Podcast

KQED’s Forum

KQED’s live call-in program presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.

Episodes

  • How to Make Friends as an Adult

    Sep 13 2019

    We’ve all heard that friendship and community is important for our happiness and even our health. But many of us find it harder to make friends, and nurture friendships that we do have, as adults. Forum discusses ways to find new friends and how to forge deeper connections with people who are already in our lives.

  • Lawmakers Move to Protect Renters, Pass Limits on Rent Increases and Evictions

    Sep 13 2019

    Assembly Bill 1482, a measure to cap most annual rent increases at 5% plus inflation, passed the state legislature this week and will take effect Jan. 1. The bill also provides further protections against eviction without cause. Governor Newsom has pledged to sign AB 1482, calling its renter protections “the strongest package in America.” We’ll take your questions about the bill.

  • PG&E Agrees to $11 Billion Wildfire Insurance Settlement

    Sep 13 2019

    In a major development in the utility’s efforts to exit bankruptcy, PG&E and a group of insurance companies announced Friday that they have settled claims for $11 billion arising from the 2017 and 2018 California wildfires. The settlement is subject to approval by the federal bankruptcy court overseeing the utility’s reorganization.

  • Ibram X. Kendi Explains ‘How to Be an Antiracist’

    Sep 12 2019

    It’s not enough to be against racism, or to not consider ourselves racists, argues American University professor Ibram X. Kendi. Instead, we must actively be “antiracist” and fight for racial equality. Kendi’s new book, “How to Be an Antiracist,” examines what he’s learned from the Antiracist Research & Policy Center at American University, of which he is founding director, as well as from his own life as a black man. Kendi puts personal and contempo...more

  • California Legislature Passes AB 5, What It Means for You

    Sep 12 2019

    On Wednesday, lawmakers passed Assembly Bill 5, which would extend benefits and labor protections to workers in California’s “gig economy.” The bill now awaits Governor Newsom, who endorsed it earlier this month and is expected to sign it. We’ll unpack the details of the bill, who stands to be affected by its requirements and what it means for workers. And we want to hear from you: Will this bill impact you and your work? Share your experience with us.

  • Indian Playwright and Engineer Writes and Directs New Gandhi Musical

    Sep 11 2019

    Playwright, novelist and software engineer Sujit Saraf has been writing and directing plays since co-founding the community theater company Naatak as a UC Berkeley student in 1995. Based in the South Bay, Naatak’s plays are put on primarily by Indian immigrants working in Silicon Valley’s tech industry. Saraf’s newest play, a musical exploring the life and legacy of Mahatma Gandhi, opens Sept. 14.  Saraf joins Forum to preview the musical and discuss his approach to presenting ...more

  • Johanna Pfaelzer Takes the Reins as Artistic Director of Berkeley Rep

    Sep 11 2019

    Berkeley Repertory Theatre has a new artistic director, Johanna Pfaelzer. Her inaugural season at Berkeley Rep opens this month and will include the shows “White Noise,” “School Girls; or, the African Mean Girls Play” and “Happy Days.” Pfaelzer previously helped develop Broadway hits “Hamilton” and Green Day’s  “American Idiot” as artistic director of the nonprofit New York Stage and Film. Pfaelzer joins us to discuss her vision f...more

  • California Health Officials Investigate 62 Cases of Vaping Related Lung Disease and 1 Death

    Sep 11 2019

    California’s first known death associated with vaping marijuana was announced Friday by Los Angeles County health authorities. That same day, national health officials discouraged the use of e-cigarettes until they determine the cause of about 450 reported cases of a severe lung disease that has killed at least five people. In California, the Department of Public Health is currently investigating 62 potential cases of the disease in people with a recent history of vaping. An estimated 9 mi...more

  • John Bolton Departs From Role as National Security Adviser

    Sep 11 2019

    John Bolton stepped down from his role as national security adviser on Tuesday. The former security adviser and the president clashed over foreign policy throughout Bolton’s term, and the two tweeted contradictory accounts of Bolton’s resignation on Tuesday. President Trump announced via Twitter that he will appoint a new national security adviser next week. We’ll talk about what the ousting of the Trump Administration’s third national security adviser means for the White...more

  • ‘Super Pumped’ Looks at Rise, Fall of Former Uber CEO

    Sep 10 2019

    Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick stepped down from his role as chief executive in 2017, following company scandals over sexual harassment, privacy violations and driver mistreatment. New York Times technology reporter Mike Isaac covered Kalanick’s resignation, and his new book “Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber” analyzes how Silicon Valley’s reverence for founders allowed for Kalanick’s rise, and fall. Isaac talked to more than 200 current and former Uber employees, who described its hyper-mascul...more

  • 48 States Announce Google Antitrust Investigation, California Not Among Them

    Sep 10 2019

    Attorneys general for 50 U.S. states and territories announced Monday that they are launching an antitrust investigation of tech giant Google. The probe will initially focus on Google’s advertising business. It comes amid increasing scrutiny and criticism of large technology firms. California, where Google is based, is not part of the investigation. We’ll get the latest developments.

  • Astrobiologist Explains How Geographical History ‘Shaped Human History’

    Sep 09 2019

    Astrobiologist Lewis Dartnell discusses his book “Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History.”

  • President Trump Cancels Peace Talks With Afghan President, Taliban

    Sep 09 2019

    President Trump says he has called off secret Camp David talks with the Taliban and the president of Afghanistan. Tweeting on Saturday, Trump cited last week’s attack in Kabul, which the Taliban claimed responsibility for. In addition to the Camp David meeting, the president said he was canceling ongoing U.S. peace talks with the Afghan Taliban. We’re going to find out what this all means for Afghanistan and the U.S. role there. 

  • Republicans Gather in Indian Wells for Annual State Convention

    Sep 09 2019

    This weekend Republicans from across the state will gather in Indian Wells for the Fall 2019 California GOP Convention. Speakers include President Trump's national campaign manager Brad Parscale, Energy Secretary and former Texas Gov. Rick Perry and San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer. Forum takes a look at what happened at the convention, and what it means for the future of the party.

  • Just How Unfashionable Is the Bay Area?

    Sep 06 2019

    Given the North Face fleeces that populate BART, and San Francisco's identity as the birthplace of Levi's jeans, some might consider the Bay Area to be the casual capital of the world. That's the topic of KQED's latest Bay Curious episode, which argues that California's history has influenced the styles you'll see around the Bay today -- from the Gold Rush to the Silicon Valley tech boom. We'll discuss whether the Bay Area dresses down more than other places, as well as what qualities define Bay...more

  • Listening to ‘America’s Lost Street Kids’

    Sep 06 2019

    The 2015 double-murder of Audrey Carey and Steve Carter by three transient youth rocked the Bay Area and brought the issue of the region's long-standing street kids population to the forefront. Vivian Ho, then a criminal justice reporter at the San Francisco Chronicle, covered the Haze Lampley, Lila Alligood and Sean Angold murder trail. The three drifters were eventually all convicted for these senseless murders, but Ho knew that a big part of the story was still left unanswered - how did youn...more

  • Jury Acquits One Defendant in Deadly Ghost Ship Fire, Deadlocks on the Other

    Sep 06 2019

    Defendant Max Harris was acquitted Thursday of all 36 counts of manslaughter in the deadly fire at the Ghost Ship warehouse in Oakland. The jury hung on all counts against co-defendant Derick Almena. Prosecutors accused the two men of turning the warehouse and artist collective into a death trap, resulting in a massive fire that killed 36 people in December 2016. Wednesday's verdict comes after years of legal battles and two trials, which could have resulted in up to 36 years in prison for both ...more

  • Creating ‘Safe Enough Spaces’ on College Campuses

    Sep 05 2019

    While the concept of "safe spaces" for learning on college campuses has been mocked for coddling and infantilizing students, Wesleyan University president Michael Roth says protecting students from harassment and intimidation doesn't mean shielding them from uncomfortable or confrontational ideas. He argues for "safe enough spaces." His new book, subtitled "A Pragmatist's Approach to Inclusion, Free Speech, and Political Correctness on College Campuses" proposes creating environments where stude...more

  • Democratic Hopefuls Release Sweeping Climate Plans

    Sep 05 2019

    Ten Democratic presidential candidates take the stage Wednesday evening to present their climate platforms during a seven-hour CNN town hall. Most of the candidates are calling for trillions of dollars in transportation and infrastructure investment and a carbon-neutral or carbon-free economy within 20 to 30 years. We'll compare the candidates' proposals and discuss whether the issue of climate change is likely to play a major role in the presidential race.

  • California Legislature Passes Vaccine Legislation, Newsom Wavers

    Sep 05 2019

    On Wednesday, the California State legislature passed a vaccine bill designed to close a loophole that allowed parents to skirt the state's mandatory immunization for school children. SB 276, which passed with large margins, requires state oversight of medical vaccine exemptions given to children by doctors. It's unclear, however, if Governor Newsom will sign it into law. His request for a companion bill that could weaken the bill's provisions has many critics accusing him of pandering to vaccin...more

  • Geographer Explores Resegregation and Inequality in Northern California

    Sep 04 2019

    More than 50 years after the civil rights movement, Northern California has become racially segregated in new ways, argues urbanist, planner and geographer Alex Schafran. Even while communities of color continue to suffer the effects of decades-old postwar housing discrimination, Schafran says there are new factors that have driven people of color out of cities, into the farther reaches of the Bay Area, resulting in long commutes, unstable finances and rising poverty. In his book, "The Road to R...more

  • Officials Push for Safe Return of San Francisco Activist Shot in Philippines

    Sep 04 2019

    Brandon Lee, a human rights activist and San Francisco native, is in critical condition after he was shot last month outside his home in the Philippines. Watchdog groups say the Philippine government carried out the attack as retribution for Lee's environmental and indigenous rights advocacy within the country. On Tuesday, following a week-long fact finding mission in the Philippines, San Francisco Supervisors Matt Haney and Gordon Mar introduced a resolution calling for Lee's evacuation and ur...more

  • British Parliament Votes to Wrest Control of Government from Conservatives to Stop No-Deal Brexit

    Sep 04 2019

    In stunning defiance of Prime Minister Boris Johnson, UK lawmakers voted Tuesday to take control of the parliamentary agenda to debate legislation that would block a no-deal Brexit. In response, Johnson introduced a bill to hold a general election next month. We’ll discuss the latest developments and their political and economic implications.

  • Remains of 20 People Recovered After Conception Boat Fire

    Sep 03 2019

    Rescue crews recovered the bodies of 20 people who died when a fire erupted on the diving boat Conception near an island off the Southern California coast early Monday morning. At least 14 people are still missing of the 39 people who were aboard the 75-foot boat, operated by Santa Barbara-based company Truth Aquatics. Forum gets the latest updates about the search and recovery efforts.

  • The Man Who Built Condé Nast’s Publishing ‘Empire’

    Sep 03 2019

    Forum talks with Susan Ronald about her book "Condé Nast: The Man and His Empire."

  • Amidst Housing Crisis, California Reaches Rent Cap Agreement

    Sep 03 2019

    Governor Gavin Newsom announced a new deal on Friday that seeks to protect millions of California renters against rent-gouging and evictions. If approved by the state Legislature, the agreement would limit rent increases to 5 percent plus inflation, with a 10 percent maximum increase. Forum discusses what this rent cap might mean for California and we hear the latest from the Conception boat fire off the Santa Barbara coast.

  • National Political News in Review

    Sep 03 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C. 

  • Rebroadcast: ‘Don’t Read Poetry’ Examines the Joys and Challenges of … Reading Poetry

    Sep 02 2019

    Poet and literary critic Stephanie Burt joins us to discuss the diverse world of poetry.

  • Rebroadcast: Steven Greenhouse on Why Workers Feel ‘Beaten Down, Worked Up’

    Sep 02 2019

    Steven Greenhouse discusses his book on American workers "Beaten Down, Worked Up."

