government has repeatedly played a bad hand badly. Native American communities are being hit hard, too, putting tribal customs and even languages at risk. And why China’s company seals hold such power—and potential for abuse.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...more

  • Editor’s Picks: June 22nd 2020

    Jun 21 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Amazon is essential, but vulnerable; (10:35) pandemic politics in Britain; (18:15) and the United Nations after 75 years. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Generals strike

    Jun 19 2020

    America is in the midst of its worst civil-military crisis for a generation. President Trump’s call to use military force to quell protests caused alarm up and down the chain of command. What is the place of the military in political life? We speak to Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, and Republican Congressman Mike Gallagher, an Iraq veteran.John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. F...more

  • Syria’s condition: Bashar al-Assad

    Jun 19 2020

    The country’s dictator has spent nearly half his time in power waging war on his own people. His patchwork support network is fading, but he will not go easily. America’s racial unrest has put reparations back in the national conversation—but how best to pay slaves’ descendants, and how much? And the antiquated etiquette lessons required of South Asia’s civil servants. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer &...more

  • The Economist Asks: Mellody Hobson

    Jun 18 2020

    How can business be braver on race? Anne McElvoy asks Mellody Hobson, co-CEO of Ariel Investments, whether investors should divest from companies that don’t do enough to address racial inequality. Hobson also explains the challenges of managing diverse views, in particular when it comes to investing in the tobacco industry. And, what does she learn from Lenin?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast...more

  • Painting the red towns: covid-19 in America

    Jun 18 2020

    Coronavirus cases are easing in Democrat-held jurisdictions and rising in Republican-held areas. What is behind the shift, and what will it mean for President Donald Trump? Ireland at last has a coalition-government plan—upending a nearly century-old rivalry in order to keep the Irish-nationalist party Sinn Fein out of power. And a nine-year-old hopes to become the world’s youngest-ever chess grandmaster.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.ec...more

  • Babbage: Pole position

    Jun 17 2020

    A year-long, $160m expedition to the Arctic has passed its halfway mark and is amassing sobering data about the effects of climate change there. One of the scientists on board explains the discoveries so far. Also, Peter Schwartz, who imagined the future in Minority Report, shares his advice for forward planning in the age of covid-19. And, what next for facial recognition technology?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcasto...more

  • Himalayan assault: India and China clash

    Jun 17 2020

    The first deaths at the contested border in 45 years signal broader geopolitical shifts—and mark an escalation that will be difficult to reverse. “Mercenary” is less and less a dirty word in Africa; in fact, there may be more of them than ever before. And how the art business increasingly relies on marketing the dead.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out in...more

  • Money Talks: What USA Inc can do about racial injustice

    Jun 16 2020

    The killing of George Floyd and ensuing protests are a wake-up call for corporate America. There are few African-Americans among its CEOs. What will bosses do to combat racism beyond releasing PR statements? Also, how diversity helps the bottom line and the history of economic suppression of African-Americans. Patrick Lane hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and op...more

  • No port in a storm: the world’s stranded sailors

    Jun 16 2020

    Pandemic policies seem to have overlooked the key workers who keep the global trade system afloat: merchant seamen. More than a quarter of a million are at sea unwillingly. Misinformation was a plague even before covid-19. Now it’s a matter of life and death—and of political persuasion. And why pedigree puppies are so pricey in Britain. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for pr...more

  • A shifting alliance: NATO

    Jun 15 2020

    As the organisation’s defence ministers meet this week we look at two of its principal challenges: China’s rising influence and America’s declining interest. After more than three decades, a grand murder mystery has been solved in Sweden—but the outcome has many more frustrated than before. And why there is a matchmaking boom in Japan. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy fo...more

  • Editor's Picks: June 15th 2020

    Jun 14 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the power of protest and the legacy of George Floyd; (11:07) life in great cities after the pandemic; (17:55) and the lessons from one hundred Bartleby columns on work and management. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Modelled citizens

    Jun 12 2020

    Forecasters put Hillary Clinton’s chances of winning at 70 percent or more on the eve of the election in 2016. She was also the favourite to carry key states like Pennsylvania and Wisconsin that Donald Trump won on the night. This week The Economist data team launches its 2020 presidential election forecast. How useful are models at a time when politics can seem so out of control?We speak to Elliott Morris, data journalist for The Economist, and pollster Cornell Belcher.John Prideaux, The Econom...more

  • Heavy lifting: India’s lockdown tradeoffs

    Jun 12 2020

    As the world’s largest lockdown loosens, we examine how it went wrong and the challenges ahead for a health-care system pushed to its limits. As statues fall across the globe our culture correspondent considers how they represent shifting values and hierarchies—and when they should go. And economists weigh in once again on the phenomenon of winning streaks. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See aca...more

  • The Economist Asks: Jeffrey Sachs

    Jun 11 2020

    The seismic shock of the coronavirus pandemic has revealed the fragility of an interconnected world. Anne McElvoy and economist Jeffrey Sachs debate whether globalisation is still worth the risks—and whether liberal economists should bear some of the blame. And could the end of American leadership on the world stage help President Donald Trump’s re-election effort?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See ...more

  • Spend, sometime: Germany’s economic shift

    Jun 11 2020

    After decades as the continent’s penny-pincher, the country seems to be splashing out. That isn’t just a covid-19 response; a big thrift shift was already under way. Burundi’s brutal outgoing president of 15 years has died. Will his chosen successor be any better? And after some serious number-crunching, The Economist launches its US presidential forecast.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast...more

  • Babbage: Covid-19's path of destruction

    Jun 10 2020

    Slavea Chankova and Kenneth Cukier investigate the ways in which SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes covid-19, wears the body down. Apart from pneumonia, there are other facets to the disease that are less understood such as damage to the kidneys, blood vessels and heart. And, how does covid-19 continue to harm the body—and patients' mental health— in the long term?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See ...more

  • Haftar be going now: the balance shifts in Libya

    Jun 10 2020

    Tripoli has long been under siege by Khalifa Haftar, a warlord bent on toppling the internationally backed government. At last he has been pushed back from the capital; now what? North Korea is no longer taking calls from the South, but that is probably a diplomatic distraction from big problems at home. And how Ikea is assembling its post-covid future. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See ac...more

  • Money Talks: Joblessness in May

    Jun 09 2020

    American unemployment fell in May, but is this really a sign of a "rocket-ship" recovery? Also, Gene Sperling, a former director of the National Economic Council, lays out his vision for a more equitable society. And, thriving on secrecy—the private fund behind well-known brands. Simon Long hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Cops, a plea: police reform in America

    Jun 09 2020

    George Floyd will be laid to rest today; our obituaries editor reflects on his life and untimely death. His murder has fuelled a long-overdue discussion of America’s fragmented and unaccountable police forces. How much could yesterday’s sweeping congressional bill actually fix? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Say his name, and others’: American protests spread globally

    Jun 08 2020

    Far beyond America’s shores demonstrators are calling for justice in their own countries. It’s an awkward time for America’s allies, and a fortuitous one for its rivals. Labour-market swings during recessions are normally a measure of male employees’ moves—but not this time. And why the video-games industry is raiding its own back catalogue.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy fo...more

  • Editor’s Picks: June 8th 2020

    Jun 07 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Police violence, race and protest in America, How will China’s Belt and Road Initiative survive? (10:30) And, Alexander Pushkin’s productive lockdown (23:10). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and balance: Fair cops

    Jun 05 2020

    America is engulfed in its most widespread, sustained unrest since the late 1960s. It was sparked by an act of police brutality caught on camera. In the days since, Americans have seen police forces look more like an invading army than public servants sworn to protect their fellow citizens. Who will the politics of police versus protestors favour in 2020?We speak to Janeé Harteau, a former Minneapolis police chief, historian Khalil Gibran Muhammad, and Mitch Colvin, Mayor of Fayetteville, North ...more

  • Not everything in moderation: Twitter v Facebook

    Jun 05 2020

    The seemingly similar social networks have quite different business models—and that goes some way in explaining why they choose to police their content differently. Emmanuel Macron again finds himself changing course after members of his party defect. And move over, doctors: literature by nurses is at last hitting bookshelves.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and o...more

  • The Economist Asks: Valerie Jarrett

    Jun 04 2020

    Valerie Jarrett was President Obama's longest serving senior adviser, with responsibility for criminal justice and police reform. In the wake of the killing of George Floyd and protests across the country, Anne McElvoy asks whether this moment could be a turning point on racial equality in America and which changes to policing would have the most effect. Also, how does the outcry affect President Trump’s chances of reelection—and how does she assess Joe Biden's record on race? Please subscr...more

  • This, too, shall impasse: Brexit talks resume

    Jun 04 2020

    The pandemic has made negotiations more difficult and changed the political calculus on both sides. Prospects for a deal before year’s end are dimming. After more than two decades on the lam, an alleged architect of Rwanda’s 1994 genocide is headed to court. And how archaeologists use “soundscapes” and replica instruments to examine past civilisations. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/priva...more

  • Babbage: The rise of robo-doc

    Jun 03 2020

    Doctors enter augmented reality to help them treat patients with illnesses like covid-19. Host Kenneth Cukier speaks to the doctors leading a Hololens initiative at an Imperial College London hospital. Also, Dario Gil, director of IBM Research, on the future of scientific collaboration. And SpaceX has successfully sent two astronauts to the International Space Station—what’s next for commercial spaceflight? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editio...more

  • Forgoing the distance: covid-19 spreads in Brazil

    Jun 03 2020

    Even those who can distance themselves are unsure whether to do so—in part because President Jair Bolsonaro mocks the science and rails against lockdowns. The private-equity industry has ballooned since the last financial crisis; does that make it weaker or stronger in this one? And our correspondent investigates a Mexican-mummy mystery. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy ...more

  • Money Talks: Hong Kong, gone wrong?

    Jun 02 2020

    China and America are clashing over Hong Kong. Can the multi-trillion-dollar financial centre survive the fall out? Also, property developer Hamid Moghadam explains why the rise of e-commerce has made warehouses hot property. And the lockdown has led to a bicycle boom—will it last? Patrick Lane hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • An epidemic of hunger: covid-19 and poverty

    Jun 02 2020

    The pandemic is driving up the number of impoverished people for the first time in more than two decades. Lockdown-policy calculations are simply different in the poor world. The ill effects of China’s hydropower boom are trickling down to the tens of millions who depend on the Mekong River. And a meditation on the merits of reading others’ diaries. Additional audio from 'caquet' at Freesound.org. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscrib...more

  • The flames spread: protests in America

    Jun 01 2020

    Demonstrations against police violence have only amplified. We ask why George Floyd’s death touched a nerve, and why these events keep happening in America. A look at the country’s cyber-defences reveals considerable weaknesses—what are states to do as electronic attacks outpace the conventional kind? And what museums are doing now to document the history unfolding around them.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Editor’s Picks: June 1st 2020

    May 31 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the world’s most powerful country is handling covid-19, China’s decision to impose a security law on Hong Kong threatens a broader reckoning (10:04). And why mercenaries are still hired by African governments (18:30).For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: The American way

    May 29 2020

    America has passed a grim milestone: 100,000 deaths from covid-19. Many Americans think the country has been hit uniquely hard and that the president’s bungled response is to blame. That view is not borne out by international comparisons. But, as all 50 states reopen with the virus still prevalent, Americans are right to be nervous. How will America’s efforts to recover impact the presidential race?John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and ...more

  • Crying foul, again: Black Lives Matter

    May 29 2020

    Protests have broken out in Minneapolis and far beyond, following another black man’s death at the hands of a white policeman. Can the once-mighty Black Lives Matter make itself heard? The pandemic may threaten London’s place as Britain’s undisputed centre of gravity. And a researcher spooks spooks by revealing a decades-old spy pact. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...more

  • The Economist Asks: Marcus Samuelsson

    May 28 2020

    America’s independent restaurants face a future in which half their tables stand empty. Anne McElvoy asks award-winning chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson how restaurants can reinvent their business models to survive. They talk about converting chic eateries into community kitchens in the covid-19 crisis and why he thinks Joe Biden deserves a chance. Also, what does Mr Samuelsson make of racial tensions following the fatal police brutality case in Minnesota? And he takes Anne McElvoy on a c...more

  • Checking their privilege: Beijing’s threat to Hong Kong

    May 28 2020

    China’s parliament voted today to draft legislation that would utterly undermine the territory’s independence. What now for protesters, for Western powers, for the region’s foreign firms? The pandemic has quashed some crimes but has also created new nefarious opportunities. And it may be closing time for the golden age of the booze business.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for priva...more

  • Babbage: The language of the universe

    May 27 2020

    How can mathematics help us understand our lives and predict the world around us? Host Alok Jha speaks to David Sumpter of Uppsala University about the equations that can help people make better decisions. Christl Donnelly, an epidemiologist at the University of Oxford and Imperial College London details the role mathematics plays in modelling covid-19. Moon Duchin of Tufts University explains how maths can stop gerrymandering. And physicist Graham Farmelo on why he thinks the universe speaks in...more

  • Leading nowhere: assessing Trump’s covid-19 response

    May 27 2020

    President Donald Trump’s failures of leadership have compounded the crisis. But America’s health-care and preparedness systems have problems that predate him. South Korea marks the 40th anniversary of a massacre that remains politically divisive even now. And, today’s space-launch plan in America blazes a trail for a new, commercial space industry. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy f...more

  • Money Talks: We’re not going on a summer holiday

    May 26 2020

    Travel has virtually ground to a halt during the pandemic, exacerbating the global economy’s woes—by complicating trade ties, upending business and devastating the tourist trade. Host Simon Long explores the future of the travel industry, staycations in South Korea and future consolidation in the airline industry. Also, could travel bubbles offer a route to economic recovery?   For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Shot chasers: big pharma’s covid-19 boost

    May 26 2020

    The pandemic has caused a shift in how drug firms are viewed: their capacity for big-money innovation will give them immunity in the crisis. Widespread homeworking will have broad consequences, from commercial-property values to urban demographics. And a seemingly innocuous Hong Kong history exam is a window into the territory’s increasingly fraught politics. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See aca...more

  • The World Ahead: After Kim Jong-un

    May 25 2020

    The North Korean leader’s recent disappearance for three weeks led to intense speculation about his health. What would happen if Mr Kim's regime collapsed? Peter Singer, an author and political scientist, explains how his novel, set in the near future, is helping policymakers respond to artificial intelligence. And how feasible is wireless charging for electric cars? Tom Standage hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Clear skies with a chance: covid-19’s green opportunity

    May 25 2020

    Emissions have plummeted as the pandemic slowed the world. It could be a mere blip—but it is an unprecedented opportunity for a greener, more sustainable economy. Serving in America’s armed forces is a long-established path to citizenship, but that path is narrowing. And we ask how sport will emerge from the pandemic, even if the stands stay empty. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy f...more

  • Editor’s Picks: May 25th 2020

    May 24 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the chance to flatten the climate curve, when, why and how to lift coronavirus lockdowns (9:25) and the arrest of Africa’s most wanted man (17:25).  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Fab phwoar

    May 22 2020

    Taiwanese firm TSMC plans to build a new fab, or computer chip factory, in Arizona. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the $12bn investment a boost for American “economic independence” amid China’s creeping dominance in tech. A geopolitical tug-of-war is being fought over nanoscopic wafers of silicon. What do microchips tell us about what’s happening to globalisation? And, as the coronavirus stokes anti-China sentiment, will trade barriers remain no matter who wins November’s election?John Pr...more

  • Systemic concerns: China’s party congress

    May 22 2020

    Legislation signalled at the annual meeting undermines the “one country, two systems” approach to Hong Kong’s rule—and may inflame rather than quell protests. Argentina finds itself at the doorstep of default once again; the pandemic is sharpening the hardship ahead. And remembering the woman who expanded Irish poetry with the gloriously quotidian. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy f...more

  • The Economist Asks: David Simon

    May 21 2020

    The writer of “The Wire” and “The Deuce” takes a break from the dark side of real life to explore an alternative history in which Franklin D Roosevelt lost the 1940 presidential election to an anti-Semitic isolationist—on a platform to lead America towards fascism. As the country prepares for a very different election, Anne McElvoy asks David Simon about the roots of anti-immigrant feeling in America and whether individuals can change the course of history. Plus, when does a storyteller need to ...more

  • Swimming against the currency: Turkey

    May 21 2020

    A central bank struggling for independence, dwindling foreign reserves to prop up the currency and a president who just hates rates: Turkey’s economy looked shaky even before covid-19. Online dating carries on apace amid lockdowns, and it seems people are forging more emotionally intimate bonds. And the risk that humans might pass the coronavirus to their primate cousins.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  ...more

  • Babbage: Think of the children

    May 20 2020

    An apparent spike in a rare childhood illness, Kawasaki disease, suggests the coronavirus may manifest very differently in children and raises questions over the role they play in spreading the pandemic. America’s latest offensive against Huawei pushes the global semiconductor industry into uncharted territory; it may also harm American interests in the process. And, flattening the other curve—could fossil fuels be added to covid-19’s casualty list? Kenneth Cukier hostsFor more on the pandemic, ...more

  • Politics trumps co-operation: the WHO’s annual meeting

    May 20 2020

    Rhetoric and posturing at the World Health Organisation’s annual assembly reveal an agency under geopolitical stresses just when global co-operation is needed most. Illegal logging has become an existential threat for the Amazon; under the cover of covid-19, a new bill in Brazil could hasten its decline. And reflections on the vast musical legacy of Kraftwerk’s Florian Schneider.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Money Talks: Eye of the hurricane

    May 19 2020

    America and Europe face a wave of corporate bankruptcies as a result of covid-19. But will some businesses be able to restructure rather than go broke? Also, why some are calling for the Federal Reserve to turn to negative interest rates to alleviate the slump. And, is now the time for entrepreneurial true grit? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt...more

  • Extreme measures: America’s far right

    May 19 2020

    Extremists are cropping up at protests and expanding their reach online. They see the pandemic as proof of their worldview, and as an opportunity to spread their messages. After systematically ignoring mental-health concerns for decades, China’s authorities are at last tackling the issue—somewhat. And lockdowns prove that Britain is a nation of gardeners. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/pr...more

  • Carriers and the disease: the airlines set for hard landings

    May 18 2020

    Which firms will fly above the covid-19 clouds? Big, low-cost carriers with strong finances seem likeliest, but either way consolidation is inevitable. The Indian state of Kerala seems to be handling its outbreak far better than others; blame an unassuming but wildly popular health minister. And whether New York’s beloved Irish pubs will craic on past the pandemic.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See aca...more

  • Editor’s Picks: May 18th 2020

    May 17 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, has covid-19 killed globalisation? Why the European Union is having a bad crisis (10:55) and how Mike Pompeo is confusing leadership with bashing his opponents (19:20). Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Law law land

    May 15 2020

    A row over the president’s tax returns has arrived in the Supreme Court. Donald Trump is challenging subpoenas that seek to disclose his finances. The court’s power over the presidency is being tested while the justices face the frustrations of remote working. How might the Supreme Court affect the election?John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Steven Mazie, the Economist’s Supreme Court corresponden...more

  • Continental divides: covid-19 strains the EU

    May 15 2020

    What started as a public-health crisis is developing into an existential one. The most fundamental question to be addressed is: what is the European Union for? Hopes of helpful change by El Salvador’s millennial president are dimming as he becomes increasingly dictatorial. And why so many Indonesians are draping themselves in the sun.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...more

  • The Economist Asks: Dan Crenshaw

    May 14 2020

    Liberty is curtailed around the world during the global pandemic. With the costs of lockdown mounting, Americans are divided over how far and how fast to reopen. Anne McElvoy asks Dan Crenshaw, a rising star in the Republican ranks in Congress, whether the coronavirus is forcing conservatives to embrace a new era of big government. As his own state of Texas eases restrictions, the congressman argues Americans are ready to accept the risks. Plus, is a post-oil future possible for the Lone-St...more

  • Bibi steps: Israel’s long-awaited government

    May 14 2020

    After three elections and 16 months, the unity government between sworn rivals Binyamin Netanyahu and Benny Gantz gets to work tonight. Can it withstand the coming political storms? Frenetic research into the coronavirus is upending some long-established ways of disseminating science, perhaps for good. And we examine the merits of outlawing an awkward job interview question. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radioofferEdi...more

  • Babbage: Is there anybody out there?

    May 13 2020

    Will humans ever discover intelligent life in space? Since the 1960’s, scientists have been working on the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. They have not found it yet but their research is moving up a gear. Better telescopes, faster computers and more funding means that the chances of discovering ET in the next few decades have dramatically increased. Alok Jha hosts.For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See aca...more

  • Fool Britannia? A covid-19 response under scrutiny

    May 13 2020

    After a series of government missteps, people in Britain—and, increasingly, outside it—are lambasting the covid-19 response. That has great reputational costs. In a story suited to a television drama, a Filipino network popular with the people but critical of the president has been forced off the air. And our columnist finds surprising modern resonance in a 1950s Argentinian novel. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radioo...more

  • Money Talks: How to keep feeding the world

    May 12 2020

    The global food network has so far weathered the challenge of covid-19 and largely kept shelves and plates full. As the pandemic continues, more people are at risk of going hungry. But unlike past crises, the problem this time will not be supply. Rachana Shanbhogue and Matthieu Favas trace an $8trn food chain back from fork to farm to investigate the weak links. Can governments hold their nerve and resist protectionism? And could the crisis reveal an opportunity for a greener food future?Read Th...more

  • Moveable feast: a global food system adapts

    May 12 2020

    The vast network moving food from farm to fork has shifted gears mightily in response to covid-19. But some will still go hungry; governments must resist the urge to crimp exports. Inflation statistics are often tallied in store aisles and at restaurant tables; how to gather those data now? And why being a warm-up act is cold comfort for many bands. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy ...more

  • Back to the furore: protests set to reignite

    May 11 2020

    The pandemic overshadowed a striking spate of uprisings around the world. In Lebanon economic conditions have only worsened since—and the protesters are back. A look at urban architecture reveals how past diseases have shaped the world’s cities; we ask how much covid-19 will leave its mark. And, can Corona beer, Latin America’s first global brand, escape its associations with the coronavirus?  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.eco...more

  • Editor’s Picks: May 11th 2020

    May 10 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the dangerous gap between Wall Street and Main Street in America, (10:22) high-speed science—new research on the coronavirus is being released in a torrent. (21:00) And, casual sex is out, companionship is in. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informatio...more

  • Checks and Balance: University challenge

    May 08 2020

    Amid the lockdown some American students have filed lawsuits to get refunds on their tuition fees. Shifting classes online has rekindled concerns about the high cost of college education. Last year an FBI investigation exposed wealthy parents paying to cheat elite university admissions. The perception that university is no longer a driver of social mobility - but the opposite - fuels the political divide. How true is that?In this episode US policy correspondent Idrees Kahloon reports on a scheme...more

  • Rises and false: markets v the economy

    May 08 2020

    How can stockmarkets be so healthy when many businesses are so unwell? We look at the many risks that are clearly not priced in. China’s documentary-makers are having to find clever ways to get past censors—which is why one famed filmmaker is just giving his work away online. And remembering a legendary rock-climber who always wanted to find a new way up.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/pri...more

  • The Economist Asks: General Sir Nick Carter

    May 07 2020

    Seventy-five years after the end of the second world war in Europe, armed forces around the world have been mobilised to fight a new common enemy. Anne McElvoy asks General Sir Nick Carter, Britain's chief of the defence staff, what lessons past wars hold for conquering the coronavirus. He explains the work of the secretive 77 Brigade in fighting disinformation and his view on rumours about the origins of the coronavirus. Plus, why neither NATO nor Russia is "taking its foot off the gas” during ...more

  • Hitting a Vlad patch: 20 years of Putin

    May 07 2020

    As Russia’s leader marks two decades in power, he faces almighty headwinds—not only covid-19 but also cut-price oil and an increasingly leery citizenry. The pandemic is hitting different tech firms in different ways but on balance it seems to be further consolidating the power of the big ones. And the surprisingly upbeat music that comes about during downturns.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.c...more

  • Babbage: Shot at victory

    May 06 2020

    Could repurposing existing drugs, such as remdesivir, be the answer to the search for treatments for covid-19? Also, the winner of this year’s Marconi Prize, Andrea Goldsmith of Stanford University, on her pioneering work in wireless communications technology. And, the mission to give rivers their wiggle back. Kenneth Cukier hosts. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economis...more

  • Disarming revelation: a chance at a global ceasefire

    May 06 2020

    Many were shocked when armed groups heeded a call for a global ceasefire; given a squabble at the UN it would now be shocking if those pockets of peace continue to hold. We examine a century-old technique as a possible treatment for covid-19. And a family feud involving Britain’s most-reclusive octogenarians heads to court. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out in...more

  • Money Talks: Judgement day for the ECB

    May 05 2020

    Germany’s constitutional court has given the European Central Bank an ultimatum. The ruling could prompt further challenges to both the EU’s economic recovery plan and the authority of its highest court. The pandemic is a moment of reckoning for America’s health-care industry; but could patients ultimately benefit? And host Patrick Lane gets a glimpse of the—contactless—office of the future.For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.Please subscribe to The Economist for full a...more

  • Degrees of separation: universities and covid-19

    May 05 2020

    Many universities were on thin ice financially before the pandemic. Now, with foreign travel slumping and distancing measures the norm, a global reckoning is coming. In many Asian countries, Ramadan seems largely untouched by pandemic-protection measures; we ask why. And the vexing question of how many people live in North Macedonia.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and o...more

  • Lives v livelihoods: Africa’s covid-19 tradeoffs

    May 04 2020

    As Nigeria tentatively lifts its lockdown today, we examine the decisions African leaders face: pandemic policies may do more harm than the pandemic itself. There’s a curious dearth of smokers among covid-19’s most severe cases; that may point to a treatment. And on its 150th anniversary, a reflection on the history and the mission of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  ...more

  • Editor’s Picks: May 4th 2020

    May 03 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, a 90% economy—life after lockdowns will be hard in ways that are difficult to imagine today. Also, a bust-up in Brasilia (10:10), and solitude is both a blessing and a curse (17:25). Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Apocalypse Now

    May 01 2020

    The pandemic has been grim for admirers of America's preeminence. The country that rallied allies to defend democracy and lead the world in scientific endeavour has been hit hardest by the coronavirus. China has sent medical supplies to American states, while the president brainstorms unlikely cures on live TV. Is America ceding global leadership? Maybe. One certainty is that fretting over the demise of the Republic is a longstanding American tradition. In this episode we trace the origins ...more

  • Nature, or nurtured? A politicised virus-origin hunt

    May 01 2020

    Scientists may soon understand how the new coronavirus got its start; that could help head off future outbreaks. In the meantime, politicians are clouding the discussion. America and Europe are taking different approaches to keeping small businesses afloat, but it’s a struggle on both sides of the Atlantic. And tuning in to the global boom in community radio stations. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See...more

  • The Economist Asks: Shakespeare in America

    Apr 30 2020

    In a year of plagues, power struggles and star-crossed lovers divided by lockdown, Anne McElvoy asks James Shapiro, author of “Shakespeare in a Divided America”, what the bard would make of it all. Shakespeare is claimed by Americans of all political stripes. But how can a lad from 16th-century Stratford-upon-Avon illuminate the past and future of the republic now? Plus, what the president might teach the professor about Shakespeare’s work. And, Shapiro prescribes a verse for the trials and trib...more

  • Submerging markets: developing economies and covid-19

    Apr 30 2020

    The pandemic is hitting emerging markets particularly hard, and the crisis is likely to widen the gap between the strongest and the weakest among them. Physical distancing is making life even harder for people with dementia, and their carers. And a few tips on learning a new language in lockdown.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Beyond immunity

    Apr 29 2020

    The immune system plays a vital role in protecting humans from infections, but how is it faring against covid-19? Pascal Soriot, chief executive of the pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, tells host, Kenneth Cukier, about potential treatments for covid patients. Plus, do people build up an immunity to covid-19 if they have recovered from it, or can they catch it again? And, Sonja Lyubomirsky, professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, on how acts of kindness can boost the ...more

  • Those who can, teach! The case for reopening schools

    Apr 29 2020

    The world’s students are falling behind and lockdown is only exacerbating prior disparities in their progress; we examine a compelling back-to-school argument. America’s Environmental Protection Agency is rolling back yet more pollution protections, but who stands to gain is unclear. And why so many urban Kenyans understate their salaries to the villagers back home.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See ac...more

  • Money Talks: Peak car?

    Apr 28 2020

    Lockdowns worldwide have brought the automobile industry to a standstill. Hakan Samuelsson, the CEO of Volvo, explains why the solution to the crisis will not be as simple as getting factories moving again. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Simon Wright, industry editor, and Patrick Foulis, business affairs editor, whether carmakers can still afford to invest in the cutting-edge technologies that could transport them to a greener, safer future. Has the world passed peak car?Read The Economist’s full ...more

  • First, pass the post: Ohio’s vote-by-mail experiment

    Apr 28 2020

    The state’s all-postal primaries vote could be seen as a trial run for November’s presidential election. Might voting by mail be the least-bad option? The BBC’s canny response to covid-19 has quietened its critics, but bigger problems await after the pandemic. And how a few once-feuding families are pushing Bolivian wine onto the world stage. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for pri...more

  • The World Ahead: Viral acceleration

    Apr 27 2020

    The covid-19 pandemic has triggered an economic crisis, but how will this change the way people use technology—and which of these changes will last? Host Tom Standage speaks to guests from Ark Invest, the Brookings Institution and Alphabet’s drone-delivery company, Wing, to explore which technologies stand to benefit from an acceleration in the pace of adoption.  Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, dig...more

  • End transmission: covid-19 in New Zealand

    Apr 27 2020

    The country is aiming for complete elimination of the coronavirus; so far, so good. But renewed freedom within its borders requires that virtually no one cross them. Restrictions in Europe on movement of agricultural labour could leave crops to rot in the fields. And why cologne is the hand-sanitiser of choice in Turkey.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inform...more

  • Editor's Picks: April 27th 2020

    Apr 26 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how will governments cope with the expensive legacy of covid-19? (11:05), unscrupulous autocrats in the pandemic of power grabs (17:52), and, why Netflix’s success will continue. Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Corona corralled?

    Apr 24 2020

    "We can corral the coronavirus," Gov. Greg Abbott said, announcing his plan to reopen the Texas economy. Floridians have returned to the beaches and other Southern states are starting to relax restrictions on restaurants, gyms and hair salons. But public support for maintaining the lockdown remains strong. Can America reopen while keeping covid-19 at bay?In this episode we hear how Wisconsinites view the lockdown and a Bronx medic tells us what it’s like on the frontline. We also find out where ...more

  • Unsteady states: America’s piecemeal reopening

    Apr 24 2020

    Some governors are co-ordinating mutual lockdown plans, others are already reopening their states. That haphazardness bodes ill in the absence of widespread testing and tracing. The pandemic is kicking an industry that was already down: newspapers’ readerships are up, but profits are through the floor. And, reflecting on the life of a saintly obstetric surgeon in Ethiopia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • The Economist Asks: Isabel Allende

    Apr 23 2020

    As billions of people remain in lockdown to stem the coronavirus, Anne McElvoy asks the Chilean author whether imagination is the cure for isolation. Allende, who lives in California, talks about why she loves her adopted home and her hopes for the political future of Latin America. Plus, long lunches, hard truths with Pablo Neruda, and the urgent beauty of falling in love and getting married again in her seventies.For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.Please subscribe to...more

  • Rakhine and ruin: insurgency in Myanmar

    Apr 23 2020

    The Rohingya genocide was just one of many sectarian flashpoints in Rakhine state; now a slick separatist insurgency is getting the better of Myanmar’s army. America is floundering in its bid to win the 5G mobile-technology race; we ask what options it has. And denying locked-down Sri Lankans booze has driven them to home-brewing. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt...more

  • Babbage: Opening up

    Apr 22 2020

    Tech firm Microsoft has announced plans to embrace open data. Jeni Tennison, from Britain’s Open Data Institute, says it marks a milestone in the way big companies share data. Also, could mass testing for covid-19 provide a way out of the global lockdown? And, what is causing the worst drought in over 1,000 years in the south-west of the United States? Kenneth Cukier hosts  You can read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. Please subscribe for full access to print, digital...more

  • Held in cheque: corporate payouts and covid-19

    Apr 22 2020

    Even before the pandemic, companies were accused of returning too much money to shareholders. As a recession looms, dividends and share buy-backs should be cut—but not everywhere. Coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef is more widespread than ever, and each event makes a full recovery less likely. And the animals are out to play as humans are locked away.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/...more

  • Money Talks: Hedging their bets

    Apr 21 2020

    Hedge funds are usually seen as the risk-takers of the financial world, but how have they been performing in these times of economic turmoil? And, why the coronavirus pandemic could lead to the deaths of millions of small businesses. Plus, the problem of moral hazard—could government bail-outs have unintended consequences? Patrick Lane hosts You can read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. Please subscribe for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com...more

  • Symbols’ status: arrests in Hong Kong

    Apr 21 2020

    Authorities have re-ignited tensions by arresting some of the democracy movement’s most prominent figures—and Beijing seems to be piling more pressure on. Shortages of protective equipment are not just about supply; we look at the global scramble for kit. And Brazil’s universally beloved “telenovelas” are on hold; how will they eventually deal with covid-19? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com...more

  • Restarting Europe’s engine: Germany’s lockdown lightens

    Apr 20 2020

    Non-essential businesses are opening; schools soon will be, too. The country’s fortunes are down to a mix of science-minded leadership, functional federalism and a bit of luck. Saudi Arabia has halted its brutal air campaign in Yemen, ostensibly for humanitarian reasons; there is more to it than that. And a look at the wave of female avengers in drama. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/priva...more

  • Editor's Picks: April 20th 2020

    Apr 19 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is China the pandemic’s big geopolitical winner? (8:30) Saudi Arabia has declared a ceasefire in Yemen, but the Houthis are fighting on. (14:13) And, how Britain's glossy magazines are adjusting to a gloomy world. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inform...more

  • Checks and Balance: Oil be back

    Apr 17 2020

    President Trump scored a big diplomatic win by pushing the main oil producing countries to agree to cut output. A price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, combined with the slump in demand caused by the coronavirus, had halved oil prices. Trump said the deal would save thousands of American energy jobs. But pushing for higher oil prices in an election year is a ploy more common in Caracas or Moscow than Washington DC. Has Donald Trump made America an energy superpower? How reliable is his bet ...more

  • Gross domestic plummet: China’s historic contraction

    Apr 17 2020

    The covid-19 pandemic has caused the country’s first GDP dip in more than four decades. What struggles still lie ahead for the world’s second-largest economy? Decisive action to help the homeless amid the crisis offers hope for what comes after it. And a look back at the life of Joseph Lowery, a firebrand preacher and rhyming civil-rights activist. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/priv...more

  • The Economist Asks: Margrethe Vestager

    Apr 16 2020

    A global contagion requires global solutions. The big technology platforms that have been targets of politicians and regulators are now at the centre of efforts to fight the coronavirus. Anne McElvoy asks Margrethe Vestager, EU competition commissioner, whether the pandemic has killed the techlash. The “giant-slayer” in charge of the EU’s digital strategy weighs trade-offs between personal privacy and public health. As parts of Europe contemplate reopening, can Brussels coordinate the exit strat...more

  • This sequestered isle: Britain’s covid-19 response

    Apr 16 2020

    The prime minister is still convalescing; Parliament is still finding ways to meet virtually. Meanwhile questions are growing about how the government has handled the pandemic. In China authorities are promoting unproven traditional remedies to treat covid-19—treatments they would love to export. And the role that animals play in making wildfires worse, and in preventing them. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Babbage: Worth a shot

    Apr 15 2020

    Scientists are working at an unprecedented pace to find a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes covid-19. The stakes are high. Natasha Loder, The Economist's health policy editor, explains how an effective vaccine might be developed. Dr Trevor Drew of the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness speaks to host Kenneth Cukier about two trials which have reached the animal-testing stage. Plus, once a vaccine is discovered, what can be done to make sure it is distributed fairly? Dr Seth B...more

  • The gloves are on: South Koreans vote

    Apr 15 2020

    Today’s legislative elections in South Korea are the world’s first to take place amid the covid-19 crisis. How have masked campaigners managed, and how are masked voters likely to respond? “Contact tracing” is crucial in following the coronavirus’s progression; we look into nascent technological approaches to the task. And a look at whether the pandemic will give way to a baby boom.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Money Talks: The business of survival

    Apr 14 2020

    With countries accounting for more than half of global GDP in lockdown, the collapse of commercial activity is unprecedented. Falling demand and a bitter price war had pushed the price of crude oil to its lowest since 1999. Could a historic deal between oil producers be enough to stabilise the market? Plus, those companies that survive the coronavirus crisis will have to adapt to a very different environment. And, how to reopen factories after covid-19. Patrick Lane hosts For more on t...more

  • Dis-Kurti-ous: intrigues in Kosovo

    Apr 14 2020

    We speak to Albin Kurti, a reformist prime minister, after his ouster—and ask how American officials may have played a role in his downfall. Gloomy forecasts will dominate this week’s virtual meetings of the IMF and the World Bank, with more countries than ever begging for financial help. And the connection between Instagram, Indonesian lovers and conservative Islam.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See a...more

  • Opening arguments: Europe’s cautious restart

    Apr 13 2020

    This week, some European countries are beginning to switch their economies back on, but leaders face a grim trade-off between economic health and public health. Meanwhile, bids to finance Europe’s fiscal-stimulus programmes re-ignite old debates on financial interdependence. And why a bad-boy Belgian is making chocolate in Congo.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-o...more

  • Editor’s Picks: April 13th 2020

    Apr 12 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the business of survival—those companies that survive the coronavirus crisis will need to master a new environment. Plus, how to reopen factories after covid-19 (9:23) and Venezuela's navy battles a cruise ship, and loses (17:41).  The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newslette...more

  • Checks and Balance: The covid campaign

    Apr 10 2020

    How do you hold a vote in the middle of a pandemic? Statewide elections in Wisconsin this week showed how hard it is to manage the logistics of democracy during a lockdown. A partisan fight over changes to the way votes are cast went all the way to the Supreme Court. Meanwhile the most expensive campaigns in history have had to rip up their plans and start again online. In this episode we talk to election officials in Wisconsin, hear how electoral campaigns unfolded during the 1918 flu, and...more

  • The fascists and the furious: remembering the 43 Group

    Apr 10 2020

    Many have forgotten that, even after the second world war, a fascist movement held sway in Britain. Our culture editor recounts the tale of the group that quashed it. Leonora Carrington was an adventurous and pioneering Surrealist artist; our correspondent explores deepest Mexico to discover what inspired her. And the wizard industry that is casting a spell over Myanmar. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  ...more

  • The Economist Asks: Kristalina Georgieva

    Apr 09 2020

    As governments around the world see their finances savaged by the pandemic, emerging economies are crying out for cash. More countries are turning to the International Monetary Fund for support than at any point in its history. In an exclusive podcast interview ahead of its Spring Meetings, host Anne McElvoy and Zanny Minton Beddoes, The Economist’s editor-in-chief, ask IMF head Kristalina Georgieva how it intends to bail out the global economy. Could issuing “paper gold” provide the answer or d...more

  • What Viktor’s spoiled: ten years of Orban

    Apr 09 2020

    Under Hungary’s shape-shifting prime minister the country has essentially become a dictatorship—and it seems there is little the European Union can do about it. We examine the serious mental-health effects the covid-19 crisis is having—and will have in the future. And Japan’s #KuToo movement aims to reform some seriously sexist dress codes at work. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/priv...more

  • Babbage: Maskarade

    Apr 08 2020

    The “silent transmission” of covid-19 means people without symptoms could be a major source of its spread. How effective are masks as a defence? Plus, Kenneth Cukier asks Ivan Oransky, co-founder of Retractionwatch.com, whether the race to uncover the mysteries of the virus could lead to a torrent of “bad science”.For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/ra...more

  • Movement at the epicentre: Wuhan’s lockdown lifts

    Apr 08 2020

    People are spilling from the Chinese metropolis where the global outbreak took hold. But controls actually remain tight, and authorities’ attempts to spin pandemic into propaganda are not quite working. Mozambique’s rising violence threatens what could be Africa’s largest-ever energy project, in a region that has until now escaped widespread jihadism. And “geomythologists” may have uncovered humans’ oldest tale yet. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subs...more

  • Money Talks: Banking on it

    Apr 07 2020

    Banks have entered this financial crisis in better health than the previous one. But how sick might they get? Emerging-market lockdowns match rich-world ones but their governments cannot afford such generous handouts. Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz explains how emerging economies might weather the pandemic. And how Silicon Valley's unicorns are losing their sheen. Simon Long hosts For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. And please subscribe to The Economist ...more

  • States’ evidence: Brazil’s messy covid-19 response

    Apr 07 2020

    President Jair Bolsonaro still dismisses the disease as “just the sniffles”, so state and local authorities—and the country’s vast slums—have taken matters into their own hands. The physical and mental needs of the world’s locked-down populations are driving a boom in online wellness. And we look back on the life of the French chef who revolutionised English fine dining.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  S...more

  • An app for that: covid surveillance

    Apr 06 2020

    To keep track of the spread of covid-19, some governments are turning to digital surveillance, using mobile-phone apps and data networks. We ask whether this will work—and examine the threat to privacy posed by a digital panopticon. Britain’s Labour Party has a new leader. We ask in which direction Sir Keir Starmer will lead the opposition. And we report on the northern hemisphere’s winter that wasn’t. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.econ...more

  • Editor’s Picks: April 6th 2020

    Apr 05 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, covid-19 presents grim choices between life, death and, ultimately, the economy (11:02), lockdowns in Asia have sparked a stampede home (17:52) And, Formula 1 comes up with a breathing machine for covid-19 patients. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, reg...more

  • Checks and Balance: How long?