  • Social Media and ‘The End of Forgetting’

    Aug 30 2019

    Part of growing up is being able to forget in order to change and reinvent yourself. New media technologies, like Youtube and Facebook, are increasingly making the past unforgettable. What does it mean for the new generation of young people to never be able to fully let go of their past — even the most embarrassing photos? According to Kate Eichhorn, culture and media professor at New York City's New School, people are now forming their identities online from an early age and in the process, cre...more

  • California Considers Law to Rewrite Rules of the Gig Economy

    Aug 30 2019

    State legislators are considering a bill that would require many gig-based companies to hire their independent contractors as employees. The bill could affect as many as two million contract workers in California, across a variety of industries, from rideshare drivers to construction workers to strippers. Supporters of Assembly Bill 5, including drivers for Uber and Lyft who have been rallying in support of the change, say the gig economy is exploiting low income workers. Opponents say the rise ...more

  • Looking to the Future Through ‘The Optimist’s Telescope’

    Aug 29 2019

    In order to address issues like climate change, we need to learn how to do something that doesn't come naturally to us — plan for the long-term. That's according to former Obama senior climate adviser, Bina Venkataraman. In her new book, "The Optimist's Telescope: Thinking Ahead in a Reckless Age," Venkataraman argues that our society and economy reinforces our addiction to instant gratification by focusing on short-term market gains. Venkataraman joins Forum to talk about how we, as individuals...more

  • The Legal Fight for Accountability in the Opioid Crisis

    Aug 29 2019

    On Monday, a judge in Oklahoma handed down a ruling that Johnson & Johnson must pay $572 million to the state for the company's role in the opioid epidemic. It's the first ruling of its kind to hold a pharmaceutical company accountable for the opioid crisis. Meanwhile,Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, is offering to settle over 2,000 lawsuits from states, cities and counties for $10 billion to $12 billion dollars. We'll discuss what these developments could mean for other health care and dr...more

  • House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff Talks Election Security, Domestic Terrorism Bill

    Aug 28 2019

    House Intelligence Committee Chairman and California Congressman Adam Schiff has been at the center of the ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. With the 2020 presidential race approaching, Rep. Schiff is looking into what the United States can do to shore up our election security and the rising threat of deepfake videos. He joins Forum to discuss the latest in the ongoing investigation into foreign intervention in our election and his legislative res...more

  • Documentary Podcast ‘Out of The Blocks’ Showcases Lower Bottoms West Oakland

    Aug 28 2019

    Our streets are full of "stories hidden in plain sight" say Aaron Henkin and Wendel Patrick, hosts of the award-winning documentary podcast "Out of The Blocks." A project of Baltimore public radio station WYPR, the podcast showcases the stories of residents on a given block, in their own words and backed by an original score. Even though it is rooted in the streets of Baltimore, "Out of The Blocks" has expanded to also tell the stories of neighborhoods in Atlanta, Chicago, Seoul, South Korea and...more

  • FCC to Investigate Cellphone Radiation Exposure

    Aug 28 2019

    A Chicago Tribune investigation tested the amount of radiation exposure from cell phones and found many phones exceeded the legal safety allowed limit. The Tribune funded lab tests on various cell phone models and found the popular iPhone 7 measured more than double the radiation Apple officially reported to federal regulators. In response, the Federal Communications Commission, which regulates cell phones, says it will now conduct its own testing. Forum discusses the investigation and whether w...more

  • Federal Election Commission Toothless Ahead of 2020 Election

    Aug 28 2019

    The Federal Election Commission (FEC) will partially shut down at the end of this week. The bipartisan election watchdog, which oversees national campaign finance law, has long been plagued with open vacancies and infighting. Republican commissioner Matthew Petersen's resignation on Monday, however, made history by making it the first time in 11 years that the FEC will not have the four-person quorum needed to conduct business. Forum discusses what this new development means for the future of th...more

  • Getting College Students to the Finish Line

    Aug 27 2019

    More than 2 million high school graduates begin college every year. Yet only 60 percent of four-year college students finish their degree within six years, and less than 40 percent of community college students graduate or transfer to four-year institutions. UC Berkeley professor David Kirp, who details these issues in his latest book “The College … Continue reading Getting College Students to the Finish Line →

  • Actor, Model, YouTuber Lolo Spencer on “Sitting Pretty” as a Disability Lifestyle Influencer

    Aug 27 2019

    The videos on Lauren “Lolo” Spencer’s YouTube channel “Sitting Pretty” range from travel tips to relationship advice for people with disabilities to candid views on how she navigates the world. They’re based in Spencer’s own experiences as a black woman who was diagnosed with ALS when she was 14 and now uses a wheelchair. She … Continue reading Actor, Model, YouTuber Lolo Spencer on “Sitting Pretty” as a Disability Lifestyle Influencer →

  • PG&E Asks CA Legislature for $20 Billion Tax-Exempt Bonds Amidst Rate Increases

    Aug 27 2019

    PG&E CEO Bill Johnson requested California lawmakers to approve a $20 billion bond plan to address wildfire cases and its bankruptcy case, last week. Although critics are calling this plan a bailout, PG&E claims this will help wildfire victims and will be paid off by shareholders instead of ratepayers. Residential rates, however, are still likely … Continue reading PG&E Asks CA Legislature for $20 Billion Tax-Exempt Bonds Amidst Rate Increases →

  • San Francisco Geriatrician Louise Aronson on a New Vision for Aging

    Aug 26 2019

    With people today living decades past the age of 60, UCSF geriatrician Louise Aronson says that we need to stop looking at aging as if it’s a disease or a chronic deterioration. Elderhood, according to Aronson, should be viewed as a life stage, like childhood or adulthood, with its own benefits and challenges. Dr. Aronson … Continue reading San Francisco Geriatrician Louise Aronson on a New Vision for Aging →

  • Nearly 350,000 California Homeowners in Fire Prone Areas Dropped by Insurers

    Aug 26 2019

    Between 2015 and 2018, insurance companies dropped nearly 350,000 California homeowners in high-risk fire areas. This insurance coverage data, recently released by California Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara’s office, does not reflect how many people who lost insurance went on to purchase it elsewhere, or if newly purchased premiums were at a higher price. Forum talks … Continue reading Nearly 350,000 California Homeowners in Fire Prone Areas Dropped by Insurers →

  • Democratic National Committee Prepares for 2020 Election in San Francisco

    Aug 26 2019

    Members of the Democratic National Committee, plus 14 Democratic presidential candidates, are gathered in San Francisco for three days of meetings that began Thursday. The weekend convening is the last chance before primary season for the Democratic Party to develop a 2020 strategy and attend to party business. On Thursday, sparks flew when the DNC’s … Continue reading Democratic National Committee Prepares for 2020 Election in San Francisco →

  • Road Trip: Discovering California

    Aug 23 2019

    Nothing captures a sense of summer's freedom like a good road trip. As the end of summer looms and a long Labor Day weekend approaches, we'll help you savor the last days of summer with tips for great California road trips. The San Francisco Chronicle has mapped out six itineraries to off-the-beaten-path California spots that go beyond Highway 1. We'll talk with one of the Chronicle's editors and take your suggestions for getting on the road, and off the familiar routes.

  • ‘Earth’s Lungs’ on Fire as Amazon Burns

    Aug 23 2019

    Brazil's Amazon rainforest is burning at a record rate, according to Brazil's National Institute for Space Research. Producing 20 percent of the oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere, the Amazon is often called "the planet's lungs," and these fires could have disastrous effects on the fight against climate change. On Wednesday, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro accused nongovernmental organizations of starting the fires, though he did not provide evidence. Critics of Bolsonaro's administration point...more

  • Sen. Jeff Merkley on Trump’s ‘War Against Migrant Families’

    Aug 23 2019

    After witnessing child separations, a dearth of hygiene products and poor medical care at Texas migrant detention centers last summer, Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon has introduced the "Stop Cruelty to Migrant Children Act." His new book, "America Is Better Than This: Trump's War Against Migrant Families," is both a report on detention center conditions and a call to action against the Trump administration's immigration policies. We'll talk with Sen. Merkley about the Trump administration's plan to...more

  • Closing the ‘Knowledge Gap’ Through Content-Rich Primary Education

    Aug 22 2019

    According to education writer Natalie Wexler, American elementary schools are failing to train better readers, especially when it comes to poor students. In her book "The Knowledge Gap," Wexler argues that schools in the U.S. are largely ignoring the research on elementary learning, which shows that students best learn to read through context, not through short passages and multiple choice questions. Wexler joins Forum to talk about "The Knowledge Gap" in elementary schooling, and how it contrib...more

  • Suburban Communities Are Blocking Apartment Construction, Report Finds

    Aug 22 2019

    Earlier this month, the state threatened the city of Cupertino with a lawsuit for not meeting its mandated housing goals. Cupertino responded assuring all is on track, however a number of other small California cities in metropolitan areas are successfully blocking the production of new multifamily dwellings. According to a recent report, Bay Area towns … Continue reading Suburban Communities Are Blocking Apartment Construction, Report Finds →

  • Tensions Continue to Rise After India Revokes Kashmir’s Autonomous Status

    Aug 22 2019

    Earlier this month, India revoked Article 370, which had granted the state of Jammu and Kashmir a special autonomous status for the past 70 years, further escalating long-standing tensions in the region. Claimed in full by both India and Pakistan, the Muslim-majority region of Kashmir has been divided between the two nations since 1949. On Tuesday, Pakistan announced it will bring the dispute to the International Court of Justice. We'll talk about recent developments in the conflict, and what th...more

  • California’s Ethnic Studies Curriculum to Be Revised After Draft Critiqued as ‘Too P.C.’ and Anti-Semitic

    Aug 21 2019

    State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond announced last week that a draft version of the California high school ethnic studies curriculum, created in accordance with a 2016 state law, will be revised. The announcement came at the end of the draft’s public comment period, and after the State Board of Education’s president, vice president … Continue reading California’s Ethnic Studies Curriculum to Be Revised After Draft Critiqued as ‘Too P.C.’ and Anti-Semitic →

  • New California Law Places Limits on Police Use of Deadly Force

    Aug 21 2019

    California police officers will have new restrictions on when they are able to use deadly force under a law signed by Governor Newsom this week. The legislation, which has been called one of the toughest standards in the country for when an officer can kill, is a response to the Sacramento police shooting of Stephon … Continue reading New California Law Places Limits on Police Use of Deadly Force →

  • Trump Administration Moves to Hold Migrant Families Longer

    Aug 21 2019

    Today the Trump administration announced that the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Health and Human Services will withdraw from the 1997 Flores Settlement Agreement and replace it with a new rule on Friday. Until now, the Flores Agreement has set the basic conditions and length of time migrant children and teens can … Continue reading Trump Administration Moves to Hold Migrant Families Longer →

  • Amidst Ebola Crisis, Dr. Paul Farmer Calls for ‘Care Along With Containment’

    Aug 20 2019

    The world's second-deadliest Ebola outbreak has claimed the lives of at least 1,900 people to date in war-torn Congo. Last month, the World Health Organization declared the nearly yearlong outbreak a "public health emergency of international concern." Dr. Paul Farmer, a co-founder of Partners in Health, joins us to talk about the Ebola crisis and his group's work providing free medical care in poor communities around the world.

  • Back-To-School Tips for Parents

    Aug 20 2019

    When your child comes home from school, don't ask her how she did on her math test, rather ask if she learned anything interesting that day. Or if she got to spend time with her friends. That's one of the back-to-school tips from Challenge Success, a Stanford-based organization that helps families and schools to prioritize student well-being, resilience and ethics more than grades, test scores and performance. Forum talks with co-founder Denise Pope about tips for raising well-balanced kids who ...more

  • ‘Bottle of Lies’ Exposes Hazards of Generic Drugs

    Aug 19 2019

    Generic drug companies in India and China have been cutting corners in their manufacturing and sending faulty drugs into the marketplace for years. That's according to investigative journalist Katherine Eban in her new book "Bottle of Lies: The Inside Story of the Generic Drug Boom." In it, Eban details the rise of generic drugs as an affordable alternative to the expensive pharmaceutical industry, and some generic manufacturers' deliberate deception of the industry's quality oversight. Eban joi...more

  • Are We Heading for a Global Recession?