    Apr 03 2020

    President Trump changed tone and course this week, extending federal guidelines on social distancing to the end of April. New York is now the epicentre of the global pandemic. Yet large parts of the US remain relatively unaffected by covid-19. Public opinion supports tough measures to contain the virus for now. But how sustainable are strict curbs on personal freedom in a country founded on individual liberty?The Economist’s healthcare correspondent Slavea Chankova explains the epidemiological m...more

  • Trough to peak: how high will American unemployment go?

    Apr 03 2020

    The coronavirus pandemic has sent America’s mighty jobs machine into screeching reverse. How bad might the labour market get? Covid-19 is just one reason why Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Muhammad bin Salman, is finding 2020 to be a much harder year than he’d hoped. And we report on the fight to save a 44,000-year-old cave painting.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt...more

  • The Economist Asks: Cory Booker

    Apr 02 2020

    The global total of confirmed coronavirus cases has exceeded one million; a quarter of them are in America. The new epicentre of this pandemic is the New York tri-state area. As politicians argue over how to save lives and the economy, Anne McElvoy asks Cory Booker, a senator from New Jersey, whether America can unite to fight the virus. They talk about tussles over vital equipment between states and the federal government. Also, does he agree with the mayor of LA on recommending masks to lessen...more

  • No port of call: coronavirus may sink the cruise industry

    Apr 02 2020

    Cruise ships had been enjoying a golden era—until covid-19 came along. The pandemic has been a catastrophe for the industry. Stranded passengers have taken ill and even died, ships have been banned from ports, and revenue has collapsed. But lawmakers are unlikely to bail it out. In Sweden, daily life has been pretty normal, despite the coronavirus, but can that continue? And we report on Dutch disease—the language’s unusual affinity for poxy swear words.For full access to print, digital and audi...more

  • Babbage: Fighting contagion with data

    Apr 01 2020

    How are location data from mobile phones being used to combat covid-19? And, as more people are forced to stay at home, can broadband and mobile internet connections keep up? Plus, the epidemiologist who helped defeat smallpox, Larry Brilliant, on what needs to be done against the coronavirus. Kenneth Cukier hosts.The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register h...more

  • Wishful thinking: America’s offer to Venezuela

    Apr 01 2020

    The Trump administration makes Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro an offer he seems sure to refuse: an end to sanctions in return for power-sharing and elections. The coronavirus pandemic has crushed oil prices at the same time a price war is raging: the industry has never seen anything like it. And as videoconferencing brings your workmates into your home, we suggest how to create the right impression. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.c...more

  • Money Talks: The home front

    Mar 31 2020

    At the beginning of a financial year like no other, millions of newly furloughed or unemployed Americans face rent and mortgage payments. How long can the financial system withstand the strain caused by the coronavirus pandemic? Many employees have had to make a quick transition to remote working. Businesses struggling to make the switch could look to those companies that have never had an office. And, a day in the life of Bartleby—and his cat. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.The Economist is making so...more

  • In need of Comfort: New York's covid-19 crisis

    Mar 31 2020

    New York is at the centre of America’s—and the world’s—coronavirus crisis. The metropolis has also been caught in a damaging three-way political division, involving three of its native sons. In the Middle East and north Africa, governments have imposed unusually harsh covid-19 crackdowns, but will the authoritarians let up afterwards? And we report on a golden age for African art.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer &#...more

  • The World Ahead: Pandemic predictions

    Mar 30 2020

    As the covid-19 situation worsens, host Tom Standage explores what the pandemic reveals about the perils of prediction and what other future threats we might be overlooking. Also, what a simulation of a future mission to Mars could teach us about self-isolation on Earth today. And, the hit video game “Plague, Inc” is teaching players about the dynamics of pandemics—and how to stop them. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to pr...more

  • Containment or complacency? Covid-19 in Japan

    Mar 30 2020

    Japan has reported a relatively low number of coronavirus cases. But concern is growing. The Olympics have at last been postponed and infections are on the rise. Uganda’s president faces a challenge from a pop star—and has his own backing group. And turtles have a deadly appetite for plastic. To them, it may smell like lunch. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out ...more

  • Editor’s Picks: March 30th 2020

    Mar 29 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the role of big government in the time of covid-19, (10:20) assessing the havoc the pandemic is causing in emerging countries, (17:45) and, a guide to videoconferencing etiquette. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Counting the cost

    Mar 27 2020

    President Trump worries a sustained lockdown may do more damage than the covid-19 pandemic itself. More Americans have been laid off in the past week than ever before. He wants the country back open for business by Easter. Meanwhile Congress has approved nearly two trillion dollars to avert a prolonged slump. But is it enough?Chicago restaurant workers tell us what happens when an entire sector shuts down. Idrees Kahloon, US policy correspondent, assesses the rescue package. Economics columnist ...more

  • Life sentences? Prisons and covid-19

    Mar 27 2020

    Outbreaks among inmates are all but inevitable. Efforts at prison reform that were already under way will get a boost, because now they will save lives. We examine the international variation in what are considered “essential industries” and “key workers”. And, what our editors and correspondents are doing to pass the time in lockdown. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy an...more

  • The Economist Asks: Sir David Attenborough

    Mar 26 2020

    For decades Sir David Attenborough has brought the natural world into people’s homes. But his upcoming film, “A Life On Our Planet”, offers a stark message about human impact on the environment. Anne McElvoy asks the godfather of natural history television where he draws the line between wonder and warning. Does his work have the power to change hearts and minds or is he preaching to the choir? They talk about whether the climate could be the only winner from the global covid-19 pandemic and why...more

  • Going to townships: covid-19 threatens Africa

    Mar 26 2020

    Governments across the continent have had a head start, but that will not address some worrying systemic problems many of them share. Ventilators are now a bottleneck in critical covid-19 care; we ask how many there are, and whether many more would help matters. And voting closes for the enthusiasts nominating a national lichen for Canada. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for p...more

  • Babbage: The sniff test for covid-19

    Mar 25 2020

    Ear, nose and throat experts believe there may be a link between covid-19 and the loss of the senses of smell and taste. Might this help tackle the spread of the disease? And, how scientists and manufacturers are trying to keep up with demand for life-saving ventilators. Plus, the climate impact of staying at home. Kenneth Cukier hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer and read The Economist’s full coverage o...more

  • Fiscal firepower: governments’ covid-19 aid

    Mar 25 2020

    As American lawmakers reach a deal on the country’s largest-ever rescue package, we examine how planners are balancing the health of their citizens and that of their economies. China’s lockdown came in the midst of the spring planting season; what can other countries learn about how to keep food flowing? And the increasingly perilous lives of crocodile hunters in the Congo River basin. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radioof...more

  • Money Talks: Closed for business

    Mar 24 2020

    In a desperate attempt to slow the spread of covid-19, governments around the world are ordering residents to stay at home. As the number of fatalities increases, so do the corporate casualties. Which companies are worst-hit and how long will they be closed? And, as Americans stock up on goods in preparation for lockdown, a peek into the pantry shows the scale of the challenge facing one of the country's core industries–dairy. Plus, can global trade weather the economic havoc caused by the virus...more

  • Trial, trial again: the race for covid-19 treatments

    Mar 24 2020

    The world’s scientists are swiftly identifying drugs that may help with the pandemic, and setting out on the long road toward a vaccine. Ethiopia’s prime minister has been hailed as a peacemaker—so why is a violent crackdown plaguing the country’s most populous state? And a look at the epidemiology hidden in Instagram posts. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out i...more

  • Continental shift: covid-19 grips Europe

    Mar 23 2020

    The novel coronavirus is spreading around the world, but its grip on Europe is curiously tight; we ask why, and what to expect next. We pay a visit to Colombia, which is suffering a refugee crisis it did not create and fighting a drug war it cannot win. And all those cancelled sporting events are costly in more than just monetary terms. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy a...more

  • Editor’s Picks: March 23rd 2020

    Mar 22 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the covid-19 pandemic is shutting planet earth down (10:55) America’s financial plumbing has seized up (19:30) and the show must go on for London’s theatres. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf...more

  • Checks and Balance: The invisible enemy

    Mar 20 2020

    Californians have been ordered to stay home. The border with Canada is closed to non-essential traffic. Donald Trump says he now considers himself a “wartime president”. But, for now, the enemy remains invisible. Only 4% of Americans report knowing someone who has tested positive for covid-19. Is the US healthcare system prepared for the coming offensive?John Prideaux, our US editor, talks to Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, former CDC head Dr Tom Frieden, and Charlotte Howa...more

  • Lessons unplanned: school shutdowns spread

    Mar 20 2020

    Schools are closing down as covid-19 measures take hold; we look into the social, economic and educational costs for a world thrust into distance learning and homeschooling. Wild market swings have regulators worldwide wondering whether to shut down stock exchanges altogether. And remembering the backgammon genius known only as Falafel. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy a...more

  • The Economist asks: Ezra Klein

    Mar 19 2020

    Why is America divided? Anne McElvoy asks the editor-at-large of Vox Media and podcast host about whether the coronavirus pandemic will bring Americans together or further apart, if Donald Trump is a symptom or cause of polarization in America and why podcasts are the platform to find common ground. Also, when did Klein last change his mind?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radioofferRead The Economist’s full coverage of the ...more

  • Pandemic, meet politics: the US-China spat

    Mar 19 2020

    Prior tensions have blunted the chances for a co-ordinated response to covid-19—and both countries are fighting a grand ideological battle alongside an epidemiological one. India has so far reported few covid-19 cases; we explore the systemic concerns that would make a large outbreak there staggeringly deadly. And, a failed attempt to tame the notorious traffic of Lagos. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  ...more

  • Babbage: Can the curve be flattened?

    Mar 18 2020

    Dramatic measures to staunch the spread of covid-19 are happening around the world, but will they be enough to reduce the rate of new cases? And amid public anxiety we answer your questions such as can you get coronavirus twice? How does testing work? And how long does the virus live on surfaces and in the air? The Economist’s health-care and science correspondents answer your covid-19 questions. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Drawbridges up: lockdowns and covid-19

    Mar 18 2020

    Borders are closing; suggestions to stay home are becoming mandates. We examine how the national responses to covid-19 have varied, and how they may be converging. In America, Joe Biden cemented his lead in the race for Democrats’ presidential contender. But the bigger question is how the pandemic will affect elections. And Japan’s government fights to protect the country’s famed Wagyu beef. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/r...more

  • Money Talks: Nearing zero

    Mar 17 2020

    America’s Federal Reserve cut interest rates to close to zero to try to ease the economic pain caused by the outbreak of covid-19. What more can central banks do? And, why are many companies fleeing to cash? As consumers race to buy pasta and toilet rolls, what are governments shopping for? Simon Long hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer And go to www.economist.com/coronavirus for our full coverage on the v...more

  • Same old song, and Gantz: fresh coalition talks in Israel

    Mar 17 2020

    He has four weeks to form a government, but Binyamin Netanyahu’s rival Benny Gantz is likely to find that the battle lines from three inconclusive elections haven’t moved. As Western factories shift gears to help in the coronavirus response, we ask what they could learn from China’s distillers. And a look back on the economic upheavals wrought by past pandemics. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast...more

  • Flight risk: airlines and covid-19

    Mar 16 2020

    Travel restrictions that are proliferating worldwide may represent an existential threat to many airlines. How long the pandemic lasts will determine how much the aviation industry is reshaped by it. We ask why the Philippines’ politics is so much more socially conservative than its populace. And the self-defence measures being developed for delivery drones. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com...more

  • Editor’s Picks: March 16th 2020

    Mar 15 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the politics of pandemics, (09:40) stress-testing the NHS, (17:50) and, the fallout of the oil war. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Getting a grip

    Mar 13 2020

    The United States is bracing itself for the spread of covid-19. Sports leagues, universities, and, in some states, schools have shut down. Donald Trump announced a ban on flights from Europe, but investors remain unconvinced he has a grip on the situation. China meanwhile appears to have got over the worst of the outbreak after imposing strict quarantine measures. Will America manage to limit the spread of the coronavirus? How much will the delayed response damage Donald Trump? Charlotte Ho...more

  • Coming two terms with it: Putin’s power grab

    Mar 13 2020

    A resetting of the clock on the Russian leader’s tenure will almost certainly pass into law. That sets up a standoff with a public swiftly losing faith in him. The incentives around sick days are all wrong; a change in attitudes could keep everyone safer. And why it is that, for many contestants on “The Price is Right”, the price is wrong. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privac...more

  • The Economist Asks: Mervyn King

    Mar 12 2020

    The covid-19 pandemic is spreading fast, bringing immense uncertainty to individuals, governments and the global economy. Lord Mervyn King, who led the Bank of England through the depths of the global financial crisis, faced turbulent times. Anne McElvoy asks the former governor whether forecasters can keep up in the era of coronavirus. Also, how panic-buying is like a run on a bank and the radical uncertainty of marriage.  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, di...more

  • Stimulating discussion: policy responses to covid-19

    Mar 12 2020

    Britain’s central bank made an emergency cut and released a budget with a whopping £30bn ($38bn) stimulus; we discuss what countries are doing, or should be, to cushion economies against the pandemic. After decades of false starts, laser-based weapons will soon shine on the battlefield. And a look at the legacy and philosophy of “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” as it turns 42.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Babbage: Fighting the virus

    Mar 11 2020

    As the number of cases of covid-19 rises over 100,000 around the world, scientists and governments are working around the clock on treatments and vaccines. Our science editor, Geoffrey Carr, explains the genetic make-up of the virus. Mark Suzman, CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rupert Beale from the Francis Crick Institute, and Regina Barzilay from MIT explain their attempts to thwart the outbreak. Plus, we turn data outlining the fatality rate by age into sound. Kenneth Cukier hos...more

  • Hollywood moment: Harvey Weinstein’s sentencing

    Mar 11 2020

    The disgraced producer’s conviction may seem a clear-cut win for the #MeToo movement, but it’s as yet uncertain just how much will change outside the media spotlight. Today’s verdict on Guyana’s election result will be crucial in determining how a coming flood of oil wealth will be managed. And “anti-terror architecture” is proliferating—but must it all be ugly? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast...more

  • Money Talks: Another Black Monday

    Mar 10 2020

    Financial markets are reeling from a new “Black Monday” which saw oil prices tumble and stocks plunge in the most brutal day for the market since the global financial crisis of 2007-2009. Slumping demand caused by the spread of the novel coronavirus has sparked a crude-oil price war. What are the ramifications? And, how the virus is boosting a fledgling Chinese industry. Patrick Lane hosts ____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio edit...more

  • When in Rome...stay put: Italy on lockdown

    Mar 10 2020

    The unexpected expansion of quarantine measures are a look into the near future of many countries, each facing different social and epidemiological tradeoffs. Slovakia is on the cusp of forming a government with anti-corruption as the new foundational principle—but will it be able to get anything else done? And a look at the social and cognitive benefits of speaking two languages.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer &#...more

  • A day without women: a vast strike in Mexico

    Mar 09 2020

    Millions of women will stay home today, protesting against rising levels of violence against them. In the Netherlands, a criminal trial begins in the case of flight MH17, downed over Ukraine in 2014—but none of the defendants will be there. And a repeat of The Mayflower’s journey from 400 years ago, this time with no captain or crew. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...more

  • Checks and Balance: Joementum

    Mar 06 2020

    "They don't call it Super Tuesday for nothing." Those were Joe Biden’s words after his astonishing comeback this week. Votes in 14 states catapulted him into the lead in the delegate count that decides the Democratic Party nomination. The former Vice President’s resurrection poses new questions about a campaign that had been all but written off. Does he have the character and organisation to beat Bernie Sanders, then President Trump? The Economist’s US editor John Prideaux looks into Joe Biden’s...more

  • Nevertheless, she persisted: the futility of restricting abortion

    Mar 06 2020

    America’s Supreme Court is again tussling with the age-old question of abortion rights. Internationally the picture is very different; abortions are becoming easier, safer and more legally protected. We look back on the life of Katherine Johnson, a pioneering black woman who helped put men on the moon. And our annual glass-ceiling index ranks countries on workplace equality for women.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffe...more

  • Editor’s Picks: March 5th 2020

    Mar 05 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the covid-19 pandemic threatens an economic crisis as well as a health crisis. Both need fixing. (9:16) The battle for liberty in Africa—across the continent, young protesters are standing up to ageing autocrats. (17:06) And, how Jack Welch, former boss of GE, transformed American capitalism.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/...more

  • The Economist Asks: Christian Louboutin

    Mar 05 2020

    The French designer’s red-soled shoes have won devotees from Aretha Franklin to Cardi B. But when what it means to be feminine, sexy and fashionable is being redefined, where does the stiletto stand? In Paris, Anne McElvoy asks Christian Louboutin where the line lies between fashion and fetishism. Is veganism a fad and how is he preparing the business for a coronavirus pandemic? And, which nationality can match the English for prudishness—and kink.Subscribe to The Economist for full access to pr...more

  • Testing times: the world responds to covid-19

    Mar 05 2020

    Our journalists explore the variance in both policy and preparedness among different countries and regions that are dealing with coronavirus outbreaks—or that soon will. American graduates are saddled with crippling student debts; we examine the systemic problems behind the crisis. And a look at Scotland’s landmark period-products bill. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy a...more

  • Babbage: The ocean—it ain't easy being blue

    Mar 04 2020

    The ocean is under assault as people demand more of its resources. Now climate change is causing the greatest stress yet to ocean ecosystems. Kenneth Cukier talks to Jane Lubchenco, the first US science envoy for the ocean, about why the ocean is too big to ignore. He meets the scientists helping corals to spawn outside their natural habitat and using seaweed as a substitute for single-use plastic. Also, how can Japanese sushi chefs guarantee the origins of their fish? Please subscribe to T...more

  • Joe through a rough patch: Biden’s super Tuesday

    Mar 04 2020

    The former vice-president stormed a raft of primaries yesterday, setting up a two-horse race to the Democratic nomination. What happens next, though, doesn’t depend entirely on those two. A new study examines subtleties in the “bamboo ceiling” that holds back Asian-American workers. And why wealth divides in English football reveal societal divides, too. Additional audio by stinkhorn at freesound.org. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.econo...more

  • Money Talks: How to save the world economy?

    Mar 03 2020

    The Federal Reserve has cut interest rates in the face of increasing concern about the economic impact of the new coronavirus. It follows warnings from forecasters that the outbreak could tip some countries into recession. What more needs to be done to prevent a full-scale downturn? The Economist’s Europe economics correspondent Rachana Shanbhogue asks Patrick Foulis, business affairs editor; Alice Fulwood, American finance correspondent; and Henry Tricks, Schumpeter columnistPlease subscribe to...more

  • Caught in the middle: Idlib’s humanitarian disaster

    Mar 03 2020

    Turkey sees the fall of Idlib as an existential threat; Russian-backed Syrian forces see the province as the last redoubt of troublesome rebels. Millions are trapped in the crossfire. Loans are hard to come by in Venezuela, so one plucky rum company has boldly made a share offering. And why it’s so hard to deliver the mail in Congo. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and o...more

  • EU’ve heard this one before: Brexit trade talks

    Mar 02 2020

    Once again, Britain’s negotiators are talking tough, threatening a no-deal scenario as a long series of trade talks begins in Brussels. They’ve got a hard job ahead. Many aircraft engines have computer-based “digital twins” to keep them healthy and efficient—now that idea is being used to monitor human hearts. And a descendant of Vienna’s Rothschild family fights to regain a family foundation. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com...more

  • Checks and Balance: Crashing the party

    Feb 28 2020

    The centrists of the Democratic Party establishment have only a few days to figure out how to stop Bernie Sanders running away with the nomination. Something similar happened to the Republicans in 2016 when Donald Trump memed his way to the presidency to the horror of party grandees. Mainstream parties in European democracies have also faced challenges from the fringes. Is the era of the party machine over? Or are moderates simply losing the battle of ideas?Subscribe to The Economist for full ac...more

  • Playing with fire: Democrats may get Bern

    Feb 28 2020

    Bernie Sanders's rise in the Democratic primaries has echoes of Donald Trump’s road to the Republican nomination. He has already changed the tone of the race; can he win it? We take a look at the shadowy history of spies running front companies. And a look back on the life of “Mad Mike” Hoare, an accountant-turned-mercenary. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out i...more

  • Editor’s Picks: February 27th 2020

    Feb 27 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what can be done about the viral pandemic that is sweeping the world (9:07), the dangerous consequences of forcing Americans to choose between Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump (16:56), and three lessons from Bob Iger, the king of Disneyland. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for...more

  • The Economist Asks: Janet Yellen

    Feb 27 2020

    America is enjoying its longest ever economic growth spurt. How much longer can it last? The spread of the new coronavirus is threatening global growth, the link between lower unemployment and higher inflation seems to have gone missing, and central banks are facing politically motivated attacks. Janet Yellen, the first woman to chair the Federal Reserve, talks to Anne McElvoy and Henry Curr, our economics editor, about what it’s like to manage the world’s biggest economy and whether central ban...more

  • Delhi melee: India’s citizenship protests

    Feb 27 2020

    Violence in the country’s capital is the worst in decades. The unrest pits the ruling party’s Hindu-nationalist agenda against citizens proud of India’s secular history. Both technology and society are outpacing the laws on free speech; we examine the battle lines. And we turn a data set outlining Europe’s economic history into sound. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...more

  • Babbage: Going viral, going global

    Feb 26 2020

    Covid-19, the new coronavirus, is spreading around the world. Abdi Mahamad, the World Health Organisation’s incident manager for Asia, reveals that for the first time since the start of the outbreak, more cases are being reported outside China than within it. What can countries do to limit the spread of the virus, and will it become a pandemic? The Economist’s deputy editor Tom Standage hosts a debate with Therese Hesketh, professor of global health at the Institute for Global Health at Universi...more

  • Clash pipe: Canada’s widening protests

    Feb 26 2020

    Successive governments have overlooked the concerns of indigenous peoples, and that has elevated a small gas-pipeline protest into a national conflagration. We look back on the life and legacy of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s longest-serving ruler. And the violent turf war in Sri Lanka—between people and elephants.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: covid-19 spreads

    Feb 25 2020

    Stockmarkets saw some of the sharpest falls in years after a rise in new coronavirus cases. Is a global economic downturn on the cards? Also, Argentina faces serious debt difficulties—can it strike a new deal with the International Monetary Fund? And, Professor Diane Coyle, from Cambridge University, on the importance of the “data economy”. Rachana Shanbhogue hostsPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See ac...more

  • Mitigating circumstances: coronavirus spreads

    Feb 25 2020

    Global markets tanked yesterday as governments reported startling rises in covid-19 cases. Our correspondents around the world assess countries' differing policies, and the prospects for overcoming the outbreak. There’s chaos and intrigue in Malaysia, where persistent ethnic divides continue to dominate the country’s politics. And why Saturday bus services in Israel are a potent election issue.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com...more

  • The World Ahead: NPT threats

    Feb 24 2020

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty turns 50 this year, but the celebrations may be short-lived. Also, the challenges facing Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, as he tries to keep both China and America happy. And why the future of video-gaming may play out in the cloud. Tom Standage hosts.    Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer or her...more

  • Peace-meal: ceasefire in Afghanistan

    Feb 24 2020

    For now, a “reduction in violence” is holding, and a long-awaited agreement hangs in the balance. But can the Taliban and the country’s government engineer a lasting peace? Brazil’s surfers dominate the sport, but perhaps not for long. And the mismatch between teens’ job desires and their prospects.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Mike drop

    Feb 21 2020

    Michael Bloomberg is trying to transform the Democrat presidential field through the sheer weight of his cash. But does politics in America really work that way? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, Jon Fasman, and Charlotte Howard assess whether Bloomberg’s advertising campaign matches his mayoral record, why a legal case from the Watergate era has been crucial to the billionaire’s campaign, and how South Carolina’s minority voters are reassessing the moderate field. Listen to The Eco...more

  • Clerical era: Iran’s elections

    Feb 21 2020

    In a bid to unite a fractious populace, hardliners barred half of the parliamentary candidates; by silencing moderates, the plan will suppress turnout and deepen the disquiet. We take a look at the rise, fall and this week’s pardon of the “junk-bond king” Michael Milken. And why so few Japanese people use their widely welcomed passports.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy a...more

  • Editor’s Picks: February 20th 2020

    Feb 20 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to make sense of the latest tech surge, (10:20) examining Jeff Bezos’s $10bn promise to fight climate change (15:30) and, Bagehot on Boris - the imperial prime minister. Zanny Minton-Beddoes, The Economist’s Editor-in-chief hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...more

  • The Economist Asks: What makes an extremist?

    Feb 20 2020

    Technology has transformed the way extremist groups recruit and mobilise their members. Julia Ebner, author of “Going Dark”, spent two years undercover inside radical organisations of all political hues. This week, in the wake of a far-right terrorist attack in the German town of Hanau, Anne McElvoy asks her what drives perpetrators to commit mass violence. They talk about how Julia won the trust of neo-Nazis and militant Islamists, how gamification is used to radicalise—and why she believes cou...more

  • Uncut emerald: Ireland’s unification prospects

    Feb 20 2020

    Spurred on by demographic shifts, Brexit and the success of the Sinn Fein party in this month’s election, the once-unthinkable idea of Irish reunification is gaining ground. The IMF is in Lebanon to discuss restructuring the country’s crippling debts; we examine the roots of the economic crisis. And visiting a frigid festival where even the instruments are made from ice.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  S...more

  • Babbage: Feeding tomorrow’s world @AAAS

    Feb 19 2020

    By 2050 the global population is projected to reach 9.7 billion. At the same time, climate change is putting increasing pressure on agricultural land. At the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Seattle, Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, speaks to nutritionists, genetic engineers and computer scientists to find out whether the planet can sustainably feed future generations. Could genetic engineering make key crops more productive, res...more

  • Many hands light of work: China’s 170m migrant workers

    Feb 19 2020

    Strict controls meant to contain the spread of the coronavirus are affecting many of the country’s villages. Our correspondent visits migrant workers who are trapped and draining their savings. We look into why Boeing’s space-and-defence division, which used to prop up the commercial-aircraft side, is itself losing altitude. And why American politicians’ heights matter so much to their prospects.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.c...more

  • Money Talks: Coronanomics

    Feb 18 2020

    Coronavirus is causing unprecedented supply and demand challenges for the global economy. How can businesses minimise economic damage? Also, why are MBA schools in China thriving? And, the cities rebelling against the cashless revolution. Patrick Lane hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A friend of mines: America’s explosive policy turn

    Feb 18 2020

    The Trump administration’s stance on anti-personnel landmines worries many—but also speaks to a future in which the rules of war are uncertain. Britain’s universities are coming to grips with how much the slave trade built them. And why the ads on televised sport aren’t always what they seem.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The snails of justice: the International Criminal Court

    Feb 17 2020

    Sudan’s transitional government has pledged to hand over the country’s brutal former leader to the ICC—could justice for the court’s most-wanted man at last give it credibility? Even with a world-beating renewables push, Norway’s wealth depends on oil; how can it navigate the shifting economics of energy? And the bid to make Los Angeles just a bit less car-dependent.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Checks and Balance: The Trump pay bump

    Feb 14 2020

    Amid the drama of impeachment and the Democrats' first primaries, President Trump expanded the list of mostly Muslim nationalities restricted from travel to the US. A hard line on immigration will be a big part of his reelection pitch. He’ll make the link between stronger borders and a booming economy. It turns orthodox economics on its head, but recent data on rising wages will help the president make his case. Might the wall be good economics after all? Callum Williams, senior economics writer...more

  • Another man’s Treasury: Britain’s cabinet upheaval

    Feb 14 2020

    The dramatic departure of the head of the Treasury reveals Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s desire—and that of his wily chief aide—to take firm hold of the country’s purse strings. A new book finds that a landmark study in psychiatry was not at all what it seemed. And the thumping changes going on in Berlin’s club scene. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radioofferAdditional audio “Dustbin Acid (Super Rhythm Trax)” courtesy...more

  • Editor's Picks February 13th 2020

    Feb 13 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week Irish unification is becoming more likely, (09:40) Angela Merkel’s presumed successor quits as party boss (16:30) and, looking at the world through the eyes of options traders Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Thomas Piketty

    Feb 13 2020

    The idea that inequality is rising is being used to explain everything from tribalism to low voter turnout. But how much is known about the gap between the haves and the have-nots, is it growing and why does it matter? Economist Thomas Piketty, dubbed “the modern Marx” for his theories on how wealth concentrates, talks to Anne McElvoy and Henry Curr, The Economist’s economics editor, about his new book, “Capital and Ideology”. They debate how unfair societies can learn from their mistakes and wh...more

  • Defence on the defensive: NATO under scrutiny

    Feb 13 2020

    It’s not just President Donald Trump piling pressure on the alliance. As defence ministers meet in Brussels, we examine one of the longest-lasting defence treaties in history. Despite mounting public unease, Japan’s government is pressing ahead with plans to bring in a wave of casinos. And the man who’s bringing agave spirit to India—just don’t call it tequila. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See a...more

  • Babbage: Close encounters of a solar kind

    Feb 12 2020

    The Solar Orbiter is on a two year journey towards the sun, the most studied astronomical subject in the sky. What will this new view of the sun reveal? Also, Kenneth Cukier talks to Amy Zegart, who advises American policymakers on cyber-spycraft, about how countries can improve their defence against digital security threats. And, why living in a city impairs navigational skills. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radioof...more

  • Bern turn: New Hampshire’s primary

    Feb 12 2020

    Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg led the pack in New Hampshire. Two candidates have exited the race, and a potential spoiler is yet to compete. Argentina’s administration is at risk of defaulting on its gargantuan debt to the International Monetary Fund; both will be hoping to end the standoff today. And the environmentally conscious quest for artificial shrimp. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acas...more

  • Money Talks: Supply strain

    Feb 11 2020

    As the Wuhan coronavirus continues to spread, what effect will factory closures in China have on global supply chains? Also, how technology is finally poised to disrupt the market for real estate. And what it takes to be a CEO in 2020. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Christian Democratic disunion: Germany’s political upheaval

    Feb 11 2020

    Chancellor Angela Merkel’s hand-picked successor is out of the running. The ruling CDU party must now pick a new leader and a path in dealing with the rising far right. Legislation in the works in America shows how gender dysphoria among children has become a battlefront in the culture wars. And, a musical analysis of the winter blues. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for priva...more

  • Trust the process? China’s coronavirus response

    Feb 10 2020

    The Communist Party is exuding an aura of complete control over the outbreak, but our correspondent finds an undercurrent of distrust. International health experts are racing to understand just how deadly the virus is, and whether it can ultimately be contained. And the rise of ratings—it seems employees in many industries will eventually be angling for a five-star review. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Checks and Balance: Left Bern

    Feb 07 2020

    Might America choose a socialist president? Ahead in the polls for the New Hampshire primary, Bernie Sanders’ grip on the left of the Democratic Party is strengthening. The Senator from Vermont is the American left’s best chance in decades to defy political gravity. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, looks at the history of socialism in America and James Astill, Lexington columnist, assesses Senator Sanders’ chances. Checks and Balance regulars Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman also conside...more

  • From out of left field: Ireland’s election

    Feb 07 2020

    After the adulation, the discontent. Voters are abandoning the party of the young, progressive leader Leo Varadkar, with many supporting Sinn Fein, a party with a violent history. Our obituaries editor looks back on the life of Homero Gómez, a renowned logger-turned-butterfly-activist. And the coyotes invading America’s cities. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-ou...more

  • Editor’s Picks: February 6th 2020

    Feb 06 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the state of the Democrats. (10:20) What does it take to be a CEO in the 2020s? (18:40) And, QE or not QE? The Economist‘s editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Has Donald Trump reinvented the American presidency?

    Feb 06 2020

    After being acquitted in the Senate, Donald Trump will be the first president to run for reelection having been impeached. Anne McElvoy asks Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey, the authors of “Unmaking the presidency”, about whether the verdict strengthens Mr Trump’s electoral hand. Will the way Mr Trump is reshaping the presidency outlast him and could he be changing the office for the better?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.c...more

  • Imperfect call: Trump’s exoneration

    Feb 06 2020

    A predictable outcome in President Donald Trump’s Senate trial will have unpredictable effects on executive power and congressional oversight—but probably not on November’s elections. A staggering map of neural connections opens a new frontier in brain science. And the entirely preventable plague of locusts munching through east Africa. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy a...more

  • Babbage: Viral hit

    Feb 05 2020

    Can a vaccine for the new coronavirus be developed in time to stop a pandemic? How a satellite called Claire has found a new way of spotting methane leaks to help combat global warming. And, unfolding the mystery of butterfly wings. Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Address change: the State of the Union

    Feb 05 2020

    President Donald Trump seemed to be going out of his way to rankle Democrats while he pitched his tenure as a change from American decline to American rejuvenation. In the developing world mobile phones have given millions access to financial services—as well as exposing them to exploitation. And what fashion houses do with their piles of unsold, high-end stock. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast...more

  • Money Talks: Business after Brexit

    Feb 04 2020

    After Britain’s official departure from the European Union on January 31st, the government faces a divergence dilemma: departing from the EU's rules may mean less access to its markets. The Economist’s Britain business editor Tamzin Booth explains the costs and opportunities of a directive-free future. And Mike Cherry, chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses, and city financier Dame Helena Morrissey discuss what government and business must do to adapt. Patrick Lane hosts_________________...more

  • An app-polling delay: Iowa’s caucus chaos

    Feb 04 2020

    Technical glitches and “inconsistencies” threw America’s first Democratic caucuses into disarray. That will have political consequences, irrespective of the eventual winner. So-called bio-bots—tiny machines made from the stem cells of a frog—blur the line between the biological and the mechanical. And the children competing in Thailand’s elbows-and-all Muay Thai boxing. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  S...more

  • Economic contagion: Hong Kong

    Feb 03 2020

    Hong Kong’s GDP report released today reflects the squeeze that enormous protests at home and economic headwinds on the mainland have put on the territory—and that was before the coronavirus outbreak. Inequality in Brazil is bad and getting worse; we ask why the government is chipping away at a much-praised social safety-net. And a look at the self-help craze gripping Ethiopia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Checks and Balance: Des Moines craft

    Jan 31 2020

    It’s 1,000 miles from the White House. But for decades, Iowa has played an outsized role in America’s presidential race. Voters give their verdict on the 2020 candidates for the first time in the Iowa caucuses next week — an important test for the Democrats hoping to be elected President in November. How much does Iowa really matter? The Economist’s US editor, John Prideaux, heads to the Midwest to find out. Correspondents Adam Roberts and Jon Fasman have also been in Iowa this week. Charlotte H...more

  • When one door closes: Brexit day

    Jan 31 2020

    The costs of leaving the European Union are likely to outweigh the benefits. But as Britain re-aligns itself in the world, those benefits should be seized. The outcome of America’s impeachment proceedings is all but assured, and that is an insight into the Senate, the presidency and impeachment itself. And why pregnancy was absent for so long in British art.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: January 30th 2020

    Jan 30 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, will the Wuhan virus become a pandemic? (09:40) The United Kingdom leaves the European Union. (17:55) And, drugs offered to transgender children need to be used more cautiously.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Viral hit: the costs of China’s lockdown

    Jan 30 2020

    Our correspondent travels to the border of the locked-down Hubei province, finding among the people a mixture of resignation, fear and distrust. Was the draconian response appropriate? Big oil firms have just the kind of expertise needed to make a vast transition to renewables; in order to survive, they should put it to use. And why Mongolia’s winters are growing deadlier. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer &nbs...more

  • Babbage: Judging the book

    Jan 29 2020

    Will Facebook’s new “oversight board” restore trust in the social media giant? Also, venture capitalist Roy Bahat on how AI will transform the future of work. And, how to make oxygen from moon dust. Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • They went that Huawei: Britain’s crucial 5G call

    Jan 29 2020

    Facing pressure from both China and America on allowing Huawei into its next-generation network, Britain opted to fully appease neither—and that will test relationships in the post-Brexit era. Collecting tax in Africa is a fairly fraught business, but it’s too much potential revenue to ignore. And the sociology that suggests the ideal size for a team. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/p...more

  • Money Talks: Market contagion

    Jan 28 2020

    Concern over the new coronavirus caused global stockmarkets to fall. Could the Wuhan virus hurt economic growth in China more than the SARS virus did? Also, how can India’s economy recover from “stagflation”? And, the “father of disruptive innovation” has died—the legacy of Clayton Christensen’s management lessons. Simon Long hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and o...more

  • The Economist Asks: Trapped in Iran

    Jan 28 2020

    In July 2019 Nicolas Pelham, The Economist's Middle East correspondent, received a rare journalist’s visa to visit Iran. But on the day he was due to fly home he was detained by intelligence officials from the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, one of the country’s most powerful institutions. He was questioned repeatedly and forced to stay in the country for seven more weeks. Although unable to leave, he was later allowed to roam the city without a minder and found a paradoxical liberation in ca...more

  • Showpiece in the Middle East: Trump’s “ultimate deal”

    Jan 28 2020

    Palestinian leaders have already rejected the American administration’s peace plan. But the proposal is nevertheless politically useful, both for Binyamin Netanyahu and Donald Trump. Our correspondent Nicolas Pelham recounts being detained in Iran last year. He was given a surprising amount of freedom—and made the most of it. And the shrinking American states paying people to move in. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/rad...more

  • The World Ahead: Deep green sea

    Jan 27 2020

    New environmental rules have been introduced to control pollution at sea, but might they do more harm than good—and how can shipping be made greener in the long term? Also, a look at the future of nursing, as 2020 has been designated the year of the nurse. And how Xi Jinping is playing a long game to improve Chinese football in the decades to come. Tom Standage hosts.  Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, di...more

  • Spread bet: China’s coronavirus quarantine

    Jan 27 2020

    In Hubei province and increasingly across China, new-year celebrations are muted. Authorities are trying to contain the outbreak with an unprecedented lockdown. Homelessness is rising in the rich world, with Finland as a notable exception; we examine the merits of the country’s “housing first” policy. And how to identify someone by reading their heartbeat at 200 paces. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  Se...more

  • Checks and Balance: Disruptor-in-chief

    Jan 24 2020

    How far has President Donald Trump delivered on his promise to remake American power in the world? With so much attention focused on the impeachment drama originating in Ukraine, John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, identifies the places more likely to determine the fate of Trump’s presidency. And has America’s global standing been damaged as Trump’s critics allege? Co-hosts Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman debate President Trump’s foreign pol...more

  • Ill-judged: Poland’s rule-of-law crisis

    Jan 24 2020

    Poland's government has been trying to nobble the courts for years. Now the European Union is intervening, and the outcome could undermine the union itself. Our obituaries editor looks back on the life of Nell Gifford, whose small, tight-knit circus brought a sense of community into the big top. And modern sensitivities reveal why gender is so tricky in German. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast....more

  • Editor’s Picks: January 23rd 2020

    Jan 23 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Narendra Modi and the ruling BJP are sowing division in India. (10:06) Investors at home and abroad are piling into American government debt. (16:31) And, the similarities between Britain’s queen and Sir Alex Ferguson. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out i...more

  • The Economist Asks: Does the world need Davos?

    Jan 23 2020

    At the World Economic Forum, which celebrates its 50th anniversary, The Economist’s editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes, Anne McElvoy and Patrick Foulis debate the future of the annual alpine gathering. How did a young academic’s pet project come to be seen as the ultimate A-list bash for global CEOs, political leaders and celebrities alike? Anne McElvoy speaks to the CEO of Youtube, Susan Wojcicki, actress and activist Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Natalia Vodianova, a supermodel and philanthropis...more

  • On the right track: a trend in diplomacy

    Jan 23 2020

    When conflict-resolution efforts falter in official channels, there are unofficial ones. We ask why “Track 2”—allowing well-meaning third parties to mediate—is on the rise. The prime minister of Lesotho has pledged to resign and his wife is on the run; we examine the high drama playing out in the African country. And some surprising truths about lie-detector tests. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See ac...more

  • Babbage: The Wuhan plan

    Jan 22 2020

    The new coronavirus, which was discovered in December in the city of Wuhan China, is now causing a global scare. What are the symptoms of the Wuhan virus and how can it be contained? Also, a new biotech company is hoping to revolutionise the way drugs are brought to market. And, should countries around the world ban Huawei technology from their 5G network? Kenneth Cukier hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer...more

  • Justin time, again: Trudeau’s second term

    Jan 22 2020

    Canada’s prime minister now leads a minority government, and has lost support in the country’s west. We ask what he must do, and how, with his weakened mandate. Our correspondent travels across Ireland to discover how it swiftly switched from socially conservative to proudly progressive. And a look at the worrying numbers in our annual Democracy Index. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/...more

  • Money Talks: Goldilocks economy

    Jan 21 2020

    America’s biggest banks posted record profits last week, despite falling interest rates. This week the attention turns to smaller lenders. Why might they not do so well? Also, why precious metals rhodium and palladium make gold look cheap. And, ganbei! The world’s biggest alcoholic-drinks company, finding success in doing everything… wrong. Simon Long hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  Se...more

  • Can I get a witness? Impeachment

    Jan 21 2020

    The rules are set, battle lines drawn and the outcome is all but assured. We ask why the Senate trial of President Donald Trump seems so sewn up. A decade after a devastating earthquake, Haiti is still a mess—and now a constitutional crisis is compounding the misery. And why gay women are more likely to divorce than gay men. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out i...more

  • Tripoli crown: the battle for Libya

    Jan 20 2020

    This weekend’s peace talks in Berlin were a good start, but the situation is still ripe for a longer, messier proxy war. More than a million people die each year on the world’s roads; solutions to the crisis are plain to see, if only governments would seize them. And how curators and conservators are bracing for climate change. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-ou...more

  • The Economist asks: How to be a dictator

    Jan 17 2020

    The 20th century has become known as the “age of dictatorship”, for the horrors perpetrated by Hitler, Stalin, Mao and other despots from Chile to Cambodia. Anne McElvoy asks Frank Dikötter, a historian and professor at the university of Hong Kong, how these men rose to power and why some survived while others were brought down. They debate the limits of authoritarian power today, including China’s ability to act in Hong Kong. And what makes a true dictator—or is there something a bit dicta...more

  • Address the problem: the global housing blunder

    Jan 17 2020

    Badly run housing markets are linked to broader ills, from financial crises to the rise of populism. The first problem? The conviction that home ownership is an unambiguously good thing. While China clamps down on most religions, it encourages others; we meet the followers of a tenth-century sea goddess. And the decline of drinking a century after Prohibition began. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See a...more

  • Checks and Balance: Trailer

    Jan 17 2020

    US editor John Prideaux and his colleagues from across the US and around the world go beyond the headlines and the horserace to delve deeper into the race for the White House—and why it matters so much.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: January 16th 2020

    Jan 16 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the consequences of the West's obsession with homeownership. (8:58) Vladimir Putin’s power grab. (14:08) And, Harry, Meghan and Marx—why Brand Sussex represents the biggest threat to the monarchy so farPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Set for life? Putin’s power-grab

    Jan 16 2020

    After Russia’s president proposed vast constitutional change, the whole government resigned. It seems to be another convoluted power-grab by Vladimir Putin—and it seems likely to work. Our correspondent finds that the tired stereotypes European Union countries have about their neighbours are pervasive even at the heart of the European integration. And the surprising and nefarious world of sand-smuggling.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here ...more

  • Babbage: Starlight, star bright

    Jan 15 2020

    A giant star called Betelgeuse is behaving strangely. Could the dimming star be about to become a supernova? Also, a group of internet veterans are contesting the billion dollar sale of the “.org” domain registry. What’s their alternative? And, accidental stampedes can be deadly. How does a crowd turn into a crush? Kenneth Cukier hosts____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer____________________ &#...more

  • Going through a phase: US-China trade deal

    Jan 15 2020

    Negotiators will sign a “phase one” pact today—but the trickiest issues remain unresolved, and plenty of tariffs will stay in place. Will the deal repair trading relations? As more young people head online, “cyberbullying” is on the rise, too. But why are some kids bullying themselves on social media? And why quirky Las Vegas weddings are on the wane. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privac...more

  • Money Talks: Experiencing turbulence

    Jan 14 2020

    Boeing has a new chief executive. What does he need to do to restore faith in the world’s biggest aerospace company? Also, why some countries are trying to ditch the dollar and challenge America’s dominance of the global financial cycle. And, how can the economics profession solve its race problem? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. ____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy...more

  • A Biden by their decision? Democrats debate

    Jan 14 2020

    The race for the Democratic nomination looks much like it did a year ago—but previous contests prove that once voting starts, momentum can reshuffle the pack. Iran has been roiling with protests following the accidental downing of an airliner; what should Iranians and the wider world expect now? And we examine how Bogotá’s once-adored public-transport system went so wrong. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer &nbs...more

  • Tsai of the times: Taiwan’s defiant election

    Jan 13 2020

    China has been getting more aggressive in its claims over the island, but voters have made it clear just how much they favour democracy. The relentless slipping of interest rates around the world isn’t recent: new research suggests it’s been going on since the Middle Ages. And why the language of scientific papers disfavours female authors.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privac...more

  • The Economist Asks: The Suleimani killing—masterstroke or madness?

    Jan 10 2020

    As America announces new sanctions and Iran threatens further revenge attacks, Anne McElvoy interviews Ambassador Ryan Crocker about what the killing of Qassem Suleimani means. The former US chief diplomat to Iraq, Syria, Kuwait and Lebanon explains why his reaction to the news was one of satisfaction and how the loss of its top general will reshape Tehran's influence in the region. They explore whether America can stop Iran from becoming a nuclear power. Or will the conflict become Preside...more

  • Scorched-earth policies: Australia and climate change

    Jan 10 2020

    Evacuations are expanding as fast as the flames, and worse may yet be to come. We visit the fiery extremes that climate change is making more likely. At a museum dedicated to disgust, our correspondent tries some repugnant stuff, learning that the reaction is about far more than food. And why Japan’s new, surname-first rule reveals a big shift in attitudes. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/...more

  • Editor’s Picks: January 9th 2020

    Jan 09 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the fallout from the killing of Qassem Suleimani. (09:30) Can a new boss salvage the reputation of Boeing? (17:47) And, a right-royal shake-up Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Will you still feed me when I’m 62? Macron’s pension fight

    Jan 09 2020

    He won a landslide victory campaigning on it, but like French presidents before him Emmanuel Macron is struggling to push through his grand pension reform; we ask why. The belief in guardian spirits in Myanmar is being cracked down on by increasingly intolerant monks. And the Canadian town of Asbestos considers a name-change. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out ...more

  • Babbage: Fire fighting

    Jan 08 2020

    Australia is battling catastrophic wildfires. Climate models predict extreme fire events are going to become more commonplace. What can countries do to prepare? And, a glimpse into the chip factory around which the modern world turns. Also, what is “open innovation”? Henry Chesbrough, professor at the Haas School of Business, at UC Berkeley talks to Kenneth Cukier.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  S...more

  • Return fire: Iran’s missile attacks

    Jan 08 2020

    Attacks on bases that house American troops seem a dramatic retaliation to the killing of Iranian commander Qassem Suleimani—yet both sides seem to be tuning their tactics toward de-escalation. After nearly a year without one, Spain has a government. But amid fragmented politics, it may not get much done. And how darts is moving from British-pub pastime to American prime time. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Money Talks: Full battle rattle

    Jan 07 2020

    Oil and gold prices spiked after the killing of Qassem Suleimani, an Iranian general, by the United States. How might heightened tension in the Middle East affect these important commodity markets in the weeks ahead? And, at the American Economic Association’s annual meeting, Ben Bernanke reflected on how successfully the Fed has adapted to a world of ultra-low interest rates. Also, why consumer shame now means it pays to be ethical. Patrick Lane hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for ...more

  • Two heads aren’t better than one: Venezuela

    Jan 07 2020

    After chaotic scenes in the National Assembly, it seems the country’s legislature has two leaders. Has Juan Guaidó’s chance at regime change run out of steam? Allegations against Harvey Weinstein sparked the #MeToo movement; as he stands trial in New York we examine how the movement is progressing. And unpicking the weird theories for Sudan’s nasty traffic. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/...more

  • The general and specific threats: Iran

    Jan 06 2020

    Killing Iran’s top military commander does not seem likely to further America’s aims for the region. What should America and its allies expect now? Biologists have long struggled to explain why homosexual behaviour is so widespread in nature, but a new theory simply asks: why not? And the global comeback of dubbing in foreign films. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and o...more

  • The Economist Asks: Bagehot on Bagehot

    Jan 03 2020

    What can Britain today learn from Walter Bagehot? He was The Economist’s greatest editor who mixed with the cream of British society in the 19th century. The Economist’s current Bagehot columnist, Adrian Wooldridge, talks to James Grant, financial journalist and biographer of Bagehot, about Bagehot’s prose, politics and lasting influencePlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy ...more

  • Negative feedback: reversing carbon emissions

    Jan 03 2020

    It is increasingly clear that putting less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will not be enough to combat climate change; we take a look at the effort to actively remove the stuff from the air. Our correspondent takes a ride on Chicago’s Red Line, whose length represents a shocking level of inequality. And why a push to go organic in Turkey isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See...more

  • Editor’s Picks: January 2nd 2020

    Jan 02 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, don’t be fooled by the phase one trade deal between China and America. (10:20) Finding new physics requires a new particle collider. (30:52) And, a dispute over racism roils the world of romance novelists Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Made (entirely) in China: a tech behemoth rises

    Jan 02 2020

    No longer content just to assemble devices, Chinese firms want to design them and the infrastructure around them—and in some sectors they look set to succeed. Our correspondent visits indigenous communities along the icy sliver of water between Russia and America. And why North Korean students get illegal tutoring. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information...more

  • Babbage: What’s the frequency Kenneth?

    Jan 01 2020

    Kenneth Cukier celebrates the invention of a musical instrument that turns 100 in 2020—the Theremin. A staple of sci-fi sound-effects, the instrument is enjoying a revival in the digital age. We talk to players, historians, a former student and relative of its inventor to learn about the influence of the Theremin on modern culture. Was the instrument a technological achievement that came a century too soon?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www...more

  • Money Talks: Work in progress

    Dec 31 2019

    The office is evolving beyond recognition. How did a functional grid of desks become more like a home, complete with in-house childcare and spare exercise clothes? James Fransham, a data journalist at The Economist, takes a tour of some of the world’s leading offices to find out whether other companies will follow their lead. Is it possible to leave work feeling better than when you arrived? And, when it comes to the bottom line, is the office of the future good for business? Please subscri...more

  • The World Ahead: Tax me if you can

    Dec 30 2019

    2020 will be a key year for determining how big multinational and technology companies are taxed, but can a global deal be reached? Also, to what degree will the Olympics boost Japan’s international standing next year and will a new event called sport climbing catch on? Finally, the science fiction guide to the future. Anne McElvoy hosts  Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.ec...more

  • The Economist Asks: The Best of 2019

    Dec 27 2019

    In 2019 Anne McElvoy challenged the people making the news. From presidential candidates and CEOs to fashion icons and even a relationship therapist. Among her guests were Democratic hopeful Pete Buttigieg, editor-in-chief of Vogue, Anna Wintour and author Anand Giridharadas. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:https://www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: 26th December 2019

    Dec 26 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the holiday issue of The Economist. This week, visiting the most diverse district in Africa, (17:30) meeting the Cockneys of Thetford, (34:22) and the tangled history of California’s eucalyptus trees.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A very merry Money Talks Christmas special

    Dec 24 2019

    From pickled radishes to red knickers, we take a break from the news of the moment to look back over the peaks and troughs of the past year in business, finance and economics. Our merry panel of Helen Joyce, The Economist’s finance editor, Patrick Foulis, our business affairs editor, and Schumpeter columnist Henry Tricks join Philip Coggan, otherwise known as Bartleby, for a riotous ride through the stories of the year. And, fortified with mulled wine and chocolate coins, they offer their predic...more

  • Lifesaver: meet a death-row detective

    Dec 24 2019

    Death sentences are occasionally overturned in America; we meet a private detective responsible for saving many of those lives. We scour our foreign department taking nominations for The Economist’s country of the year. And our correspondent joins a shipment of Congolese beer for its long river journey from brewery to bars. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out in...more

  • Lying in states: fibbing politicians

    Dec 23 2019

    Lies and politics have always come as a pair, but the untruths keep getting bigger and more frequent; our correspondent digs into why. We speak with an adventurer who fought off the murderous boredom of a whole Antarctic winter with little more than books. And, the benefits and risks of home genetic-testing kits. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Greta Gerwig

    Dec 20 2019

    Every generation has its own “Little Women”. Anne McElvoy asks Greta Gerwig, the Oscar-nominated writer and director of “Lady Bird”, about how she reinvented the classic story of Jo, Amy, Meg and Beth March for a new audience. They talk about her move to behind the camera, rescuing her characters from stereotypes and the economics of being a woman artist then and now. Also, how does Barbie, the subject of her next film, fare in the age of #MeToo? Please subscribe to The Economist for full a...more

  • Old China hands: ageing in the Middle Kingdom

    Dec 20 2019

    Next year, China’s median age will surpass America’s, but with just a quarter the median income; the government is nervous that China will get old before it gets rich. This weekend’s elections in Uzbekistan are another sign of astonishing change in the country—but plenty of political reform is still needed. And a sidelong glance at the tradition of the boss’s end-of-year memo. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Editor’s Picks: December 19th 2019

    Dec 19 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the holiday issue of The Economist. This week, the phenomenon of technological pessimism (08:23), how to cut homelessness in the world’s priciest cities (12:51), and how China made the piano it’s ownPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Exclusionary rule: India’s citizenship law

    Dec 19 2019

    The Hindu nationalist government’s latest move pointedly excludes Muslims from immigration reform. Protesters reckon that is an attack on the country’s cherished secularism. Tuberculosis is still among the world’s biggest killers; we look at emerging new tools to fight an old disease. And a deep dive on the sex lives of eels. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt...more

  • Babbage: How the planets got their spots

    Dec 18 2019

    The workings of the solar system were once likened to the machinations of a precise clock, but the orbits of the planets haven’t always been so perfectly balanced. How did the planets end up where they are today? Also, the Mars missions which hopes to reveal life on the red planet. And, designer and technologist John Maeda on the importance of understanding machines. Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com...more

  • Marching orders: impeachment around the world

    Dec 18 2019

    America’s impeachment battle falls along unhelpfully partisan lines—but the process has other shortcomings. We take some lessons from how the rest of the world does it. Cuba has long run an official two-currency economy; now, the once-banned American dollar is establishing itself as a third. And another take on American partisanship: our analysis shows intriguing divides in the country’s music tastes. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.econo...more

  • Money talks: Maxed out

    Dec 17 2019

    Boeing has announced it will temporarily cease production of 737 Max airliners. How high are the stakes for the company? And Heather Boushey, executive director at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, says data on inequality should be making economists rethink their models. Also, The Economist’s Bartleby columnist on how to survive the office Christmas party. Simon Long hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radi...more

  • Majority rules: Britain’s new Parliament sits

    Dec 17 2019

    Now that the prime minister has a thumping parliamentary majority, Brexit is assured—but on what terms? And what other legislative shake-ups are in the works? President Donald Trump has relied heavily on financial sanctions, often in place of old-fashioned diplomacy. We ask whether that is an effective avenue of foreign policy. And an attempt to peek into Asia’s illegal tiger farms.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • COP out: the UN climate talks

    Dec 16 2019

    Again, the annual COP conference ran long and ended with disappointment. Why can’t countries agree on what so clearly must be done? One big contributor to the changing climate is meat-eating, and China looks ever more carnivorous. And a new, push-button system to land planes whose pilots are incapacitated. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: How did Boris turn Britain blue?

    Dec 13 2019

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson has redrawn the political map in Britain after the Conservative party won the general election by a landslide. Outside the Houses of Parliament, Anne McElvoy asks Richard Burgon, a prominent pro-Corbyn frontbencher, whether Brexit or the Labour leader caused the party's crushing defeat. Did pollsters predict the blue rinse? And, Lord Falconer and Sir Michael Fallon, former cabinet ministers on either side of the political divide, debate how the Tories broke Labo...more

  • Editor’s picks election special: December 13th 2019

    Dec 13 2019

    A UK election special featuring a selection of three essential articles from our coverage of the night, read aloud. Victory for Boris Johnson’s all-new Tories. Why not to expect the Labour Party to move back to the centre quickly (08:50). And, why markets surged after the Conservative victory (16:31)Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bolt from the blue: Britain’s Conservatives triumph

    Dec 13 2019

    A thumping win for Boris Johnson’s Tory party is more complex than it seems; the returns cast a light on changes bubbling under the surface of the country’s politics. A renewed push for land restitution in Kenya is making life hard for foreign firms. And the hardcore safety training that Chinese students think they need before heading to the West. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy fo...more

  • Editor’s picks: December 12th 2019

    Dec 12 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, President Trump deserves to be removed for attempting to tip the 2020 election. (11:37) A long-promised pension reform in France will coddle the old and squeeze the young. (17:20) And, how grime is helping Britain’s left-behindPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-o...more

  • Defending the indefensible: Aung San Suu Kyi

    Dec 12 2019

    Myanmar’s de facto leader appeared before the International Court of Justice to answer allegations of war crimes. We look at the stark turnaround of an icon of democracy. Storing renewable energy remains a powerful problem, but engineers are getting more creative. And a look at Americans’ obsession with dogs. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Beijing kicks out foreign kit

    Dec 11 2019

    China wants to remove all foreign technology from its state offices within the next three years. One in every two people will experience the menopause. Why are so few women taking advantage of life-changing hormone replacement therapies? And, the internet domain registry “.org” is being sold for over $1bn. What does this mean for the future of the internet? Kenneth Cukier hosts ____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.eco...more

  • Articles of faith: charges laid against Trump

    Dec 11 2019

    House Democrats have issued their narrowly focused articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. We look back on the history of impeachments and ask whether the process is working as first intended. Killings of French women by their partners account for a tenth of the country’s murders; at last, the problem is being addressed. And what climate change is doing to the wine industry.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/rad...more

  • Money talks: Political currency

    Dec 10 2019

    How are markets pricing the various possible outcomes of the British election? And, central banks are starting to incorporate climate risk into their forecasts, but some wonder whether they are over-reaching. Also, the nuts of wrath—a tale of Italian Nutella. Helen Joyce hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Running into debt: Argentina’s new president

    Dec 10 2019

    For the first time in decades, a non-Peronist president will peacefully hand over power. But the new president—and his deputy, former president Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner—have their work cut out for them. There’s a resurgence in radical-left ideas brewing; our correspondent picks through the manifestos. And an American mega-mall attempts to beat the rise of e-commerce with thrills.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooff...more

  • Oil be going: Canada’s separatist west

    Dec 09 2019

    Long-simmering tensions in the oil-rich west of the country have boiled over, and now there’s an increasingly credible push for secession. Investors are gobbling up startups that turn reams of climate data into better climate-risk predictions. And the lessons to be drawn from Sweden’s vast crop of billionaires. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Is there a future for democracy in China?

    Dec 06 2019

    The historian Jung Chang, a survivor of the Cultural Revolution and the author of “Wild Swans”, talks to Anne McElvoy about her latest book, “Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister”. It follows three remarkable women from China’s brief period of democracy in the 1920s to positions of influence that shaped their country’s history. They talk about how Beijing views the challenge to its authority from the ongoing pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong and what the rest of the world misunderstands about...more

  • Writing on the Wall: a revealing British-election hike

    Dec 06 2019

    Our correspondent walked the length of Hadrian’s Wall, in northern England, finding shifting party alliances and surprising views on Brexit. We take a look at the phenomenon of Japan’s hikikomori, who shut themselves in for years on end. And why a plague of rats in California is likely to get even worse. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: December 5th 2019

    Dec 05 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, an electoral nightmare before Christmas for Britain. (10:10) China’s behind-the-scenes battle for influence in the United Nations. (18:10) And, how to make a small supercomputer with a really big chipPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Not shy about retiring: strikes in France

    Dec 05 2019

    A massive, rolling, national strike begins today, in protest against proposed reforms of the sprawling pension system. But details of the changes haven’t even been published yet. Our correspondent visits the conflict-ravaged Darfur region, and sees a historic opportunity for peace. And a look at how best to let entrepreneurial immigrants get back in business. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.co...more

  • Babbage: Now I’ve learned my ABC

    Dec 04 2019

    After the founders of Google, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, step back from their roles at Google’s parent company Alphabet, who will really be in charge? Israeli venture capitalist Chemi Peres on the ways innovation can lead to peace. And, cases of Malaria are no longer in decline — what needs to happen to reignite the fight? Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy...more

  • Inquiring minds: impeachment’s next stage

    Dec 04 2019

    The House Judiciary Committee will now take up the inquiry into President Donald Trump. But will any of it matter to uninterested voters? The probe into the mysterious death of an investigative journalist is now haunting Malta’s halls of power. And a look back on the life of a beloved athlete who never quite won cycling’s biggest prize. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for priv...more

  • Money talks: Instant tariffication

    Dec 03 2019

    Donald Trump is introducing new tariffs and this time they are not aimed at China. The latest figures suggest that China’s economy is stronger than Mr Trump portrays. What valuation will the Saudi Aramco IPO achieve? Also, economist and author Branko Milanović on the battle between liberal capitalism and political capitalism. Patrick Lane hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy...more

  • With allies like these: NATO’s bickering leaders hold a summit

    Dec 03 2019

    It will be all smiles at the NATO summit today in London--but many of them will be forced. Behind the scenes, the alliance’s leaders are arguing about what its purpose should be. We also look at the disputed data behind the idea that inequality has been rising inexorably in recent years. And how a novel way to reduce cow and sheep burps could help in the fight against climate change. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffe...more

  • Terrorist on parole: A jihadist killer fools Britain’s justice system

    Dec 02 2019

    The Islamic militant who killed two people in London last week was supposedly being monitored by the authorities. That revelation has prompted a fierce debate about what went wrong. We take a look at the state of the global AIDS epidemic. And as their country goes to wrack and ruin, Venezuelans have been turning to video games, but not for the reasons you might think. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See...more

  • The Economist asks: What’s the future of the Republican party?

    Nov 29 2019

    Ahead of the 2020 American presidential election, John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, talks to Bill Weld, a former governor of Massachusetts, Joe Walsh, a talk radio host and former Illinois congressman, and Mark Sanford, a former governor of South Carolina. While Donald Trump enjoys near 90% approval ratings among his party, can anyone challenge him for the Republican presidential nomination? And how has he changed what it means to be a Republican? Anne McElvoy hosts____________________Fo...more

  • AMLO and behold: Mexico’s president tries to tackle corruption

    Nov 29 2019

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador, Mexico’s president, is wildly popular, in part because of his determination to wipe out corruption. But is his crusade against graft everything it’s cracked up to be? We also look at the debate around randomised control trials, a popular but controversial tool in economics. In Congo, caterpillars are considered a delicacy. We explain why they deserve to be the next superfood. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here w...more

  • Editor’s picks: November 28th 2019

    Nov 28 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, inequality could be lower than you think (11:20), Britain’s Labour Party plans to redistribute political power as well as income (17:30), and Mexico’s President is using a crusade against corruption to take controlPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information...more

  • Presidential SEAL: Donald Trump puts his stamp on military discipline

    Nov 28 2019

    Donald Trump used to lionise generals, but this week he had a falling out with the top brass. Are the armed forces becoming as politicised as America’s other institutions? We also take a look at the emergence of a new narco-state in West Africa, Guinea-Bissau. And Silicon Valley has been trying to shed a reputation for sexism, but many of its products remain ill-suited to women. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Babbage: AI: The end of the scientific method?

    Nov 27 2019

    Researchers are using artificial intelligence techniques to invent medicines and materials—but in the process are they upending the scientific method itself? The AI approach is a form of trial-and-error at scale, or “radical empiricism”. But does AI-driven science uncover new answers that humans cannot understand? Host Kenneth Cukier finds out with James Field of LabGenius, Demis Hassabis of DeepMind, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, tech venture capitalists Zavain Dar and Nan Li, philosophy ...more

  • Global warning: The UN sounds the alarm on climate change

    Nov 27 2019

    The UN has just released its annual report on how well the fight to slow climate change is going. It finds that efforts to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions are going from bad to worse. We also look at a surprising new lease on life for China’s regional dialects. And while people debate about the merits of Uber, one thing is clear -- it drives people to drink -- or so new research suggests. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radi...more

  • Money talks: Shopping for diamonds

    Nov 26 2019

    LVMH, a French luxury goods giant, is buying American jeweller Tiffany & Co for over $16bn. What are its plans for the latest jewel in its crown? Soumaya Keynes speaks to Stephen Vaughn, former general counsel to the United States Trade Representative, about a crisis at the heart of the World Trade Organisation. And, what lessons can be learned from the world’s most extreme economies? Patrick Lane hosts___________________ For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Econo...more

  • Start spreading the cash: Michael Bloomberg runs for president

    Nov 26 2019

    Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former mayor of New York, has announced he is running for president. But he is late to join the race and not very popular with Democratic primary voters. We also look at TikTok, a wildly successful video-sharing app, that some see as a threat to security in the Western world. And much of Switzerland is up in arms--about the reliability of the country’s coffee supply. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.econo...more

  • The world ahead: Small COP, big COP

    Nov 25 2019

    On the eve of the 2019 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Madrid, we ask what delegates hope to achieve. Also, how can online games help in the fight against fake news? And host Tom Standage interviews an artificial intelligence called GPT-2 about its views on the big themes of 2020. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) “The World in 2020”, our future-gazing annual, is now available at shop.economist.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and op...more

  • Protest vote: Hong Kongers send a message to Beijing

    Nov 25 2019

    After almost six months of protests and street battles, Hong Kongers have had a chance to vote in local elections. They sent a clear message of support to those agitating for greater democracy. We look at how the impeachment hearings in Washington are undermining the fight against corruption in Eastern Europe. And deep below Jerusalem, a high-tech cemetery is under construction. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • The Economist asks: Is NATO experiencing “brain death”?

    Nov 22 2019

    The secretary general of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, Jens Stoltenberg, reacts to Emmanuel Macron’s stark warnings about the future of the alliance. Daniel Franklin, The Economist’s diplomatic editor, asks Mr Stoltenberg how NATO’s members can overcome their differences—should Europe have its own defence force and is Turkey at risk of drifting away from the alliance? Also, how should Article 5 be enforced in space?For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, ...more

  • Bibi in the corner: Binyamin Netanyahu’s indictment

    Nov 22 2019

    After years of investigations, Israel’s prime minister has been indicted. A fraught legal case will complicate the already messy business of cobbling together a government. We examine the work of a pioneering sociologist to understand the causes and consequences of eviction in America. And Leonardo da Vinci’s vineyard has been faithfully recreated, and his wine is enjoying its own renaissance.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/...more

  • Editor’s picks: November 21st 2019

    Nov 21 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Hong Kong is not the only part of China’s periphery to resent the heavy hand of the Communist party. (9:20) What happens when McKinsey, the high priesthood of management consultancy, is itself disrupted? (16:51) And, if disaster strikes, the Swiss want to be caffeinated____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/rad...more

  • Fuel to the fire: growing unrest in Iran

    Nov 21 2019

    After petrol subsidies were slashed, protests of surprising ferocity have flared up across the country—and neither the government nor the demonstrators seem to be backing down. The illicit trade in rhinoceros horn threatens the animals’ survival, but scientists have come up with a convincing fake that could collapse the market. And the surprisingly subtle choices to balance meat-eating and environmentalism. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe her...more

  • Babbage: Reality check

    Nov 20 2019

    Virtual reality continues to make people sick. Will the technology ever take off and is it designed for women? Leo Murray, from “Riding Sunbeams”, on using solar power to propel future commuter journeys. Also, how slippery toilets could reduce water-use. Alok Jha hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Settling in: Israel-Palestine policy

    Nov 20 2019

    The American administration’s shifting position on Israeli settlements in the West Bank will have little immediate effect—but may end up sharply crimping hopes for a Palestinian state. The first debate ahead of Britain’s general election didn’t leave much room for the two main candidates to get past canned talking points. And how high-end gin is displacing the rot-gut variety in India.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooff...more

  • Money talks: Getting bizzy

    Nov 19 2019

    Ahead of the UK’s general election, party leaders courted businesses at the annual conference of the Confederation of British Industry. We ask the CBI’s chief economist Rain Newton-Smith what attendees made of their proposals. Also, Scott Kupor of Andreessen Horowitz reveals the secrets of success in the world of venture capitalism. And, why the future of gaming is in the cloud. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:w...more

  • Bits in pieces: a fragmenting internet

    Nov 19 2019

    The early vision for a borderless, unregulated internet has not panned out as its pioneers hoped. How to handle the “splinternet”? Doug Jones is Alabama’s first Democratic senator in a quarter of a century; in his moderate ways our correspondent finds broader lessons for the Democratic Party. And air pollution is a threat the world over—most of all to the well-being of children.Additional audio courtesy of Department of RecordsFor full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist...more

  • Futurewatch: The crypto craze

    Nov 18 2019

    Is cryptocurrency the future of money? Helen Joyce, The Economist’s finance editor, explores whether digital coins can offer a viable alternative to existing currencies. And Tim Cross, The Economist’s technology editor, explains the blockchains that underpin them  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Head for the Hill: this week’s impeachment hearings

    Nov 18 2019

    Democrats have a hard task as the hearings’ public stage proceeds: not uncovering new evidence, but building a robust public case for impeachment. The online-grocery business is tough—but that isn’t stopping e-commerce players big and small from trying to crack it. And it’s getting harder for artists to hang around on the album charts; new talent is coming in, and heading out, ever faster. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/rad...more

  • The Economist asks: Esther Perel

    Nov 15 2019

    What is the secret to a great working relationship? The psychotherapist, author and podcaster opens up about the key ingredients to collegiality in the office, millenials’ expectations of managers and the cult of the founder. Esther Perel also offers Anne McElvoy advice on managing her team.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Better the devil they know? Sri Lanka’s election

    Nov 15 2019

    After multiple suicide bombings in April, much campaigning has been about security. Will Sri Lankans vote tomorrow for the authoritarian-but-effective candidate, or the more untested peacemaker? We examine the growing nostalgia for Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted as Egypt’s president as part of the Arab Spring. And a trawl through historical records shows how long it took for William Shakespeare to reach real fame.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe her...more

  • Editor’s picks: November 14th 2019

    Nov 14 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Democrats want impeachment hearings to change the public’s view of Donald Trump. That will be difficult. (10:50) The tangled politics surrounding a killing and its aftermath in Gaza. (16:30) And, for aircraft-carriers, bigger isn’t betterPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for p...more

  • Language barrier: Cameroon’s forgotten conflict

    Nov 14 2019

    There is widespread terror in the largely Francophone country’s English-speaking region. Both hardline separatists and the army target civilians with shocking brutality. In a Central Asian valley, a tangle of borders and exclaves that stretch back to Soviet times is making travel difficult—and sometimes deadly. And an experiment in Estonia to punish lead-footed drivers not with a fine, but with a time-out.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.e...more

  • Babbage: Private patients

    Nov 13 2019

    Google has teamed up with US-healthcare provider Ascension to access patient data without them being notified. What are the privacy concerns and implications for digital healthcare? And, how will 3D printing change the way we build everything from skyscrapers to spaceships. Also, Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and author, speaks to Kenn Cukier about the future of science education and space exploration.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:ww...more

  • Umbrellas to firebombs: Hong Kong’s escalating protests

    Nov 13 2019

    Molotov cocktails are flying and live rounds have been fired. Once-peaceful pro-democracy demonstrations are transforming into violent confrontations—and neither side seems willing to back down. The agricultural revolution that has swept much of the world has still not reached much of Africa; we look into the seeds of the problem. And why Colombia has a growing difficulty with a druglord’s hippos.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist....more

  • Money talks: Streams come true

    Nov 12 2019

    Disney Plus enters the battle of the streaming services, amongst competition from Netflix, Apple, Amazon and others. Which will achieve the Hollywood ending? And we ask Peter Navarro, President Trump’s trade advisor, what the endgame is in negotiations with China. Also, why our Bartleby columnist hates videoconferencing. Helen Joyce hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy...more

  • The American Dreamer: DACA in the Supreme Court

    Nov 12 2019

    The Trump administration has long wanted to scrap the “Dreamers” scheme, which allowed illegal immigrants who came as youths to stay in America. The question is whether the programme’s founding was legal. An emissions debate has infuriated Dutch farmers, and the debacle may threaten Holland’s long history of calm negotiation. And we ask why Disney wants to enter the cut-throat business of video-on-demand. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.e...more

  • Futurewatch: The future of banking

    Nov 11 2019

    Futurewatch: The future of bankingWill the bricks and mortar of high-street banks be replaced by the silicon chips of data centres? Looking at the rise of "neobanks" around the world, The Economist’s finance editor Helen Joyce explores how technology is changing traditional bankingPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unpresidented: Bolivia’s leader resigns

    Nov 11 2019

    After weeks of protests following a disputed election, Evo Morales has stood down. Who is in charge, and how can the country escape its gridlock? On a visit to a military hospital our correspondent wonders why Americans seem so disengaged from their veterans. And the campaign to clear Bangladeshi streets of a beloved mode of transport. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy an...more

  • The Economist asks: Thirty years on, is Germany still divided?