    Aug 19 2019

    Financial analysts believe markets could be heading into a recession due to the emergence of a key recession indicator in the U.S. bond market last Wednesday. While consumer confidence remains high, turbulent stock markets and the U.S.'s protracted tariff war with China have raised concerns with investors. Forum takes a closer look at the state of the U.S. economy, and the likelihood of a global recession.

  • Workplace Advice For Women of Color Beyond ‘Lean In’

    Aug 16 2019

    Women of color experience higher gender pay gaps than white women, according to the Institute for Women's Policy Research. Minda Harts, founder of the career education site The Memo, says advice books aimed at working women, such as Sheryl Sandberg’s "Lean In," fail to recognize the unique obstacles facing women of color. Tired of not seeing her experience reflected, she decided to write her own advice book, "The Memo: What Women of Color Need To Know to Secure a Seat at the Table." Hart joins F...more

  • Waking up Before 5:30 A.M. May Be More Common Than You Think

    Aug 16 2019

    Extreme early risers -- people who naturally and willingly wake up before 5:30 a.m. -- may be more common than popularly imagined. That's according to a new study in the journal "Sleep," which found one in every 300 people surveyed were "extreme morning larks" and that the behavior is likely hereditary. Extreme early risers tend to go to sleep by 8:30 at night and many fill their early morning hours with exercise, work or bird watching. Forum talks with Dr. Louis J. Ptáček, co-author of the s...more

  • Tensions Between Google Management and Employees Exposed

    Aug 16 2019

    There has been a rising distrust between Google management and employees in the aftermath of the 2016 election according to Wired Magazine's cover story, “Three Years of Misery Inside Google, the Happiest Company in Tech.” Reporter Nitasha Tiku interviewed 47 current and former Google employees, and describes a changing culture within Google, wherein employees on both sides of the political spectrum feel disrespected by upper management's reactions to controversial posts in internal online forum...more

  • Israel Draws Criticism for Denying Entry to 2 American Congresswomen

    Aug 16 2019

    Israel denied entry to U.S. Democratic Congresswomen Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar on Thursday after President Trump urged Prime Minister Netanyahu to block them. Tlaib and Omar, both outspoken supporters of Palestinian rights, planned to visit the Israeli-occupied West Bank. Israel's announcement and Trump's involvement has drawn wide criticism, including from strongly pro-Israel groups. Forum talks about what it means for the President to encourage a foreign ally's punishment of his domestic po...more

  • ‘Don’t Read Poetry’ Examines the Joys and Challenges of…Reading Poetry

    Aug 15 2019

    Poet and literary critic Stephanie Burt likes to imagine a world where discovering an enticing new poem would happen as readily as, say, enjoying a new song from a band. In her book “Don’t Read Poetry,” Burt introduces readers to poetry as “a living art form” and looks to demystify it from its stereotype as … Continue reading ‘Don’t Read Poetry’ Examines the Joys and Challenges of…Reading Poetry →

  • Ask the Mayor: San Jose’s Sam Liccardo

    Aug 15 2019

    On Monday, two weeks after the Gilroy Garlic Festival shooting claimed the lives of two children from his city, San Jose mayor Sam Liccardo proposed requiring gun owners to buy liability insurance. If approved, the law would be the first of its kind in the country.  In this hour, Liccardo joins us to talk about … Continue reading Ask the Mayor: San Jose’s Sam Liccardo →

  • Planned Alta Bates Closure Has East Bay Residents Worried Over “Healthcare Desert”

    Aug 14 2019

    Sutter Health, the owner of Alta Bates Hospital in Berkeley, is planning to close the facility, including the emergency room, by 2030. The nonprofit hospital operator says that it is not able to make the seismic upgrades required by the state. East Bay leaders and community activists say closing the hospital at a time when the region's population is growing will put lives at risk and create a "healthcare desert," with patients forced to travel further to access emergency care. Forum talks about ...more

  • Tensions High as Protests Continue in Hong Kong

    Aug 14 2019

    Protests continued for a second day at Hong Kong International Airport, with riot police clashing with demonstrators. Tensions have been high since early June in response to a law, which has since been suspended, that would have extradited alleged criminals to mainland China. We’ll get the latest on the protests, which have led to chaos … Continue reading Tensions High as Protests Continue in Hong Kong →

  • Controversial George Washington High School Mural Revisited

    Aug 14 2019

    The San Francisco school board is revisiting the issue of a controversial mural at George Washington High School that depicts slavery and a dead Native American man. The school board planned to discuss preserving the mural behind a covering, instead of painting over it, Tuesday night. In June, the board unanimously voted to paint over … Continue reading Controversial George Washington High School Mural Revisited →

  • Beth Gardiner Spotlights the Serious Health Effects of Air Pollution in “Choked”

    Aug 13 2019

    Air pollution prematurely kills seven million people around the world and more than 100,000 Americans a year, according to environmental journalist Beth Gardiner. In her new book, "Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution," Gardiner travels the world, from China to the San Joaquin Valley, to understand how political and economic forces impact our air quality. Gardiner joins Forum to discuss the current state of air pollution, the legacy of the 1970 U.S. Clean Air Act, and what needs t...more

  • Changes to Endangered Species Act Weaken Wildlife Protections

    Aug 13 2019

    The Trump administration is moving forward with changes to the Endangered Species Act that will weaken protections for "threatened" species and make room for greater corporate input. Credited with saving the bald eagle and grizzly bear, the 1973 Endangered Species Act currently protects more than 1,600 species in the United States and its territories. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, among other state attorneys general, have already promised to fight back against these rollbacks. Foru...more

  • Ask the Mayor: Oakland’s Libby Schaaf

    Aug 13 2019

    Since being sworn in to her second term in January, Oakland mayor Libby Schaaf has faced a teachers' strike, a conflict with President Trump over ICE immigration raids, and a report showing a dramatic rise in homelessness. In this hour we'll hear Mayor Schaaf's perspective on these challenges, and take your questions.

  • What Greenland’s Melting Ice Tells Us About Climate Change

    Aug 12 2019

    Greenland may be the world’s least-populated country, but its vast and dwindling ice sheet can predict the global effects of climate, according to New York Times magazine contributing science writer Jon Gertner. In his new book, “The Ice at the End of the World: An Epic Journey into Greenland’s Buried Past and Our Perilous Future,” … Continue reading What Greenland’s Melting Ice Tells Us About Climate Change →

  • Jeffrey Epstein Dies in Federal Detention

    Aug 12 2019

    Financier and registered sex offender Jeffrey Epstein was found hanging in his New York cell on Saturday. In July, Epstein was arrested and charged with sex trafficking and was denied bail shortly after. He was first indicted in 2007 after being accused of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls at his mansion in Palm Beach, Florida. Attorney General Barr stated there were "serious irregularities" at the Manhattan Correctional Center where Epstein was found. We’ll talk about what his mysteriou...more

  • Under Fiscal Pressure, Oakland Unified School District Grapples With Closures, Mergers

    Aug 12 2019

    As students head back to school Monday, the cash-strapped Oakland Unified School District is weighing a second round of school closures and consolidations, in order to regain fiscal stability after years of budget struggles and a state bailout. Among the scenarios under consideration is the merger of Kaiser Elementary with Sankofa Academy. That merger proposal, … Continue reading Under Fiscal Pressure, Oakland Unified School District Grapples With Closures, Mergers →

  • How the English Language Is Changing ‘Because Internet’

    Aug 09 2019

    Ever had a joke or sarcastic comment go awry when sending a text message? According to author and linguist Gretchen McCulloch, the challenge of conveying subtle differences in tone over short, written messages is driving rapid change in the English language. Her new book, "Because Internet," answers questions like why young people might read periods as passive aggressive, or why "lol" rarely means "laugh out loud" in the literal sense. We talk to McCulloch about the internet's dramatic effect on...more

  • Gilroy Mourns Victims in Weeks After Mass Shooting, Vows to Stay Strong

    Aug 09 2019

    Nearly two weeks ago, on July 28, a 19-year-old opened fire at the Gilroy Garlic Festival, killing three people and himself and wounding 15. The incident is now being investigated as an act of domestic terrorism. Forum checks in with members of the Gilroy community on how the city is faring since the attack.

  • Bus Service Returns to the SF Transbay Transit Center

    Aug 09 2019

    For the first time since September 2018 when cracked steel beams halted transit, buses will once again run in and out of San Francisco's Transbay Transit Center starting Sunday. This follows the reopening of the center's rooftop park and retail areas in July, and could signal a new era for the $2.2 billion transit hub. Forum discusses how this could change your commute and what's next for the long-beleaguered Transbay Transit Center.

  • Climate Change May Shrink Northern California Oyster Habitat

    Aug 08 2019

    A UC Davis study published this week found that human-caused climate change will likely shrink the habitats of oysters in Northern California. Focusing on native Olympia oysters and commercially grown Pacific oysters, the study monitored the growth and health of the bivalves and their habitats. We’ll talk with the study’s lead author about what this … Continue reading Climate Change May Shrink Northern California Oyster Habitat →

  • Pink Seesaws Promote Play and Goodwill Along US-Mexico Border Wall

    Aug 08 2019

    Images and videos of children bouncing on pink seesaws on either side of the U.S.-Mexico border went viral across social media in late July. The seesaws, installed by Bay Area professors and architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello, spanned the border fence between Sunland Park, N.M. and Ciudad Juárez in Mexico, inviting families on … Continue reading Pink Seesaws Promote Play and Goodwill Along US-Mexico Border Wall →

  • Congresswoman Jackie Speier on Gun Laws, Immigration

    Aug 08 2019

    This week Congresswoman Jackie Speier joined fellow Democrats in reiterating the call for stricter gun laws, including an assault weapons ban, in the wake of last weekend’s mass shootings. She also took part in a recent congressional visit to a migrant detention facility, which she described in an opinion piece for NBC News as a … Continue reading Congresswoman Jackie Speier on Gun Laws, Immigration →

  • Steven Greenhouse on Why Workers Feel ‘Beaten Down, Worked Up’

    Aug 07 2019

    Faced with income inequality, gender pay inequity and declining social mobility, American workers have been experiencing a decades-long depletion of their power, according to long-time labor reporter, Steven Greenhouse. Drawing from his 19-year tenure at the New York Times, Greenhouse’s new book “Beaten Down, Worked Up” chronicles the history and current state of labor organizing … Continue reading Steven Greenhouse on Why Workers Feel ‘Beaten Down, Worked Up’ →

  • Reflecting on the Literature and Legacy of Toni Morrison

    Aug 07 2019

    Toni Morrison, acclaimed author of "Beloved," "Song of Solomon" and "The Bluest Eye," died on Monday at the age of 88. The first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, Morrison's work brought center-stage black identity and womanhood in America, and her writing style echoed and built upon black oral traditions. This hour on Forum, we'll remember her legacy as an author who pushed against the homogeneity of the American literary canon and wrote stories of enduring emotional ...more

  • Empathy as a Radical Act

    Aug 06 2019

    Are we born with a certain level of empathy? Stanford psychology professor Jamil Zaki explores that question in his new book, “The War for Kindness,” which looks at the declining level of empathy in society. He argues that, like a muscle, empathy must be trained or it can atrophy. Cris Beam, author of “I Feel … Continue reading Empathy as a Radical Act →

  • Will US Reconsider Gun Laws After Spate of Mass Shootings?

    Aug 06 2019

    Increased calls for action on gun violence are coming in the wake of the two mass shootings in El Paso, TX and Dayton, OH last weekend. On Monday, Democratic leaders called for the Senate to come back from recess to pass the Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019, which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked … Continue reading Will US Reconsider Gun Laws After Spate of Mass Shootings? →

  • CalEPA Secretary Jared Blumenfeld on California’s Environmental Priorities Under the Trump Administration

    Aug 05 2019

    California’s Secretary of Environmental Protection Jared Blumenfeld oversees the state’s efforts to combat climate change, ensure clean air and water, regulate pesticides and manage waste and recycling goals. Governor Gavin Newsom appointed the former Obama administration official and director of San Francisco’s Department of the Environment to head CalEPA in January. Blumenfeld joins Forum to … Continue reading CalEPA Secretary Jared Blumenfeld on California’s Environmental Priorities Under the...more

  • Latest Mass Shootings Underscore Growing Threat of Home-Grown Terrorism

    Aug 05 2019

    The mass shooting at Wal-Mart in El Paso Saturday morning took the lives of 21 people, leaving 26 injured. That horrific attack came less than a week after the massacre at the Gilroy Garlic Festival and was followed less than 24 hours later by a shooting at a bar in Dayton, Ohio. While the motives … Continue reading Latest Mass Shootings Underscore Growing Threat of Home-Grown Terrorism →

  • What’s for Lunch? Tell Us the Best Cheap Local Eats

    Aug 02 2019

    KQED just moved its offices to downtown San Francisco and we're looking for the best places to get a quick, affordable and delicious lunch. We talk with Eater SF editor, Ellen Fort about her top picks and we hear from you: What are your favorite lunch spots in downtown San Francisco or the area where you work? And check out Eater SF's Essential Cheap Eats in San Francisco for their recommendations.