    Nov 08 2019

    On November 9th 1989, Anne McElvoy and Conny Günther were in East Berlin watching the impossible—the fall of the Berlin Wall. Thirty years later they retrace their steps to find out how decades of division transformed and still shape German lives. They talk to those who risked their lives tunnelling under the wall to help people escape, delve into the surveillance files kept on them by the Stasi, and hear from a new generation about the future of post-Wall Germany Please subscribe to The Ec...more

  • Persistence of division: after the Berlin Wall

    Nov 08 2019

    This weekend marks three decades since the wall fell, yet stark divides remain between East and West. We revisit that moment of hope that remains unfulfilled. Ethiopia’s Somali state was until recently the country’s most repressive; a visit to one of its prisons reveals a tremendous transformation for the better. And China’s effort to boost its national football team: naturalising foreign talents. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.econ...more

  • Editor’s picks: November 7th 2019

    Nov 07 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Emmanuel Macron warns that Europe is “on the edge of a precipice”. (9:20) Bashing billionaires is misguided. (15:40) And, could the internet splinter along nation-state lines? ____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer____________________  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out info...more

  • Allez, Europe! Macron’s diplomatic push

    Nov 07 2019

    This week our correspondent joined Emmanuel Macron on his visit to China. The French president is stretching his diplomatic wings, and has some striking views about Europe’s place in the world. The state of Texas has been reliably Republican for decades, but its demographics are changing; could it at last turn blue? And how Japan is dealing with its epidemic of public-transport groping.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radioof...more

  • Babbage: Designer genes

    Nov 06 2019

    How far away are “designer babies” from being a reality? Host Kenneth Cukier explores the ethical questions around the applications of a genome-wide association study. Journalist and author Gaia Vince on how “cultural evolution” shapes society. Also, a solution to the problem of “concrete cancer”  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Demonstrative: a global wave of protest

    Nov 06 2019

    Today’s public-sector demonstrations in Zimbabwe are just the latest in a wave of protests around the world. We look into why there are so many, and what might be driving them. It’s not all sound and fury, though; in Lebanon, an Instagram-driven push is helping demonstrators find love in the crowds. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Unhappy EUnion

    Nov 05 2019

    Opposition to the European Central Bank’s plans for quantitative easing has been split along North-South lines in the euro zone. But are these concerns justified? And, journalist and author Matthew Syed explains why thinking is more creative in organisations where the staff are diverse. Also, our Wall Street correspondent, Alice Fulwood, plays a round of poker with player and entrepreneur Bryn Kenney, who tops the world’s All-Time Money List. Simon Long hostsPlease subscribe to The Economist for...more

  • Stone unturned? Trump’s adviser on trial

    Nov 05 2019

    Today Roger Stone, a colourful associate of President Donald Trump for 40 years, goes on trial facing seven charges; he denies them. Could his testimony worry the Trump camp? In the international race to mass-market driverless cars, China’s 5G network may provide a critical edge. And why you shouldn’t worry too much about eerily apposite computer-generated text.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast....more

  • Futurewatch: The death of cash

    Nov 04 2019

    As digital payments become the norm, will there be a need for cash? The Economist’s Finance editor Helen Joyce takes a look behind the scenes of the future, from Sweden to Shanghai. She explores how digital payments will transform the economy, and how they risk leaving some people behindPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Facebooklets: breaking up Big Tech

    Nov 04 2019

    Few politicians are as ambitious about dismantling the tech behemoths as Elizabeth Warren, one of America’s Democratic presidential contenders. What she is proposing, though, would be neither easy nor quick. We dive into the myriad threats faced by corals, and by the millions of people whose livelihoods depend on them. And a new book considers the likes of Genghis Khan as manager material.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radi...more

  • Editor’s picks: November 1st 2019

    Nov 01 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Islamic State after the death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. (11:12) The reinvention of the MBA for the next business revolution. (22:33) And, why Donald Trump’s hostile reception at the World Series was a defining moment in his presidencyFor full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here: www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...more

  • Impeach-y keen: Trump investigation goes public

    Nov 01 2019

    America’s House of Representatives took its first vote on how to proceed with impeachment proceedings against the president. Republicans will now struggle to defend him. Uighurs, China’s Muslim minority, are not just at risk of internment and “re-education” at home; even Uighur exiles abroad face intimidation. And a look at the remarkable artist behind the first-known “Last Supper” painted by a woman. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.econo...more

  • The Economist asks: José Manuel Barroso

    Oct 31 2019

    The Brexit deadline has been delayed and Britain is now heading for a snap general election. Anne McElvoy asks José Manuel Barroso, former president of the European Commission, whether Boris Johnson can win on December 12th and “get Brexit done”. Also, will Britain’s exit from the EU threaten workers’ rights? And, as an opera devotee, which work does he think would best serve as a guide—or a warning—to the unfolding political drama?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digi...more

  • Iraq in a hard place: deadly protests continue

    Oct 31 2019

    Demonstrations have been growing for a month and show no signs of abating. But would the reforms that the protesters are demanding actually work? We examine a pioneering bit of Lithuanian software that excels at fake-news detection. And why Germans are resistant to calls for speed limits on the Autobahn. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Home o’Sapiens

    Oct 30 2019

    Scientists believe they have located the ancestral home of one of humanity’s early ancestors—in northern Botswana. Tom Siebel, a Silicon Valley veteran and the founder of C3.ai, explains how digital transformation stops companies from going extinct. And, host Kenneth Cukier takes a trip to the Natural History Museum in London to learn about bias in species collection_________________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/r...more

  • May as well: Boris Johnson’s electoral bet

    Oct 30 2019

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson has at last secured a general election. Just as with his predecessor Theresa May, that may not result in easier Brexit arithmetic. We speak to Amy Klobuchar, a Democratic-nomination contender; she is behind in polls, but might be a better bet for a party bent on ousting President Trump. And, the campaign to reduce alcohol consumption that’s funded by the alcohol industry. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.e...more

  • Money talks: HSBC change

    Oct 29 2019

    HSBC’s third-quarter results have revealed a “disappointing” performance in Europe and America. What has caused problems for the global bank? Also, Saudi Aramco, the state-owned oil firm, looks likely to push forward with plans for an IPO. What challenges does the oil giant face? And Julian Richer, founder of the entertainment retailer Richer Sounds, on the secret to keeping staff happy. Simon Long hostsPlease subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.ec...more

  • Not fare enough: Chile’s protests

    Oct 29 2019

    The ongoing unrest is no longer about a rise in metro fares; Chileans have risen up to demand that the prosperity of their country be distributed more evenly. The “Visegrad Four” economies of central Europe have been a post-communism success story—but as flows of people and money shift, they’re looking more precarious. And, a bid to measure just how useful managers really are. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • Futurewatch: Trailer

    Oct 28 2019

    Coming soon: a new series from The Economist that goes behind the scenes of the future to meet the people who are building tomorrow's world. In its first season, Futurewatch looks at the future of money—the death of cash, the rise of challenger banks and the potential of cryptocurrencies.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Libra in the balance

    Oct 28 2019

    As doubts surround the launch of Facebook’s Libra, will 2020 really be the year of digital currencies? We find out what shopping is like when payments are automatic and invisible. And, how China provides a glimpse of how people will handle their finances in the future. Tom Standage hosts Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for pri...more

  • State of disarray: the killing of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi

    Oct 28 2019

    The man who brought Islamic State to the world stage with visions of a brutal “caliphate” has been killed. But the jihadist movement, while weakened, lives on. Argentines voted their reformist president out and protectionist, big-state Peronists back in. Can the hobbled economy cope? And America’s push to start school later could boost grades and the economy, and even save lives.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer ...more

  • The Economist asks: Where does power lie in America?

    Oct 25 2019

    Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams was the first African-American woman to win a major-party nomination for governor in 2018, narrowly losing to the incumbent she accused of suppressing non-white votes. Anne McElvoy asks what the fraught Georgia race taught her, whether identity politics is a benefit or drawback to her party -  and whether she would serve as Joe Biden’s vice-president. Also, who would Abrams, as spy novelist, like to see in the role of James Bond?Please subscribe to The Economi...more

  • Poll dance: Boris Johnson’s election ploy

    Oct 25 2019

    Britain’s prime minister is making a risky move by calling for a general election in December. Will it succeed any more than it did for his predecessor? In Japan, both the government and the people take a dim view of soft-drug use; we ask why. And tourists make a dangerous and defiant last-minute dash up Uluru, Australia’s most famous rock. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for priva...more

  • Editor’s picks: October 24th 2019

    Oct 24 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why Elizabeth Warren’s plan for American capitalism is not the answer to the country’s problems. (10:30) Russia’s increasing influence in Africa (21:20) And, IPOs are a racket but try finding something better  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Calls to action: Lebanon’s continued protests

    Oct 24 2019

    What began as protests against a tax on WhatsApp calls has blossomed into surprisingly united and peaceful demands for wholesale government overhaul. Today’s disinterment and reburial of Francisco Franco, Spain’s dictator for four decades, speaks volumes about how the country views its bloody history. And how radio DJs are helping with Thailand’s teen-pregnancy problem. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer &n...more

  • Babbage: Libra takes a pounding

    Oct 23 2019

    Facebook’s cryptocurrency, Libra, has suffered setbacks in recent weeks, as the company’s founder Mark Zuckerberg appears before a congressional committee to defend it. The Economist’s technology editor Tim Cross explains what’s at stake. Also, how a giant timber mill in Finland is leading the way in sustainable forestry. And Damian Bradfield, chief creative officer of WeTransfer, on how ethics and the internet can coexist. Kenneth Cukier hosts____________________Please subscribe to Th...more

  • Putin, he’s back into it: Russia’s growing influence

    Oct 23 2019

    Vladimir Putin’s diplomacy regarding northern Syria is just one example of the Russian president’s widening influence. British Airways was once known as the world’s favourite airline, we ask why its popularity has fallen far faster than its profits. And why voters should be wary of politicians claiming to speak for “the people”.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-ou...more

  • Money talks: Wells Far(to)go

    Oct 22 2019

    The new boss of Wells Fargo has an unenviable to-do list. Our Wall Street correspondent sizes up Charlie Scharf’s prospects for rehabilitating the bank after a series of scandals. Senator Elizabeth Warren is now leading the pack of Democratic candidates for the American presidency. Would her plans reshape American capitalism for better or worse? And, can money really buy happiness? Patrick Lane hosts____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio...more

  • The course of Trudeau love: Canada’s election

    Oct 22 2019

    Justin Trudeau will remain prime minister, but will lead a minority government. He will probably be able to continue with his progressive push, but his halo is a bit tarnished. It’s ten years this month since Greece’s financial implosion; we look back on a decade spent balancing the books. And, the surprising success of fun stock-ticker symbols. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy...more

  • Going through the motion: more Brexit contortions

    Oct 21 2019

    It might have been a clarifying vote on Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit motion; instead, more legislation and frustration. We dig through the parliamentary procedure to try to map out what happens next. Sports fans’ easy access to the world’s games poses a threat to some sports, and is even changing the nature of others. And, Indonesia’s curious push for halal pianos.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Who can trust Trump’s America?

    Oct 18 2019

    America’s withdrawal from northern Syria and the subsequent Turkish invasion have overturned the power balance in the region, displacing tens of thousands of America’s former allies, the Kurds. Ash Carter helped build that alliance as US secretary of defence. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, asks him how America’s actions in Syria will affect its ability to deal with future threats. Also, why Secretary Carter believes some American companies are too quick to abandon American values. And...more

  • Irish ayes? A new Brexit deal

    Oct 18 2019

    Britain’s prime minister Boris Johnson has a newly struck European Union divorce deal in hand. He has defied the expectations of many, but he still faces a tricky vote in Britain’s parliament. Turkey’s pummelling of the Syrian border area will pause for five days, but the decline of America’s role and image in the region has not been halted. And the burgeoning business of therapeutic psychedelics.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: October 17th 2019

    Oct 17 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Donald Trump’s betrayal of the Kurds is a blow to America’s credibility. (09:40) The proposed Brexit agreement is different to anything advertised during the referendum. (14:40) And the Japanese royal family has little room to make itself more relevant. Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Antsy about ANC: reform in South Africa

    Oct 17 2019

    Our journalists interview Cyril Ramaphosa, South Africa’s president, about his efforts to clean up his country and his African National Congress party. He’s the right man for the job, but the clock is ticking. The markets are rife with funds run by computers, but handing decisions to the machines comes with plenty of risk. And how political polarisation is driving a new dictionary of discourtesy.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Cough up

    Oct 16 2019

    Over the past two decades the Global Fund has fought the spread of AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, but now many in the field fear its progress is under threat. The founder and CEO of language-learning app Duolingo, Luis von Ahn, on his plans to help the 750m illiterate adults in the world learn to read. And, why net-zero carbon emissions targets are measuring the wrong thing. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Back to Square one? Tiananmen veterans in Hong Kong

    Oct 16 2019

    Amid the growing disquiet in Hong Kong are a few survivors of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre. These once-moderate voices are changing their minds about whether the protesters should keep provoking the Chinese government. Even as a currency crisis unfolds, Lebanon’s central bank is keeping things stable—so far. The bank has a solid history, in part because of one man who guarded a pile of Ottoman gold. And an effort to wrangle the dialects of the Canadian Arctic.  See acast.com/priv...more

  • Money talks: A Nobel endeavour

    Oct 15 2019

    What causes poverty? Rachana Shanbhogue interviews this year’s winners of the Nobel prize for economics—Esther Duflo, Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer. Their pioneering work has changed the understanding of one of the hardest problems in economics: why do some countries grow rich while others stay poor? Plus, Europe’s Nordic banks are embroiled in money-laundering scandals. What do regulators need to do to restore confidence?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informatio...more

  • Then there were 12: the Democrats’ fourth debate

    Oct 15 2019

    Twelve candidates take to the stage again tonight, with two clear front-runners. We ask how the winnowing field reflects the mood of the party. We also examine an unlikely candidate in a lesser-watched race: that for the Republican nomination. And, why the shattering of the two-hour-marathon mark has much to do with snazzy footwear.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The enemy of their enemy: the Kurds ally with Syria

    Oct 14 2019

    Turkey’s violent strikes on north-eastern Syria came as swiftly as America’s withdrawal. The overwhelmed Kurds, once America’s staunch allies against Islamic State, now want protection from Syria’s Russian-backed forces. “Microfinance” experiments are intended to alleviate poverty, but in Sri Lanka one trial has gone badly wrong. And, why China’s 30m truckers aren’t the folk heroes they might be elsewhere.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Senna, Winehouse, Maradona—can a film reveal the person behind the myth?

    Oct 11 2019

    In his trilogy of documentaries the filmmaker Asif Kapadia rejected the traditional tools of the trade. Instead, he painstakingly reconstructed the lives of Formula One champion Ayrton Senna, acclaimed singer Amy Winehouse and legendary footballer Diego Maradona almost entirely from archival footage. Anne McElvoy asks Kapadia whether this forensic approach reaches closer to the real person behind the myth. They talk about the difficulty of interviewing a champion of deceit and whether it matters...more

  • PiS prize: Poland’s crucial election

    Oct 11 2019

    It is at once a story of post-communist success and of populist threats to the rule of law by the governing Law and Justice (PiS) party. What direction will Poles choose for their country? Gay rights are few and far between in China, but couples have found protection in a little loophole in guardianship law. And, how Elvis Presley’s last flash in Las Vegas changed the city forever.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: October 10th 2019

    Oct 10 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the strange new rules of the world economy. (9:40) A long-feared clash between Turkey and Syria’s Kurds will have consequences across the Middle East. (17:00) And, a tale of adventure in a library of ice  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Uncomfortable president: Trump’s stonewalling

    Oct 10 2019

    The White House is stonewalling the impeachment inquiry. Could that hinder the Democrats’ ability to build a strong public case? We look at this year’s crop of Nobel prizes in the sciences and ask why, once again, all the winners are men. And, Japan’s government-led efforts to match lonely urbanites with rural folk.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The promise and peril of AI

    Oct 09 2019

    Artificial intelligence—the technique of using data and algorithms to make decisions as well as (or better) than humans—is on track to become a mainstream technology, on a par with electricity or computing. But in order to flourish it needs to overcome several challenges. From privacy and market concentration, to safety and explainability. In this week’s show Kenneth Cukier speaks to some of the leading experts in the field about the benefits and risks of AI, and why it is so important that we d...more

  • Sorry state: Kashmir on lockdown

    Oct 09 2019

    Two months after India’s Hindu-nationalist government stripped the state of Jammu and Kashmir of its autonomy, 7m people are still in limbo. How will it end? Could America’s angrily partisan politics be explained by a rise in loneliness? We visit the Midwest to find out. And, companies are going big on “financial wellness” initiatives for their employees.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: How low can rates go?

    Oct 08 2019

    Our economics editor, Henry Curr, explores why the global economy is behaving weirdly and how governments and central banks should respond. Also, can freer trade help address climate change? The Economist’s editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton-Beddoes, asks Jacinda Ardern, the prime minister of New Zealand, Cecilia Malmström, the EU’s trade commissioner, Michael Corbat, CEO of Citigroup, and Tidjane Thiam, CEO of Credit Suisse, at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum. And, how the economics of streaming...more

  • Just a Kurd to him: Trump’s Syria withdrawal

    Oct 08 2019

    The president’s sudden talk of departure from a contested strip of the Turkey-Syria border betrays the Kurds who helped beat back Islamic State—and risks throwing the region into chaos. A look at the cashew industry in Mozambique reveals the tricky trade-offs between agriculture and development. And, an unusual opera outlining the life and letters of birth-control pioneer Marie Stopes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trade disunion: America’s tariff wars

    Oct 07 2019

    Chinese and American trade negotiators will again be trying to avoid more eye-watering tariffs this week; meanwhile a years-long dispute with the European Union has sparked yet more levies. Where does it all end? We describe the recent “quantum supremacy” result, and what it realistically means for computing’s future. And, the coming submersion of 12,000 years of human history in Turkey.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Did Margaret Thatcher pave the way for Brexit?

    Oct 04 2019

    Britain’s relationship with Europe dominated the last years of Margaret Thatcher’s premiership. Anne McElvoy asks Charles Moore, a Conservative columnist and her authorised biographer, whether the roots of Brexit can be traced back to the Iron Lady’s fierce tussles over British sovereignty. They talk about the machinations of her inner circle during her final years in power and her pioneering climate advocacy. Also, the “nightmare” of managing Boris Johnson, and what really happened at those lou...more

  • Duty call: how Ukraine sees the Trump scandal

    Oct 04 2019

    A phone call between the presidents has sparked an impeachment inquiry in America. But how do the people of Ukraine view the kerfuffle? Massive student protests put Indonesia’s president in a bind, balancing his programme of reforms and growth against uncomfortable social pressures. And, a revealing read through the Democratic presidential contenders’ autobiographies.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: October 3rd 2019

    Oct 03 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, computers will increasingly call the shots in financial markets. (10:00) China’s nationalism is the world’s problem. (17:30) And, how to reinforce the border wall with a gator-infested moat  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Immunisation shot? The case against Binyamin Netanyahu

    Oct 03 2019

    Political deadlock in Israel is now inextricably intertwined with a case against the prime minister. An eventual coalition could provide him with immunity, or could seal his political fate. The signature social reform of Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, faces furious opposition—but it might be even more risky for him not to pursue it. And, South Korea’s beauty industry has gone global, even as its biggest cosmetics retailer struggles.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out ...more

  • Babbage: Steak and Chips

    Oct 02 2019

    As the trade war intensifies, China wants to reduce its reliance on imports of foreign computer chips. Could open-source technology solve its problems? Also, new research on red meat pits statisticians against nutritionists. And Brad Smith, president of Microsoft, on the ethical dilemmas that come from powerful new technology. Kenneth Cukier hosts____________________Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/radiooffer________________...more

  • Reform over function: Peru’s political crisis

    Oct 02 2019

    A long-running dispute between the president and the opposition-controlled Congress has spun out of control—and it’s not clear who will end up leading the country. A visit to a protest camp in coal-country Kentucky is a revealing look into several of America’s divides. And, why India has ended up with a 7m-tonne pile of sugar.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: WeWorry

    Oct 01 2019

    WeWork has scrapped plans for an initial public offering after its CEO stepped down amid claims of mismanagement. What does its implosion mean for investors and other young firms with similar ambitions? Greece's new government is preparing to announce its first draft budget. Will it be enough to re-energise the economy? Plus, a taste of Chinese fine wine. Patrick Lane hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Party like it’s 1949: China’s National Day

    Oct 01 2019

    As at the founding of the People’s Republic, the 70th anniversary featured a tightly controlled parade bristling with the country’s latest military kit. That marks a sharp contrast to the growing chaos in Hong Kong, where a protest spirit has sparked new art, and an impromptu anthem. And, we ask if hot-desking costs employees more than companies are saving.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: A different dystopia

    Sep 30 2019

    With recent protests taking place against president Abdel-Fatah al-Sisi, The Economist’s foreign editor, Robert Guest, considers what might happen if Mr Sisi's regime collapses. We discuss the global cannabis revolution, as medical use opens the way to wider liberalisation. And, instead of worrying about too many robots in the workforce in the future, should we be worrying that there will be too few?Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)____________________Please subscribe to The Ec...more

  • Out-of-office messaging: Britain’s Tory conference

    Sep 30 2019

    Lawmakers are back in Parliament while the ruling party is elsewhere, laying out its legislative mission. The Tories are divided, more scandals are arising and the only consistent message is “Get Brexit done”. We meet a Georgian film-maker whose love story challenges the country’s socially conservative mores. And, how young people’s blood may hold secrets that can halt ageing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: September 27th 2019

    Sep 27 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the promise and the perils of impeachment. (9:10) China’s repression of Islam is spreading beyond Xinjiang. (21:22) And, proof has emerged that a quantum computer can outperform a classical one  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Spoiled ballot: Afghanistan’s election

    Sep 27 2019

    The country is set for another violent and disputed election. But the fact that Afghans will head to the polls anyway is an encouraging story. Insurance could mitigate the risks that climate change presents to lives and livelihoods—if it weren’t threatening the insurance industry, too. And, a look back at the life of Jan Ruff O’Herne, a courageous war-rape survivor.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Michael Bloomberg

    Sep 26 2019

    The link between capitalism and progress is being questioned. Should big business step into the breach where politics is gridlocked? In a New York buzzing with world leaders and talk of impeachment, Anne McElvoy interviews Michael Bloomberg, the businessman, philanthropist and former mayor of the city, at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum. She asks him if CEOs are the new politicians and whether he thinks Joe Biden or Elizabeth Warren has the edge in the White House race. Also, why even billio...more

  • Call to account: Trump-Ukraine intrigues

    Sep 26 2019

    President Donald Trump’s call to his Ukrainian counterpart is under ever-greater scrutiny. An unexpected impeachment inquiry has started; how will it end? For the world’s small-island states, climate change is literally an existential concern. So they’ve banded together to become a potent negotiating force. And, why India’s science funding features so much mysticism and cow dung.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Carbon sucks

    Sep 25 2019

    Scientists are experimenting with different ways to reduce the amount of carbon being emitted into the Earth’s atmosphere. Nilay Shah, of Imperial College London, explains how carbon capture and storage works. And, Wang Jian, a tech chief of Alibaba, on how data can be harnessed to make cities more efficient. Plus, three low-tech innovations that could make a big difference to sustainable living. Kenneth Cukier hostsAdditional music by Chris Zabriskie "Divider" (CC by 4.0)____________________Ple...more

  • And the law won: Boris Johnson’s latest defeat

    Sep 25 2019

    Once again, Britain’s prime minister has been thwarted, this time for trying to stymie Parliament as the European departure looms. How will Boris proceed, and how will Brexit progress? We take a look at economists’ rise to policy prominence, and what they did wrong when they got there. And, a surprisingly cheery Congolese doomsday sect.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Planet Inc

    Sep 24 2019

    What are the risks businesses face from climate change? And, Kate Raworth, economist and educator, explains “doughnut economics” and says rich economies are addicted to “unending growth”. Who are the billionaires hoping to make big bucks from climate change? Also, we hear from the finalists of The Economist’s Open Future essay competition who sought an effective response to climate change. Simon Long hosts Additional music by Chris Zabriskie "Divider" (CC by 4.0)____________________Please s...more

  • Aid for abetting? Trump’s Ukraine call

    Sep 24 2019

    President Donald Trump’s critics say a telephone call with his Ukrainian counterpart would reveal his most egregious offence yet. But it’s hard to say what would tip lawmakers into pursuing impeachment. Thomas Cook, the world’s oldest travel agency has folded—but that’s not to say package holidays are passé. And, what the reviews of a propaganda film reveal about China’s international infrastructure efforts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Madurable: impasse in Venezuela

    Sep 23 2019

    International sanctions have crimped the regime, and the country’s people. Yet President Nicolás Maduro is still in charge. The only way out is for him to share power, not relinquish it. The “internet of things” will eventually comprise perhaps a trillion connected devices—each a tempting target for hackers. And, how cities came to be, and why they’ve been such a draw through the millennia.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Inside Huawei

    Sep 20 2019

    In his palatial headquarters, Ren Zhengfei, founder and CEO of the Chinese telecommunications giant, explains how the American boycott has hurt Huawei and how he will fight back. He outlines plans to sell Huawei’s 5G technology to Western companies, allowing them to compete on a level playing field. David Rennie, The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, and Patrick Foulis, our business affairs editor, also ask Mr Ren about the US-China trade war, unfettered access to the internet in China and the p...more

  • To all, concern: a climate-change special

    Sep 20 2019

    As the Global Climate Strike gets under way, we look at all matters climatic. History shows that fervent debate—and self-interested misinformation—go back to the mid-20th century. Uncertainties in scientists’ climate models are swamped by uncertainties about what people will do. And, plenty of people are already adapting to climate change, but that presents its own risks. Finally, climate-minded artists add their voices to the debates.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf...more

  • Editor’s picks: September 19th 2019

    Sep 19 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, climate change must be tackled urgently and clear-headedly. (12:50) Israel’s prime minister has lost his majority. (19:00) And, why Russia is ambivalent about global warming  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • I can do that, Dave: AI and warfare

    Sep 19 2019

    Artificial intelligence is making its way into every aspect of life, including military conflict. We look at the thorny legal and ethical issues that the newest arms race raises. Three executives from Fukushima’s melted-down nuclear-power plant were cleared of negligence today, but the disaster’s aftermath is far from over. And, what a swish new Chinese restaurant in Havana says about China-Cuba relations.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Climate. Change

    Sep 18 2019

    As global leaders prepare for the UN climate change summit next week, we debate what changes individuals can make today to help limit the effects of climate change. The Economist’s environment editor, Catherine Brahic, hosts a roundtable with Christiana Figueres, who convenes Mission 2020 to reduce global carbon emissions; Ed Davey, a director of the Food and Land Use Coalition with the World Resources Institute; and Kevin Anderson, professor of energy and climate change in the school of enginee...more

  • Ursa minor: Russia-China relations

    Sep 18 2019

    In the 20th century Russia was the more powerful partner. Take a look at the flows of money and influence today, though, and it’s clear the situation has reversed. Part-time work first took hold because it offered flexibility to women just entering the labour market—but it costs them both in terms of pay and prospects. And, a look at the burgeoning sports-betting market in Ethiopia.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Purpose vs profit

    Sep 17 2019

    What are companies for? The orthodoxy was that they exist primarily to pursue profit. But a new faith in higher corporate purpose as a means to address social injustice, climate change and inequality is sweeping the Western business world. How much is this trend of “reverse Friedmanism” going to change what it means to do business? Or could chief executives playing politics have dangerous consequences? Tamzin Booth hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Always be my Bibi? Israel back at the polls

    Sep 17 2019

    The country has never had two elections in a year, and the second looks to be as close-run as the first. Could that at last spell the end of the Binyamin Netanyahu era? A mysterious illness linked to e-cigarettes has now killed seven Americans—but vaping is still less dangerous smoking. Also, we consider the lobster roll, and a wider truth it reveals about lunch economics.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pipe down: attacks on Saudi oil

    Sep 16 2019

    Strikes on the world’s largest refinery are bad news for the state oil firm ahead of a record-breaking stock listing—and worse news for the proxy war between Iran and America. Another coming listing is that of WeWork; we consider whether the office-rental firm can prove its critics wrong. And, how the Spanish Inquisition is affecting some Europhile British Jews.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: September 13th 2019

    Sep 13 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the “internet of things” revolution is about to go into overdrive. Europe’s best hope of economic revival lies in its neglected single market (09:29). And, Neanderthals and the consequences of chronic earache (18:02)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • To Viktor, more spoils: Hungary’s autocracy

    Sep 13 2019

    He was once a liberal reformer, but now no institution is safe from Viktor Orban’s iron grip. His transformation into an autocrat is a troubling lesson about the decline of liberal democracies. Afghanistan’s drug trade has for decades mostly meant opium and heroin; thanks to a native bush, now methamphetamines are on the rise. And, a look at the resurgent musical genre called yacht rock. Additional audio: Soundsnap  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Margaret Atwood

    Sep 12 2019

    The author of “The Testaments” and “The Handmaid’s tale” debates whether her novels are speculative fiction and how women's rights have evolved since she began writing in the early 1960s. Anne McElvoy asks Margaret Atwood whether she benefitted from a “Trump bump”, if #MeToo is an invincible weapon and what makes a “bad” feminist? Also, does she admire the Queen?http://economist.com/radiooffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trust issues: Huawei’s radical plan

    Sep 12 2019

    The tech giant finds itself enmeshed in a broad battle between China and America. But Huawei’s boss has an idea that might extricate it: selling off its 5G crown jewels. The battle isn’t only in technology; the documentary “American Factory” examines what happens when a Chinese company comes to Ohio. And, the surprising ease of shutting down an airport using drones.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Taxis for take-off

    Sep 11 2019

    Flying taxis could soon become commonplace in cities if operators can overcome strict regulations on their use. Journalist Rebecca Fannin explores the future of technology giants in China. And, how can the sound of sand reveal its source? Kenn Cukier hostsextra music by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Scapegoating: xenophobia in South Africa

    Sep 11 2019

    Migrants have become a convenient scapegoat for South Africans frustrated by a slumping economy and rampant unemployment—and for the politicians who might otherwise take the blame. We take a look at the ever-sharper divisions in America’s abortion debate. And, why the improbably complex business of getting cabs in Beirut is preferred over disrupters like Uber. Additional audio courtesy of Soweton  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Fannie and Freddie move house

    Sep 10 2019

    The US Treasury plans to privatise Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which prop up most of the country’s mortgage finance. How will this affect the US mortgage market? Also, despite legislation aimed at blocking a no-deal Brexit, Britain could still leave the EU without a deal. The Bank of England is weighing up its options for how to deal with the consequences. And, how important are coaches to sporting success? Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Things fall apart: Britain’s fading centre-right

    Sep 10 2019

    Parliament is suspended for weeks. The Conservative party has been hollowed out. The prime minister’s hopes for an election have been dashed, twice. What does all this portend for the Tory party? And a special election in a solidly Republican district in North Carolina may shed light on President Donald Trump’s re-election chances. Also, a look at the unsung human superpower of language.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tali-banned: Trump calls off Afghan peace talks

    Sep 09 2019

    President Trump has abruptly cancelled talks with the Taliban in Afghanistan, raising fears of renewed internal strife. Wales dabbles in nationalism, and it could follow the Scottish push for separatism. Finally, could a deal finally be on the horizon in the US-China trade war? Our correspondent searches for answers in the well-stuffed secrets of Chinese upholstery.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Malcolm Gladwell

    Sep 06 2019

    The prolific author and podcaster explains why people so often misunderstand strangers and the consequences when they do, from police injustice to Ponzi schemes. Anne McElvoy asks Malcolm Gladwell why humans are so bad at distinguishing lies from the truth, whether judges should be replaced with AI, and if true strangers still exist in the age of social media  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Disunited Russia party? Moscow’s elections

    Sep 06 2019

    This weekend’s vote will fill some fairly inconsequential city positions. But how it plays out will indicate the strength of a rapidly broadening, national movement against the ruling United Russia party. China has long been repressing the Muslim-minority Uighurs; worryingly, it’s now starting to squeeze the Huis, more dispersed followers of Islam. And, a well-intentioned anti-knife-crime push in Britain draws ire after targeting fried-chicken shops.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy ...more

  • Editor’s picks: September 5th 2019

    Sep 05 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, President Assad clings to power in Syria. (10:40) The Conservatives tightening embrace of populism has set up Britain for a dangerously polarised election. (15:20) And, Americans are paying more for their lobster sandwiches  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Age-old problem: reforming France

    Sep 05 2019

    President Emmanuel Macron embarks on a serious policy challenge today over pensions. Will his efforts at reform re-ignite the protests that have dogged his presidency? And, a look at the legacies of two opposing figures of environmentalism: David Koch, a billionaire industrialist who undermined the science of climate change, and Steve Sawyer, an activist who elevated Greenpeace to a formidable global movement.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Innovation around innovation

    Sep 04 2019

    Innovation: it’s more than just a buzzword that companies use when trying to sound dynamic. But what does it actually mean? Some entrepreneurs and economists like Patrick Collison and Tyler Cowen think that it needs to be studied as a science of progress. How can pulling together thinking about this help innovators of the future? And what are companies doing today to try and change the way we work? Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • This is revolting: Britain’s parliament rebels

    Sep 04 2019

    Boris Johnson has lost his parliamentary majority. Conservative party rebels will now help push for a bill precluding a no-deal Brexit, making an early election look even more likely. Violence in Afghanistan continues, even as America’s negotiations with the Taliban wrap up; we ask where America’s longest war went wrong. And, unreadably long terms and conditions lead to more than consumer confusion—they break some basic economic principles.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-ou...more

  • The Secret History of the Future: New Media, Old Story

    Sep 04 2019

    Radio was originally a social medium, as early radio sets (each of which could transmit as well as receive) turned cities into giant chatrooms, populated by Morse Code-tapping enthusiasts. But the excitement of this democratic, digital platform did not last, and radio was tamed by corporate interests in the 1920s. The utopian dream of platforms that are open and meritocratic has been reborn in the internet era in the form of blogging, and more recently podcasting. But can it ever come true? ...more

  • Money talks: Hell to peso

    Sep 03 2019

    Argentina’s President has imposed currency controls in an attempt to stabilise the markets, as the country faces escalating financial troubles. How did things go so wrong so quickly? And what next? The Economist’s Soumaya Keynes asks Binyamin Appelbaum, author of “The Economists’ Hour”, what impact economists have had on public policy. Also, why are older people not retiring? Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • No safety in numbers: America’s immigration raids

    Sep 03 2019

    Workplace raids catch many undocumented migrants in one place. But they do nothing to tackle the criminal element that the Trump administration has so vilified. Many of the 2,000 Turkish citizens that fought alongside jihadists in Syria now want to return; the whole region is struggling with its expat extremists. And, a “culinary balance of trade” reveals which cuisine has most conquered the world’s menus.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Until blue in the face: Hong Kong’s protests

    Sep 02 2019

    The territory’s authorities have used live rounds, pepper spray and water cannon with blue dye to mark participants in ever-growing protests. What else might they resort to? The Baltic states, worried about Russian expansionism, are countering the old-school spycraft of the Kremlin’s agents. And, drag acts sashay into the mainstream.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Should billionaires call the shots on solving global problems?

    Aug 30 2019

    At glitzy gatherings across the world, former heads of state, corporate bosses and celebrities champion the power of philanthropy to change the world. Anand Giridharadas, author of “Winners take all”, argues this is a charade and the 1% have little interest in changing the system. Anne McElvoy challenges him on the nature of the problem with elite do-gooding. Should billionaires give their money to different causes, or pay more tax and let governments choose how to spend it? And would government...more

  • Out to launch: American nuclear policy

    Aug 30 2019

    There is a push in America to subscribe to a “no first use” policy on nukes, in a bid to reduce risks and anxiety. But could that actually make things less stable? We tour through South Asia, where the annual monsoon is increasingly disrupted by climate change. How will the region cope? And, a look at Taylor Swift’s off-again, on-again “Love Story” with streaming services.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: August 29th 2019

    Aug 29 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, after Boris Johnson announced he will temporarily suspend Parliament, how can MPs stop a no-deal Brexit? The conflict between Israel and Iran is widening (10:00). And, vertical farming is on the up (16:40)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Suspend, disbelief: Parliament and Brexit

    Aug 29 2019

    Boris Johnson, Britain’s prime minister, sparked widespread outrage by suspending Parliament in the run-up to Brexit. What recourse do lawmakers still have? Taiwan’s deal to buy American fighter jets reveals wide political support for tooling up against Chinese aggression. And, the exceptional efforts to save New Zealand’s chubby parrot, the kakapo.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Oh, grow up

    Aug 28 2019

    Investors are ploughing hundreds of millions of dollars into vertical farming. Could towers of vegetables help feed the world’s growing population? Also, how studying gravitational waves could unlock the deepest mysteries of the universe and prove Einstein wrong. And, network theorist Albert-Laszlo Barabasi explains the science of professional success. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Ex-Seoul-mate: Japan-South Korea spat escalates

    Aug 28 2019

    Century-old discord is never far from the surface for the two countries, but the latest flare-up risks disrupting stability in the region. We estimate how much the grounded Boeing 737 MAX plane is costing airlines, suppliers and the planemaker itself: about $4bn a quarter. In other no-fly news, Greta Thunberg, a Swedish climate activist, arrives in New York by boat. We examine data showing that she’s not the only Scandinavian with “flight shame”.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...more

  • The Secret History of the Future: A Brief History of Timekeeping

    Aug 28 2019

    The first mechanical clocks were made to summon monks to prayer. Ever since, timekeeping technology has often been about control and obligation. But underneath a mountain in Texas, a new kind of clock is being built that’s meant to alter the way we think about time. Can it force us to connect our distant past with our distant future, tick by tick?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Big pharma in court

    Aug 27 2019

    The pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay $572 million for its part in the opioid crisis in the state of Oklahoma. What precedent will this set? In Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis President James Bullard explains how the escalation of trade tensions is affecting monetary policy and he reacts to President Trump’s adversarial style. And finally, some funny business. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Emmanuel transmission: outcomes of the G7

    Aug 27 2019

    The weekend summit hosted by France’s President Emmanuel Macron resulted in few concrete actions; mostly the diplomatic dance was intended to keep President Donald Trump on side. Such meetings may not always go smoothly, but they’re still worth having. We ask why Uzbekistan is at last closing Jaslyk, its notorious gulag. And, the emerging science of investigating planets in other solar systems. Additional sounds by Soundsnap.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informat...more

  • The world ahead: Clash of the titans

    Aug 26 2019

    With tensions rising in the South China Sea, we consider how a potential clash between America and China might play out—and why the world should pay more attention to this region. And host Tom Standage takes a ride in a self-driving car in London, to see how Europe is faring in the race to build autonomous vehicles.Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A friend of mines: Asia’s coal habit

    Aug 26 2019

    The region accounts for three-quarters of the world’s coal consumption—even as giants such as China and India consider its environmental effects and opportunities in renewables. For a while, international aid and attention were showered on Liberia; now they’re gone, things aren’t going well. And, a look at cruise lines’ new wheeze in the Caribbean: real travel it ain’t.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: What’s the recipe for the restaurant of the future?

    Aug 23 2019

    Over iced coffee and crullers at Union Square Cafe in New York, Anne McElvoy asks restaurateur Danny Meyer about his recipe for restaurant success—from Michelin-starred 11 Madison Park to the fast-food chain Shake Shack. They talk about how #MeToo has changed the politics of the kitchen and why he would rather diners left smaller tips. And, when any dish can be delivered at the tap of an app, is there still magic in eating out?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information...more

  • Fight or flight: Cathay Pacific

    Aug 23 2019

    China’s central government has made an example of the huge, Hong Kong-based carrier. Will the ploy work to quell protests in the territory, or just further rattle the nerves of its international firms? We examine the spectacular rise of Pentecostalism in Ethiopia, and its effects on the country’s politics. And, the plight of the puffin in the Faroe Islands.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: August 22nd 2019

    Aug 22 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, our cover story on what companies are for (12:20) Also, Matteo Salvini hopes elections will make him Italy’s prime minister. (18:40) And how Burgundy wine investors have beaten the stock market  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Pull out all the backstops: Boris Johnson in Europe

    Aug 22 2019

    Britain’s prime minister is on the continent ahead of this weekend’s G7 meeting. We ask whether he’ll be able to ditch the Irish “backstop” that has become Brexit’s stickiest sticking point. We take a look at FedEx, its old-school disrupter founder and how it is itself being disrupted in the age of Amazon. And, economists tease out the long-suspected link between marijuana and the munchies.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Gut Feeling

    Aug 21 2019

    How can understanding the link between gut bacteria and Autism Spectrum Disorder help scientists develop a treatment? Broken heart syndrome, or Takotsubo, is a serious condition that can be caused by the death of a loved one. Scientists have recently discovered a possible link to cancer. Also, could re-training the brain combat chronic breathlessness? Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • League of its own? Italian politics

    Aug 21 2019

    Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini has pulled the rug from under the country’s government, betting that his charismatic right-wingery might win him more-complete rule. Will it work? We take a look at Latin America’s state energy giants—and find the shared ills of mismanagement, politicisation and sticky fingers. And, a curious film-making boom in Siberia.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Salvation in the Air

    Aug 21 2019

    At the dawn of the 20th century, chemists dreamed of extracting nitrogen from the air and turning it into a limitless supply of fertiliser. Sceptics thought they were crazy—it was possible in theory, but it was unclear if it could be done in practice. What happened next changed the course of 20th-century history, and provides inspiration to innovators pursuing a different dream today: sucking carbon dioxide out of the air to avert climate change. Might they not be quite so crazy after all? ...more

  • Money talks: From bad to wurst

    Aug 20 2019

    This week the Bundesbank warned that Germany’s economy will probably soon be in recession. Henry Curr, our economics editor, argues that the country needs more fiscal stimulus. Who will buy the world’s largest AI computer chip? And, Apple's entry into the credit card market. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Power rationing: Sudan in transition

    Aug 20 2019

    After months of unceasing protests, military leaders have struck a deal to share power with civilians, while Omar al-Bashir, the country’s deposed dictator, is in court. But can Sudan break out of its cycle of violence? We examine the curious notion that the shapes of parliamentary chambers shape the debates within them. And, politics meets choral music at Estonia’s Laulupidu festival.Additional audio of the International Criminal Court courtesy of ICC-CPI.  See acast.com/privacy for p...more

  • Scarcely surviving: Zimbabwe

    Aug 19 2019

    Electricity, food, water: everything is in short supply in the country, including faith in the government’s ability to recover from Robert Mugabe’s kleptocracy. China produced a record 8.3m university graduates this year; we take a look at the changing labour market they’re entering. And, experiments in the Netherlands to house the young with the old are going remarkably well, in part because both parties benefit.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Who will decide the fate of Hong Kong?

    Aug 16 2019

    Former Chief Secretary of the territory, Anson Chan, has called on leader Carrie Lam to withdraw a controversial law which sparked a wave of protests. Anne McElvoy asks her whether Hong Kong’s special status is under threat and, 30 years after the Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing, if history might repeat itself? Anne also speaks with our Asia columnist, Dominic Ziegler, who has been reporting on the story since it began  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Yield signs: the global economy

    Aug 16 2019

    Investors are piling into safe assets as markets whipsaw: what’s driving the global economy these days is anxiety. Is all the worry justified? Nestled among the conflicts and suffering in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a vast national park that is trying to make the most of its stunning natural beauty. And, why are some languages so damnably hard to learn? Additional audio by ‘sctang’ from Freesound.org.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: August 15th 2019

    Aug 15 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, markets are braced for a global downturn. (10:00) Bernie Sanders could hand the Democratic ticket to a moderate. (18:02) And, investors are growing disenchanted with Narendra Modi  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Poll reposition: Macri fights back

    Aug 15 2019

    President Mauricio Macri’s thumping presidential-primary loss in Argentina left the markets fearing a left-wing resurgence. To win over voters, he’s announced a relaxation of some austerity measures. Will it be enough? In the Arctic, wildfires are rampant—and they’ll amplify the very temperature rises that caused them. And, a look at the unlikely rise of Gulf-state book fairs.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: A cure for Ebola?

    Aug 14 2019

    Two treatments for Ebola have emerged from a clinical trial in Africa. Scientists estimate that sea-levels across the globe will rise by 50cm or so in the next 80 years; in some places they could go up by twice as much. Are governments and businesses prepared to deal with the rising tides? And, as face-recognition technology spreads, so do ideas for subverting it. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Let’s not make a deal: Brexit

    Aug 14 2019

    Talk grows ever-louder of Britain exiting the European Union without a divorce agreement. Most parliamentarians would rather avoid that—but can they do anything to stop it? We join a Ukrainian military exercise as the country seeks to beef up defences that were nearly wiped out by Russia’s annexation of Crimea. And, China’s tech companies train their sights on the tech-savvy elderly. Additional audio: "English Dawn Chorus, Rural, late spring" by odilonmarcenaro at Freesound.org and “Puzzle Piece...more

  • The Secret History of the Future: Bug in the System

    Aug 14 2019

    The first ever computer program was written in 1843 by Ada Lovelace, a mathematician who hoped her far-sighted treatise on mechanical computers would lead to a glittering scientific career. Today, as we worry that modern systems suffer from “algorithmic bias” against some groups of people, what can her program tell us about how software, and the people who make it, can go wrong?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Delayed tariffication

    Aug 13 2019

    President Trump has delayed some tariffs on Chinese imports. Soumaya Keynes, our US economics editor, explains the surprise decision and its implications for the global economy. Also, is data as valuable an asset as oil? What can companies learn from the oil industry about keeping data safe? And, the secrets of success for online fashion retailers. Rachana Shanbogue hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sex cells: the modern fertility business

    Aug 13 2019

    Companies are rushing to fill new niches for would-be parents: in vitro fertilisation extras, swish egg-harvesting “studios” and apps to track reproductive health. But some companies promise more than science can deliver. The worrying flare-up of piracy off west Africa presents new challenges and unmitigated risks to sailors. And, lessons learned from a shooting simulator for police.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Raid in Aden: Yemen’s fragmented conflict

    Aug 12 2019

    Over the weekend, armed rebels overran Aden, the seat of Yemen’s internationally recognised government. They had defected from a loose, Saudi-backed coalition that looks increasingly shaky. The gaming business is huge, but isn’t yet part of the streaming revolution seen in films and music; who will become the Netflix of gaming? And, an update to a 1970s book on sexuality reveals much about modern female desire, and how it’s perceived.Additional music by Rymdkraft and Kuesa.  See acast....more

  • The Economist asks: Is LA the model for a more diverse America?

    Aug 09 2019

    Eric Garcetti, the mayor of Los Angeles, argues America’s second largest city benefits from being a melting pot. Anne McElvoy asks him how he is faring in tackling the city’s housing crisis and why he is not running for the Democratic nomination in 2020. They address allegations of racism in the White House and, in the wake of two mass shootings, how to curb gun violence in America. Also, could smooth jazz prevent traffic jams?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information...more

  • Withdrawal symptoms: America-Taliban talks

    Aug 09 2019

    America’s envoy claimed “excellent progress” in negotiations ahead of the country’s planned exit from Afghanistan. But stickier talks await, between the Islamist militia and the Afghan government. A promising new vaccine may at last tackle typhoid fever, which claims 160,000 lives every year. And, we travel to Scotland and hop on the world’s shortest scheduled flight.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: August 8th 2019

    Aug 08 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, China’s response to the protests in Hong Kong could have global repercussions.  The British government claims it is too late for MPs to prevent the country leaving the EU on October 31st. Yet many are determined to try (9:12). And, Norway has had its fillet of fish-smugglers (16:33)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Clear-cut risks: the Amazon degrades

    Aug 08 2019

    Deforestation is on the rise and Brazil’s government is all but encouraging it. Beyond a certain threshold, the world’s largest rainforest will dry out into a savanna—with dire consequences. We ask why Malaysia’s reformist coalition isn’t doing much reforming of the country’s illiberal laws. And, Norway’s growing scourge of fish-smuggling.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Meno-Pause

    Aug 07 2019

    Can pioneering surgery help delay the menopause and how will it impact women's lives? And, Clara Vu, of Veo Robotics, explains some of the challenges of designing “cobots”, robots that work collaboratively with humans on manufacturing tasks. Also, should people have the right to choose to know if they are a carrier of a hereditary genetic disease? Alok Jha hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • State of alarm: India moves on Kashmir

    Aug 07 2019

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has gutted the autonomy of the restive and disputed Jammu & Kashmir. India’s only majority-Muslim state is locked down and fearful of a vast demographic reshuffle. We meet the deep-sea divers of the oil industry, finding that their work is as dangerous as it is dependent on oil prices. And, what is a “deepfake”, how are they made and what risks do they pose?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Dots, Dashes and Dating Apps

    Aug 07 2019

    In the 19th century, young people wooed each other over the telegraph. But meeting strangers on the wires could lead to confusion, disappointment, and even fraud. Do modern online dating apps have anything to learn from telegraph romances?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Yuan-a fight?

    Aug 06 2019

    President Donald Trump has accused China of being a currency manipulator, after the Chinese currency “po qi” or “cracked 7” against the US dollar— a psychologically significant value—for the first time in over a decade. How will this escalation of the US-China trade war affect global markets? Also, how useful are yield curves for predicting future recessions? And, life without Uber. Rachana Shanbhogue presents.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • PLA a part? Hong Kong’s growing unrest

    Aug 06 2019

    China’s central government held another press conference to address increasingly chaotic unrest in Hong Kong. A close listen reveals language that may be presaging a military intervention. There’s much to be said for employee share ownership—but a push from left-leaning politicians to mandate its availability is creating controversy. And, the dirty secret behind the exorbitant costs of music-gig tickets.Additional audio courtesy of cgeffex from Freesound.org.  See acast.com/privacy for...more

  • Sticking to their guns: violence in America

    Aug 05 2019

    Two mass shootings over the weekend add to the unrelenting stream of gun violence in America. We look at the political and social forces that ensure it will continue. The collapse of Venezuela’s infrastructure has left its people desperate for medical care. We meet some of the women crossing into Colombia to seek help. And, the politics behind the ever-shifting travel advice dispensed in the Middle East.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Should race matter on stage?

    Aug 02 2019

    Wendell Pierce, best known for his roles in the television dramas “The Wire”, “Suits” and “Jack Ryan”, plays Willy Loman in a new production of “Death of a Salesman”, moving to London’s West End in the autumn. Anne McElvoy caught up with him backstage in July and asked him about whether casting an all-black Loman family changes the nature of the play, his thoughts on America's troubled racial history, and how that history shapes his views of the current president of the United States  ...more

  • A farewell to arms control: the INF treaty dies

    Aug 02 2019

    As America abandons the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces treaty we examine the future of arms control. New weapons abound and new countries are using them, but new treaties will be hard to come by. With Baltimore in the news as President Donald Trump’s latest point of provocation, we ask how the city’s crime rates got so high, and what can be done. And, the surprising rise of rosé wine in France.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: August 1st 2019

    Aug 01 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the collapse of the Amazon, which is home to 40% of Earth’s rainforest, would be felt far beyond Brazil’s borders. America’s central bank has cut rates for the first time in more than a decade (9:40). And, meal delivery is anything but a tasty business (15:20)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Disbelief, dysfunction, disaster: Congo’s Ebola outbreak

    Aug 01 2019

    As aid workers battle the second-worst outbreak in history, they face violence and disbelief. A history of conflict, suspicion of the rich world and wild conspiracy theories make fighting a difficult battle far harder. Architects are tackling the dark, loud, violent nature of jails to make them more about rehabilitation than retribution. And, the increasingly absurd language of job adverts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Hot as hell

    Jul 31 2019

    Record-breaking heatwaves are becoming routine and they are killing people. But many of the potentially life-saving solutions are both low-tech and low-cost. Governments should be doing more. Also, we visit Lake Chad in the Sahel to understand how climate change can fuel conflict. And, droughts or floods, heatwaves or cold snaps, just how responsible is humanity for extreme weather events? Catherine Brahic hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Apply liberally: Trudeau’s re-election bid

    Jul 31 2019

    Canada’s prime minister may not have an easy campaign ahead; we sit down with Justin Trudeau to discuss his tenure so far. The country’s role as a liberal bastion seems safe, for now. Bayer is now reckoning with the problems presented by its latest acquisition, Monsanto—and it may emerge stronger. And, we meet a Mongolian band on a heavy-metal mission. Track “Remember Your Thunder” courtesy of SnakeBiteSmile  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Mars on Earth

    Jul 31 2019

    Polar exploration was the Victorian equivalent of the space race. Major powers vied to outdo each other, funding expeditions to the most inhospitable parts of the world as demonstrations of their supremacy over nature and each other. Today, the resulting tales of triumph and tragedy hold valuable lessons about what to do—and what not to do—as human explorers plan missions to Mars.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Warren of Wall Street

    Jul 30 2019

    Can US Senator Elizabeth Warren convince Wall Street to back her and how are the other candidates faring in the Democratic competition for the 2020 presidential nomination? And, David Autor, an economist at MIT, speaks to Money Talks about how computers changed the US labour market, the impact of China and his gecko brand. Also, will the world follow Sweden’s lead and go cashless? Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Primary culler: Democrats’ second debates

    Jul 30 2019

    The fields of American presidential candidates just keep getting bigger, and party rules incentivise extreme views and dark-horse entrants. That might not be what’s best for either party. The fast-shipping arms race sparked by Amazon is radically reshaping how stuff gets around the world. And, on a visit to Shanghai’s flagship Lego store, we ask what makes the bricks so popular in China.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Sunshady business

    Jul 29 2019

    If efforts to cut emissions fall short, might some nations resort to solar geoengineering — building a sunshade in the stratosphere — to buy more time? Also, what if Facebook blocked Europeans from using its services? Tom Standage hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • One country, one system: Hong Kong’s protests

    Jul 29 2019

    Authorities in Beijing held a rare press conference addressing unrest in Hong Kong. That gives lie to the region’s “one country, two systems” governance; fears of a vicious crackdown are growing. Beneath what might seem to be advancements of women’s rights in Saudi Arabia is a mess of contradictions. And, why youngsters are turning away from Facebook—but toward the social-media giant’s other platforms.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: How should filmmakers depict Nazi Germany?

    Jul 26 2019

    Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck hoped never to make a film about the Third Reich. Anne McElvoy asks the Oscar-winning director of “The Lives of Others” what changed his mind. His new film, “Never Look Away”, was inspired by the life of the artist Gerhard Richter, who unwittingly married the daughter of an SS doctor responsible for the death of his aunt. Von Donnersmarck responds to criticisms of the film from Richter, and from those who say he stylises violence. And, how does his nation's relat...more

  • A plight in Tunisia: the president passes

    Jul 26 2019

    Beji Caid Essebsi promised to fix the economy, re-establish security and consolidate Tunisia’s democracy—but all of that remains unresolved as the country begins its search for a new leader. Pet ownership is surging around the world, as are ways to pamper pets. Who owns whom here? And, homeopathy gets diluted as France removes its state subsidy for the pseudoscience.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: July 25th 2019

    Jul 25 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, to stop a no-deal Brexit, moderate Tory MPs must be ready to bring down Boris Johnson. The growing friendship between Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping is much better for China than it is for Russia (8:50). And, the business of live music – how big stars maximise their take from tours (16:30)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Nothing new to report: Robert Mueller testifies

    Jul 25 2019

    As promised, the special counsel revealed no more than appeared in his report into Russian election-meddling and obstruction of justice. The story hasn’t moved on, but Democrats would be wise to. Economists are returning to an old idea: that cultural forces should figure into their theories. And, a look at the blindingly fast hands—and feet, and robots—of Rubik’s Cube competitions.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Return of the king

    Jul 24 2019

    Under Satya Nadella, Microsoft has reclaimed its crown as the world’s most valuable listed company. What can other firms learn from its reboot? Also, Reshma Shetty, cofounder of Gingko Bioworks, explains the potential of synthetic biology to harness – and transform – the power of nature. And, British ethicists put police use of artificial intelligence on trial. Alok Jha hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Ricky situation: Puerto Rico’s protests

    Jul 24 2019

    Rolling protests have rocked the island after leaked texts revealed the governor’s insults. But Puerto Rico’s problems are far greater than almost 900 pages of tasteless jokes. We consider the merits of challenging Latin America’s amnesties; justice might be served, but unearthing the past comes with its own perils. And, why women are so well represented among eastern Europe’s scientists.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Meat and Potatoes

    Jul 24 2019

    The potato seemed strange and unappetizing when it first arrived in Europe. But it grew into a wonder food that helped solve the continent’s hunger problems. Can its journey tell us what to expect from current efforts to replace animal meat with societally healthier meat alternatives made from plants, insects, or cells grown in petri dishes?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Europe’s bright spots

    Jul 23 2019

    A few resilient countries and sectors have helped cushion the effects of a trade and manufacturing slowdown on the euro zone. But can that continue? Also, Tyler Cowen, an economist and blogger, stands up for big business. And, it’s all in the small print – why it matters that consumers neither read nor understand the contracts they sign. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • You, May, be excused: Boris Johnson ascends

    Jul 23 2019

    Britain has a new prime minister—who will inherit all the same problems his predecessor had. Good luck guiding a divided nation through Brexit with a paper-thin majority in parliament. Europe’s steel industry is getting hammered by tariffs and gluts, but one tucked-away mill in Austria has steeled itself for tumult. And, what single characteristic do Americans least want in their roommates?Additional audio "Fly" by Benboncan at Freesound.org.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-...more

  • Get one thing strait: Iran’s tanker stand-off

    Jul 22 2019

    The seizure of a British-flagged tanker in the Gulf may seem counter to Iran’s international objectives. But at home, hardliners are in the ascendancy—for them, it’s a public-relations coup. The rise of populism, particularly in Europe, suggests voters are angry. But polls suggest otherwise; we dive into this “happiness paradox”. And, the curious rise in borrowing against high-end art.Additional music "Puzzle Pieces" by Lee Rosevere.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out infor...more

  • The Economist asks: Anna Wintour

    Jul 19 2019

    For more than 30 years as editor-in-chief of Vogue, Anna Wintour has been the gatekeeper of high style. Anne McElvoy asks if the fashion business can genuinely deliver sustainability and shift catwalk stereotypes. They discuss why Wintour personally avoids social media and the consequences of Donald Trump’s tweets about non-white congresswomen. Also, she addresses why Melania Trump has not been asked to appear on Vogue's cover since becoming first lady  See acast.com/privacy for privac...more

  • Servant’s entrance: Ukraine’s elections

    Jul 19 2019

    Volodymyr Zelensky’s Servant of the People party looks set to make big gains in Ukraine’s parliament this weekend. It must, if it wants to weaken oligarchs’ hold over the country. If space exploration and exploitation is to really take off, there’s one big thing missing: the laws to regulate it. And, we remember João Gilberto, the father of bossa nova, whose rise coincided with an all-too-brief cultural renaissance in Brazil.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: July 18th 2019

    Jul 18 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Donald Trump’s re-election campaign is likely to be even more racially divisive than his first. WhatsApp has become Africa’s most popular messaging platform but also a political tool to spread misinformation (8’22). And, drag performers in China are adapting to their socially conservative society (16’17).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unmoving movement: Venezuela’s bloody stalemate

    Jul 18 2019

    The opposition’s momentum has faded; many protesters are too tired to go on. Nicolás Maduro, the illegitimate president, is showing his grip on power with shows of force. Global shipping is in a slump—but a visit to the Port of Rotterdam reveals that the industry itself got the message late. And, assessing whether the internet is as ruinous to language as many assume.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The next giant leap for mankind

    Jul 17 2019

    This week marks the 50th anniversary of the launch of the Apollo 11 moon mission. Is humankind about to return there? And what do the next 50 years of space exploration hold? The task of moderating a platform with over two billion active users is a daunting one. Brent Harris, Facebook’s director of governance, explains his plans. And the science behind the search for the reddest red yet. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In like a Leyen: the European Commission’s new president

    Jul 17 2019

    Ursula von der Leyen has a tough task ahead, pressing a broad agenda in a fragmented European Parliament. We take a look at the vast international collaboration that is weather prediction, where it’s heading and how climate change could make it harder. And, why the villages of Japan are where to head if you love getting close to bears.Additional sound by Solostud at Freesound.org.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Unreliable Evidence

    Jul 17 2019

    In the early 20th century a new forensic technique—fingerprinting—displaced a cruder form of identification based on body measurements. Hailed as modern, scientific, and infallible, fingerprinting was adopted around the world. But in recent years doubts have been cast on its reliability, and a new technique—DNA profiling—has emerged as the forensic gold standard. In assuming it is infallible, are we making the same mistake again?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informati...more

  • Money talks: How slow can you grow?

    Jul 16 2019

    Last week’s episode asked how long American economic growth could last. Now, new figures reveal that China’s growth is the slowest in nearly three decades. What can the Chinese government do about it? Insurance companies make their money from predicting disaster, but as those risks change the industry is lagging behind. And England has won the Cricket World Cup in a controversial tiebreak––but are tiebreaks fair? Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out info...more

  • At stake, chips: Japan-South Korea trade spat

    Jul 16 2019

    A dispute about industrial chemicals reveals tensions that have remained unresolved since the second world war—and threatens the global electronics market. In the Indian state of Assam, a trumped-up rule on citizenship singles out Muslims for detention and deportation. And, a look at why American and European working hours have diverged so much.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tip of the ICE work: the immigration raids that weren’t

    Jul 15 2019

    There was little evidence this weekend of the widespread immigration raids long promised by President Donald Trump. But his campaign of sowing fear seems to be working. Many of China’s infrastructure projects in Africa have been costly flops, and China is tightening its purse strings. Also, Colombia’s centuries-old ceremonies under the influence of a hallucinogenic brew are bringing in tourists and new problems.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Is conservatism in crisis?

    Jul 12 2019

    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author, George Will, and Adrian Wooldridge, The Economist’s political editor, debate whether the conservatism movement is reorienting into one that chooses populism over prudence and they dissect the challenges that conservatism faces around the world. Anne McElvoy asks them whether the next generation of conservative leaders will be made in the image of Donald Trump. And, can a baseball nation and a cricket nation unite over conservatism?  Se...more

  • Tsai hopes: Taiwan’s president on tour

    Jul 12 2019

    The delicate diplomatic dance that America is performing during Tsai Ing-Wen’s visit hints at the island’s strategic importance. Two of the deadly blazes of Australia’s “Black Saturday” were deliberately set; we ask what makes someone start fires. And, the hunt for a cheap holiday read in France: by law books must be sold at full price, but sellers are finding ways around that.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: July 11th 2019

    Jul 11 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: could America’s longest economic expansion on record be coming to an end? How India’s hunt for “illegal immigrants” is aimed at Muslims, including many citizens (09:20). And, employers are wrongly looking for superhero candidates (14:30).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unspeakable truths: Britain’s US ambassador

    Jul 11 2019

    The “special relationship” has been strained this week, following the leak of frank diplomatic cables. The conditions of Sir Kim Darroch’s departure are a window into both Britain’s current politics and its future. International development projects don’t always work, and often the problem is scale: what works for a few may not work for many. And, why, in a country with a riot of regional accents, do almost all British politicians sound the same?   See acast.com/privacy for privac...more

  • Babbage: How tech is my valley?

    Jul 10 2019

    China is promoting a tech district that it hopes will be a serious contender to America’s Silicon Valley. Hal Hodson, The Economist’s technology correspondent, visits the new hub. Lord John Browne, author of “Make, Think, Imagine”, on how advancements in engineering and artificial intelligence will eventually affect civilisation. And, what do hydrogen molecules sound like? Some innovative students have developed “molecular music.” Kenneth Cukier hosts. Music provided by Ilkley Grammar School stu...more

  • From Russia with launch codes: Turkey’s new hardware

    Jul 10 2019

    President Recep Tayyip Erdogan faces increasing pressures at home and abroad, and he’s adding to them—most of all by acquiring Russian missile defences that make Turkey’s NATO allies nervous. As Colombia emerges from a half-century of conflict with FARC rebels, a government push aims to stem cocaine production; so far, it’s not going well. And, we examine the retirement homes for elderly LGBT people that are cropping up. Music courtesy of Lee Rosevere - "Introducing the Pre-roll"  ...more

  • The Secret History of the Future: Second Wind

    Jul 10 2019

    For thousands of years we sailed our cargo across oceans using zero-emission, 100 percent renewable wind. Then we switched to ships that run on oil, creating a global maritime fleet that pumps greenhouse gases into the sky. Could we go back to wind-powered ships by rediscovering a clever nautical innovation that we abandoned a century ago?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: When the growing gets tough

    Jul 09 2019

    America’s economy has been expanding for 121 months in a row—unemployment is low and the stock market has soared. But how long can this last? History suggests a painful recession might be around the corner. Nobel prizewinner and economics professor Joseph Stiglitz tells us capitalism is broken. And, what is an economist's secret to affordable tickets to Wimbledon? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Late to the parting: Deutsche Bank shrinks

    Jul 09 2019

    For years, management at Germany’s largest bank knew the firm was in serious trouble. Why didn’t they do more? The massive cuts announced this week may be too little, too late. We consider Texas and California as political and social laboratories: which one looks like the America of the future? And, a bit of monkey archaeology shows our distant cousins have been honing their tools far longer than previously thought.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In the after-Ba’ath: Syria’s rising Kurds

    Jul 08 2019

    For years, Syria’s Kurdish people were largely invisible: their language, flag and festivals were all suppressed. Now, in much of the country’s north and east, they rule over the Arabs who once ruled over them. A brutal murder in a sleepy German village sparks angst about a resurgent far right. And, the surprising trend of American-style debate in China.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Mark Carney

    Jul 05 2019

    The Governor of the Bank of England explains how central banks are preparing for a riskier world. Mark Carney, who is due to step down next year, singles out climate change as a significant emerging risk for insurance companies and markets. But what can central bankers do about it? He also responds to critics who say he's overstepping the bounds of his role and discusses why he feels that his Brexit warnings have been vindicated. And, was he a fan of Stormzy's Glastonbury performance? Anne McElv...more

  • New Democracy in an old one: Greece’s election

    Jul 05 2019

    Kyriakos Mitsotakis looks likely to lead his New Democracy party to victory in this weekend’s snap election. But can he deliver on all the promises of his big-tent campaign? We examine the controversy and the politics surrounding the detention of migrants at America’s southern border. And, it’s clear that the quality of women’s football is rocketing—we’ve got the data to prove it.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: July 4th 2019

    Jul 04 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the global crisis in conservatism. Royal Dutch Shell’s boss delivers some hard truths on oil and climate change (10:18). And, insects become fish food (18:00)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Putin on a show: Russia’s resurgence

    Jul 04 2019

    Russia’s president is glad-handing in Italy, where his anti-liberal roadshow resonates. But Mr Putin’s is a twisted vision of liberalism, and at home many of his compatriots see through the ruse. We examine the “Swedish model” of prostitution laws, and how the approach endangers sex workers. And, the push to make robots that can handle environments like the melted-down Fukushima Daiichi power plant.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: DeepMind games

    Jul 03 2019

    The child chess prodigy who created a computer that outplays human grandmasters—Demis Hassabis, founder of DeepMind, explains how games are a testing ground for algorithms and what real-world challenges he hopes to tackle with artificial intelligence. And, what can AlphaZero, the chess-playing computer, teach human players? Kenneth Cukier also speaks to the chess players Dominic Lawson, Natasha Regan and Matthew Sadler about the future of machine intelligence and its interplay with human wisdom ...more

  • Growth anatomy: America’s expansive decade

    Jul 03 2019

    What’s behind the record-breaking economic boom and how much longer can it last? Does America’s central bank have the tools it needs to handle the inevitable downturn? The racial gap in Americans’ life expectancy is as small as it’s ever been; we examine what’s been making black lives longer. And, why spoilers are so prominent in entertainment, and how that can spoil the craft.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: A Familiar Tune

    Jul 03 2019

    The 19th-century invention of the phonograph left composers worried they might not be paid for recordings. The 20th-century proliferation of digital sampling outmoded old copyright laws. Can these previous tech disruptions of the music business teach us how to handle a 21st-century onslaught of computers that can compose their own songs?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Brexit and the City

    Jul 02 2019

    London is home to the world’s biggest international financial centre. But Brexit threatens to cut the City off from its most important single foreign market. Tamzin Booth, The Economist’s Britain business editor, investigates whether the City of London can survive Brexit and how other cities across Europe, like Frankfurt, are vying to win their rival’s business. What is at stake on both sides of the Channel, and are there any winners in this battle?   See acast.com/privacy for pri...more

  • Break a LegCo: Hong Kong’s protests boil over

    Jul 02 2019

    Protesters are in a defiant mood—a hard core of them has smashed up Hong Kong’s Legislative Council. But demonstrations aren’t going to make the territory any more free. The state-owned investment vehicles known as sovereign-wealth funds are usually cautious; those of the Gulf region are proving much more adventurous and less transparent. And, a look at the future of New York’s island of the dead  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Armoured Khartoum: Sudan’s bloody transition

    Jul 01 2019

    Protesters returned to the streets of Khartoum this weekend, again with deadly consequences. We look back to last month’s violent crackdown, and consider Sudan’s troubled push for democracy. China’s swine-flu outbreaks threaten hundreds of millions of pigs—but might spark long-overdue reforms in the country’s pork industry. And, we examine San Francisco’s e-cigarette ban: if vaping is safer than smoking, should it be stubbed out?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informati...more

  • Editor’s picks: June 28th 2019

    Jun 28 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how should the world contain Iran? Reparations for slavery is a morally appealing but flawed idea (9:08). And, Europe heroically defends itself against veggie burgers (16:30)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Census and sensibility: landmark SCOTUS rulings

    Jun 28 2019

    America’s highest court has handed down decisions that will shape voter representation for years to come. The rulings make clear the court’s reluctance to become politicised. As China’s and America’s leaders meet on the sidelines of the G20 gathering, we examine the likelihood that a trade war could turn into the shooting kind. And, a view from Silicon Valley, where surrogacy has become a trendy life hack.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Curing the big sea

    Jun 27 2019

    Researchers hope to use disease-fighting genes found in whales to help find treatments for cancer in humans. Airliners that mix batteries and fossil fuel could dominate the skies in the future. And, are people more honest than they think they are? Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fight if you Haftar: the struggle for Libya

    Jun 27 2019

    Life in Libya’s capital seems calm, even as a warlord backed by ragtag forces bids to take the city. Meanwhile the putative government can muster little political power—or electric power. We examine a miracle in Moldova: after years as a swamp of post-Soviet corruption, an anti-graft campaigner has become prime minister. And, historical data reveal the overlooked power of primary debates.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Can Labour solve Brexit?

    Jun 26 2019

    While British headlines are dominated by the race to become the next Conservative prime minister, the opposition Labour party is divided over how to resolve the Brexit stalemate. Anne McElvoy interviews John McDonnell MP, the shadow chancellor, who is one of the strongest voices calling for a second referendum in which he wants Labour to campaign to remain in the EU. Anne asks him about revoking Article 50, if he would push for a vote of no confidence to force a general election, whether he has ...more

  • Rights on Q: same-sex marriage in Japan

    Jun 26 2019

    A bill to recognise same-sex marriage has failed in Japan’s parliament, exposing a widening divide between the views of its politicians and the values of its people. For some officials, Burundi’s election tax is an excuse for extortion; for some citizens, a reason to flee the country. And, why you should be circumspect about that next promotion opportunity.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Season 2 Trailer

    Jun 26 2019

    What can 19th century polar exploration teach us as humans plan missions to Mars? Do modern online dating apps have anything to learn from romances over the telegraph wires? Dig into the past, and you’ll find surprising lessons about what’s next for our modern world. Season 2 of "The Secret History of The Future" starts on July 3rd 2019.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Bargaining chips

    Jun 25 2019

    The trade war between America and China is intensifying after America blacklisted five more Chinese technology entities. Will this jeopardise any talk of a trade deal at the upcoming G20 summit? Could low-denomination treasury bills help Italy’s cash-strapped economy? Also, a new way of working called “ghost work”. Phil Coggan hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money in the West Bank: Kushner’s peace plan

    Jun 25 2019

    Tensions between Iran and America are distracting from Jared Kushner’s long-awaited Israeli-Palestinian peace plan. It’s got plenty of dollar signs, but no sign yet of a political solution. We ask why Argentina’s former president is now running for vice-president, and whether Argentines will want more of her populism. And, be careful what you tweet if you’re heading to America; more and more, border officials are watching.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World ahead: In the Sharenthood

    Jun 24 2019

    What if America decided to pull out of NATO? And a trip to 2029 to report on a landmark case in which parents are required to pay damages for sharing images of their children online, and refusing to take them down when the children grow up. Tom Standage hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lover or Leaver? How Brexit divided Britons

    Jun 24 2019

    Exactly three years after the referendum result, it’s clear: Brexit has driven Britain a bit batty. We look into the grand societal divides that the vote exposed. In Istanbul, a repeat mayoral election reaches the same result: the ruling party lost. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan no longer seems so invincible. And, in Kenya, an “Uber for ambulances” saves time and lives.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Which Democrats can challenge Donald Trump in 2020?

    Jun 21 2019

    Anne McElvoy and John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, interview two distinctive hopefuls in the race to replace Donald Trump. Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, assesses America's role in the world and sets out his plan to redress racial inequality. He also reflects on what he has learned both from Mr Trump and from Leslie Knope, a character in the TV comedy, “Parks and Recreation”. And Andrew Yang, an entrepreneur, champions universal basic income as a way to res...more

  • Blonde ambition: Boris’s bid for power

    Jun 21 2019

    Charming buffoon or cunning chameleon? Welcoming liberal or snarling Brexiteer? We ask why, despite having no guiding philosophy, Boris Johnson is so likely to become Britain’s prime minister. Our obituaries editor remembers the socialite Claus von Bülow, his sensational attempted-murder trials in America and the enduring question of whether he did it. And, despite appearances, China’s and America’s film markets are growing further apart.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out ...more

  • Editor’s Picks: June 20th 2019

    Jun 20 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Boris Johnson is the favourite to become Britain's next Prime Minister (8:23). America’s future will be written in the two mega-states—California and Texas (16:50). And, pets have gained the upper paw over their so-called owners  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Hawks, stocks and peril: Iran-America brinkmanship

    Jun 20 2019

    Iran’s downing of an American drone today is just the latest source of tension between the countries. Where does it end? As facial-recognition technology improves, rising privacy concerns are hampering its adoption. And in Britain, advertisements that play to gender stereotypes are under more scrutiny from regulators and consumers.Additional music by Lee Rosevere "Puzzle Pieces".  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Facebucks

    Jun 19 2019

    Facebook wants to create a global digital currency—what could possibly go wrong? Also, why billionaire Stephen Schwarzman, founder of Blackstone private-equity firm, is donating £150m to fund a humanities centre at Oxford University. And, what can be done to increase public trust in artificial intelligence? Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Moving stories: the UN’s refugee report

    Jun 19 2019

    The worldwide count of people forced from their homelands has increased sharply, again. What’s driving these movements, and what are governments doing about incoming refugees? The Democratic Republic of Congo is suffering the world’s second-largest outbreak of Ebola—we ask why it hasn’t been declared an international emergency. And, why Thailand is getting into the weed business.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Banking bad

    Jun 18 2019

    Deutsche Bank plans to create a new division, a “bad bank”, which will hold tens of billions of euros of assets as part of an overhaul of it is operations. Will the remaining firm become profitable enough to satisfy regulators and investors? And the growing concern in China over balancing the books at a local level. Also, our correspondent takes a trip to Citeco — France’s museum of economics. Patrick Foulis hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Florida Man: Trump’s re-election campaign

    Jun 18 2019

    America’s president heads back to the Sunshine State today to announce his candidacy. What to expect this time around? Muhammad Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically elected president, has died in court. We look back on his troubled leadership and ignominious end. And, this year’s Women’s World Cup is drawing much more attention than past tournaments, in part because of a long-overdue reckoning about money in the sport.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lam to the slaughter: Hong Kong’s shocking U-turn

    Jun 17 2019

    Calls for the resignation of Carrie Lam, the territory’s leader, are intensifying. Hong Kongers may have put a recent freedom-crimping bill on ice, but more challenges to their independence await. We speak to the mother of a child genius who reveals the private agony of being an exceedingly clever kid. And, a new podcast in Latin gets our columnist thinking about language evolution and resurrection.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Armistead Maupin

    Jun 14 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks the creator of “Tales of the city” about what drew him back to 28 Barbary Lane and a new batch of tales of queer America. Fifty years on from the Stonewall riots that sparked the LGBT civil rights movement, Armistead Maupin talks about how far there is still to go, what young gay men can never understand about his generation and why he has finally decided to abandon his beloved San Francisco  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • What’s yours has mines: the Gulf of Oman attack

    Jun 14 2019

    America has blamed Iran for yesterday’s tanker attacks in the Gulf of Oman. If that’s true, Iran is playing a dangerous game that involves the whole of the region. The violent militias that control much of Rio de Janeiro might be easy to beat if they weren’t so well-connected. And, a breakaway hit reveals the racial fault lines in country music.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: June 13th 2019

    Jun 13 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, huge demonstrations in Hong Kong have rattled the territory’s government. (8:50) America’s biggest defence merger highlights the changing nature of war (17:11) And, why Australia’s pioneering image cloaks a nanny state  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Vlad the un-jailer: the Ivan Golunov case

    Jun 13 2019

    An investigative journalist’s release may look like a press-freedom win in Russia—but it represents much more than that. Democratic presidential hopefuls have no shortage of transformative ideas, yet Senate arithmetic ensures there’s little hope of realising them. And, we visit a place where malaria rages while a cure literally grows on trees.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Space invaders

    Jun 12 2019

    The business opportunities from small satellite technology are infinite: from an ‘ambulance’ which rescues malfunctioning spacecraft to devices that can measure the oil level in a tanker from space. Are we on the verge of making gene-editing technology safer? And, 50 years after man set foot on the moon, Oliver Morton, senior editor and author, predicts the future of humans’ relationship with lunar exploration. Kenn Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informatio...more

  • Once more, with felines: half the world gets online

    Jun 12 2019

    Half of humanity is now online. What will the second half do when it logs on? The same as the first: friendly chat, personal expression and a lot of cat videos. Despite appearances, racism in America is actually going down; the problem is that America’s politics is increasingly fractured along racial lines. And, why is it that screams are so prevalent in popular culture?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: All the presidents men

    Jun 11 2019

    There are no women in the running to take over as the next President of the European Central Bank. And, lessons from the Woodford Investment group—even star fund-managers can struggle to outperform the market. Also, why do German billionaires avoid the limelight? Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Independence say: Hong Kong’s ongoing protests

    Jun 11 2019

    A proposed change to the judicial system is just the latest sign that mainland China is exerting pressure on Hong Kong’s autonomy. Authorities seem ready to quell further demonstrations. Although solitary confinement is widely condemned, it’s still common in America; we speak with an inmate who’s spent half a lifetime in solitary. And, the sheikhs of Iraq who help resolve disputes—and are available for hire.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • No way to tweet a friend: Trump’s Mexico tariffs

    Jun 10 2019

    In the end, President Donald Trump’s tariff threat did what he had hoped: Mexico has pledged to tighten immigration flows. But such weaponisation of tariffs bodes ill for the future. China’s “green Great Wall” of trees—a bid to halt desertification—may be doing more harm than good. And, we meet some of the Filipino sailors who keep the global shipping industry afloat.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: June 7th 2019

    Jun 07 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the second half of humanity is joining the internet. Citizens of the emerging world will change the web and it will change them. Next, could the slaughter of pro-democracy protesters in Khartoum be Sudan’s Tiananmen? (7:43) And, why baseball reflects America’s desire to be different (14:39)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tory story: Britain’s next prime minister

    Jun 07 2019

    Today Theresa May stepped down as leader of the Conservative Party, and would-be replacements are already lining up. There’s little hope that any would be able to arrange an elegant exit from Europe. Also, we take a look at the astonishing range of ailments that could be treated by magic mushrooms.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Who can lead Britain through Brexit?