  • San Francisco Changes Feral Cat and Kitten Policy

    Aug 02 2019

    San Francisco's SPCA and Animal Care & Control recently changed the trap, neuter and return policy for feral cats and kittens. This policy encouraged volunteers to trap feral mothers with new kittens, bring them to an animal shelter to be spayed or neutered, and then put the kittens up for adoption. Instead, the shelters now advocate leaving feral cats alone until their kittens are weaned, which they say protects the wild mother cats from the stress of living in a shelter. Some animal volunteers...more

  • For Students With Disabilities, Access to Testing Accommodations Depends on Income and Race

    Aug 02 2019

    High school students in the wealthiest one percent of school districts are more than twice as likely to receive testing accommodations than the national average. That’s according to a recent New York Times investigation which found a “glaring wealth gap” in so-called 504 designations, which provide students extra time on classroom and standardized tests. The … Continue reading For Students With Disabilities, Access to Testing Accommodations Depends on Income and Race →

  • What’s Medicare for All (And Who Would Pay for It)?

    Aug 01 2019

    At Tuesday night’s primary debate, Senator Bernie Sanders made the case for his Medicare for All plan, which would create a single-payer health system for all Americans and replace most private insurance. Sanders said the plan would stabilize the health care system, enable patients to freely choose doctors and hospitals, and eliminate “profiteering” by drug … Continue reading What’s Medicare for All (And Who Would Pay for It)? →

  • Second Democratic Primary Debate Continues Wednesday

    Aug 01 2019

    Ten more Democratic presidential hopefuls take the stage in Detroit Wednesday evening in the second round of primary debates. We'll review the highlights and hear your reactions.

  • Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf on Homelessness and Housing Affordability

    Aug 01 2019

    The number of homeless people in Oakland jumped 47 percent over the past two years, according to a new survey. That’s despite the city’s $9 million initiative, Keep Oakland Housed, which provides emergency financial assistance and free legal help to people at risk. The city has also committed to building thousands more affordable homes by … Continue reading Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf on Homelessness and Housing Affordability →

  • Oakland Homelessness Increases 47% in Two Years

    Aug 01 2019

    Alameda County spent more than $100 million last fiscal year to prevent housing displacement via shelters, permanent supportive housing and other solutions. Despite that investment, the number of homeless in the county increased by 43 percent, according to the latest point-in-time count. Oakland saw the largest increase, with numbers jumping 47 percent between 2017 and … Continue reading Oakland Homelessness Increases 47% in Two Years →

  • Presidential Candidates Face Off in Part One of Second Democratic Debate

    Jul 31 2019

    Twenty Democratic presidential hopefuls are set to meet in Detroit Tuesday and Wednesday evenings for the second round of primary debates. We'll review Tuesday's debate, which will feature half of the candidates, including progressive front runners Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders. We'll also talk about Silicon Valley's role in the upcoming election and the candidates' positions on big tech. And we want to hear from you: What was your biggest takeaway from the debate?

  • Solutions for Housing Vulnerable Seniors

    Jul 31 2019

    A recent UCSF study shows that nearly half of homeless seniors became homeless for the first time above the age of 50.  And that number is expected to grow. In collaboration with the San Francisco Chronicle and other media outlets, this week KQED focuses on the housing affordability crisis in the Bay Area. Forum will discuss the specific causes of elderly homelessness, the vulnerability of this population, and the solutions being proposed to decrease or end the displacement of Bay Area seniors.

  • How to Navigate Your Marriage’s ‘Rough Patch’

    Jul 30 2019

    Hitting a "rough patch" in a long-term relationship doesn't mean the end is near, nor inevitable. According to psychologist Daphne de Marneffe, "rough patches" can make a marriage stronger when partners work through it together. Her book, "The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together," explores how to improve communication, respect and empathy in a partnership. De Marneffe joins us in studio to share her relationship advice and workarounds.

  • Community Grieves for Gilroy, California Gun Laws in the Spotlight

    Jul 30 2019

    The city of Gilroy continues to grieve the deadly shooting at the Gilroy Garlic Festival that injured 12 people and left four dead on Sunday, including two children and the gunman. Gilroy Police Chief Scot Smithee identified Santino William Legan, the grandson of former Santa Clara supervisor Tom Legan, as the alleged gunman. Gilroy police, with assistance from the FBI, are continuing to investigate the motives behind the deadly attack. Forum checks in with the latest news from Gilroy and discus...more

  • Sea Foraging Along the Bay Area Coastline

    Jul 29 2019

    Traversing the San Francisco Bay in his kayak, Kirk Lombard, also known as the "Sea Forager," scavenges unusual seafood from our local shores, bays and estuaries. A commercial fisherman, a sea foraging tour guide, and a sustainability advocate, Lombard works to raise awareness about the importance of eating local and getting to know the lesser-known fish that the bay area has to offer. Kirk Lombard joins Forum to explain the art of sea foraging and illuminate some of the bay's more obscure delic...more

  • Exploratorium’s ‘Middle Ground’ Prompts Introspection on Biases, Stereotypes

    Jul 29 2019

    While some may be familiar with the Exploratorium's distorted room or toilet water fountain, its upcoming installation “Middle Ground” analyzes perception in a whole new way. A free, public exhibition at Civic Center Plaza that opens August 13, “Middle Ground” analyzes the ways we interact with one another, questioning stereotypes, bias, teamwork and isolation. As the Exploratorium celebrates its 50th year, Executive Director Chris Flink joins us to share the installation's message and what to e...more

  • Looking Ahead to the End of Life

    Jul 29 2019

    Everyone dies. BJ Miller and Shoshana Berger's new book "A Beginner's Guide to the End" aims to help us accept that fact, providing practical advice on preparing for our own deaths or the death of a loved one. Covering both complex emotions and bureaucratic end-of-life and funeral paperwork alike, the book aims to encourage more people to prepare for the inevitable and make their lives — and the lives of their loved ones — less complicated at the end.

  • Lizzie Post Says We Need ‘Higher Etiquette’ for Cannabis Use

    Jul 26 2019

    As cannabis use becomes more common in social settings, is it time to set some ground rules? Lizzie Post, the great-great-granddaughter of etiquette maven Emily Post, thinks so. In her new book, "Higher Etiquette," Post clears up cannabis-related terminology, the proper ways to pass a joint, and how to host a dinner party where some do, and some don't, partake in an after-meal vape. And we want to hear from you: do you have any burning questions about common cannabis courtesy?

  • How to Tip in the Digital Age

    Jul 26 2019

    The popular food delivery app DoorDash announced this week it would no longer use customer tips to subsidize delivery workers' pay, after a Slate journalist brought the practice to light. But how can you know how much of your electronic tip is really going to the person who delivered your food? And what should you make of digital prompts to pay a gratuity, even for a shrink-wrapped pastry or a bottle of water? We'll talk about the complexities of tipping in the digital world, and we want to hear...more

  • California Childcare Characterized by Unaffordable Prices and Low Wages

    Jul 26 2019

    California early educators are nearly twice as likely to live in poverty than other workers, that's according to a new report by UC Berkeley's Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, in collaboration with the Economic Policy Institute. Low pay for early educators and high turnover rates are contributing to an already stressed early child care and education system, defined by overall shortages. Few Californians have access to quality child care, regardless of salary. In the state, an estim...more

  • California Strikes Emissions Deal with Major Carmakers

    Jul 25 2019

    The California Air Resources Board announced Thursday that it has reached a deal with four major automakers to reduce tailpipe emissions, undermining the Trump Administration’s plan to roll back Obama-era clean vehicle standards. The voluntary pact struck with Ford, Honda, Volkswagen and BMW keeps in place the state’s current emissions reduction program through 2026 and … Continue reading California Strikes Emissions Deal with Major Carmakers →

  • Peter Orner on Crafting 44 Heartfelt American Stories in ‘Maggie Brown & Others’

    Jul 25 2019

    In his recent essay "A Refusal to Defend or Even Stick Up for the Art of the Short Story," author Peter Orner opts to leave unspoken "what makes certain stories reach into your chest cavity and rip out what is left of your heart." Orner joins Forum to talk about his new short story collection "Maggie Brown & Others," and his own process of tugging on readers' heartstrings.

  • Robert Mueller Testifies Before Congress

    Jul 25 2019

    Former special counsel Robert Mueller testified before Congress Wednesday in a much anticipated hearing. Democrats used a subpoena to make Mueller appear before Congress so that Americans could watch the former special counsel tell his story. Republicans have undermined Mueller's investigation, the Justice Department and FBI for months. Now the question is, what does this mean for Washington and the nation? We'll talk about how the testimony could affect the Trump Administration moving forward.

  • Understanding the Link Between Cannabis Use and Mental Illness

    Jul 23 2019

    People who use cannabis daily are three times more likely to develop psychotic disorders like schizophrenia than those who have never used cannabis. That's according to a study published in March in The Lancet Psychiatry, which also found that daily users of high potency cannabis, defined as having THC concentrations of greater than ten percent, are five times more likely to develop psychosis. As more states join California in legalizing recreational cannabis, we'll talk about the latest researc...more

  • Hundreds of Thousands Protest in Puerto Rico, Call on Governor to Resign

    Jul 23 2019

    Hundreds of thousands of protesters shut down a main highway in Puerto Rico Monday, demanding that Governor Ricardo Rosselló step down. Rosselló has been under fire for corruption and leaked chat room messages in which he disparaged victims of Hurricane Maria. In an interview with Fox News Monday, Rosselló said he hasn't resigned because of his "respect" for democracy and the rule of law. We'll discuss the latest developments.

  • Boris Johnson Poised to Become UK’s Next Prime Minister

    Jul 23 2019

    Former London Mayor Boris Johnson has won the United Kingdom's conservative leadership vote and will take over as prime minister Wednesday afternoon. In his victory speech, Johnson vowed to withdraw from the European Union by the October 31 deadline, even if no deal is reached with the remaining EU countries. Forum looks at what this leadership change means for the UK and Brexit.

  • Richard Clarke on Cybersecurity Threat and What Can Be Done About It

    Jul 22 2019

    While progress has been made in defending the U.S. against cyber attacks, significant threats continue to emerge like the takedown of power grids and election hacking seen in recent years. And former U.S. counter-terrorism officer Richard Clarke fears worse scenarios await–like the U.S. getting pulled into war against a cyber army capable of hacking the … Continue reading Richard Clarke on Cybersecurity Threat and What Can Be Done About It →

  • National Political News in Review

    Jul 22 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest from Washington, D.C.

  • FaceApp Prompts Calls for Federal Investigations Over National Security, Privacy Concerns

    Jul 19 2019

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer called on the FBI and the FTC Wednesday to investigate FaceApp, the popular photo-aging mobile tool. Schumer, echoing concerns by digital privacy advocates, said that FaceApp could use its customers’ photos and names publicly without their consent. He also said that FaceApp, which is based in Saint Petersburg, Russia, could … Continue reading FaceApp Prompts Calls for Federal Investigations Over National Security, Privacy Concerns →

  • Johnny Funcheap on the Best of the Bay Area’s Free Summer Events

    Jul 19 2019

    From gallery crawls to canine happy hours to ice cream giveaways, the Bay Area abounds with free and low-cost events this summer. We’ll hear from Johnny Hayes, publisher of funcheap.com, about his picks for adults and kids alike. And we want to hear from you: what’s your favorite free (or almost free) local summer activity?