    Jun 06 2019

    Anne McElvoy speaks to two candidates in the race to succeed Theresa May as Conservative leader and Britain's prime minister. She catches up with Rory Stewart, the international development secretary, who proposes a “citizens’ assembly” to solve Brexit. And she asks the foreign secretary, Jeremy Hunt, how he would avoid a no-deal Brexit and about explaining the National Health Service to President Donald Trump  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Basta! The EU challenges Italy’s finances

    Jun 06 2019

    European officials have threatened a substantial fine if Italy doesn’t shrink its debt and budget deficit. Whether or not it follows through, markets are already punishing the country. Tens of thousands of refugees have snuck into Canada from America, but as an election looms, the government is rethinking its openness. And, the plague of “presenteeism”: when your work is done, just go home.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Fusing the future

    Jun 05 2019

    In this week’s Babbage, Alok Jha investigates the organisations and companies trying to crack a technology that could solve all of the world’s energy problems in a stroke—nuclear fusion. From Iter, the world's largest collaborative fusion experiment, to private start-ups racing to be first, could the long-promised dream of nuclear fusion - to provide clean, limitless, carbon-free power - finally be about to come true?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Same as the old boss? Crackdown in Sudan

    Jun 05 2019

    Nearly two months after staging a coup, military leaders have brutally cracked down on protesters in Sudan. Talks with the opposition have fallen apart—as have hopes for a resurgent Sudanese democracy. We examine the rise in gun violence in Latin America and how much of it can be pinned on American-made weapons. And, a look at the striking effects of a striker: how one footballer’s image is reducing Islamophobia in Liverpool.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Tariffs at dawn

    Jun 04 2019

    President Trump has started using import tariffs to win political as well as economic battles. What will be the impact of his latest threats to impose tariffs on Mexican goods? Also, how the US Federal Reserve is preparing for the next recession. And, how a toxic working environment can poison lives even among do-gooders. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Thirty years of forgetting: Tiananmen

    Jun 04 2019

    On the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square tragedy, our correspondents reflect on a dark and confusing day—and the Chinese government’s efforts to suppress the memory of it. Could such widespread dissent flare up in today’s China? Also, why laws requiring immigrants to speak host-nations’ languages are counter-productive.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Get pomped up: Trump’s British visit

    Jun 03 2019

    President Donald Trump kicks off his state visit to Britain with some opening shots at London's mayor Sadiq Khan. But larger issues will take center stage. Amid Brexit, a leadership contest and simmering security tensions, we discuss the strains to the “special relationship”. We consider how regulators and the tech giants can tackle the wilds of the internet to make browsing safe for children. And, a Ramadan drama in Saudi Arabia that reveals how the crown prince wants his kingdom to be perceive...more

  • The Economist asks: Who will run tomorrow’s top companies?

    May 31 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks Ursula Burns about how she became the first black woman to run a Fortune 500 company. She explains why she now champions gender quotas, having vehemently opposed them. And, as AI threatens more traditional jobs, how CEOs should balance protecting profits with protecting their employees  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Protectionist racket: trade-war rhetoric

    May 31 2019

    As President Donald Trump threatens new tariffs on Mexican goods, retaliatory ones between China and America are starting to bite. That puts China’s party leaders—and their hardening nationalist message—in a tricky spot. We examine how the global grounding of Boeing’s 737 MAX planes might change air-safety regulation. And a visit to Venice’s Biennale, where immigration and climate change are taking centre stage.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: May 30th 2019

    May 30 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Britain’s constitutional time-bomb. Brexit is already a political crisis—sooner or later it will become a constitutional one too. How floods and storms in the Midwest are altering American attitudes to climate change (9’24). And, 30 years after the Tiananmen Square massacre, many Chinese know little about the bloodshed (18’07)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....more

  • Likudn’t: Israel’s political crisis

    May 30 2019

    For the first time since Israel’s founding, efforts to form a government have failed. What will the resulting snap election mean for Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu? Alleged meddling in the Czech judiciary has sparked protests; it seems that challenges to the rule of law are proliferating in eastern Europe. And, we visit Crimea’s winemakers, who are struggling after annexation by Russia.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Rash behaviour

    May 29 2019

    The measles resurgence around the world has been blamed on parents refusing to vaccinate their children but is vaccinating children enough? Also, how a new glove for humans is teaching robots how to feel. And Kenneth Cukier asks Carl Benedikt Frey, economic historian, what can be learnt from the industrial revolution in today’s world of automation and robots.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Baba Go Slow: Nigeria’s President gets another term

    May 29 2019

    Muhammadu Buhari earned the nickname “Baba Go Slow” for a lackadaisical approach to reform as Nigeria’s president. He mismanaged the economy, failed to tackle corruption and has been unable to restrain the terrorist group Boko Haram. Will he be more effective in his second term? Also, why so many climbers are perishing on the slopes of Everest. And for the first time in football history, clubs from just one nation compete in Europe’s top tournaments. How England’s Premier League teams have outpe...more

  • Money talks: Just the job

    May 28 2019

    The received wisdom is that work is becoming low-paid and precarious, with jobs lost to automation and the gig economy. The data say otherwise. What does the jobs boom in the rich world mean for the global economy? Also, will Alibaba’s plans to list in Hong Kong start a corporate shift away from Wall Street? And, the role of clearing houses in averting financial crises. Philip Coggan hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Continental breakfast: European elections

    May 28 2019

    Europe’s voters have shown they are not happy with traditional parties. But even as the Brexit Party surged in Britain, populists across the continent found elections to the European Parliament tougher than expected, while the Green Party made a strong showing, buoyed by climate concerns. Despite being "asset-light", some tech companies need property to keep expanding. That’s good news for real-estate investment trusts. And quinoa is the grain getting a new lease of life.  See acast.co...more

  • The world ahead: Food for thought

    May 27 2019

    After the successful stockmarket flotation of Beyond Meat, maker of the Beyond Burger, we assess the potential impact of meat substitutes on global meat consumption. Also, is space tourism about to take off? And what can be done to preserve indigenous languages for future generations. Tom Standage hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Are the Victorians a model for Brexit Britain?

    May 24 2019

    With Theresa May on her way out of 10 Downing Street and Britain no closer to achieving the Brexit she promised, Anne McElvoy takes the long view. She asks Jacob Rees-Mogg, a Conservative MP, and Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, to debate how the titans of the 19th century shaped modern Britain. What would Queen Victoria do? And who in the Conservative party do they tip to take over the leadership?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • This May hurt: British politics

    May 24 2019

    Britain’s prime minister Theresa May has at last revealed the date she will step down. She had the unenviable task of trying to deliver Brexit, which she failed to, and her successor may not fare any better. President Donald Trump has lost crucial legal battles over his financial records, and more defeats are likely if the cases head to the Supreme Court. And, why is it that some music can give you chills? Additional music: “Try Again” by Posthuman, “Blackwall” by Snakebitesmile.  See...more

  • Editor’s Picks: May 23rd 2019

    May 23 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata party has won a second landslide victory. The prime minister, Narendra Modi, should make better use of his latest triumph. Can China, home to half the world’s pigs, curb the epidemic of African swine flu (6’28)? And Brazil faces painful disagreement over how to commemorate its history of slavery (12’54)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out info...more

  • Repeat performance: India’s election

    May 23 2019

    Narendra Modi’s BJP appears to have won a convincing re-election victory. What will that mean for India and the region? We look back on the life of Bob Hawke, a former Australian prime minister who convinced the world that his country deserved a place in global politics. And, why Silicon Valley’s latest obsession is optimising sleepy time.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Data to the rescue

    May 22 2019

    Access to the right data can be as valuable in humanitarian crises as water or medical care, but it can also be dangerous. Misused or in the wrong hands, the same information can put already vulnerable people at further risk. Kenneth Cukier hosts this special edition of Babbage examining how humanitarian organisations use data and what they can learn from the profit-making tech industry. This episode was recorded live from Wilton Park, in collaboration with the United Nations OCHA Centre for Hum...more

  • Ibiza remix: Austria and the European fringe

    May 22 2019

    As a scandal involving Austria’s hard-right Freedom party causes the government to unravel, we examine the fringe parties of Europe and their chances in this week’s European election. As tech billionaires continue to indulge their obsession with space travel, we look at the sketchy economics of moving off-world. And, a stark warning for lovers of avocados: supply concerns make it a volatile brunch choice.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: When the chips are down

    May 21 2019

    How will the Trump administration’s restrictions affect Huawei—can the world’s second biggest smartphone maker adapt to not doing business with America? Michael Froman, a former US trade representative and the vice-chairman of MasterCard, discusses how private companies themselves can promote freer trade. And Jennifer Eberhardt, a professor of psychology, on the science of racial bias. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • In a heartbeat: abortion in America

    May 21 2019

    The strict anti-abortion bills cropping up in multiple American states aren’t expected to become the law of the land—but proponents want them to chip away at Roe v Wade, which is. Attacks on albinos have risen ahead of Malawi’s presidential election; we discuss the superstitions driving the violence. And, why young Americans are having so little sex.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Battle for legitimacy: Afghanistan v the Taliban

    May 20 2019

    After 18 years and almost a trillion dollars to fight the Taliban, Afghanistan’s government still struggles for legitimacy; we ask why. A list of the world’s ultra-rich reveals a disproportionate number of self-made female billionaires from China—but the trend isn’t set to continue. And we examine why presidential libraries are so controversial, and why Barack Obama’s is no exception.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Cass Sunstein

    May 17 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks Cass Sunstein, a former advisor to Barack Obama and co-author of "Nudge", how far the state should define our quest for personal freedom. They discuss how we might need a GPS to navigate through life, the limits of nudging and why left-wing Democrats might be their own worst enemy  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Private iniquity? The Abraaj case

    May 17 2019

    Not long ago, Abraaj was one of the world’s highest-profile private-equity firms. We take a look at its spectacular downfall, and the fate of its charismatic boss, Arif Naqvi. This weekend Australian voters will elect a new parliament. How can politicians win back a disillusioned electorate? And why do sausages figure so strongly on voting day?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: May 16th 2019

    May 16 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, as the rivalry between China and the United States grows, surging sanctions create both risks and unexpected business opportunities. Why the feeble Afghan government is losing the war against the Taliban (10’23). And a tale of golden fleeces—why people in Senegal pay a fortune for fancy sheep (20’19)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • May, EU live in interesting times: Brexit

    May 16 2019

    As party leaders grill Britain’s prime minister—and with a looming European election the country was due to avoid—we examine how the Brexit mess is dissolving party allegiances. Turkey was once seen as a success story in dealing with Syrians fleeing conflict, but as war has dragged on their welcome is wearing thin. And, kinky and camp meet fraught politics in this year’s Eurovision Song Contest.Additional music "Thoughtful" and "Under Suspicion" by Lee Rosevere.  See acast.com/privacy ...more

  • Babbage: Facing the future?

    May 15 2019

    Legislators in San Francisco have just voted to ban the use of facial recognition—is this a victory for privacy or a setback for technology? Also, new research on how machine learning can be used to predict the likelihood of breast cancer. And Amazon's boss, Jeff Bezos, draws inspiration from science fiction in his aim to build space habitats. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Don’t spend it all at once: Pakistan and the IMF

    May 15 2019

    The International Monetary Fund has struck another deal to bail out Pakistan—its 22nd. But how did the country’s economy end up in such a mess? Never mind rising numbers of vegetarians: the world is eating more meat, and in a way, that’s a good thing. And, how French names reveal social trends that census data cannot.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: A US-China game of nerves

    May 14 2019

    Two-way trade between America and China hit $2bn a day last year. But the growing mistrust between the two countries is turning business from a safe space into a field of contention. David Rennie, The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, has travelled across both countries and found that, with China’s daunting rise, making money is no longer enough to keep friendly relations.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Supply demands: Yemen peace talks

    May 14 2019

    UN negotiators are trying to salvage a ceasefire agreement surrounding the Yemeni port city of Hodeidah. The Arab world’s poorest country is suffering mightily, but the patchwork of actors makes a successful deal ever more difficult. In Latin America, democracy has stalled as economies have stagnated. Yet for democracy to succeed elsewhere, its Latin American shoots must be preserved. And, a splashy apartment building in Bulgaria that’s become emblematic of graft.Additional music "Chez Space" by...more

  • Spare the Rodrigo: Philippine elections

    May 13 2019

    Personalities, not policies, will determine votes in today’s poll in the Philippines to fill some 18,000 government jobs. Loyalists of the firebrand president Rodrigo Duterte—including his daughter—will do well. Also, why is it that amid a growing need for new antibiotics, the incentives to produce them are fewer? And, a trip to the tiny Greek island of Delos, for an unusual meeting of modern art and protected antiquity.Runtime: 21min  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out info...more

  • The Economist asks: Melinda Gates

    May 10 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks Melinda Gates whether gender equality starts in the kitchen. The American philanthropist explains why the tech world risks entrenching bias into the future, but defends the Gates Foundation’s decision to halve its paid family leave. And Anne and Melinda swap top tips for getting teenagers to do the washing up  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unbalance of trade: China-America talks

    May 10 2019

    Negotiations to end the trade war have been ruffled as the Trump administration again ramped up tariffs. But even if a deal is struck, that won’t address serious systemic troubles in the countries’ relationship. Many diets rely on simply counting calories, but the truth is that the scientific-sounding measure is mightily misleading. And, as Uber goes public, we take an instructive ride through historic disruptions of the taxi industry.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf...more

  • Editor’s Picks: May 9th 2019

    May 09 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, our cover story reports on the brewing conflict between America and Iran. Both sides need to step back. Also, why the Mexican-American population is shrinking, despite headlines from the southern border (10:05). And, what the latest trends in baby names say about how France is changing (17:34)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Generals’ election: Thai politics

    May 09 2019

    The military junta that runs Thailand almost completely sewed up a momentous vote—almost. After further electoral meddling the generals will now lead a weak government, with a surging youth-led party nipping at their heels. As Russia intensifies bombings in Idlib, the last stronghold of Syrian rebels, we examine how Russia’s involvement in Syria has expanded its role in the Middle East. And, a visit with the soldier-poets of Guinea-Bissau.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out...more

  • Babbage: Uber traffic

    May 08 2019

    As Uber prepares for its public listing this week, a new study in San Francisco shows that ride-hailing companies cause major road congestion. Also, how much should smart speakers see as well as hear? And, author Douglas Rushkoff explains why he views modern technology as anti-human. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Nuclear diffusion: Iran

    May 08 2019

    Exactly a year after President Donald Trump pulled America out of the Iran nuclear deal—and days after America moved warships into the Persian Gulf—Iran has announced it will break the terms of the deal. Is it more than just sabre-rattling? We examine an impressive new effort to get inside the minds of those unable to speak. And, why is it that British food gets such a bad rap? The answer stretches back to the Industrial Revolution.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inform...more

  • Money talks: Tech’s raid on the banks

    May 07 2019

    Digital disruption is coming to banking at last. Helen Joyce travels across Asia to see how fintechs like Ant Financial are transforming how people spend, save and invest their money, and asks whether traditional banks can catch up. Who will win the battle to be the bank of the future? And could having a bank in your pocket make your money safer?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Mayor may not: Turkey’s election re-run

    May 07 2019

    Turkey’s ruling AK party never conceded defeat in Istanbul’s mayoral election in March. Now the result has been annulled, worrying the opposition and international observers. A China-America trade deal has been thrown into doubt thanks to a presidential tweet, but one senator is warning of a grave danger that transcends tit-for-tat tariffs. And, why there’s a growing feminist contingent in a genre of Brazilian music known for its misogyny.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out...more

  • Everything in moderation: YouTube

    May 06 2019

    Susan Wojcicki, YouTube’s chief executive, tells our correspondent that moderating the streaming giant’s content is her biggest challenge. No wonder: every minute, 500 hours-worth of it is added. Also, how West African research is being used to address gun violence in Chicago. And a look at the declining number of royal families, and why some that have survived will stick around.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Bret Easton Ellis

    May 03 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks author and iconoclast Bret Easton Ellis about why he has decided to take on the social mores of millennials. From the #metoo movement and freedom of expression to anger on social media, he discusses the dangers of a growing generational disconnect. And he apologises for claiming millennials don’t care about literature  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Barr, none: the White House’s defiance

    May 03 2019

    The no-show of America’s attorney-general in Congress is just the latest example of the White House’s broad stonewalling policy; we look at the constitutional crisis that may be brewing. Facebook’s blocking of extremists yesterday is just one front the social-media behemoth is fighting. Mark Zuckerberg’s bid to remake the platform will probably ape its Chinese rival, WeChat. And, we check into the Czech Republic and Poland, finding one immigrant group being embraced in a notoriously anti-migrant...more

  • Editor’s Picks: May 2nd 2019

    May 02 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the fight against jihadists is moving to Africa. Despite Western help, governments in the Sahel are struggling to beat back violent extremists. Next, the Democrats and American foreign policy—a chance for radical rethinkers (12:43). And, Netflix and pills—why the drugs industry should take inspiration from the entertainment industry (23:38)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-ou...more

  • Buy the bullet: global defence spending

    May 02 2019

    Governments the world over are beefing up defence spending—chief among them America’s and China’s. But some aggressive countries’ budgets are actually shrinking. May Day protests in France took a violent turn this year, and that complicates President Macron’s efforts to calm an already protest-prone populace. And, academics have been trying to determine which English-speaking country produces the most bullshit.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Net zero Britain

    May 01 2019

    This week the Committee on Climate Change releases its anticipated recommendations for Britain to become a carbon-free economy, but will the Government take meaningful action? Also, the controversial subject of lung cancer screening. And David Spiegelhalter discusses ‘The Art of Statistics’. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Putsch comes to shove: Venezuela

    May 01 2019

    Juan Guaidó, the opposition figure widely viewed as the legitimate leader of Venezuela, has made a dramatic attempt to seize power from President Nicolás Maduro. But the effort appears stalled; how did he go wrong? We look more widely at coups around the world, why they succeed or fail and even how to predict them. And, a dramatic embassy raid reveals why it’s so tough to be a North Korean dissident.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Rise of the No Men

    Apr 30 2019

    Since the financial crisis, compliance officers in charge of minimising banks’ regulatory woes have never been more in demand. Will banks reach peak compliance? Also, author Caroline Criado Perez exposes what she calls “data bias in a world designed for men”. Also, after Avengers: Endgame broke box office records, will Disney Hulk smash the streaming competition later this year? Philip Coggan hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Inflationary pressure: Argentina’s strikes

    Apr 30 2019

    Patience runs thin amid rampant inflation and a devaluing currency; Argentines are taking to the streets for two days of strikes and protests. Taiwan’s richest man has joined the presidential race, but lots of his business is based in China. He will struggle to shake perceptions of a conflict of interest. And, America’s Supreme Court is deciding whether to ensure trademark protection for businesses with some pretty racy names.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information....more

  • The world ahead: When the drugs don't work

    Apr 29 2019

    In this edition of The world ahead we examine a possible future where antibiotics no longer work. What causes such antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and what can be done to remedy it? And in another health-care scenario, we examine technology's potential to address the global shortage of medical staff. Anne McElvoy hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Crossing the “t”s: China-America trade talks

    Apr 29 2019

    American negotiators will be in Beijing this week, for what appears to be the final stages of striking a trade deal. What’s left to be agreed, and what are the sticking points? Also, America’s shale boom has given it leverage in international oil markets—the trick will be using that newfound power effectively. And, we have a sniff of a pungent Egyptian holiday treat that has the potential to kill.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Ian McEwan

    Apr 26 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks Man Booker prize-winning novelist Ian McEwan what distinguishes humans and robots in the age of AI. They discuss his new novel "Machines Like Me", a Promethean story which argues that engineers are the mythic gods of today. They also talk about why young writers should switch off their smartphones  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The strain in Spain: an election looms

    Apr 26 2019

    Ahead of this weekend’s general election, we examine Spain’s fractured political landscape. A much-needed bastion of stability in Europe looks set for a long fight to form a government. We also take a look at two lingering effects of Japan’s post-war policies: first, we speak to one of the victims of decades of forced sterilisation, for which the government apologised this week. And, given the country’s notorious culture of work—itself a consequence of post-war reconstruction—not everyone relish...more

  • Editor’s Picks: April 25th 2019

    Apr 25 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to stop the rot in South Africa. The liberal opposition cannot win the elections on May 8th, so the president must clean up his own party. Next, why Britain’s artful compromise on Huawei and 5G is a model for other countries (10:17). And, geoengineering could alleviate climate change, but with politically explosive consequences (14:54)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out...more

  • Five Eyes and 5G: the Huawei debate

    Apr 25 2019

    Leaked discussions reveal that Britain is going against the grain of its “Five Eyes” security partners by letting Huawei supply kit for coming 5G networks. What are the risks—to security and to the alliance? Now that Robert Mueller’s report is in the hands of Congress, what should happen, and will American democracy be the better for it? And, after years of considering how office interiors affect workers, the focus has shifted outside.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf...more

  • Babbage: The genetic revolution

    Apr 24 2019

    Kenneth Cukier takes a look at the future of genetic engineering and what it means to be human. He speaks to leading scientists, doctors and philosophers to ask if ethics and regulations are able to keep up with the technology  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Troubling: a death in Northern Ireland

    Apr 24 2019

    A young journalist will be buried today, after being accidentally shot by dissident republicans in Northern Ireland. The killing is a worrying reminder of bygone decades of violence that fraught Brexit negotiations may be rekindling. We take a look at South Africa’s job market, and the push to get more young people into work. And, why is there a spate of politicians who speak multiple languages?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Waging bull

    Apr 23 2019

    As the debate about raising the minimum wage in America intensifies, it seems that wages for the lowest-paid Americans are already on the increase.  Also, why is wage growth in the UK picking up at last? Finally, the most expensive homes in the world’s most desirable cities are becoming a bit less expensive.  Simon Longs hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Worrying new threat: tragedy in Sri Lanka

    Apr 23 2019

    After co-ordinated bomb attacks that killed hundreds, Sri Lanka is reeling. But if the government was so consumed by internal struggles as to miss warnings, how can it respond to the devastation? We take a look at global efforts to contain corruption, drawing lessons from Brazil’s sprawling Lava Jato investigation. And, a visit to what will be the precise geographic centre of the European Union—if and when Britain leaves.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Early to wed: child marriage in Africa

    Apr 22 2019

    Marrying too young has lifelong effects: on a girl’s body as much as on her education and career. We explore what is behind a sharp decline in child marriage in parts of Ethiopia. There’s an ancient-clothing trend in China that is mostly goofy fun. But its ethnic overtones may soon worry the Communist Party. And, a chat—as well as a hard-fought match—with Africa’s first World Scrabble Champion.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Renée Fleming

    Apr 19 2019

    Anne McElvoy goes backstage at New York’s newest arts centre, The Shed, to talk to the Grammy and Polar music prize-winning soprano. They discuss bending the rules of genre and gender opposite Ben Whishaw in “Norma Jeane Baker of Troy”. Also, why opera isn’t in trouble and how to reclaim the title of “diva” for the 21st century  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Planes, trains and automobiles: the travails of travel

    Apr 19 2019

    Easter weekend is a busy travel time for the many people who celebrate it. If you’re lucky, it means some time off work. But you might be unlucky, and travel through a terrible airport (we talk about the world’s worst). Or perhaps you’ll splash out and take one of the many sleeper train services that are cropping up (we discuss why train travel is such a draw, particularly for artists). Or you might get stuck in traffic (we visit the places where traffic jams are seen as opportunity rather than ...more

  • Editor’s Picks: April 18th 2019

    Apr 18 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the trouble with tech unicorns. These billion-dollar businesses seem to have it all—except a path to high profits. Next, why did a fire at Notre Dame cathedral provoke more global grief than the recent deadly floods in Mozambique? (9:54) And, why Pakistan risks exterminating a bird that lays golden eggs (15:23)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • [Redacted]: the Mueller report

    Apr 18 2019

    Today the report by Robert Mueller, the special counsel who investigated Russian links to the Trump administration, will be released—mostly. What lies behind the redactions, and what investigations are still to play out? Politicians have dabbled in comedy for decades, but comedians who take up politics are an increasingly potent force. And, why Pakistani citizens don’t much mind that their local doctor might be a total quack.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Am-AI-zon

    Apr 17 2019

    Amazon’s use of artificial intelligence has long outstripped Facebook and Google. Just how ingrained is AI at Amazon? Also, journalist and author David Wallace Wells explains the diminishing optimism of the climate change movement. And, how natural disasters fade from collective memory. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Roads to success: Indonesia’s election

    Apr 17 2019

    Joko Widodo, the incumbent president, is expected to win today’s vote, after a people-pleasing term tackling the country’s infrastructure. But there are worrying signs about how Jokowi would continue to rule. As a herd of “unicorns” stampedes toward stockmarkets, their business models don’t look so sure-footed. And, a battle is heating up as hotpot, a spicy Chinese dish, spreads globally.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Big bank theory

    Apr 16 2019

    America’s largest banks reported earnings this week. Bank of America’s chief executive, Brian Moynihan, tells Anne McElvoy why he is bullish about the American economy and justifies his pay package. Also, can Goldman Sachs reinvent itself in the shadow of a scandal? And, Tiger Woods’s stroke of genius—for the business of golf. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • And then, silence: a Paris icon burns

    Apr 16 2019

    Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, was already battling the flames of national protest when fire broke out at the Notre Dame cathedral. Will the tragedy, and Mr Macron’s leadership, bring the country together? America’s armed forces often don’t know how many civilians are killed in its air-strike campaigns—but that’s changing, thanks to help from some of the Pentagon’s loudest critics. And, the Trump administration’s cancellation of a deal for Cuban baseball players won’t stop them making thei...more

  • Modi’s operandi: India’s enormous election

    Apr 15 2019

    The world’s largest democratic exercise is under way. Prime Minister Narendra Modi looks likely to win on a divisive platform about Hindu nationalism and Pakistani aggression—even if those aren’t voters’ biggest concerns. Social-media companies are increasingly under the microscope of regulators; we take a look at the seemingly intractable problem of policing online content. And, pole-dancing is trying to shed its seedy image. But can it also develop into a global sport?  See acast.com...more

  • The Economist asks: Preet Bharara

    Apr 12 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks the former United States attorney for the powerful Southern District of New York whether the law can still do justice in America. He explains the failure to prosecute any Wall St executives after the financial crisis and his concern about how politicised the Mueller report has become. And, Mr Bharara reveals what crime he would be tempted to commit and why he loves mafia movies.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bashir and present danger: Sudan’s coup

    Apr 12 2019

    A protest movement that began in December at last brought Sudan’s military brass on board. The country’s cycle of dictatorship and democracy may be repeating itself. Bitcoin just turned ten, but it’s still far from fulfilling its promise to upend the financial system—we examine its fundamental shortcomings. And, the human family tree got bigger this week, but as new data flood in the murkier the human-evolution story seems to get.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informat...more

  • Editor’s Picks: April 11th 2019

    Apr 11 2019

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, mass protests have ousted Sudan’s dictator. The big question now is who will succeed him. Our Lexington columnist argues that Donald Trump is a pro wrestler masquerading as commander-in-chief (7:54). And kidney donors are wanted, dead or alive—we consider how to persuade more of the living to donate (15:39)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Brussels’ doubts: another Brexit delay

    Apr 11 2019

    Britain now has a new Brexit deadline: the end of October. But those negotiations magnified divisions within the European Union that Brexit is revealing—and causing. We visit one of the Chinese towns whose governments are running social experiments, rating people and businesses on their trustworthiness. And, a chat with Dame Stephanie Shirley, a pioneering programmer since before it was a male-dominated field.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Hypersonic Boom

    Apr 10 2019

    America, China and Russia are developing long range, gliding missiles that travel at speeds greater than Mach 5. What are the threats and safeguards? Also, Dame Stephanie Shirley, the programmer who set up Britain’s first all-female software company in 1962, gives advice to women in tech today. And, how to knit a sports car with carbon fibre. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Bibi got back: Israel’s election

    Apr 10 2019

    Binyamin Netanyahu looks set to win a fifth term as prime minister. How will his policies affect negotiations about some of the most contested land on Earth? Meanwhile in space, Israel’s Beresheet probe is set to land on the Moon—but the recent spate of lunar landings is more about national flag-planting than it is about science. And, how will economies adjust as the old increasingly outnumber the young?Additional audio courtesy of NASA. Additional music "Fanfare" courtesy of Kevin MacLeod. ...more

  • Money talks: Banking on independence

    Apr 09 2019

    It’s all change at the European Central Bank with its president, Mario Draghi, set to depart, along with two senior board members. As debate rumbles in America around central-bank independence, can new leadership at the ECB navigate the political shoals? Also, Airbus’s new boss seeks to capitalise as Boeing flounders. And, can the exorbitant cost of cross-border remittances be brought down? Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The new mediocre: the world economy

    Apr 09 2019

    The International Monetary Fund releases its global-growth forecast today. Expect news of a downgrade, but not recession: low growth has become the status quo. We join international forces in Burkina Faso, where African troops are being trained to contain a growing risk of jihadism. And, why is it that concern about climate-change comes and goes?   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tripoli threat: a warlord’s bid to take Libya

    Apr 08 2019

    As rebel forces advance on Tripoli and American troops withdraw, we look at the Libyan general leading the march, and at the country’s fractured politics. There’s evidence that Facebook’s advertisement algorithms discriminate on the basis of race and gender. But who’s to blame, and how to fix it? And, the tricky business of making slot machines appeal to a generation of gamers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Juan Manuel Santos

    Apr 05 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks the former president of Colombia whether the country can sustain a lasting peace with the left-wing FARC guerrilla group. They discuss the best way to tackle the global drug trade and why Venezuela’s dictator, Nicolás Maduro, needs a “golden bridge” to give up power peacefully  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Theresa looks left: Brexit negotiations

    Apr 05 2019

    Having seemingly exhausted options within her own party, Prime Minister Theresa May is now trying to strike an EU divorce deal with Jeremy Corbyn, the head of the opposition. We profile the hard-left Labour leader. This weekend marks 25 years since one of history’s most horrifying campaigns of slaughter; our correspondent reflects on Rwanda, then and now. And, a prominent scientist seeks a molecule that confers all of the fun of alcohol, but none of the risks.  See acast.com/privacy fo...more

  • Editor’s picks: April 4th 2019

    Apr 04 2019

    A selection of three defining articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the promise and perils of synthetic biology—the nascent human capacity to redesign life. Now that Algeria’s President Abdelaziz Bouteflika has resigned, the real battle to overhaul the system begins (9:24). And, where a rejuvenated Tiger Woods ranks on The Economist’s forecast for the golf Masters (14:58).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Resigned to it: Algeria’s president

    Apr 04 2019

    After two decades as president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika has resigned. But the cabal that’s been running the country doesn’t want to give up power and the opposition is disorganised. Will anything change? Medical professionals staged protests in Canada this week, calling for stricter gun laws; the country’s debate over gun ownership is intensifying. And, the gender pay gap in many countries is exacerbated by parenthood—you can hear it in the data.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt...more

  • Babbage: Dino-more

    Apr 03 2019

    A little-known paleontologist may have found the last piece of the puzzle explaining the fate of the dinosaurs: what actually happened when the giant asteroid struck the Earth. Also, Paul Davies, a renowned physicist, explains the systems of information that make up consciousness. And, why being heard in the House of Commons is not always essential to getting things done. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fund while it lasted: the 1MDB scandal

    Apr 03 2019

    Today Malaysia’s former prime minister faces his first of several trials, for alleged involvement in the disappearance of billions of dollars from 1MDB, a state-run fund. Businesses also endure their share of scandals, too—the latest one surrounding the maker of OxyContin, a maligned opioid drug. But why are so many recent corporate scandals coming out of America? And, a fabulously popular Chinese soap challenges deeply held notions of filial duty.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy an...more

  • Money talks: Opioid scandal

    Apr 02 2019

    Purdue Pharma, a US company which makes OxyContin and is owned by members of the Sackler family, is at the eye of the opioid crisis.  What next for the Sacklers and how similar is this storm to that which faced the tobacco industry in the 1990s? Also, the fading fortunes of European banks and NYC’s $100bn congestion problem. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Vote with pride: LGBT politicians

    Apr 02 2019

    Chicago votes for a new mayor today. Either way it will become the largest American city run by an African-American woman, but it may also get another openly gay mayor. We examine America’s proliferation of LGBT candidates. Mark Zuckerberg’s open letter calling for more regulation of Facebook should come as no surprise; social-media giants are reckoning with hard truths about where technology meets society. And, Korean pop music’s dark underbelly is revealed.  See acast.com/privacy for...more

  • AK, not quite OK: Turkey’s elections

    Apr 01 2019

    Turkey’s ruling AK party made historic losses in local elections. Voters, it seems, are fed up with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s economic mismanagement—but his party remains firmly in control. We visit Mozambique to take stock of the damage wrought by Cyclone Idai. And, as Europe comes onto Daylight Savings Time, a look into the past and the doubtful future of the practice.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Matteo Renzi

    Mar 29 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks the former prime minister of Italy what lessons the European Union should take from the turmoil of Brexit. They discuss where the power lies in the union today, why Europe needs to make friends with China and why Westminster is looking rather Italian. This interview was recorded at the Global Education and Skills Forum in Dubai.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Comic’s relief? Ukraine’s presidential race

    Mar 29 2019

    A television show’s everyman character winds up as president: and now the actor who plays him leads the polls ahead of Ukraine’s election. Many museums house artefacts that were looted from their homelands; we examine why the calls for returning such objects are getting louder. And, why the humble baguette is falling out of favour in France (plus, the secret to making them crispy).  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s picks: March 28th 2019

    Mar 28 2019

    A selection of three defining articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Binyamin Netanyahu, prime minister of Israel, provides a parable of modern populism. Flaws in Bitcoin suggest that a lasting revival of cryptocurrencies is unlikely (9:20). And, why museums should return stolen art, but accept donations from almost anyone (18:57)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Another dance ‘round the May poll: Brexit

    Mar 28 2019

    Britain’s prime minister has promised to step down if Parliament passes her deal with the European Union. That has sparked a leadership contest that seems likely only to complicate the mess. As an American county declares a state of emergency over its measles outbreak, we discuss anti-vaccine misinformation and examine its grave consequences. And, your formal grammar knowledge has little to do with your grammar skills; it’s time to change how the subject is taught.  See acast.com/priva...more

  • Babbage: DiagNoses

    Mar 27 2019

    How scientists followed the nose of a super-smeller to identify a new test for Parkinson’s disease. Also, historian Kate Brown tells us what she uncovered from decades of researching the Chernobyl disaster. And scientists in China have found a potential solution for recharging the pacemaker. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Seeing the Lighthizer: China trade talks

    Mar 27 2019

    Another week, another round of negotiations between China and America. But as domestic and economic pressures on both sides have lifted, the path to resolution seems ever more unclear. Apple’s entry into the film-and-television business is just the latest move in a reshuffling of the entire entertainment industry. And, why Kim Jong Un has appeared a bit more approachable recently—and why not to be fooled.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Too close to the Son

    Mar 26 2019

    Masayoshi Son reinvented investing — as he prepares to raise billions of dollars for Vision Fund 2, what are the governance questions? Chickenomics and how chicken became the rich world's most popular meat. And, our Bartleby columnist explores the role of charisma in good leadership.  Rachana Shanbhogue hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Loan behold: a global-economy danger

    Mar 26 2019

    The world has only just recovered from the last global financial shock. But a new trend has economists worried: the rising debt on companies’ balance-sheets. Methamphetamine use is skyrocketing in East Asia; we look into the causes and the effects. And, the surprising rise of “Slovakia’s Erin Brockovich” ahead of the country’s presidential election  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the March 23rd 2019 edition

    Mar 25 2019

    To understand the future of Silicon Valley, look across the Atlantic, where the European Union is pioneering a new way of controlling big tech. Plus, the hackers perfecting the art of getting free stuff, and why civilisations create the gods that suit their needs. Josie Delap hosts. This is the last episode of “Tasting menu”. For highlights from The Economist every Thursday, search for “Editor’s Picks”, from Economist Radio, wherever you listen to podcasts  See acast.com/privacy f...more

  • Collusion elusion: the Mueller report

    Mar 25 2019

    Robert Mueller, the special counsel, has at last delivered his report on President Donald Trump’s campaign. Will it have disappointed or empowered the Democrats in Congress who are still bent on investigating the president? And, four years ago the hard-left Syriza party stormed to power in Greece. But it has broken many of its campaign promises. As an early election looms, we take a look at Syriza’s slow slide.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Slow social

    Mar 22 2019

    In this episode we discuss why, after years of trying to make their products as addictive as possible, social-media companies are now heading in the opposite direction. We look forward to key dates later this year for elections, Chinese anniversaries and historic figures. And we ask what the former headmaster of Eton College is bringing to China’s educational system. Tom Standage hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out infor...more

  • The never-ending saga: Brexit delayed

    Mar 22 2019

    European leaders nixed Theresa May’s request to postpone Brexit for three months, but have given her a short-term reprieve - delaying it by a few weeks and possibly longer. Thailand is about to hold its first election since the military seized power five years ago. The only hitch is that the generals are trying to influence the outcome, and anyone who criticises the ruling royal family can be thrown in prison. And how do you make a whisky age more quickly? The answer lies in dance music. We take...more

  • The Economist asks: Ben Shapiro

    Mar 21 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks the controversial podcast host, and author of “The Right Side of History”, why he thinks the West needs a revival of old-fashioned values. In the wake of the mass shootings in New Zealand, they debate whether individuals, platforms or governments are responsible for controlling extreme content online. Also, does Ben Shapiro ever regret having gone too far and which presidential hopeful gets his bet for 2020 and beyond?Music by Chris Zabriskie, “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK) &nbs...more

  • Not now, Theresa: Postponing Britain’s EU goodbye

    Mar 21 2019

    With just eight days to go before Brexit, Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May wants to extend the leaving date. As an EU summit gathers, Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, insists she needs to get her twice-rejected deal through Parliament first. Also, are stronger strains of cannabis causing psychosis among users? And why Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump should have eaten “family-style” to help pull off a nuclear deal.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out informati...more

  • Babbage: Insectageddon?

    Mar 20 2019

    The insect apocalypse may not be imminent, but the decline of insect species is still a concern. And we speak to Dr Angela Gallop about her career as one of Britain’s most eminent forensic scientists. Also, when will a robot barista serve you a latte? Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Alpha Beto: O’Rourke’s appeal

    Mar 20 2019

    Beto O’Rourke launched his bid for America’s presidency. Despite his relative lack of experience, he’s already been raking in donations. We look at the source of his appeal. And palm oil is ubiquitous in many consumer goods used today, but it comes at a high environmental cost. Also, does the field of economics have a culture that is off-putting to women?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: #Metoo in Economics

    Mar 19 2019

    A new survey published this week shows harassment and discrimination are widespread problems in the academic field of economics. Soumaya Keynes, our US Economics Editor, speaks to those in the field and Ben Bernanke, President of the American Economic Association, about their experiences and what can be done to achieve change  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • War and pestilence: Ebola makes a comeback

    Mar 19 2019

    Five years ago Ebola spread across West Africa, killing more than 10,000 people. In August a fresh outbreak hit the war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo. We look at why the response this time around has been so ineffective. NATO is about to turn 70. It will not be a happy birthday. And Rodrigo Duterte wants to rename the Philippines.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the March 16th 2019 edition

    Mar 18 2019

    After Theresa May’s deal was decisively rejected for a second time, Brexit will almost certainly be delayed. It is time for Parliament to seize the initiative. Plus, how sharing a plate of food could help international diplomacy. And, the world wide web has turned 30—what does its future hold? Lane Greene hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Replacement anxiety: White supremacist terrorism

    Mar 18 2019

    The terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, has left 50 people dead and a lot of unanswered questions. How big a threat are violent white supremacists? We take a look at a network of museums in China trying to commemorate that country’s murderous experience in the 20th century without offending the Communist Party. And our San Francisco correspondent goes in pursuit of free stuff - a lot of it-in the Bay Area.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Can't deal with it: Brexit

    Mar 15 2019

    It’s been another brutal week for Britain’s prime minister as her deal to leave Europe was swatted down comprehensively—again. As a delay to Brexit looks likely, we ask what all the chaos reveals about how Brexit will ultimately play out. Ahead of global climate protests by schoolchildren, we examine how a proposal regarding geoengineering—radically reversing the effects of climate change—reflects coming squabbles over regulating the approaches. And, why is it so difficult to open an Irish pub i...more

  • The Economist asks: Ricky Gervais

    Mar 14 2019

    Anne McElvoy asks the award-winning stand-up comedian and creator of "The Office" whether there are any taboos left in comedy and if it matters when people are offended. They discuss seeing the funny side of illness, addiction, death and grief in his new comedy, “After Life”, and whether dogs might save the world  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Lights out: Venezuela’s blackout

    Mar 14 2019

    Power cuts in Caracas have endangered lives and deepened the misery of Venezuelans. It’s another sign of the corruption that pervades the Maduro regime. Also, how do you make a 10,000 ton ship disappear? And the Hebrew bible - otherwise known as the old testament - gets a fresh new translation. Music courtesy of Ethan James McCollum  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Pioneers of the WWW

    Mar 13 2019

    Kenneth Cukier gets in the Babbage time machine and travels to 1989, when Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote the famous memo that laid the foundations for the world wide web. Kenn speaks to some of the other key figures that influenced its invention, like Ted Nelson and Vint Cerf, and then asks what the WWW might look like in the future.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Losing the plot: Brexit

    Mar 13 2019

    The second defeat of British Prime Minister’s plan for withdrawal from the EU has weakened her. But what does it mean for the risk of a no-deal outcome? The chances of a Brexit delay are rising by the day. Competition between major powers for influence in Africa is intensifying, as Russia, China, Europe and America all see potential in the continent. And more gender-inclusive language is proving a headache for grammarians.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Boeing grounded

    Mar 12 2019

    Several countries have grounded Boeing’s 737 Max after two catastrophic crashes. What are the precedents and can the business recover? Also, as China’s giant current-account surplus vanishes, could this lead to the Chinese economy opening up? And Volkswagen announces plans to cut jobs as it launches a fleet of new electric cars. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Flying stop: Boeing

    Mar 12 2019

    Following a second fatal crash of Boeing’s 737-MAX, China was quick to ground its fleet of the newish airliner. What does this mean for the world’s largest planemaker? In Russia, protests have broken out against President Vladimir Putin’s attempt to isolate and control the country’s internet. His bid to regain Russians’ full attention may come too late. And, we look at why so many women are getting divorced in Bangladesh. Additional audio from Anton Scherbakov  See acast.com/privacy fo...more

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the March 9th 2019 edition

    Mar 11 2019

    A new “scramble for Africa” is taking place. This time Africans themselves stand to benefit the most. Also, a dispatch from the frozen Antarctic, and what the samba-dancers of Rio de Janeiro reveal about Brazil’s neglected history – and its present. Christopher Lockwood hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The sensitive month: Tibet

    Mar 11 2019

    China’s party leaders get nervous in March—a month full of anniversaries that Tibetans hold dear. As the 60th anniversary of Tibet’s uprising approaches, security is tighter than usual. Corporate-risk managers are rotten at assessing their exposure to a changing climate; we examine the dangers that many are ignoring. And, a look back at André Previn—and a life of far more than just show tunes and showmanship. Additional audio courtesy of Twitter users @ngagya95 and @TibetPeople  See ac...more

  • The Economist asks: Is education the great leap forward for feminism?

    Mar 08 2019

    Meghan Markle (the Duchess of Sussex), Annie Lennox, Adwoa Aboah, Julia Gillard and other guests discuss feminism with Anne McElvoy on International Women’s Day. They debate how to end period poverty, what men and boys can do and does the Duchess get irked by charges of supporting "trendy" causes? The event was organised by the Queen’s Commonwealth Trust  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Fifth time unlucky: Algeria’s protests

    Mar 08 2019

    Widespread protests will continue today against the re-election run of President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who hasn’t been heard from since a stroke in 2013. Algerians have had enough of their country’s proxy rule and misrule. We also ask if countries can sometimes be better run when their leaders are out of action. And, knife crime is on the rise in Britain, but the causes—and the solutions—are a matter of uncomfortable debate.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Christine Lagarde

    Mar 07 2019

    The head of the International Monetary Fund tells Anne McElvoy what it is like to be the “firefighter” of the global financial system. They debate how realistic it is to push for multilateralism against a backdrop of tariff wars, whether Brexit will be delayed and how the IMF can help Venezuela. Ms Lagarde also reflects on the loneliness of being a woman at the top and how women need to stick together.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Guilt and association: Paul Manafort

    Mar 07 2019

    President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager can expect to have the book thrown at him at his sentencing today—the first for crimes revealed by Robert Mueller, the special counsel investigating Mr Trump’s campaign. Following a tense stand-off with Pakistan, we look at how Hindu nationalism has shaped Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s time in office, and will shape his re-election campaign. And, how North Korean refugees ship money home illicitly.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...more

  • Babbage: Breaking the ice

    Mar 06 2019

    We have an exclusive interview with Dr Huw Griffiths on the mission to investigate a recently uncovered marine ecosystem in the Antarctic. And the author and scholar Shoshana Zuboff explains surveillance capitalism. Also, how the makers of the game Fortnite have the online platforms of Steam and Google locked in their sights. Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trudeau in trouble: a sunny leader in stormy times

    Mar 06 2019

    Canada’s fresh-faced leader has been a icon for embattled liberals. But now he faces damaging accusations of meddling in a judicial process. Will Justin Trudeau be contrite or fight? And free money sounds like a grand idea. Here’s how universal basic income is being tested in practice. Also, young men in Pakistan grow some very fancy beards.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Winter is coming

    Mar 05 2019

    How a once white-hot tech sector in China is shedding capital, employees and bonuses and heading for a freeze. Plane stupid — a look at the private jet industry and why airlines are phasing out first class seats. Also, Jim Collins, author of the best seller ‘Good to Great’, explains the flywheel principle. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Xi’ll meet again: China’s People’s Congress opens

    Mar 05 2019

    The National People's Congress of China gathers today for ten days of deliberations. Tensions with the West over the trade war and disagreement about the role of technology giant Huawei will be in the background. Bosses are not always the most reliable narrators for an investor seeking to gain insight into a company. But there are new data sources that are making it harder for executives to mislead them. And an attic in France has yielded a find some claim to have been painted by the 17th centur...more

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the March 2nd 2019 edition

    Mar 04 2019

    India’s prime minister Narendra Modi may be hoping brinkmanship against Pakistan will fire up voters ahead of April’s elections. Both countries must stop playing with fire. Plus a tour of the neglected treasures of ancient Peru—and is there such a thing as a perfect guide to the English language? Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • A thirsty world: the future of water

    Mar 04 2019

    Fresh water is becoming increasingly scarce, as climate change and population growth puts greater pressure on resources. But the problem is one of mismanagement, rather than supply. When Jair Bolsonaro was sworn in as Brazil’s president in January, he spoke of a national effort to fix the country’s economy and to tackle crime and corruption. Can he deliver on those promises? And how a big-budget Chinese film reflects the philosophy of the country’s leader.  See acast.com/privacy for pr...more

  • Bibi one more time? Binyamin Netanyahu

    Mar 01 2019

    Israel’s prime minister has been indicted, pending a hearing, just weeks before an election. We look at the charges he faces, and how he has already transformed the country’s politics. Huawei, a Chinese technology giant, has drawn global scrutiny of its tactics and perceived relationship with the Chinese state. But a greater concern is going unmentioned. And, why autonomous-vehicle firms are taking their wares to retirement communities.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out in...more

  • The Economist asks: Is Brexit happening?

    Feb 28 2019

    Sir Ivan Rogers, Britain’s former Ambassador to the EU, says Brexit will happen in 2019. Anne McElvoy also asks him whether Theresa May, Britain’s Prime Minister, is right to take a no-deal exit off the table, what was his advice and how much did she listen. Also, what will the EU’s relationship with Britain be after the divorce and could Britain rejoin the EU?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Line of control: India-Pakistan

    Feb 28 2019

    Air strikes by India and Pakistan this week represent a worrying flare-up of tensions that have simmered for years. We examine the forces and politics at play between the nuclear-armed powers. What’s causing the chill in the global manufacturing sector, and how to escape it? And, under the threat of a potentially costly infectious disease, Denmark is building a border wall.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The element-hunters

    Feb 27 2019

    It is 150 years since Dmitri Mendeleev discovered the periodic table, the innate order underpinning the elements. Kenneth Cukier explores how this simple grid has shaped our understanding of the universe and our place in it. In a laboratory near Moscow the search is on for element 119, but on the other side of the world in California, researchers are hesitant. Is chemistry over?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Chaos and calculation: Brexit

    Feb 27 2019

    Grand fissures have opened in Britain’s politics; the two main parties’ leaders are struggling to keep control. What does it all mean for Brexit, just a month away? As pharmaceutical companies defend their prices this week, we look at the push to use cheap, existing drugs in new ways. And, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the desire to adequately mourn the dead opens a market opportunity for paid wailers.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: No magic sauce

    Feb 26 2019

    Could Kraft Heinz’s troubles signal the limits of cost-cutting and the strategies of 3G Capital? Germany’s Deutsche Bank is struggling, but merging might not be the right answer. Sallie Krawcheck, a titan of Wall Street, who once thought social impact investing was for “granola eaters”, now tells us companies should be less dominated by white males. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Two for the show: Trump meets Kim

    Feb 26 2019

    As Kim Jong Un arrives in Vietnam ahead of a second summit with President Donald Trump, we ask about the real prospects for a nuclear-free Korean peninsula. Chicago votes for a new mayor today; we speak with Rahm Emanuel, the outspoken incumbent, about what he has—and hasn’t—done for the city. And, we examine Hungary’s curious effort to stem its population slide.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the February 23rd 2019 edition

    Feb 25 2019

    The Chinese economic model of steroidal state capitalism is facing a global backlash and offering diminishing returns. Can President Xi be persuaded to reform? Plus, how gumbo tells the story of the American South and why a good astronaut needs a sense of humour. Lane Greene hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • It’s bean difficult: the China-America trade war

    Feb 25 2019

    As President Donald Trump delays further tariffs on $200bn-worth of Chinese goods, there are hints of an end to the trade war. We assess the damage already done by looking at the global soyabean market. Countries around the world are struggling with the ethics and security concerns around re-admitting their citizens who have fought with Islamic State. And, there’s a rising favourite among wine investors—but it could represent a bubble.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf...more

  • The world ahead: Shifting sands of the Sahel

    Feb 22 2019

    In this episode of our future-gazing podcast we discuss how an often-ignored region in Africa seems set grow in prominence, for the wrong reasons. Professor Stephen Hsu discusses the implications of genomic risk-scoring in health care. And we look at the rise of the couture designer in China. Tom Standage hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Alms held up: Venezuela

    Feb 22 2019

    Venezuela is in dire need of humanitarian aid, and Juan Guaidó, the interim president, has pledged to deliver it tomorrow. Will Nicolás Maduro, the dictatorial leader still formally in power, let him? Ahead of Warren Buffett’s annual letter to shareholders, we look back on a half-century’s-worth of wisdom from the “Sage of Omaha”. And in Japan, longer lives are leading to more books by and for the elderly.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Chiwetel Ejiofor

    Feb 21 2019

    After earning an Oscar nomination for "12 Years a Slave" and his super-villain stripes in "Doctor Strange", Chiwetel Ejiofor has turned his hand to directing. Anne McElvoy asks him what it will take for Hollywood to start casting black actors as the romantic lead. They discuss why there is still so little diversity behind the camera and how much power directors have to change the status quo  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Sins of the fathers: the Vatican and child abuse

    Feb 21 2019

    The Vatican is hosting a high-profile meeting on child abuse by the clergy. It’s a topic that has been woefully overlooked, and one that threatens to define the tenure of Pope Francis. We visit the world’s largest building, in the city of Chengdu. Inside there’s a giant wave pool, thirty thousand workers, free cats—and a glimpse of the state of China’s economy. And, an effort to resurrect the native language of Hawaii has brought unexpected benefits.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy ...more

  • Babbage: Joker AAAStronauts

    Feb 20 2019

    The latest buzz from the AAAS, the largest general science meeting in the world, from The Economist’s science correspondent, Alok Jha. NASA scientists presented initial findings on how a year in space changes astronauts’ bodies. Why a good sense of humour is required for a successful mission to Mars. And can machines become scientists?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Prince on tour: Muhammad bin Salman

    Feb 20 2019

    Muhammad bin Salman, the Saudi crown prince, is on a tour of Asia, striking deals and trying to polish his image. What kind of influence will he have in the region? Every year as much as a quarter of the global corporate-tax bill is avoided—legally. We take a look at where all that money is going. And we speak to Nadine Labaki, the first female Arab film-maker nominated for an Oscar.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: B&B — Brexit and Business

    Feb 19 2019

    It is not yet clear how Britain will leave the European Union on March 29th. But for companies that have to ship stuff to the other side of the world, Brexit has already arrived. What are British companies doing to prepare themselves for Brexit and what effect will this have on the British economy? Richard Cockett hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Labour’s love lost: British politics

    Feb 19 2019

    Seven parliamentarians have split from Britain’s opposition Labour party. That could change the calculus of Brexit, and just might be the nucleus of a new movement. There’s a little-noticed shift in the relationship between Islam and the West; a new generation is lighting the way. And our Russia editor has a bit of a hobby—one that puts him at the nexus of language, drama and truth.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the February 16th 2019 edition

    Feb 18 2019

    After three decades in the wilderness, socialism is back. Millennial socialists offer a sharp critique of what has gone wrong in Western societies—are they right? Also, why atomic clocks, like wine, get better with age and government-sanctioned science fiction hits big screens in China. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • State of the unionising: Amazon

    Feb 18 2019

    We examine the aftermath of the online behemoth’s withdrawal of its New York expansion plans, and speak with its Midwestern workers about growing talk of unionising. President Emmanuel Macron hopes to quell protests across France with a series of “town halls”; we drop into one. And mezcal is on the rise, but can tequila’s more-traditional cousin survive if the whole world wants a shot?Music credit: "Chez Space" by The Freeharmonic Orchestra (CC-BY)  See acast.com/privacy for priva...more

  • Emergency measures: America’s border deal

    Feb 15 2019

    President Donald Trump is expected to declare a national emergency today, to fund his southern-border wall. We ask why that would be an uncomfortable constitutional precedent. Nigeria’s general election this weekend will be a nail-biter, and allegations of electoral fraud are already flying; the only certainty is that the result will be contested. And, we bid farewell to Opportunity, a Mars rover that vastly exceeded what was expected of it.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-o...more

  • The Economist asks: Why is there always trouble in the Trump White House?

    Feb 14 2019

    Former White House Staffer Cliff Sims, author of “Team of Vipers”, tells Anne McElvoy why he’s suing Donald Trump. They unpick the paradox of how a man who stirs such fierce loyalty in his supporters inspires so little inside his administration. Also, why the president is great in a crisis and the true meaning of “executive time”  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • IS this the end? Islamic State’s last stand

    Feb 14 2019

    In Syria the few remaining Islamic State fighters are hemmed in. The caliphate’s territory may be diminished, but the idea will live on. A Valentine’s Day look at the digital dating market reveals the protocols and pitfalls of online matchmaking. And the derailment of an attempt by India’s railway minister to tout a new high-speed line.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Regulating fake news

    Feb 13 2019

    Tech giants face regulation on news after UK media review. Its author, Dame Frances Cairncross, tells us even the technology platforms recognise the need for change. Roger McNamee, one of Facebook’s early investors, asks if it’s now too powerful. And the award-winning inventor of GPS on how his early atomic clock just keeps getting better with age. Kenneth Cukier hosts   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • It’s not easy: the Green New Deal

    Feb 13 2019

    As America’s Senate majority leader pledges a vote on the Green New Deal, a sweeping set of policies around climate and much more, we examine just what the legislation does—and doesn’t—lay out. Following Cyril Ramaphosa’s State of the Nation address, we explore the challenges South Africa’s president faces as an election looms. And our language columnist declares war on misused metaphors. Additional audio courtesy of Sunrise Movement & FDR Presidential Library.  See acast.com/priva...more

  • Money talks: A billionaire, a scandal and business…

    Feb 12 2019

    The world’s richest man, Amazon boss Jeff Bezos fights back against the Enquirer. Tackling the challenge of the "pink" and "blue" jobs market — should the employment market be more "purple"? And on a scale of 1 to 10, how useful are employee surveys? Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Independents’ day: Catalans on trial

    Feb 12 2019

    Today 12 leaders of Spain’s Catalonia region go on trial, accused of rebellion. The proceedings will lay bare long-running tensions about democracy and unity. As Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota senator, joins America’s presidential race, we ask whether her centrist tendencies are an advantage or a handicap. And a retrospective of the photographer Don McCullin’s work reveals extremes of human experience and suffering.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the February 9th 2019 edition

    Feb 11 2019

    Despite wildfires and polar freezes, energy firms are planning to increase fossil fuel production. The climate consequences could be grave. Also, the challenge of putting the morals back into McDonald’s. And the next express beauty trend – botox-to-go. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • You say you want: Revisiting Iran’s revolution

    Feb 11 2019

    We examine how the echoes of Iran’s revolution, 40 years ago, still influence how the Islamic Republic deals with the West today. Harley Davidson has become entangled in the Trump administration’s trade war just as changing demographics have put the brakes on the motorcycle-maker. And, we tackle an old ethics conundrum and its relevance to future autonomous vehicles.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Princess unbridled: Thai politics

    Feb 08 2019

    A Thai princess enters the running for prime minister—a development that reshuffles the country’s centres of power completely. Our obituaries editor chronicles the heartbreak of an Iraqi archaeologist. And Chinese scientists have come up with a smarter way for Earthlings to try contacting aliens—but what kinds of messages is humanity sending them?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: how to tax the rich?

    Feb 07 2019

    Rutger Bregman, author of "Utopia for Realists", told Davos that more tax is better than corporate good works. Our economics editor, Henry Curr, challenges him on whether governments should soak the rich. And is income, wealth or inheritance the best target? Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: Weapons redrawn

    Feb 07 2019

    After America and Russia pull out out of a cold war-era weapons treaty, we examine the picture of global stability without it. Our China columnist visits with members of the Hui, a repressed Muslim minority spread throughout the country. And Europe launches a system to combat fake-medicines—an expansive and expensive project that few think is necessary.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: A bill of data rights

    Feb 06 2019

    Should individuals have rights over their data that are protected similar to human rights? We discuss the universe with Jo Dunkley of Princeton. And why the oceans are turning a different shade of blue. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: Credible, but critical

    Feb 06 2019

    Today the Trump administration is expected to announce its nomination for head of the World Bank today. He’s a Treasury official with a sharply critical view of the institution and, to a degree, he’s right. A troubled region of the Philippines heads to the polls, as a Muslim minority calls for greater autonomy. The result might help calm centuries of violence. Finally, we take a trip to the shiny centre of China’s gold industry, just as golden-gift-giving spikes around the lunar new year. &...more

  • Money talks: Crude awakening

    Feb 05 2019

    ExxonMobil is pursuing an aggressive plan for oil investment. Charlotte Howard, our energy editor, explains why. Also, Brian Roberts, CEO of Comcast has a record of wrong-footing critics—can he do so again? And the producers of China’s ancient liquor, baijiu, plan to go global. Host Simon Long tastes it.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: Don’t despair, America

    Feb 05 2019

    Tonight President Trump will deliver his State of the Union address; we ask what he’ll be saying, and what the state of the union really is. Yesterday the jury began its deliberations in the trial of “El Chapo”, an alleged Mexican drug lord. What impact has his capture and trial had on the drugs trade? Finally, Japanese schools and businesses have some onerous grooming rules, stipulating even sock colour—but things seem to be changing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf...more

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the February 2nd 2019 edition

    Feb 04 2019

    The world’s democracies are right to seek change in Venezuela. The question is how. Plus, why Christian pilgrims are flocking to Abu Dhabi, the joy of missing out, and who really was Wild Bill Hickok? Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: A despot’s calculation

    Feb 04 2019

    Internal and international pressure on President Nicolás Maduro brings Venezuela to the brink of change. As Facebook turns 15, it’s lurching from crisis to crisis—and still making money hand over fist. We ask whether it has, on balance, been good for the world. Finally, there’s an Iranian pop star who was once a darling of the regime. What’s changed?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: Be careful on the way out

    Feb 01 2019

    As progress appears to have been made in peace talks between America and the Taliban, the Senate urges the Trump administration not to rush for the door in Afghanistan. Origami might be pretty, but it hides great scientific potential; it’s starting to show up in all kinds of new technologies. And, our obituaries editor discusses the career of master accordionist Marcel Azzola, and how lives can be celebrated in writing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Jacinda Ardern

    Jan 31 2019

    The prime minister of New Zealand explains why her country is a laboratory for progressive politics. The Economist’s Anne McElvoy and Zanny Minton Beddoes ask her about the economics of well-being and whether she really is “the anti-Trump”. Also, why New Zealand has had enough of being left off the map  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: Down and out in “iPhone City”

    Jan 31 2019

    As trade talks with China continue in Washington, our correspondent takes a trip to China’s “iPhone City” to see how the country’s slowdown is affecting workers. In El Salvador, a social-media darling leads the polls ahead of Sunday’s presidential election—but his policy plans remain unclear. And, a big diamond up for auction in Angola today is a crystal-clear sign of change for the country.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Ethically challenged

    Jan 30 2019

    As the controversial story of the editing of the genomes of two babies in China unfolds, we ask how can science be more ethical — and how to tackle “ethics dumping”. Also, how environmental factors can influence the national security of countries affected by climate change. And we look at the phenomenon of the placebo button. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: This is not a coup

    Jan 30 2019

    International pressure is mounting on the dictatorial regime of Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro. As he hints at negotiations with a resurgent opposition, we ask how the country’s citizens make ends meet amid the misery. A striking American indictment will make the China trade talks that start today even more tense than last time. And, why is it getting easier to get good-quality Indian food in the truck stops of America?Additional music: Cylinder Five by Chris Zabriskie.  See acast.com/priv...more

  • Money talks: Calming down hyperinflation

    Jan 29 2019

    With the economic turmoil crippling Venezuela, we ask what can be done to bring a quick resolution to hyperinflation? Also, the Chinese giant grain producer that is threatening the global industry. And yet another controversy for the credit-default swap. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: Deal, delay or dither?

    Jan 29 2019

    It’s another crucial vote in the Brexit saga as Prime Minister Theresa May learns whether her leaving plan will be derailed or delayed. Autonomous weapons are coming along just as fast as autonomous vehicles are. But who’s tackling the ethics of killer robots? And, the surprising number of uses that Cubans have found for condoms.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the January 26th 2019 edition

    Jan 28 2019

    The global flow of money and goods is stagnating. The world needs to prepare for a new era of “slowbalisation”. Plus, why more people are braving the bullring in America. And we introduce “The Intelligence”, a new daily current-affairs podcast from Economist Radio. Josie Delap hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: The price of the American government shutdown

    Jan 25 2019

    As government departments remain unfunded in America, we look at a constitutional principle that may be damaged in the standoff. Brazil’s new president Jair Bolsonaro moves to make guns more easily available. And another shutdown: of this programme. We look back on “The week ahead”, and look forward to what’s next.Creative commons attribution 4.0 International Chez Space by The Freeharmonic Orchestra  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Regulating AI

    Jan 24 2019

    In this episode we discuss what the future holds for the regulation of artificial intelligence. Is populism on the rise in Canada and will it impact Justin Trudeau's chances of re-election? And does China’s new record-breaking bridge really bring it closer to Hong Kong? Anne McElvoy hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Is this the era of slowbalisation?

    Jan 24 2019

    At the World Economic Forum in Davos, Anne McElvoy asks our editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes and Patrick Foulis, author of the cover story, why globalisation has run out of steam and what will future economic growth look like?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Droning on

    Jan 23 2019

    How can new technology deal with rogue drones? And what can be learned from Dutch hospitals in the fight against superbugs. Also, the development of a simple camera that can see around corners. Tim Cross hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Intelligence: Trailer

    Jan 23 2019

    The Intelligence is a new current-affairs podcast, published every weekday by Economist Radio, that provides a unique perspective on the events shaping your world. Drawing on the expertise of The Economist’s global network of correspondents, each episode digs past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be. For a daily burst of global illumination, you need more than just the facts. You need The Intelligence.  See acast.com/pr...more

  • Money talks: Achtung maybe?

    Jan 22 2019

    Is Germany's economy on the brink of a recession? And Professor Amy Edmondson, author of “The Fearless Organisation”, examines the importance of speaking up in the workplace. Also, remembering John Clifton "Jack" Bogle, patron saint of the amateur investor. Philip Coggan hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the January 19th 2019 edition

    Jan 21 2019

    This week's cover story analyses Britain's Brexit mess and argues the case for a second referendum as the only way out of it. Also, why modern work is so miserable and a night ride with the rebel bikers of Yangon. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Plan B, or not to be?

    Jan 18 2019

    Britain’s prime minister has just days to assemble a Plan B for Brexit. She is short on time, popular ideas and political allies. The leaders of France and Germany will sign a treaty aimed at greater harmony, but that reveals greater discord. And, China’s GDP will be dented not only by trade woes with America but also graver economic worries.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: What’s behind the new anti-Semitism?

    Jan 17 2019

    Deborah Lipstadt made headlines for facing down a libel charge from the English author David Irving after she accused him of Holocaust denial. Anne McElvoy asks her about the return of “the oldest hatred”. They discuss how the Pittsburgh massacre changed what it is to be Jewish in America. And, from Larry David to “The Marvelous Mrs Maisel”, when is it ok to joke about Jewishness?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: A growing conCERN

    Jan 16 2019

    We discuss CERN’s latest plans for a successor to the Large Hadron Collider. Also, our healthcare editor explains how scientists hope to develop vaccines more quickly for unexpected viruses. And, how altering the genetic code of E.coli is leading to groundbreaking research on cancer drugs. Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Cost of the shutdown

    Jan 15 2019

    Will the government shutdown in America cause long-lasting economic damage? Henry Tricks reports on how robots and automation will help Chinese firms cope with rising wages and the trade war. Also, what fuelled the huge growth of Canada's state pension fund and what can it teach other countries? Philip Coggan hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the January 12th 2019 edition

    Jan 14 2019

    Could China become a scientific superpower? Plus, the perils of competitive parenting and a movement for gender equality in European street names. Josie Delap hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Let’s break a deal

    Jan 11 2019

    Brexit negotiations became more fraught this week, ahead of Tuesday’s make-or-break vote on the prime minister’s deal. As South Africa’s ruling party unveils its manifesto, we ask whether its newish leader can save his party’s reputation and his country’s economy. And, our correspondent has an unexpectedly long chat with President Donald Trump’s most vocal Republican critic.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: How pushy should parents be?

    Jan 10 2019

    Childhood is not what it used to be, according to The Economist's special report this week. The race to set children on the path to professional and personal success now begins before preschool. But competitive parenting is increasing inequality. Are there any alternatives to the “rug-rat race”? Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Will China dominate science?

    Jan 09 2019

    In a special show, we examine China’s impressive scientific advances and question what they mean for the future of the sciences—and of China. Among the guests is the Chinese-American astronaut Leroy Chiao, discussing China’s recent feat of landing a probe on the far side of the moon. Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: The Euro at 20

    Jan 08 2019

    As the Euro turns 20 years old, we look back at its launch and ask what the future holds for the currency. After Apple announced it was cutting its quarterly revenue forecast, we discuss whether peak smartphone has been reached. And, Vice President of Twitter, Bruce Daisley, tells us to turn off phone notifications and how to increase the joy of work. Philip Coggan hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the January 5th 2019 edition

    Jan 07 2019

    As Donald Trump enters the second half of his first term, his luck may be about to change. Plus, the young economists to watch this decade. And should companies monitor their employees’ health? Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Hungry for change

    Jan 04 2019

    As Venezuela starts 2019 wracked with hunger, inflation and an increasingly autocratic government, we take a look ahead to President Nicolás Maduro’s second term presiding over the mess. Trade talks between China and America are looming, again. But the whole system of international trade is changing; we examine why. And, what causes people to so reliably and violently react to split infinitives?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Best of 2018

    Jan 03 2019

    Anne McElvoy looks back over a year in interviews. Among her guests were several casualties of the Trump administration, from James Comey to Steve Bannon. Tina Tchen, lead lawyer on the Time’s Up campaign, and clinical psychologist Jordan Peterson disagree over the promise of #MeToo. And David Sedaris finds comedy in the most excruciating circumstances.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Success of 'disability tech'

    Jan 02 2019

    In this special episode of Babbage, we discuss some of the advancements in technology that could change the lives of those living with a disability — an app that is helping those who are visually impaired. Also, how the sit-ski has benefited from research in the aerospace and automotive industries. And, can the symptoms of phantom limb syndrome be harnessed to enhance prosthetics? Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Bright economic stars

    Jan 01 2019

    Who are the world’s most exciting young economists? Every ten years, since 1988, The Economist has chosen those whose innovative research is likely to shape our future. Their work varies from the science of education choices to the economics of the weather. In the past, the list has included Nobel laureate Paul Krugman, Freakonomics’ Steven Levitt and Esther Duflo. Our host, Soumaya Keynes, takes a road trip to meet four of the most promising economists of the decade: Stefanie Stantcheva, Meliss...more

  • Tasting menu: A walk through Queens

    Dec 31 2018

    In a taste of our Christmas double issue, Jon Fasman takes a walk across Queens, New York City, and through America’s past, present and future. He hears from recent and long-standing Queens residents about why they made their lives there. Congresswoman Grace Meng explains the racial tensions bubbling under the surface and the importance of homemade dumplings. And down in Jamaica Bay, a more ancient migration is taking flight.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Bolsonaro’s bold agenda

    Dec 28 2018

    Next week Brazil will inaugurate a new president who has a sweeping set of reforms in mind. What will it take to make them work? We take a look at The Economist’s country of the year poll, and discuss this year’s winner. And, our obituaries editor looks back on a year of lives celebrated.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: The wordsmiths

    Dec 27 2018

    Our Johnson columnist, Lane Greene, decodes the language of 2018 with Lynne Murphy, author of “The Prodigal Tongue” and Anton La Guardia, keeper of The Economist’s style guide. Which words best sum up the closing year? They debate “woke bros” versus “iron snowflakes”, the pros and cons of Americanisms and the key to great writing.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Best of 2018

    Dec 26 2018

    In this festive special we look back at some of our favourite stories from 2018. Could IVF could save the northern white rhino from extinction? Also, the discovery of liquid water on Mars. And, how the amphibious life of the Bajau people has led to their unique evolutionary traits. Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: The cover story

    Dec 24 2018

    The Economist’s editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, and deputy editor, Edward Carr, discuss the cover stories of 2018. From Donald Trump swinging on a wrecking ball, to likening Brexit to toilet roll (softer is better), how does a picture sell a thousand words? Anne McElvoy hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Will you (not) marry me?

    Dec 21 2018

    Why will civil partnerships become more common – among straight people? What will the future look like for CCTV surveillance? Also, the business opportunities in North America for retailing cannabis. Simon Long hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Week ahead: The great emu bubble

    Dec 21 2018

    In this episode we dive into stories from The Economist’s festive double issue. In the 1980s Texas farmers looking for alternative meat sources pinned their hopes on the emu, an enormous and leggy bird. What can today’s market-watchers learn from the great emu bubble? We explore the curiously dangerous history of harmony in choral music. And in Belgium, the renovation of the world’s largest African museum at last confronts the country’s horrific colonial past. Jason Palmer hosts.  See ...more

  • The Economist asks: How is Trump changing the presidency?

    Dec 20 2018

    Anne McElvoy, our senior editor, asks Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pulitzer prize-winning author, what makes a great president and how Donald Trump is changing what it means to hold that office. Doris Kearns Goodwin also says she keeps waiting for Mr Trump to grow in office.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: A little more conservation

    Dec 19 2018

    We ask how can conservationists preserve biodiversity through new ideas. Also, what can be done to increase the number of women in the technology industry? And Hossein Derakhshan, a formerly jailed Iranian blogger, discusses whether the web is becoming more superficial. Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: The Christmas jamboree

    Dec 18 2018

    The Economist’s Vijay Vaitheeswaran, Charlotte Howard and NPR’s Cardiff Garcia join host Philip Coggan for our celebration of the business, finance and economics highlights and lowlights of 2018.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the December 15th 2018 edition

    Dec 17 2018

    In this week’s issue, family offices are a new force in global finance – but their billionaire owners will soon face uncomfortable questions. Also, how obsolete technologies could protect against new threats and the art of the perfect copy. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Yemen’s overlooked war

    Dec 14 2018

    UN-brokered peace talks, and the American Senate’s withdrawal of support for Saudi Arabia’s forces, at last represent progress in a conflict that threatens millions with starvation. What next? And, how discord and a mangled deal will haunt Britain’s parliamentarians over the holidays. Also, in Wisconsin, Republican lawmakers’ worrying efforts to hamstring incoming Democrats / Additional audio provided courtesy of Ben Wikler  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Brexit — what next?

    Dec 13 2018

    Anne McElvoy, our senior editor, takes the temperature in a dramatic week in British politics with John Peet, The Economist’s Brexit editor, and Labour MP Stephen Kinnock, a proponent of a different way to solve the Brexit dilemma. They discuss Theresa May’s next moves, a Norway option and the possibility of a second referendum  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Lots in space

    Dec 12 2018

    The race is on to launch satellites to connect the entire world to the internet. We talk to psychologist and geneticist Robert Plomin, about his career and his latest book. And, is the fax machine facing extinction? Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Huawei in the spotlight

    Dec 11 2018

    The Chinese tech company at the centre of the American - China trade war. How illicit trade is threatening our future with guest Professor Louise Shelley. And the exclusive and influential part of the financial landscape reserved for billionaires. Simon Long hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the December 8th 2018 edition

    Dec 10 2018

    As anti-government protests engulf France, how a little humility could yet save Emmanuel Macron. Plus, why sensible people fall for online scams and the lessons of Greek myths for artificial intelligence. Anne McElvoy hosts. (A previous version of this podcast included a story on new business regulations in Cuba which is now out of date.)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Brexit ramp

    Dec 07 2018

    A vote in Britain’s parliament next week could well put the country on track for another Brexit referendum. So it should. We examine this year’s UN climate conference and what, amid increasingly dire climate warnings, the delegates are actually doing. And a look back at the life and presidency of George H.W. Bush, with our journalists and one of his cabinet members.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Is populism the problem or the fix?

    Dec 06 2018

    Can Steve Hilton, host of Fox News’s “The Next Revolution”, convince Yascha Mounk of Harvard University that populist movements could return power to the people? They debate whether Donald Trump will deliver on radical reforms, whether he poses a threat to a free press and if there should be a second Brexit referendum. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Waymo to go

    Dec 05 2018

    Waymo, a division of Google's parent company Alphabet, launched its self-driving taxi service, but is it really a landmark for driverless vehicles? Also, a vast study seeks to understand the genetic underpinnings of ADHD. And we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the “Mother of all demos” computing presentation. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Easing into a recovery?