  • Trump Tweets and Rally Chants Renew Conversation on US Racism

    Jul 19 2019

    President Trump’s racist tweets last Sunday telling four progressive congresswomen of color to “go back” to their home countries appear to have galvanized Trump’s base, and sparked a larger conversation on racism in America. At a rally in North Carolina on Wednesday night, crowds chanted “send her back!” about Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar, a naturalized … Continue reading Trump Tweets and Rally Chants Renew Conversation on US Racism →

  • Want to Do Something about Information Overload? Try Nothing

    Jul 18 2019

    From the grind of the gig economy to the hustle for “likes” on social media, there is always something to do, and a constant pressure to do it. The best way to resist these productivity pressures of capitalism? Do nothing, says Bay Area artist and writer Jenny Odell. In her book “How to Do Nothing: … Continue reading Want to Do Something about Information Overload? Try Nothing →

  • Crowd Chants “Send Her Back” as Trump Continues Attacks on Rep. Omar

    Jul 18 2019

    In a rally in North Carolina yesterday, President Trump doubled down on his attacks on four Democratic Congresswomen. As the crowd chanted “Send her back! Send her back!” Trump railed against “hate-filled extremists who are constantly trying to tear our country down.” Forum talks about the rally and what it portends for the upcoming 2020 … Continue reading Crowd Chants “Send Her Back” as Trump Continues Attacks on Rep. Omar →

  • Berkeley Phases Out Natural Gas in New Buildings

    Jul 18 2019

    Berkeley’s City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to phase out natural gas hookups in new residential constructions, beginning January 1, 2020. The first-in-the-nation ordinance encompasses single-family homes, town homes and low-rise apartment buildings. The ban will extend to commercial buildings, including restaurants and hotels, once the California Energy Commission issues approvals. We’ll talk about what the … Continue reading Berkeley Phases Out Natural Gas in New Buildings →

  • Investigation Reveals Disturbing Info about Rape Prosecution and Serial Rapists

    Jul 17 2019

    "Rape - more than murder, more than robbery or assault - is by far the easiest violent crime to get away with." So writes Barbara Bradley Hagerty in a new article for The Atlantic in which she explores why the assailant goes free in 49 out of 50 rape cases. We'll talk to Hagerty about her reporting and new information about sexual predators, including that serial rapists are far more common than previously thought.

  • Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens Dies, Leaving Liberal Legacy

    Jul 17 2019

    Retired Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens died Tuesday at the age of 99. Appointed in 1975 by Republican President Gerald Ford, Justice Stevens came to side with the Court’s liberal wing. He was known for his forceful dissent in the Heller case, which recognized an individual’s constitutional right to possess a firearm; his call to abolish the death penalty; and his scathing indictment of the Court’s opinion in Citizens United, writing that it “threatens to undermine the integrity of elect...more

  • San Francisco Considers Designated Site for People Living in Cars, RVs

    Jul 17 2019

    Two San Francisco supervisors have proposed creating a designated parking site for people who live in their cars. Supervisors Ahsha Safai and Vallie Brown have suggested a site close to Balboa Park Bart station that would accommodate up to 33 vehicles for stays of up to 90 days. The site would offer bathrooms, security, and access to social services. We discuss the plan.

  • Facebook’s Cryptocurrency Project Faces Congressional Scrutiny

    Jul 16 2019

    Members of the Senate Banking Committee expressed skepticism Tuesday about Facebook’s plan to launch a digital currency called Libra. David Marcus, who heads Facebook’s blockchain subsidiary called Calibra, said the currency will build a “more inclusive financial infrastructure” and enable people to move money cheaply and safely. But lawmakers voiced concerns about consumer security, given … Continue reading Facebook’s Cryptocurrency Project Faces Congressional Scrutiny →

  • President Trump Announces Rule to Curb Central American Asylum Claims

    Jul 16 2019

    A plan by the Trump administration that goes into effect today says that migrants who want to be eligible for immigration to the U.S. must apply for asylum in the first country they pass through en route to the U.S. We'll discuss the so-called "3rd country rule" and how it will affect immigrants from Central America.

  • New Report Details How Extreme Heat will Affect the Bay Area

    Jul 16 2019

    If we don't act on climate change now, in about 50 years San Francisco could see as many as 30 above-90-degree days annually, according to a new report. Forum talks about the report from the Union of Concerned Scientists, how Bay Area temperatures will likely change in coming decades and the health impacts of extreme heat.

  • A Late Bloomer Makes a Case Against Early Achievement

    Jul 15 2019

    Forbes is known for its annual “30 Under 30” lists, which highlight the achievements of young, bold entrepreneurs around the world. But the magazine’s publisher, Rich Karlgaard, says that at age 25 he could barely handle his job as a security guard at a trucking yard. He joins us to talk about social pressure to … Continue reading A Late Bloomer Makes a Case Against Early Achievement →

  • National Political News in Review

    Jul 15 2019

    From the ongoing fall out around financier Jeffrey Epstein’s sex trafficking charges to expected raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, we discuss the latest news and what you need to know to start your week.

  • Multibillion-Dollar Wildfire Fund Approved by California Lawmakers

    Jul 12 2019

    State lawmakers on Thursday approved a multi-billion dollar fund aimed at reforming the way utilities and the state cover the cost of future wildfires. The approval of AB 1054 creates a $21 billion fund to pay for damages linked to fires caused by utility equipment. Proponents of the bill say it limits rate increases while adding safety restrictions. But critics argue it shifts the burden of proving a utility's negligence onto victims. We discuss the measure, which Governor Newsom is expected to...more

  • “Still Don’t Want to Blame Anybody”: Ghost Ship Defendant Took the Stand This Week

    Jul 12 2019

    Derick Almena, the master tenant of the Ghost Ship warehouse in Oakland, where 36 people died in a fire in 2016, testified in court this week. Almena said he wasn't aware the building was dangerous, and that he had repeatedly asked the owner of the building to make improvements. Almena and co-defendant Max Harris have each been charged with 36 counts of felony involuntary manslaughter and face up to 39 years in prison for what is considered the deadliest fire in Oakland's history.

  • Trump Administration Planning Nationwide Sweep of Thousands of Undocumented Immigrants

    Jul 12 2019

    Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials are planning to execute raids on at least 2,000 undocumented immigrants in 10 metro areas, according to a New York Times report Thursday. The sweeps, which are expected to begin on Sunday and continue into next week, could reportedly include "collateral" arrests of family members or others on the scene. Last month President Trump in a tweet canceled similar planned raids shortly before they were to take place, in order to give lawmakers more time to ...more

  • BART Experiments with New Fare Gates to Cut Down On Fare Evasion

    Jul 11 2019

    BART is getting creative and trying out new fare gate designs in order to address the issue of fare cheats, which BART management estimates drains anywhere from $15 to $25 million a year in revenue. BART installed the first of their new prototypes, the double-decker gate, on June 9 at the Richmond Station to mixed … Continue reading BART Experiments with New Fare Gates to Cut Down On Fare Evasion →

  • US Cult Movements Seen in New Light in ‘American Messiahs’

    Jul 11 2019

    Adam Morris’ new book “American Messiahs: False Prophets of a Damned Nation” traces a lineage of fringe evangelical "messiah" figures in the U.S. While these figures, like civil rights leader Father Divine and cult leader Jim Jones, were eccentric, manipulative, and even violent in their practices, Morris also finds them making social criticisms that were ahead of their time. We talk to Morris about how these radical movements--from the Shakers of the 1700s to Jim Jones’ disastrous Peoples Templ...more

  • New Legislation Would Require All Charter School Teachers to Have Credential

    Jul 11 2019

    A new bill seeks to impose more barriers on California charter schools, including requiring all teachers to be credentialed. Another aspect of the controversial proposal would allow districts to reject charters if they are deemed to have a negative impact on enrollment and funding of surrounding schools. Opponents say the bill is an attempt to curtail the growth of charter schools, which now number more than 1300 in California. We hear from both sides of the issue.

  • California Bill Seeks “Fair Pay to Play” for College Athletes

    Jul 10 2019

    The California State Assembly Committee on Higher Education passed the "Fair Pay to Play Act" on Tuesday, clearing the way for California student athletes to profit from the use of their name, image or likeness. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) currently bans collegiate athletes from this practice and has opposed the bill, along with the University of California, California State University, and the Association of Independent of California Colleges and Universities, claiming i...more

  • So Long to Chronicle Columnist Leah Garchik

    Jul 10 2019

    Leah Garchik recalls being chided throughout her career by readers of her San Francisco Chronicle column for being too positive and too optimistic. A recent column responded to that criticism by enumerating things she hates, including raisins, large groups of bicycle riders and VIP sections. Garchik, who recently retired as columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle, joins us to talk about her 47 years at the paper and her observations –both positive and negative--about the city by the Bay. If ...more

  • Federal Appeals Court Hears Broad Challenge to ACA

    Jul 10 2019

    A federal appeals court in New Orleans heard arguments Tuesday in Texas v. U.S., a major challenge to the Affordable Care Act brought by 20 Republican state officials. Last December, a lower court agreed with the Texas coalition that the ACA's individual mandate is unconstitutional, and as a result struck down the entire law. We'll talk about the hearing and what's at stake in the case.

  • Responding to the Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant ‘Superbugs’

    Jul 09 2019

    Deadly “superbugs,” or microbes that can resist antibiotics, are on the rise and killing hundreds of thousands of people annually. Pharmaceutical companies, however, are typically slow to invest in the search for new drugs for financial reasons. That’s according to infectious-disease doctor Matt McCarthy, who chronicles this conflict in his new book, “Superbugs: The Race … Continue reading Responding to the Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant ‘Superbugs’ →

  • Fungus Deadly to Bats Found in California

    Jul 09 2019

    An invasive fungus that has killed millions of bats on the East Coast, has been found in California. Government biologists announced last week that the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome was detected on several bats near Lassen Volcanic National Park in Northern California. Forum talks about the spread of the deadly bat disease and efforts … Continue reading Fungus Deadly to Bats Found in California →

  • Tensions with U.S. Escalate as Iran Exceeds More Limits Set by 2015 Nuclear Deal

    Jul 09 2019

    Iran’s atomic energy agency acknowledged Monday that it has surpassed uranium enrichment limits set by the 2015 nuclear deal. The announcement came a day after the United States, which withdrew from the deal last year, warned of “further sanctions and isolation.” This is Iran’s second major breach of the nuclear agreement; on July 1 it … Continue reading Tensions with U.S. Escalate as Iran Exceeds More Limits Set by 2015 Nuclear Deal →

  • Presidential Historian Douglas Brinkley on ‘American Moonshot’

    Jul 08 2019

    This month marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission.  Presidential historian and Rice University professor Douglas Brinkley joins us to talk about his latest book, “American Moonshot: John F. Kennedy and the Great Space Race.”  We’ll also hear from producer Robert Stone about the upcoming PBS documentary series “Chasing the Moon,” a political and social exploration … Continue reading Presidential Historian Douglas Brinkley on ‘American Moonshot’ →

  • Latest Earthquakes Spark Questions about Early Warning System

    Jul 08 2019

    Seismologist Dr. Lucy Jones joins us for the latest on the earthquakes that hit Southern California. We’ll also discuss the helpfulness of the earthquake early warning systems.