    Dec 04 2018

    As the ECB brings an end to quantitative easing, is Europe’s economic recovery underway? How, despite the glamour of its fashion show, Victoria’s Secret is struggling to keep up with rivals. And the problem of online fraud in America. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the December 1st 2018 edition

    Dec 03 2018

    China still relies on the outside world for its computer chips – how far should America go to maintain silicon supremacy? Also, democratising lunar landings and why it is so difficult to open a pub in Ireland. Christopher Lockwood hosts Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Troubled waters

    Nov 30 2018

    World leaders gathering for the G20 summit are rocked by ripples from a skirmish in the sea, when Russia captured Ukrainian ships and sailors. Citing the incident, President Trump cancelled a meeting with Vladimir Putin. Also: Mexico’s leftist president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, takes office. Is he a new broom, or a loose cannon? Josie Delap hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: General Stanley McChrystal

    Nov 29 2018

    NATO’s former commander tells Anne McElvoy why he modelled some of his own leadership on al-Qaeda. They discuss his regrets over the invasion of Iraq, the potential for ground war in Europe and whether America should still intervene abroad  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The baby crisperer

    Nov 28 2018

    A Chinese scientist has claimed to have edited the genomes of two babies using the revolutionary genome-editing technique called CRISPR-Cas9. Also, how the production of semiconductors is becoming a new battlefield. And Kenneth Cukier asks the author, technology executive and investor Elad Gil what it takes for a startup to become a technology giant.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Move over, baby boomers

    Nov 27 2018

    What will America's political landscape look like once millennials outnumber the baby-boom generation? 2019 will also see a triumphant return to the moon. And how Japan is hoping to attract even more tourists. Anne McElvoy hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Going, going, Ghosn

    Nov 27 2018

    We discuss General Motors’ plans to halt production at five factories in North America and cut more than 14,000 jobs. Also, what next for Nissan, Mitsubishi Motors and Renault after Carlos Ghosn was arrested on suspicion of financial misconduct and dismissed from his post as chairman? And, the challenges facing new pub landlords in Ireland. Philip Coggan hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 24th 2018 edition

    Nov 26 2018

    In this week’s issue, why America is the exception to a global decline in suicides. Also, a glimpse of the future of flight and the extraordinary powers of Stan Lee, creator of superheroes. Josie Delap hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: A big deal

    Nov 23 2018

    This weekend, British Prime Minister Theresa May is expected to finalise a withdrawal agreement on Brexit with European leaders. But her greatest hurdle is in Westminster rather than Brussels. Can she secure enough votes for her deal in parliament? Anne McElvoy does the 'fuzzy maths'. Also on the show: What does victory look like in a trade war with China? And why Donald Trump is wrong to gloss over the murder of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Christopher Lockwood hosts  See aca...more

  • The Economist asks: Brexit — can the deal be done?

    Nov 22 2018

    Matt Hancock MP, Secretary of State for Health in Theresa May's Cabinet, on whether the Prime Minister can get a Brexit deal through Parliament and whether a second referendum might be on the cards. Anne McElvoy, our senior editor, also quizzes him on why the NHS lags behind on technology.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The dos and don'ts of data

    Nov 21 2018

    In this special episode we examine the controversial gang-mapping database of London's Metropolitan Police Service. Also, a new pilot project to study how a "data trust" might increase access to information while retaining privacy. And how sharing mapping data by the big web platforms could unlock innovations for companies and society. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Trump’s Economics Adviser

    Nov 20 2018

    We speak to Kevin Hassett, Chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers about the American economy.Helen Joyce hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 17th 2018 edition

    Nov 19 2018

    In this week’s issue, why modern capitalism needs a competition revolution. Also, how Brexit might change the face of British football and the perils of finding online fame in China. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Age-old problems

    Nov 16 2018

    Our journalists speak with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe about Japan’s growing demographic crisis, and what he wants to be remembered for. A crushing famine in a massive region of Africa may have peaked, but it still threatens millions. How can this tragedy be mitigated, or future risks avoided? And, scientists are dealing with a weight problem they’ve had for some time: the definition of the kilogram.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Anthony Scaramucci

    Nov 15 2018

    Anne McElvoy asks the former White House communications director whether Donald Trump is true to his base. They debate the wisdom of doing battle with the press, if the president’s lies matter and what a Democratic challenger in 2020 should learn from his populist style  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The blame game

    Nov 14 2018

    Should climate change be a matter of human rights? Also, gene drives' controversial potential to wipe out entire species of mosquitoes. And, a novel watch spring that could change the way mechanical watches are designed. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Monopolies and boardroom games

    Nov 13 2018

    How powerful firms could undermine public faith in capitalism. Shakespearean drama in Nokia’s boardroom. And most businesses are ramping up their holiday hiring, but where will they find workers? Simon Long hosts. Music by TeknoAXE CC by 4.0 (Cello Zen, The Cold of the Night)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 10th 2018 edition

    Nov 12 2018

    After America's mid-term elections, how do the Democrats need to change their game to succeed in 2020? Also, a tour of the entrepreneurial city that brought blue jeans to the Soviet Union, and five minutes that changed an astronaut’s life. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Sessions ails

    Nov 09 2018

    President Trump wastes no time after America's mid-term elections before sacking Jeff Sessions, the attorney-general. What will the ouster mean for the special counsel’s Russia investigation? As NATO concludes its largest exercises since the cold war, we look at the political and logistical headwinds the alliance faces. And next week Tencent, a Chinese tech behemoth, will report more dismal results; how can it withstand the Chinese government’s pressure on games makers? Jason Palmer hosts &...more

  • The Economist asks: Where next for a divided America?

    Nov 08 2018

    After the hoopla of the mid-term elections - blue wave or red comeback - what does this all mean for America? Anne McElvoy talks to our US Editor, John Prideaux, Chip Roy, former advisor to Ted Cruz, Tim Ryan, Democratic Representative from Ohio, Deb Haaland, one of the first native American women elected to Congress, and Democratic Party strategist Celinda Lake. Who won and what does it mean for 2020?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Economist in space

    Nov 07 2018

    Highlights from The Economist’s Space Summit in New York, including an interview with Apollo 9 astronaut Russell 'Rusty' Schweickart. Also, how to prepare for space exploration with Dava Newman, Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at MIT. And, astrophysicist Simonetta Di Pippo and astronaut Leroy Chiao discuss worldwide cooperation in space. Tom Standage hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Infinite Scroll

    Nov 07 2018

    The Renaissance scholars couldn’t keep up with new information (“Have you read the latest Erasmus book?” “I don’t have time!”) and needed a better way to organize it. Thus came the invention of tables of contents, indexes, book reviews, encyclopedias, and other shortcuts. What kinds of technological solutions might help us cope with the information overload we all experience today? Guests include: Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack; Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat sociologist.  See acast.com...more

  • Money talks: Mid-term matters

    Nov 06 2018

    As Americans go to the polls, how will Mr. Trump's economic policies play out in the mid-term elections? Who will benefit from America's opportunity zones? And, the buzz around the SEC and what business bosses really think about President Trump. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the November 3rd 2018 edition

    Nov 05 2018

    In this week’s issue, could America’s mid-term elections stop the toxic polarisation of federal politics? Plus, how artificial intelligence could transform life for urban commuters. And a glimpse of the treasures to be found in translation. Anne McElvoy hostsMusic: “Sad Marimba Planet” by Lee Rosevere (CCx4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: America’s mid-terms

    Nov 02 2018

    Next week, Americans head to the polls. Why will it be such a consequential election? President Donald Trump has made a caravan of Central American migrants into an object of scaremongering—but the migrants don’t know of the political fight they’re heading into. And voter suppression is likely to have big effects in tight races; we take a look at the one for Georgia’s governor. Jason Palmer hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Angela's exit

    Nov 01 2018

    Joschka Fischer, former foreign minister and leader of the Green party in Germany, and Anne McElvoy discuss life after Chancellor Merkel’s retreat from power and whether Germany’s dominance in Europe is in jeopardy. Also Merkel's historian, Andreas Roedder, and our Europe Editor, Christopher Lockwood, on who could succeed her. Music: “Sad Marimba Planet” by Lee Rosevere, “What Does Anybody Know About Anything” by Chris Zabriskie (CC x 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and op...more

  • Babbage: Turning the oceans green

    Oct 31 2018

    Can greenhouse emissions be cut in maritime transport? Also, with the US midterms a week away, Courtney Kennedy from PEW Research Centre discusses the reliability of polling data. And the artificial intelligence system being tested as a way to cut down train delays. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: A Little Less Conversation

    Oct 31 2018

    Some people thought the laying of the transatlantic cable might bring world peace, because connecting humans could only lead to better understanding and empathy. That wasn’t the outcome, and recent utopian ideas about communication (Facebook might bring us together and make us all friends!) have also met with a darker reality (Facebook might polarize us and spread false information!). Should we be scared of technology that promises to connect the world? Guests include: Robin Dunbar, inventor of ...more

  • Money talks: End of Austerity?

    Oct 30 2018

    Analysis of Britain's budget with our Britain economics correspondent. What is driving the fall in tech stocks? And, is Harley Davidson struggling to fire on all cylinders?Helen Joyce hosts. Sound effect: THE_bizniss (cc x 3.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the October 27th 2018 edition

    Oct 29 2018

    Australia’s economy has been growing for a record 27 years without a recession—could the rest of the world benefit from playing by Aussie rules? Also, how China’s tech giants are revolutionising pig farming. And the ethical dilemmas of programming autonomous cars. Christopher Lockwood hosts. Music: "Super Hero" by TeknoAXE, "Candlepower" by Chris Zabriskie (CCx4.0)   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Oil and trouble

    Oct 26 2018

    What will the murder of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi Arabian journalist, do to Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman’s image, and to already-jittery oil markets? Eritreans continue to spill across the border with Ethiopia, which opened last month—but they worry about it closing again. And our journalists vote on the face to grace Britain’s new £50 note; why do banknotes’ famous figures stir such fervour? Jason Palmer hostsMusic: "Making a Change"; "Evocative"; "I'm going for a Coffee"; by Lee Rosevere(CC...more

  • The world ahead: Universal lessons

    Oct 25 2018

    What would it look like if every child around the world attended school? And we also consider how far the ‘gig economy’ can go. Also, we ask the question: what foodstuff will be sustaining mankind in the future? Hal Hodson hosts Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: What does it mean to be educated?

    Oct 25 2018

    Tara Westover was 17 when she first stepped into a classroom, but went on to earn a PhD. She talks to Anne McElvoy about a childhood on the edge of society, why she chose philosophy over coding—and what unorthodox education might teach the mainstream  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Pie in the sky

    Oct 24 2018

    Could delivering goods by drone soon become a common occurrence? Also, cyber-security expert Bruce Schneier discusses his latest book. And a new innovation for the disposing of human waste from Mount Everest. Hal Hodson hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: VR or It Didn’t Happen

    Oct 24 2018

    In the Victorian era, plaster casts became a way to preserve important artifacts in 3-D. Now, virtual reality promises to preserve places and experiences. But who decides what gets preserved? And is the technology an accurate recreation of the experience, or does it fool us into thinking we’ve encountered the real thing when we’ve done nothing of the sort? Guests include: Jaron Lanier, VR pioneer; Nonny de la Pena, VR artist; Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum.  ...more

  • Money talks: China jitters

    Oct 23 2018

    Is China’s slowing economic growth a cause for concern and will the market jitters spread? Amazon moves into digital advertising in a big way. And, our very own super-hero Captain Sensible takes us on a tour of effective economic policies. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. Music: Super Hero by TeknoAXE (CC x 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the October 20th 2018 edition

    Oct 22 2018

    The era of engagement is over. America now sees China as an increasingly dangerous rival. Plus, how Bollywood is boosting domestic tourism in India. And a portrait created by AI goes under the hammer, but is it art or artifice? Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Polls, apart

    Oct 19 2018

    Afghans vote in parliamentary elections on Saturday, amid Taliban attacks. Will Donald Trump’s shift in strategy at last weaken the extremists? And a by-election in Australia threatens to upend the ruling coalition’s razor-thin majority. Also, can a painting done by computer algorithm be considered art? Jason Palmer hostsMusic: "Introducing the Pre-roll"; "Sad Marimba Planet"; "All the Answers"; by Lee Rosevere (CC x 4.0). And "Rain" by Meydän (CC x 4.0).  See acast.com/privacy fo...more

  • The Economist asks: Can America remain the world's biggest economic power?

    Oct 18 2018

    Alan Greenspan,  former chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, and The Economist’s Adrian Wooldridge discuss  America's rise to global economic prominence and its future outlook. Also, what caused the 2008 financial crash, can another bust be avoided —  and the challenge posed by China. Anne McElvoy hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The quantum conundrum

    Oct 17 2018

    Is the internet about to be unravelled by quantum computing? And how artificial intelligence could be used to diagnose the need for lung transplants in patients with cystic fibrosis. Also, our technology correspondent, Hal Hodson, discuss some of the latest happenings in robotics. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: A Clock in the Sky

    Oct 17 2018

    In 1714, British parliament offered a huge cash prize to anyone who could find a way to determine longitude at sea. And it worked, sort of ... several decades later. Are modern contests (DARPA challenges, the X Prize) offering riches and glory an effective way to spur technological innovation? Guests include: Dava Sobel, author of Longitude.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Sears of change

    Oct 16 2018

    Sears, the giant of American retail, goes bankrupt. The shale boom has made America the world’s top oil producer: is it sustainable? And is Weight Watchers over “weight”? Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the October 13th 2018 edition

    Oct 15 2018

    Many economies are not ready to deal with even a mild recession—they need to start preparing now. Also, winemakers square up to the weed entrepreneurs of California. And why London is the money-laundering capital of the world. Josie Delap hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Saudi repression

    Oct 12 2018

    After the disappearance of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Saudi Arabia is starting to look like an old-fashioned Arab dictatorship. And could the drug MDMA help sufferers recover from post-traumatic stress disorder? Also, in France Marine Le Pen’s new National Rally is hoping to come top in next year’s European elections. Jason Palmer hostsMusic: "An Empty Place" by Sarin, "Rain" by Meydän, "Cylinder Four" by Chris Zabriskie (CC x 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out in...more

  • The Economist asks: What would Churchill do in 2018?

    Oct 11 2018

    We ask Andrew Roberts, historian and Churchill biographer, how the most famous British Prime Minister might have responded to today’s global turmoil. What can current politicians learn from his legacy - and are 21st century critics right about his flaws? Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: What a difference half a degree makes

    Oct 10 2018

    This week's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report recommends keeping the global increase in temperature below 1.5°C. We ask how governments and companies can reach "net zero" and whether the global economy can both grow and go green? Kenneth Cukier talks to one of the authors of the report, an advisor to Costa Rica on its pioneering decarbonisation plan and the European refineries industry body on its green efforts.Music: Smooth as Glass by The Freeharmonic Orchestra (CC x 4.0) &...more

  • The Secret History of the Future: From Zero to Selfie

    Oct 10 2018

    In 1969, an anthropologist introduced photographs and films to people in Papua New Guinea who’d never seen themselves represented in media before. It changed their conception of the world. In modern society, social media floods us with imagery at a pace we’ve never encountered before, and powerful video manipulation technology threatens to blur the line between real and fake. Are we the new Papuans, about to be overwhelmed by a wholesale media shift? Guests include: Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat’s ...more

  • Money talks: How do you solve a problem like Brasilia?

    Oct 09 2018

    The next president of Brazil will inherit a public-finance crisis. Far-right populist Jair Bolsonaro is on track to win - what are the implications if he's elected? Britain’s crackdown on dirty money. And the challenges of overcoming another global recession. Helen Joyce hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the October 6th 2018 edition

    Oct 08 2018

    Chinese investment in Europe is soaring, with benefits for both parties, but Europeans are beginning to worry. The design decisions in our favourite technologies that bring out the worst versions of ourselves. And why potatoes are no longer cheap as chips. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Dances with wolves

    Oct 05 2018

    After a contentious party conference in Birmingham, has Prime Minister Theresa May emerged intact? Lessons from the earthquake and tsunami that rocked Indonesia. And: why is the European potato in crisis? Christopher Lockwood hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Xi’s world order

    Oct 04 2018

    What would the world look like if China made the international rules? Also, what if actors were replaced by digital versions of themselves? We also consider how the future is framed for eyewear. Anne McElvoy hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: What can history teach spies?

    Oct 04 2018

    Christopher Andrew, author of "The Secret World", warns intelligence services of the dangers of historical attention span deficit disorder.  He argues we can only understand Vladimir Putin — and allegations of meddling in foreign elections — in the context of the long history of Russia.  And who was the Edward Snowden of the Victorian era? Anne McElvoy hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie, “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: The Nobel winners explained

    Oct 03 2018

    Economist science correspondents break down the discoveries that won this year's Nobel prizes. Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist at Google, discusses the dangerous ways that the tech industry competes for our attention. And: the story of blackest fish in the deep ocean. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Human Insecurity

    Oct 03 2018

    The French telegraph system was hacked in 1834 by a pair of thieves who stole financial market information — effectively conducting the world’s first cyber attack. What does the incident teach us about network vulnerabilities, human weakness, and modern-day security? Guests include: Bruce Schneier, famed hacker.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Musk do better!

    Oct 02 2018

    Could Italy’s new budget plans lead to a fresh Eurozone crisis? Elon Musk versus the regulators. And the challenges of replacing the LIBOR rate.Helen Joyce hosts. Music adapted from track by The Waiters (CC by 3.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the September 29th 2018 edition

    Oct 01 2018

    As America fights over the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, does the #MeToo movement risk becoming just another battlefield in the culture wars? Why aping the lives of top executives is not the secret to professional success. And the final chapter for China’s most beloved storyteller. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: The fight to confirm Brett Kavanaugh

    Sep 28 2018

    As allegations of sexual assault threaten to derail the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the US Supreme Court, US editor John Prideaux gives his reaction to an emotionally charged day of testimony in Washington. Anne McElvoy digs into the risk of a "no-deal" Brexit. And David Rennie reports on immigration to Guangzhou. Robert Guest hostsMusic by Noxive, “Resilience”, and Aether, "Umber" (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Bishop Michael Curry

    Sep 27 2018

    The first black presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church tells Anne McElvoy about the invitation to speak at the royal wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry. Also, his views on the role of religion in a divided America and whether President Donald Trump acts in good faith  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Lessons from Spanish flu

    Sep 26 2018

    What can we learn from the Spanish flu pandemic which killed over 50 million people a hundred years ago? Carl Malamud, founder of public.resource.org, wants to make more data public. And, is food actually scarce at the bottom of the ocean? Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: The Fault in Our Cars

    Sep 26 2018

    The first pedestrian killed by a car in the western hemisphere was on New York’s Upper West Side in 1899. One newspaper warned that “the automobile has tasted blood.” Today, driverless cars present their own mix of technological promise and potential danger. Can the reaction to that 1899 pedestrian tragedy help us navigate current arguments about safety, blame, commerce, and public space? Guests include: Missy Cummings, Navy fighter pilot and head of the Duke Humans and Autonomy Lab.  ...more

  • Money talks: Sky’s the limit

    Sep 25 2018

    The impact on the media industry of Comcast’s blowout bid for Sky. What has changed in the corporate world in the wake of the #MeToo movement? And the annoying CEO habits you might not want to emulate. Andrew Palmer hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the September 22nd 2018 edition

    Sep 24 2018

    Why Europe should embrace ties with Africa, the wildlife photographer who built an assault course for badgers, and an impressive display of bonhomie on the Korean peninsula. Lane Greene hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Beware Bolsonaro

    Sep 21 2018

    Could the result of the upcoming elections in Brazil threaten its democracy? And how Shinzo Abe, Japan’s prime minister, has been too slow and timid with reforms. Also, Cuban bees are busy living the high life. Simon Long hosts   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Steve Bannon

    Sep 20 2018

    As part of the Open Future festival Steve Bannon, former White House chief strategist, discusses how his economic protectionism could result in price rises for US consumers and why he thinks that’s ok. Also, are there any ultra populists in Europe too right-wing for his movement? His advice to Boris Johnson on Brexit — and his disagreements with Ivanka Trump.  Anne McElvoy hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie, “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inf...more

  • Babbage: Up in smoke

    Sep 19 2018

    Are e-cigarettes the answer to giving up tobacco smoking? And SpaceX revives its plans to send tourists around the moon. Also, we speak to Zia Chishti of Afiniti about the role of artificial intelligence in business. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Fork Fashions and Toilet Trends

    Sep 19 2018

    It took a long time for the fork to go from weird curiosity to ubiquitous tool. How long will it take for current technologies—like the Japanese-style bidet toilet, or heads-up displays such as Google Glass—to go from oddities to everyday necessities? Guests include: Astro Teller, Google’s Captain of Moonshots; Margaret Visser, author of "The Rituals of Dinner".  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Tariffic!

    Sep 18 2018

    More Trump tariffs, how is China likely to retaliate? Historian Lord Skidelsky challenges mainstream economic ideas. And the hopes and hurdles for South Korean businesses eyeing up opportunities in North Korea. Philip Coggan hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from The Economist's Open Future season

    Sep 17 2018

    A special episode marking the culmination of the Open Future initiative, launched this year to celebrate 175 years since The Economist's founding to remake the case for liberal ideals. Featuring contributions from James Comey, Angelina Jolie and Bjorn Ulvaeus from ABBA. Anne McElvoy hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: The Economist at 175

    Sep 14 2018

    Following on from her essay on the future of liberalism in this week’s Economist, our Editor-in-Chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, along with deputy editor, Edward Carr, discuss The Economist 175 years after its founding. Also, how Zambia is heading towards a debt crisis. And introducing our new China column, Chaguan. Simon Long hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Cylinder One" (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Francis Fukuyama

    Sep 13 2018

    The age of ideological struggle failed to end with the Cold War.  Francis Fukuyama, who coined the phrase “the end of history”, talks to Anne McElvoy about the rise of identity politics, whether there is any force that can rival it, and which party is playing the identity game better in the American midterms.  Music by Chris Zabriskie, “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Ma waves ali bye bye

    Sep 12 2018

    How China will struggle to produce another Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba, who steps down as chairman next year. And we discuss cyber-security with former United States Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: The Body Electric

    Sep 12 2018

    We’ve used electricity to treat our brains for thousands of years, from placing electric fish on our heads to cure migraines to using electroconvulsive therapy to alleviate depression. But over time, our focus has shifted from restoring health to augmenting our abilities. Should we be wearing battery-powered caps to improve our concentration, or implanting electricity-emitting devices to expand our thinking capacity? Guests include: Brian Johnson, CEO of Kernel.  See acast.com/privacy ...more

  • Money Talks: The Lehman Lessons

    Sep 11 2018

    Ten years on from the collapse of Lehman Brothers, we examine what progress has been made. Are we prepared for the next global financial crisis? Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the September 8th 2018 edition

    Sep 10 2018

    Ten years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, has finance been fixed? Plus, the benefits of 3D-printing human organs in space, where not to build your capital city, and a taste of our new series in collaboration with Slate, “The Secret History of the Future”  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Wargames

    Sep 07 2018

    Why joint military exercises by Russia and China should worry the West. And the battle for Syria’s last rebel redoubt looms. Also, the aftermath of the fire that blazed through the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: What are the forces reshaping today’s Europe?

    Sep 06 2018

    Anne McElvoy talks to historian Ian Kershaw about the continent’s rollercoaster half-century. They discuss Europe's turbulent friendships with America and Russia and the accusations of anti-Semitism against Britain's Labour party. Also, the EU needs a reboot but is Angela Merkel the person to lead it?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Content liability

    Sep 05 2018

    Should tech companies be legally responsible for all their content? Also, major European research funders have announced ‘Plan S’ to make all scientific works free to read. And how optical fibre made in orbit could be better than the terrestrial sort. Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: The Box That AI Lives In

    Sep 05 2018

    In the 18th-century, a device called the Mechanical Turk convinced Europeans that a robot could play winning chess. But there was a trick. It’s a trick that companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook still pull on us today. Guests include: Jaron Lanier, futurist. Luis von Ahn, founder of CAPTCHA and Duolingo.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Crumbling currencies

    Sep 04 2018

    How are the governments in Argentina and Turkey responding to their financial and economic crises? Samir Desai, the CEO and cofounder of funding circle, explains why he’s going public. And what are the biggest threats to the global smartphone supply chain?  Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the September 1st 2018 edition

    Sep 03 2018

    The global influence of Silicon Valley may have reached its peak – does this mean a new age of opportunity for the rest of the world? Also, Republicans and Democrats remember Senator John McCain. And what to do about the scourge of honey fraud. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Myanmar’s atrocities

    Aug 31 2018

    The UN accuses the Burmese army of genocide, what next for Myanmar? And the rising tensions between Italy and the EU. Also, the curious case of honey fraud in the United States. Christopher Lockwood hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: John McCain’s last word

    Aug 30 2018

    Has the late Senator’s final address damaged Donald Trump? What will John McCain’s legacy be? Anne McElvoy, our senior editor, recalls our interview with the political nonconformist and war hero - and talks to Senator John Barrasso about their last visit to Vietnam, Rick Wilson, Republican strategist, and Madeleine Albright, Democrat and former Secretary of State.Audio excerpt courtesy of Simon & Schuster. Audio from “Every Day is Extra” by John Kerry. Copyright © 2018 by John Kerry. Aired ...more

  • Babbage: Peaks and Valleys

    Aug 29 2018

    Has Silicon Valley’s influence as a technology hub peaked? Also, how artificial intelligence is gaining a sense of curiosity. And how a shampoo bottle is saving lives in Bangladesh. Kenneth Cukier hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: NAFTA — alive or dead?

    Aug 28 2018

    Has there been a breakthrough in efforts to revamp the NAFTA trade agreement? Henry Tricks, our commodities editor, explains recent falls in commodity prices. And how did YouTube profit from the biggest amateur boxing match of all time?  Andrew Palmer hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the August 25th 2018 edition

    Aug 27 2018

    Americans will soon have to face a simple question: is Donald Trump above the law? Plus, the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower, Christopher Wylie, on how big data is changing the political game. And a tribute to the queen of soul. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Above the law?

    Aug 24 2018

    Will the recent revelations and convictions hurt President Donald Trump? And Australia’s ruling party sacks the prime minister, again. Also, how British universities are a rare booming export industry. Richard Cockett hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Can one whistleblower tame the tech titans?

    Aug 23 2018

    Christopher Wylie tells Kenneth Cukier why he blew the whistle on Cambridge Analytica. They discuss whether platforms are doing enough to protect users’ privacy and what governments can do to safeguard independent electionsMusic by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Will Google translate?

    Aug 22 2018

    If Google does reintroduce its search engine to China what will it have to omit? And how future helicopters will fly in new ways, with pilots optional. Also, the discovery of a 3,200-year-old ancient Egyptian cheese and what we can learn from it. Hal Hodson hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Chopping zeros off the Bolivar

    Aug 21 2018

    What effect will President Maduro’s desperate measures have on the Venezuelan economy? Stephen Gibbs reports from Caracas. Also on the show: how can companies protect themselves against intangible risks and dealing with congestion in cities. Andrew Palmer hosts.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the August 18th 2018 edition

    Aug 20 2018

    Online dating has revolutionised the way humans couple up, but the impact of this mass social experiment is only just becoming clear. Plus, the bashful decline of European nudism, and The Economist gazes into the future and asks, what if 50% of CEOs were women? Anne McElvoy hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie, “Divider” and "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Secret History of the Future: Trailer

    Aug 20 2018

    Examine the history of tech to uncover stories that help us illuminate the present and predict the future.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: A call to arms

    Aug 17 2018

    The global arms market is booming, and is tilting in the buyers’ favour. Also, how successful have the first 100 days back in power been for Malaysia’s Mahathir Mohamad? And the decline of public nakedness in Europe. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Who was Adam Smith?

    Aug 16 2018

    Anne McElvoy investigates the life of the Scottish philosopher now known as the father of modern economics. What does an author who died in 1790 have to teach us about trade wars and crony capitalism in the 21st century? And which American television villain kept a copy of “The Wealth of Nations” on his bookshelf? Music by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Jumping the Q

    Aug 15 2018

    Is quantum technology getting ahead of itself? And we look into what is being done to find a cure for celiac disease. Also, we explore random control trials and the placebo effect of sham surgery. Tim Cross hosts Music by Daniel Birch "Brushed bells in the wind" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Generation XX

    Aug 15 2018

    What would the world look like if 50% of CEOs were women, and what would have to change to make this possible? We also consider a future in which drones police the oceans, making it harder to get away with lawlessness at sea. Tom Standage hosts Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Sick as a Turkey

    Aug 14 2018

    Are Turkey's currency troubles contagious? The weed-killer court case that could have worldwide impact. And why Tiger Woods still has the power to roar Andrew Palmer hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the August 11th 2018 edition

    Aug 13 2018

    Inevitable but unforgivably outdated – why today’s tax systems need to be brought into the 21st century. Also, how NASA prepared to explore a place 300 times hotter than the surface of the sun, and France's love affair with the high-speed train. Robert Guest hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Brazil’s telenovela election

    Aug 10 2018

    Why the outcome of the upcoming general election in Brazil is harder to predict than usual. And how American sanctions will bring more agony to Iran’s dysfunctional economy. Also, could long school summer holidays around the world be having a negative effect on children and families? Simon Long hosts   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: should the veil be a matter for the courts or conscience?

    Aug 09 2018

    Masih Alinejad tells Anne McElvoy how she took My Stealthy Freedom, her viral campaign against compulsory hijab in Iran, from social media to the streets – could reform be on the way? Also, the impact of visiting Western female politicians wearing the veil and why she believes Iranian women do not want to be liberated by the West.Music by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: My corona

    Aug 08 2018

    We speak to project scientist for the Parker Solar Probe, Dr Nicola Fox, about the spacecraft's upcoming mission to the sun's atmosphere. We also discuss the upsides of artificial intelligence with professor Max Tegmark. And how seal whiskers are helping to create new underwater sensors. Kenneth Cukier hosts   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Urban outbidders

    Aug 07 2018

    Property prices in the world’s most desirable cities have sped away from those elsewhere but what has caused that trend, and will it last? And how governments are limiting foreign investment in tech companies to reduce China's influence. Also, a new decentralised app for prediction markets. Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the August 4th 2018 edition

    Aug 06 2018

    As the northern hemisphere continues to smoulder through this long hot summer, is mankind losing the war against climate change? The American humourist Davis Sedaris talks about the beauty of eavesdropping. Plus, just how valuable is your accent? Lane Greene hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: The black hole of coal

    Aug 03 2018

    India struggles to move away from fossil fuels towards renewables. And is there cause for optimism in Eritrea, Africa’s North Korea? Also, selling marijuana soon becomes legal in Canada. How will it change the country's high streets? Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: David Sedaris

    Aug 02 2018

    The humourist talks to Anne McElvoy, our senior editor, about making people laugh, overhearing conversations and when can he look back at sad or embarrassing experiences with humour? Also, why he wanted to feed his tumour to a turtle and is there a funny gene in families? And, he reveals all about his sequin culottes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Drive.ai time

    Aug 01 2018

    Should AI systems be more human-centric? We look at how a trial of self-driving vehicles in Texas is focusing on what the technology can do now. Rufus Pollack, the founder of Open Knowledge International, discusses how freedom of choice promotes innovation. And, a simple solution to increasing productivity in India. Kenneth Cukier hosts   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Greek Lessons

    Jul 31 2018

    Should the Bank of England raise interest rates this week?   As Greece prepares to exit its bail-out, what are the lessons to be learned from the crisis?  And open-plan offices - do they work? Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the July 27th 2018 edition

    Jul 30 2018

    Britain’s churches are being turned into quirky campsites. Congo’s Catholics are standing up for democracy. And why open-plan offices can lead to closed minds. Richard Cockett hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: How to catch a crocodile

    Jul 27 2018

    What to expect in Zimbabwe’s first post-Mugabe general election next week. Also, we look at how badly UN sanctions are hurting North Korea’s economy. And in Britain how body-worn cameras are spreading beyond the police force. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Bjorn from ABBA

    Jul 26 2018

    Bjorn Ulvaeus from ABBA tells Anne McElvoy, our senior editor, about the melancholy beneath the exuberant voices and his musical influences.  Would he write the same songs in the #MeToo era and which song has had its lyrics changed for a different feminist time?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Too hot to handle

    Jul 25 2018

    Are the recent heat waves around the world a sign of things to come? Geoffrey Carr, our science editor, finds out at the meeting of the International AIDS Society what more needs to be done to eradicate the disease. Also, has liquid water on Mars finally been found? Kenneth Cukier hosts.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: One Belt One Road

    Jul 24 2018

    What now for Fiat Chrysler after Sergio Marchionne’s departure? How America and Europe are tightening rules on foreign direct investments. And China’s Belt and Road Initiative - a benevolent gift to connect the world or a highway to world dominance?  Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the July 21st 2018 edition

    Jul 23 2018

    The WTO and the global system it oversees are both under threat. Can they be saved? The Cook Islands could soon achieve rich-country status, but becoming the world’s newest developed country may not be all good news. A metal used to harden steel could help prevent global warming. And how to find the many fossils buried within language. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Khan he fix it?

    Jul 20 2018

    Will military tampering swing the Pakistani general election for Imran Khan? Also, Anne McElvoy and Sacha Nauta discuss identity politics. And how Spain is finally tackling the Valley of the Fallen. Christopher Lockwood hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Tony Blair

    Jul 19 2018

    The former British prime minister tells Anne McElvoy, our senior editor, why Britain should vote again on whether to leave the European Union. What should the referendum question be? And why he talks to Team Trump on the Middle East. Music by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Paranoid android

    Jul 18 2018

    What does the European Commission's record fine of Google mean for the future of its Android operating system? And how a popular gene editing tool is raising a few questions. Also, we speak to Dr David Fajgenbaum about the first ever World Castleman Disease Day. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: W-T-Oh

    Jul 17 2018

    How can world leaders fix the World Trade Organisation? Also, we discuss the runners and riders to replace Mario Draghi as president of the European Central Bank. And, after the World Cup in Russia why is the football transfer market unusually quiet? Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the July 14th 2018 edition

    Jul 16 2018

    Can Theresa May deliver a soft Brexit? Her new plan is the most realistic one yet, but it has unleashed fresh political chaos. Plus, the latest currency insights from the Big Mac index and a trip through the mean streets of Old Shanghai. Anne McElvoy hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: The Brexit fears

    Jul 13 2018

    How the Brexit strain is causing the UK government to unravel. And we look ahead to Donald Trump's meeting with Vladimir Putin. Also, why golf in Scotland is in decline. Christopher Lockwood hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: How is warfare changing?

    Jul 12 2018

    Anne McElvoy, our senior editor, went on an outing of top-brass Anglo-German military — to discuss how they are preparing for future risks of urban warfare. She had exclusive access to a mock city in eastern Germany - and visited Nazi bunkers where armies are learning from decisive urban battles in history. And they explore the way ISIS and a renewed threat from Russia is changing conflict scenarios.Music by Chris Zabriskie (CC by 4.0 UK)   See acast.com/privacy for...more

  • Babbage: The Roboburger

    Jul 11 2018

    Are robots going to replace chefs in the kitchen? And how footsteps can be used for ID and health checks. Also, we focus on the very latest discoveries from the Gaia space mission. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Make trade not war

    Jul 10 2018

    Is there a way out of trade war? The US tariffs and the global repercussions. Bringing electricity to the remotest and poorest parts of the world - are mini-grids the answer? And is WeWork worth its $20bn valuation?Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the July 7th 2018 edition

    Jul 09 2018

    A transatlantic rift is growing – why is NATO worth saving? Plus Jaron Lanier, a pioneer of VR, on why people should delete their social media accounts and get back to reality. And how the longest heatwave for nearly half a century is disrupting both Britain’s courts and its pubs. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: The three T’s of Trump

    Jul 06 2018

    Will the president who arrives at the NATO summit next week be Triumphant Trump, Tetchy Trump or Torpedo Trump? Also, how the discovery of a new gas field could mean a better economic future for Egypt. And the vegan attacks on boucheries in northern France. Simon Long hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The world ahead: Trailer

    Jul 05 2018

    Coming soon: a new future-gazing series from The Economist that examines an assortment of speculative scenarios, what-if conjectures and provocative prophecies. Thinking about possible futures can help us understand the present, and catch glimpses of the world ahead.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: How do you revive a classic musical as a tale for today?

    Jul 05 2018

    Anne McElvoy heads to the Palladium theatre in London to interview Bartlett Sher, Tony award-winning director of “The King & I”. They discuss the challenges of reviving a story written in the 1950s – and set in the 1860s – for an audience in 2018. Also, the ways in which Hamilton is not so revolutionary and the limits of colour-blind casting.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Saving white rhino

    Jul 04 2018

    How IVF could save the northern white rhino from extinction. And Jaron Lanier tells us why we should delete our social media accounts. Also, how understanding animal behaviour could reduce errors in the operating theatre. Kenneth Cukier hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Trolley wars

    Jul 03 2018

    What will Tesco and Carrefour’s strategic alliance mean for customers and suppliers? Stan Pignal reports on why women in India have dropped out of the workforce.  And CO2 shortages in the UK hit the beer industry. Philip Coggan hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the June 30th 2018 edition

    Jul 02 2018

    Netflix is the tech giant everyone is watching. It has so far managed to avoid the techlash, but will it be happily ever after? Plus Madeleine Albright, America’s first woman secretary of state, on her country’s relationship with Russia; Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the world wide web, on the failures of the internet; and the urban gardens blossoming in the big smoke. Richard Cockett hosts   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: Courting controversy

    Jun 29 2018

    A storm is brewing in America following the sudden retirement of Anthony Kennedy, a Supreme Court justice. And after seven years of war and mass displacement, how can Syria rebuild? Also, how a flawed test in China fails the country's young people. Simon Long hosts   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: Madeleine Albright

    Jun 28 2018

    America’s first female secretary of state on how populism can slide into fascism, what Kim Jong Il and Vladimir Putin were like in person, and what Donald Trump could learn from reading her lapel pins.Anne McElvoy hostsMusic by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Fixing the internet

    Jun 27 2018

    The internet was meant to make the world a less centralised place, but the opposite has happened. The Economist’s technology editor Ludwig Siegele explores why it matters and what can be done about it. Music by Fabian Measures “Open Cab” cc by 4.0  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money talks: Netflixonomics

    Jun 26 2018

    Gady Epstein explores how Netflix has grown into a global entertainment network and asks Netflix’s CEO Reed Hastings about power and responsibility. Also, is government outsourcing a toxic model that can’t be rescued? And could you lead the country of Petronia after its discovery of oil? Helen Joyce hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the June 23rd 2018 edition

    Jun 25 2018

    Women at the wheel in Saudi Arabia are the most visible symbol of a social revolution led by Muhammad bin Salman. The crown prince has a chance to transform the Arab world for the better, but failure could bring more chaos. Also, why America’s small-town newspapers are down but certainly not out. And the fight for free speech, from campuses to stand-up comedy. Anne McElvoy hosts  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The week ahead: The Arab revolution

    Jun 23 2018

    How radical reforms in Saudi Arabia are changing the Gulf and the wider Arab world. And in Turkey will President Recep Tayyip Erdogan be re-elected? Also, Anne McElvoy discusses free speech with comedian Corinne Fisher. Christopher Lockwood hosts Music by Chris Zabriskie “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist asks: James Comey

    Jun 22 2018

    The sacked director of the FBI on the message of Melania