  • False Perceptions Further Divide Among Americans, New Study Finds

    Jul 08 2019

    Another day, another story about political polarization. Yet, a study published last month shows that Americans’ political beliefs are more nuanced and less extreme than their political opponents believe. For example, Republicans think that half of Democrats would say that “police are bad people” when in reality only 15 percent hold that view. The survey, … Continue reading False Perceptions Further Divide Among Americans, New Study Finds →

  • Rebroadcast: High School Locks Up Cell Phones Hoping For More Attentive, Less Isolated Students

    Jul 05 2019

    In an attempt to get students to pay more attention to schoolwork and the non-virtual world, San Mateo High School will be locking up cellphones for the full school day beginning next year. Officials in other schools that have adopted the policy say phone-free kids are more attentive in class and less socially isolated, but some students complain the policy is too strict and penalizes those who use their devices responsibly. This segment is part of KQED’s "Youth Takeover,” a week featuring stori...more

  • Rebroadcast: Futurist Amy Webb Warns Against Leaving AI in the Hands of Big Tech

    Jul 05 2019

    The future of humanity rests in the hands of just nine companies, according to futurist Amy Webb. In her new book, "The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity," Webb explores the evolution of artificial intelligence as it seeps into our everyday lives through smart appliances, transforming our homes into "data generation machines" for large corporations. Webb argues that AI should be regulated instead of allowing a few companies, market forces and geopolit...more

  • Rebroadcast: Youth Poet Laureate’s ‘Love Poem to Oakland’

    Jul 04 2019

    Oakland will pick it's new youth poet laureate on June 7th. But before the new honoree is named, Forum talks with 16-year-old Leila Mottley, the city's current youth poet laureate, who spent the past year promoting poetry across the city. We'll also talk to Mottley about her self-published poetry collection, which grapples with the complexities of a rapidly changing Oakland.

  • Rebroadcast: Forum on the Road: Novelist Amor Towles on the Art of Writing and Reading Fiction

    Jul 04 2019

    Amor Towles' 2016 novel, "A Gentleman in Moscow," is about a Russia aristocrat confined for decades to a luxury hotel while the world changes outside its doors. Towles' first novel, "The Rules of Civility," brought 1930s and 40s New York City to life. Towles joins us in a special broadcast from the Oakland Public Library's 81st Avenue branch to talk about his writing, the connective power of books and what fiction can achieve that nonfiction writing cannot.

  • Rebroadcast: ‘The British Are Coming’ Recounts America’s Brutal War for Independence

    Jul 04 2019

    NOTE: This interview originally aired on June 10, 2019. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Rick Atkinson writes that reading George Washington’s frequent complaints about his troops “transforms the demigod into a sometimes petulant mortal.” As Atkinson’s history of the Revolutionary War digs into the details of war and contemporary writings, it provides a rich, harsh portrait of … Continue reading Rebroadcast: ‘The British Are Coming’ Recounts America’s Brutal War for Independence →

  • How ‘McMindfulness’ Manipulates Us into Coping Instead of Protesting

    Jul 03 2019

    From the apps on our phones to the magazines at our grocery stores, we're inundated with tips on using "mindfulness" to reduce stress. But San Francisco State professor Ronald Purser argues that the mindfulness advertised is more like "McMindfulness": well-packaged, individualized complacency that preserves the status quo. Instead of linking our unhappiness to larger social structures, we identify it as self-imposed -- and are told to learn how to cope. To accomplish true, revolutionary mindfuln...more

  • DHS Report and President Trump’s Independence Day Parade

    Jul 03 2019

    A Department of Homeland Security inspector general report on border facilities in the Rio Grande Valley was published Tuesday. The strongly worded report found "dangerous overcrowding" at a Texas detention facility that requires "immediate attention and action." We'll discuss the report, as well as President Trump's plans for 4th of July in Washington D.C., which will divert approximately $2.5 million from the National Park Service to cover the cost of the event.

  • Researchers: June Heat Wave Baked Local Mussels

    Jul 03 2019

    Local researchers think June’s record-breaking heat wave is to blame for scores of dead mussels along the shores of Bodega Bay. The effects of warming waters on marine life has been widely studied, but it’s rare to see marine life dying from hot air, as is suspected in this case. We’ll discuss the implications of … Continue reading Researchers: June Heat Wave Baked Local Mussels →

  • Making Sense of Parenting Advice with Emily Oster

    Jul 02 2019

    When it comes to parenting, the questions are endless, as is the advice. Health economist Emily Oster uses data to sort through the overwhelming number of studies, books, and articles telling parents what to do, in hopes of encouraging a more relaxed approach to child rearing. Oster argues that organizations like the American Pediatric Association need to get better at communicating realistic risks and benefits to time-strapped parents. Tell us: What's the most unrealistic piece of parenting adv...more

  • California Set to Ban Racially-Based Hair Discrimination

    Jul 02 2019

    A bill that would ban racially-based hair discrimination in workplaces and public schools is headed to Governor Gavin Newsom's desk. Known as the CROWN (Create a Respectful and Open Workplace for Natural Hair) Act, the bill seeks to rectify a history of "laws and societal norms that equated 'blackness,' and the associated physical traits ... to a badge of inferiority, sometimes subject to separate and unequal treatment." A study conducted by beauty company Dove found that natural black hairstyle...more

  • With More Buildings Bearing Corporate Names, is the Bay Area Becoming a ‘Brandopolis’?

    Jul 02 2019

    Salesforce Transit Center. Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. Chase Center. In recent years, corporate logos have appeared on a growing number of public buildings and structures throughout the Bay Area. The names are prominent advertising for companies and in instances where cities own the land, a source of revenue for cash-strapped municipalities and agencies. And it's not just office buildings and stadiums. Earlier this year, Caltrain voted to pursue the sale of naming rights for its s...more

  • San Jose Police Chief Eddie Garcia

    Jul 01 2019

    San Jose's sanctuary policy has been in the spotlight since city resident Bambi Larsen was killed earlier this year, allegedly by an undocumented immigrant with a criminal record. Critics of the policy--including the San Jose Police union--think police should notify federal immigration authorities when undocumented immigrants are released from jail.  The Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, however, recently voted to uphold the current policy that bars officials from notifying authorities. S...more

  • Six Months Since Launch, California Reporting Project Continues to Uncover Serious Police Misconduct

    Jul 01 2019

    In March 2017, a Napa State Hospital police officer slammed a 64-year-old patient's face into a concrete wall, breaking his eye socket and teeth. The patient, who has bipolar disorder, spent seven months in jail before charges against him were dismissed. The officer, along with three others who filed misleading reports, all kept their jobs. The incident is one of many police misconduct cases uncovered recently by KQED and other news groups around the state who are using a new California law to o...more

  • Joseph Menn’s ‘Cult of the Dead Cow’ Portrays the Lasting Influence of Early Hackers

    Jul 01 2019

    A lonely, code-savvy kid calling himself Grandmaster Ratte' created a group of friends with a mutual interest in hacking back in '80s Lubbock, Texas. Remaining anonymous until recently, group members have been credited with the hacktivist movement, where technology is used to further a political agenda. Journalist Joseph Menn joins us to talk about the history and evolution of this renowned group that called themselves the Cult of the Dead Cow.

  • Local Researchers Look at Psychological, Economic and Physical Toll of Shift Work

    Jun 28 2019

    Americans have increasingly erratic work schedules and it’s taking a toll on employees. That’s according to a study by a UC Berkeley and a UCSF professor who surveyed workers in food service and retail. Only 20 percent of those surveyed work a regular daytime shift, and two-thirds get their weekly schedule with less than two … Continue reading Local Researchers Look at Psychological, Economic and Physical Toll of Shift Work →

  • Golden State Warriors’ “Sixth Man” Andre Iguodala on His Life on and off the Court

    Jun 28 2019

    Just two weeks ago, Andre Iguodala was battling on the court in his fifth consecutive NBA Finals with the Golden State Warriors. But Iguodala has had his mind on more than basketball. In his new memoir, "The Sixth Man," Iguodala reflects on his childhood, the role of race in his life and in the NBA, and the mental and physical toll that competitive sports puts on kids and professional athletes. We'll discuss his book and get his take on the latest Warriors news, like teammate Kevin Durant's free...more

  • Soleil Ho Shakes up the Chronicle’s Top 100 Restaurants List

    Jun 28 2019

    The San Francisco Chronicle’s new restaurant critic is shaking things up for her inaugural Top 100 Restaurants List. For one thing, it’s not only hers — Soleil Ho involved other Chronicle Food and Wine staffers in compiling her list of the best restaurants in the Bay Area. But perhaps more strikingly, in compiling this year’s … Continue reading Soleil Ho Shakes up the Chronicle’s Top 100 Restaurants List →

  • Democratic Presidential Candidates Take the Stage in Second Debate

    Jun 28 2019

    We recap Thursday night's Democratic presidential debate, which features current frontrunners former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders, as well as California politicians Sen. Kamala Harris and Rep. Eric Swalwell. What did you think? Which candidates stood out to you and made their mark?

  • San Francisco and LGBTQ Pride, Before and After Stonewall

    Jun 27 2019

    This year's June pride month marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York, the widely accepted start of the LGBTQ rights movement. But LGBTQ activism began even sooner in the U.S., with similar riots and demonstrations in San Francisco. We'll talk about that history of activism before and after Stonewall with historian Marc Stein, and hear what that legacy looks like in present-day San Francisco with co-founder of Compton's Transgender Cultural District, Honey Mahogany.

  • Supreme Court to Rule on Major Census, Redistricting Cases

    Jun 27 2019

    The Supreme Court will release decisions Thursday morning in several major cases, including a challenge to the Trump Administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the the 2020 census. It will also rule on cases alleging partisan gerrymandering by democrats in Maryland and by republicans in North Carolina. We'll discuss the decisions and their impacts, and look ahead to the court's next term.

  • First Democratic Presidential Debate Kicks Off

    Jun 27 2019

    From heavy hitters like Elizabeth Warren to lesser-known figures like self-help author Marianne Williamson, twenty democratic presidential hopefuls take to the stage for the first time in the 2020 campaign Wednesday and Thursday nights. We analyze Wednesday's debate.

  • Coping with Overtourism

    Jun 26 2019

    Crashing cruise ships, striking museum workers, degrading coral reefs -- these are all symptoms of overtourism -- a problem that's only going to get worse. The UN World Tourism Organization reported that 1.4 billion trips were taken in 2018. That number is expected to rise to 1.8 billion by 2030. We discuss how popular destinations are grappling with overtourism, and if and how tourists can help relieve it.

  • 20 Democratic Candidates Face Off in First Debate

    Jun 26 2019

    The first debates between Democrats vying for the White House begin this week. Twenty candidates will take to the stage over two nights, hoping to make their mark in a crowded field. What candidates will you be watching for and why? What issue do you hope to hear the candidates speak to?

  • Leadership Shakeups at U.S. Immigration Agencies Amid Deepening Crisis at the Border

    Jun 26 2019

    Acting Customs and Border Protection chief John Sanders announced his resignation Tuesday, after just two months on the job. He'll be replaced by immigration hardliner Mark Morgan, who's currently the acting director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The personnel shake-ups come as federal officials scramble to move hundreds of migrant children from a Texas detention facility described by lawyers last week as squalid and inhumane. Meanwhile, the House moved closer toward voting on a ...more

  • Parenting as a Political Act: Raising Black Children

    Jun 25 2019

    While some parents might struggle over when and how to introduce their children to racism and other ugly truths, journalist Dani McClain writes that black mothers don't have "the luxury of sticking our heads in the sand and hoping our children learn about race and power as they go." Black mothering, McClain writes, is an inherently political act. Forum talks with McClain and writer Carvell Wallace about black parenthood and how to raise children with joy and serenity in a world that's often ho...more

  • San Francisco Poised to Pass Strict E-Cigarette Ban

    Jun 25 2019

    The San Francisco Board of Supervisors will take a final vote Tuesday on legislation banning the sale, production and distribution of e-cigarettes citywide. The measure, which would also ban the shipping of e-cigarettes to San Francisco addresses, is widely expected to pass, and Mayor London Breed has said she will sign it. The ban would go into effect in 2020 and remain in place unless the FDA verifies manufacturers' claims that e-cigarettes are safe for consumers. We'll talk about the ban, who...more

  • U.S. Advances to to Quarterfinal in Women’s World Cup

    Jun 25 2019

    The U.S. women's soccer team is looking to win its fourth World Cup this year. The team advanced to the quarterfinals on Monday with a 2-1 victory over Spain and is undefeated so far. But the Americans may meet their toughest opponent yet when they face off against tournament-host France on Friday. In this half hour, we're going to check in on Team USA and its quest for another world championship. We'll also discuss the team's lawsuit against the U.S. Soccer Federation over gender discrimination...more

  • Fentanyl Leading Cause of Opioid Overdose Deaths in San Francisco

    Jun 24 2019

    Fifty-seven people in San Francisco died of fentanyl overdoses in 2018, up from just six in 2010. That's according to a new San Francisco Chronicle report which found that the potent synthetic painkiller is now "full embedded" in the the city's streets. The report, relying on preliminary data from the San Francisco Department of Public Health, also found that fentanyl is now the leading cause of overdose deaths in city, surpassing both prescription pills and heroin. We'll discuss fentanyl's toll...more

  • What Slack’s Stock Debut Could Mean for Future IPOs

    Jun 24 2019

    San Francisco-based Slack Technologies Inc. had its stock market debut on Thursday, ending its first day of trading worth nearly $20 billion. The company, which makes a workplace-chat tool, took an unorthodox route to Wall Street, used a direct listing method rather than the conventional I.P.O. route. Coming up on Forum, we’ll look at how … Continue reading What Slack’s Stock Debut Could Mean for Future IPOs →

  • California, Texas and America’s Future

    Jun 24 2019

    California and Texas have the country’s two largest economies, but take radically different approaches to governance: Texas embraces low taxes and little regulation, whereas California is known for its higher taxes and environmental safeguards.  Both powerhouse states are models for what the future of the U.S. could look like. We’ll talk about those two competing … Continue reading California, Texas and America’s Future →

  • President Trump Confirms U.S. Military was Ready to Retaliate Against Iran

    Jun 21 2019

    President Trump confirmed on Friday that the U.S. military was "cocked and loaded to retaliate" against Iran for the downing of a U.S. drone earlier this week. Trump added that he called off the operation minutes before the planned strikes because of potential casualties. We'll get the latest on the developing story and ongoing tensions between the U.S. and Iran.

  • Battling Myths and Stereotypes, More Parents Are Choosing to Have Only Children

    Jun 21 2019

    The proportion of only child families in the United States is increasing, according to a new Washington Post report. We'll talk about the social and economic reasons more parents are choosing to have just one child and we want to hear from you: If you are an only child or are the parent of an only child, what has your experience been?

  • Fire Prevention: Cal Fire Struggles to Meet Defensible Space Inspection Goals

    Jun 21 2019

    According to a new KQED investigation, only 17 percent of properties in territory where Cal Fire is responsible for monitoring defensible space were actually checked by their inspectors in 2018. State law requires at least 100 feet of defensible space around a property, which limits the amount of vegetation close the home. With one in four residents living in places that are at a high risk for wildfire, many Californians are wondering how to save their homes. In this hour, Forum takes question...more

  • As House Takes Up Reparations Bill, How Should the U.S. Pay Its Debts to the Enslaved?

    Jun 20 2019

    A House panel heard testimony Wednesday on legislation to study proposals for reparations for descendants of enslaved Americans. Supporters of H.R. 40, which was first introduced more than 30 years ago by former Congressman John Conyers, called reparations a moral and economic imperative. The hearing came one day after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he opposed restitution for slavery, arguing that no one currently living was responsible for it. We'll discuss the history and future o...more

  • Facing Federal Investigation, YouTube Considers Children’s Content Changes

    Jun 20 2019

    YouTube is no stranger to backlash, but in recent months the video-streaming giant seems to be increasingly under fire. The Federal Trade Commission has launched an investigation into the San Bruno-based company for allegedly violating children's privacy laws. In response, The Wall Street Journal reports that YouTube is considering moving all kid's content to the YouTube Kids app. The existing app would include a new feature that disables the auto-play feature, with the hopes of shielding minors...more

  • Supreme Court Rules on Separation of Church and State Case

    Jun 20 2019

    The Supreme Court ruled today that a 40-foot cross can remain on public land. The decision was a victory for religious groups who argued that the World War One Memorial Cross, located at an intersection in Maryland, did not violate the First Amendment-based separation of church and state.

  • Sacramento Cop Killed Responding to Domestic Dispute

    Jun 20 2019

    Sacramento police officer Tara O'Sullivan was shot to death Wednesday evening after a call about a domestic disturbance between a man and a woman turned violent. KQED reporter Katie Orr joins us for the latest.

  • ‘The Dreamt Land’ Explores How California Bent its Rivers Toward Political Power

    Jun 19 2019

    In "The Dreamt Land" author Mark Arax describes "the most dramatic alteration of the earth's surface in human history": California's Central Valley. Arax details how the promise of unprecedented harvests and profits led to policy and infrastructure that altered -- and in some cases reversed -- the flow of water in the state. We'll talk to Arax about California's water history and its current groundwater crises. What's your question for him?

  • How Kim Jong Un Became ‘The Great Successor’

    Jun 19 2019

    After the death of Kim Jong Il, many experts thought the reign of his untried and inexperienced son would be short-lived. Washington Post Beijing bureau chief Anna Fifield says that almost eight years into Kim Jong Un's tenure as North Korea's "Supreme Leader," it is clear that he knows how to maintain power. Fifield's new book, "The Great Successor," details Kim's rise from a mediocre grade school student in Switzerland to a calculating dictator adept at removing rivals. Fifield joins Forum to ...more

  • Harvard Revokes Admission of Parkland Student Over Racist Statements

    Jun 18 2019

    In a series of tweets Monday, Parkland High School graduate Kyle Kashuv announced that Harvard rescinded his offer admission over newly discovered racist texts and comments Kashuv made when he was 16. Kashuv, a pro-gun conservative, says he made the comments before the deadly Parkland shootings and now disavows them. We'll talk about Harvard's decision and the extent to which universities can and should consider students' social media postings in admissions.

  • To Capture Contemporary China, an American Journalist Became a Taxi Driver

    Jun 18 2019

    When NPR reporter Frank Langfitt returned to China in 2011, he says he struggled with how "to penetrate an authoritarian nation where people are leery of talking with foreign journalists." His solution: offer free taxi rides to locals in exchange for conversation. Langfitt joins Forum to talk about his new book, "The Shanghai Free Taxi: Journeys with the Hustlers and Rebels of the New China," and what he learned from his passengers about Chinese censorship, the impact of the election of Donald T...more

  • Recycling Piles Up in Bay Area After China Bans Most Plastic Waste

    Jun 18 2019

    For years, American consumers believed that when they were putting out their recyclables on the curb, they were doing their part to help the environment. Much of this waste ended up in China, but after the country said last year that it would no longer accept plastic and other incoming waste, cities have scrambled to find a new way to dispose of the materials. How are Bay Area cities dealing with the problem of plastic and what legislation is in the works to address the problems?

  • San Francisco Mayor London Breed Reflects on Homelessness and Affordability

    Jun 17 2019

    Since her election last June, San Francisco Mayor London Breed has pushed for investment in affordable housing, more workforce development and new policies to help the city's homeless into shelter and mental health care. Mayor Breed, who is the city's first African-American woman to hold the post, joins Forum to reflect on her first year in office and talk about her vision for San Francisco.

  • CNN’s Jim Acosta on Covering the Trump White House

    Jun 17 2019

    Journalist Jim Acosta is known for taking on the White House, prompting President Trump to call him a "rude, terrible person" and "fake news." The CNN Chief White House correspondent joins Forum to talk about the role of the press in the Trump era, and his new book, "The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America."

  • Iran Expands Uranium Stockpiles, Signalling End of Nuclear Deal

    Jun 17 2019

    Iran has quadrupled production of low enriched uranium and will exceed the limit it is allowed to stockpile in just 10 days, according to a spokesman for the Iranian atomic agency. The country says it is doing so because the U.S. has reneged on its commitment to lift sanctions, leaving it unable to export excess uranium. Sanctions against Iran were removed as part of the historic nuclear deal signed by then President Barack Obama in 2015, but reinstated by President Trump in May of last year. Th...more

  • Is It Time to Stop Building in Areas at High Risk for Fire?

    Jun 14 2019

    This week’s hot weather and red flag warnings reminded us all that fire season is once again upon us. When homes burn down, fire victims often want to rebuild as quickly as possible. But in light of climate change and more frequent and deadly wildfires, is it time to stop building in areas at high risk for fire? This hour we examine the idea of so-called “managed retreat," backing away from rebuilding in areas prone to destruction.

  • Queer Eye’s Tan France Reflects on Race, Identity and Style in ‘Naturally Tan’

    Jun 14 2019

    You might know him as the fashion maven on the Netflix phenomenon, Queer Eye, but Tan France wants you to know a lot more than that. In his new book, “Naturally Tan,” France opens up about his life before the hit show, including what it was like to grow up gay in a traditional Muslim Pakistani family, how he continues to deal with racial profiling and how he met and married his “Mormon cowboy” husband. Tan France joins Forum in studio to talk about his memoir.

  • More Protests Planned in Hong Kong as Government Weighs Extradition Law

    Jun 14 2019

    Hong Kong is considering new legislation that would extradite residents to mainland China for trial for any one of 37 crimes. The bill has sparked mass demonstrations by pro-democracy defenders who say it will be used by an increasingly repressive government to punish political dissidents. More protests are planned for this weekend. We'll hear the latest developments on this issue.

  • In ‘Conservative Sensibility,’ George F. Will Aims to Return GOP to Its Roots

    Jun 13 2019

    For more than four decades, Washington Post columnist and Pulitzer Prize winner George F. Will has written about politics and civic life through the eye of a constitutional conservative. In 2016, Will famously left the Republican Party to protest the nomination of Donald Trump as the GOP’s candidate for the presidency. Now, Will is out with a new book titled “The Conservative Sensibility,” which explores the Founding Fathers’ vision of effective government and argues for a return to the right-wi...more

  • Emotions Run High As Warriors Set to Play Last Game in Oakland

    Jun 13 2019

    The Golden State Warriors play for the last time at Oracle Arena on Thursday evening, when they face the Toronto Raptors for game six of the NBA finals. A loss would spell the end of the Warriors' bittersweet post-season, which has been marked by dramatic play and the potentially career-changing Achilles tendon injury sustained by Kevin Durant. We'll preview Thursday's game and reflect on the team's final season in Oakland.

  • Moms Demand Action Founder Shannon Watts Offers Practical Tips for Taking on the Gun Lobby

    Jun 13 2019

    Last year, there were more than 300 mass shootings in the United States, an epidemic of violence that continues unabated. Shannon Watts is the founder of Moms Demand Action, a national organization working to pass stricter gun laws. Watts was spurred to action by the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting in 2012, in which 20 children and six adults were killed. Outraged by the violence, Watts started a Facebook group called Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, where she began connecting other m...more

  • Larry Diamond On Fostering Democratic Institutions Amid a Global Authoritarian Trend

    Jun 12 2019

    Political scientist and global democracy expert Larry Diamond says the world is in a recession of democracy: "Liberal democracies are becoming more intolerant. Illiberal democracies are electing authoritarian personalities... authoritarian regimes that once coexisted with pockets of opposition no longer see the need to bother." His new book "Ill Winds" warns that the U.S.'s role as an international champion of liberal democracy is needed now more than ever to counteract Russia and China's increa...more

  • When Wildfire Strikes, How Should Residents Escape?

    Jun 12 2019

    Just 22 percent of California communities vulnerable to wildfires have comprehensive, publicly available evacuation plans. That's according to a recent analysis by the USA Today Network-California, a collaboration of newsrooms around the state. We'll talk about new research into effective evacuation systems and what emergency management officials have learned about safe escape in the aftermath of the state's devastating wildfires. And we want to hear from you: Have you ever evacuated from your h...more

  • Former Secretary of Defense Takes Readers ‘Inside’ Pentagon

    Jun 12 2019

    As secretary of defense, Ash Carter urged the Pentagon to “think outside” of its “five-sided box.” Now, his new memoir offers a rare glance inside that five-sided box, recalling Carter’s decades of work at the Department of Defense. It offers a “user’s guide” to the $700 billion defense budget, a consideration of global trouble spots and an analysis of how the U.S. military could maintain its technological edge. Technology was a focus of Carter’s career; in 2016, he helped create the “Hack the P...more

  • Forum on the Road: Why More Seniors Are Working

    Jun 11 2019

    More than 900,000 California seniors 65 and older are working or trying to get a job. That's up from 590,000 in 2009, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Some seniors are choosing to work for a company or cause they love, but many others are caught up in a rising senior poverty rate. In this hour, we'll hear about the increase in working seniors, the challenges they face and what the state is doing to address the financial needs of this growing demographic. If you're over 65 and working -- we'd...more

  • Forum on the Road: How to Make Aging in Place Work

    Jun 11 2019

    Many seniors want to stay in their own homes as they age, but mental and physical limitations often get in the way. In this hour, we look at when aging in place is a viable option, how to make homes more accessible and what resources are available to support seniors and their caregivers. Tell us: what factored into your decision to age in place or move into a senior community? What tips do you have for seniors who want to stay in their homes?

  • ‘The British Are Coming’ Recounts America’s Brutal War for Independence

    Jun 10 2019

    Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Rick Atkinson writes that reading George Washington’s frequent complaints about his troops “transforms the demigod into a sometimes petulant mortal.” As Atkinson’s history of the Revolutionary War digs into the details of war and contemporary writings, it provides a rich, harsh portrait of the country’s often simplified creation story. Atkinson joins Forum … Continue reading ‘The British Are Coming’ Recounts America’s Brutal War for Independence →

  • Why Are so Many Gray Whales Washing up Dead in California?

    Jun 10 2019

    Federal scientists say they will investigate why an unusual number of gray whales are washing up dead on West Coast beaches. About 70 whales have been found dead so far this year on the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska, the most since 2000. In the Bay Area alone, at least 13 dead whales … Continue reading Why Are so Many Gray Whales Washing up Dead in California? →

  • Governor Newsom’s First State Budget

    Jun 10 2019

    California would be the first state in the nation to provide health care to some undocumented adults, under an agreement reached by Democratic lawmakers yesterday. We’ll discuss the latest on Governor Newsom’s first state budget. Tell us: what budget priorities are most important for you?

  • Trump Administration Pulls Funding For Research Using Fetal Tissue

    Jun 07 2019

    The Department of Health and Human Services announced Thursday that it will no longer fund any research involving human fetal tissue conducted by in-house scientists at the National Institutes of Health. The Department also announced the immediate cancellation of NIH funding directed to UCSF for HIV research using fetal tissue. We’ll talk about the politics … Continue reading Trump Administration Pulls Funding For Research Using Fetal Tissue →

  • Study: Monterey Bay Infested by Microplastic Pollution

    Jun 07 2019

    Monterey Bay is a marine sanctuary hiding a dirty secret: microplastics. Beneath the beautiful blue waters is a sea of tiny, plastic bits of debris in concentrations comparable to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, according to new research. The study, published Thursday by the Monterey Bay Research Institute and the Monterey Bay Aquarium, finds that this type of plastic pollution appears to be everywhere in the world’s oceans. Forum explores the issue of plastics pollution and what can be done ab...more

  • ‘From the Frontlines of PTSD Science,’ Psychiatrist Shaili Jain Talks New Treatments for Trauma

    Jun 07 2019

    Over the past 20 years, Stanford School of Medicine psychiatrist Shaili Jain has seen many traumas that can prompt post-traumatic stress disorder, from family violence, to a close escape from a major accident or fire, to being robbed. Dr. Jain joins us to talk about new treatments for PTSD, which affects an estimated 6 million … Continue reading ‘From the Frontlines of PTSD Science,’ Psychiatrist Shaili Jain Talks New Treatments for Trauma →

  • Award-Winning Mezzo-Soprano J’Nai Bridges Stars as Carmen in SF Opera Production

    Jun 06 2019

    On Wednesday evening, mezzo-soprano J'Nai Bridges debuts in the title role of Georges Bizet's "Carmen" at the San Francisco Opera. Bridges, who was once on track to become an elite basketball player, calls the role the "Beyoncé of opera" for its formidable physical and vocal demands. Bridges has performed in numerous national and international productions, taking on a range of repertoire, from modern opera to spirituals and standards. She joins us to talk about her career and her star turn as Ca...more

  • Future Uncertain for Stanford University Press

    Jun 06 2019

    A controversy is brewing over the future of the Stanford University Press, which has published research in the humanities and social sciences since 1892. Earlier this year, Stanford University turned down a subsidy request from the press, with some in the administration arguing the press should be self-sustaining. But some faculty members say the press is central to Stanford’s academic mission to produce original scholarship, regardless of profitability. We’ll get an update on the controversy. W...more

  • San Francisco’s Juvenile Hall to Shut Down in 2021. Now What?

    Jun 06 2019

    The San Francisco Board of Supervisors will close the city's juvenile hall by the end of 2021. In a nearly unanimous vote for closure, supervisors criticized the jail-like conditions juveniles are confined in, and cited the high cost of maintaining a facility at less than one third capacity because of a statewide drop in youth crime. The measure requires for the city to form a task force to create home-like rehabilitative centers to house youth offenders, but critics of the closure, including Ma...more

  • Listeners Weigh In on What to Read This Summer

    Jun 05 2019

    It's time to finalize summer plans and for many of us that means deciding what books to read as much as it means deciding where to go. So tell us: What is the best book you've read so far this year? What should fellow listeners pack in their carry-on? We'll also hear from Bay Area booksellers about what's popular at their stores and what new releases they're excited about.

  • Senate Republicans Threaten to Block President Trump’s Mexico Tariffs

    Jun 05 2019

    President Trump announced Tuesday that the White House is sticking with its plan to impose a five percent tariff on all Mexican imports by next week, unless Mexico halts the flow of migrants to the U.S.-Mexico border. Senate republicans came out in force against the proposal, and some vowed they'd vote with democrats to block the duties. We'll discuss the politics and economics of the Mexico tariffs.

  • Why We’re Not Building Seismically Safer Buildings

    Jun 05 2019

    When a major earthquake hits the Bay Area, experts say big cities may be out of commission for months. That likely won’t be the case in Japan, where they’re constructing buildings that not only can survive quakes but also remain functional. It’s thanks to advances in technology that allow the ground to shake but keep the building still. The technique, called base isolation, is used in thousands of buildings in Japan and in several other countries vulnerable to earthquakes, but not here. New York...more

  • Youth Poet Laureate’s ‘Love Poem to Oakland’

    Jun 04 2019

    Oakland will pick it's new youth poet laureate on June 7th. But before the new honoree is named, Forum talks with 16-year-old Leila Mottley, the city's current youth poet laureate, who spent the past year promoting poetry across the city. We'll also talk to Mottley about her self-published poetry collection, which grapples with the complexities of a rapidly changing Oakland.

  • Forum on the Road: Novelist Amor Towles on the Art of Writing and Reading Fiction

    Jun 04 2019

    Amor Towles' 2016 novel, "A Gentleman in Moscow," is about a Russia aristocrat confined for decades to a luxury hotel while the world changes outside its doors. Towles' first novel, "The Rules of Civility," brought 1930s and 40s New York City to life. Towles joins us in a special broadcast from the Oakland Public Library's 81st Avenue branch to talk about his writing, the connective power of books and what fiction can achieve that nonfiction writing cannot.

  • Forum on the Road: From Scraper Bikes to Support Groups, Public Libraries in the Digital Age

    Jun 04 2019

    The 81st Avenue branch of the Oakland Public Library serves as a joint library for two elementary schools and their surrounding East Oakland neighborhood. Depending on when you drop in, the branch also serves as a bike repair shop, a support group for fathers and a drop in center for legal advice. That range of services speaks to a theory posited by historian Wayne Wiegand: that libraries have always been as much about the places they're in and the communities serve, as the books they hold. In t...more

  • Tony Taccone Leaves Berkeley Rep After 33-Year Tenure

    Jun 03 2019

    The last play that Tony Taccone will oversee as artistic director of Berkeley Repertory Theatre opened recently. Taccone is stepping down after 33 years with the company. During his tenure, Berkeley Rep has consistently earned a reputation for excellence, in the Bay Area and nationally. It sent several works to Broadway, including Green Day’s “American Idiot,” — which won two Tony Awards and a Grammy — Carrie Fisher’s “Wishful Drinking” and the musical “Ain’t Too Proud — The Life and Times of th...more

  • California Democrats and Presidential Hopefuls Gather for State Convention

    Jun 03 2019

    The California Democratic Party descends on San Francisco this weekend for its annual statewide convention. Topping the agenda is the election of a new leader to replace former chair Eric Bauman, who resigned in November amid sexual harassment allegations. Fourteen presidential candidates are expected to make appearances to woo delegates, as the state gears up for its March primary. We'll review the convention and talk about the future of the party.

  • ‘Speech Police’ Navigates Social Media Regulation, Free Speech Concerns

    Jun 03 2019

    Law professor David Kaye tweeted this recently: “Homework assignment: draft the rule that prohibits doctored Pelosi video but protects satire, political speech, humor etc. not so easy is it?” Kaye’s tweet came amid a flurry of calls for Facebook to take down an altered video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. As the UN’s special rapporteur on freedom of expression, Kaye has been working on this homework assignment for years, reporting on how governments and private companies should moderate social p...more

  • Plan Approved to Shut Down Power to Prevent Wildfire Disasters

    May 31 2019

    State regulators have approved plans by California's largest utilities aimed at limiting future wildfires sparked by their equipment. The vote comes after two years of catastrophic, utility-caused fires that have devastated parts of California. On Thursday, all five members of the California Public Utilities Commission gave their blessing to wildfire prevention plans crafted by PG&E and the state’s other two large utilities. We'll discuss the plans and their projected impact on communities.

  • Trump Administration Added Citizenship Question on Census to Benefit Whites, According to New Memo

    May 31 2019

    A now deceased GOP redistricting strategist was behind the Trump Administration's decision to add a citizenship question on the 2020 census, according to a motion filed by the ACLU Thursday. The filing, based on documents obtained from the hard drive of Thomas Hofeller, argues that federal officials illegally added the citizenship question to create a structural electoral advantage for "Republicans and Non-Hispanic Whites." The Supreme Court is set to rule on the legality of the citizenship ques...more

  • New Film ‘The Last Black Man in San Francisco’ Reflects on the Meaning of Home

    May 31 2019

    "The Last Black Man in San Francisco" explores the meaning of home and community against gentrification, displacement, and a city's changing identity. It is the debut feature film of San Francisco natives and childhood friends, director and writer Joe Talbot, and actor and writer Jimmie Fails. The film follows Fails' semi-autobiographical character as he tries to reclaim his ancestral home in San Francisco's Fillmore district. Also featuring veteran actor Danny Glover, "The Last Black Man in San...more

  • Your Guide to Summer: KQED Arts Picks the Best in Bay Area Art, Film and Music

    May 30 2019

    A free outdoor concert with the San Francisco Symphony. A Lake Merritt barbecue that aims to help fight racism. A film festival featuring only Godzilla flicks. They’re all part of the Bay Area’s lively summer arts season. Forum talks with KQED Arts staff about their top picks for museums, music, movies and more this summer. We’ll also consider the state of the Bay Area arts scene--how artists survive amid the high cost of living, and what the trend toward corporate ownership of live music venues...more

  • House Speaker Pelosi Calls Out Facebook for Doctored Videos

    May 30 2019

    KQED’s politics and government editor Scott Shafer sat down with House speaker Nancy Pelosi yesterday in an interview spanning a range of issues. The Speaker called out Facebook for “lying to the public” after the company refused to remove a doctored video, shared by President Trump, in which she appeared to stammer, and she laid … Continue reading House Speaker Pelosi Calls Out Facebook for Doctored Videos →

  • Study: How Phones Affect Our Sleep and Our Relationships

    May 30 2019

    Seventy-four percent of adults and 68 percent of teens go to bed with their phones, according to a new study by Common Sense Media. Many of us are so addicted to our screens that when we wake up in the middle of the night, we check our phones. It’s not just our sleep quality that’s being hurt, the study found that both parents and teens feel as if phones have hurt their relationships. Forum will be joined by Common Sense Media CEO, Jim Steyer, to talk about the latest research and how it fits in...more

  • Oakland Considers Decriminalizing Psychedelic Mushrooms

    May 29 2019

    The Oakland City Council is considering a resolution to decriminalize natural psychedelics, including mushrooms. The resolution's sponsors point to studies suggesting that psilocybin, the active agent in so-called magic mushrooms, can ease addiction, depression, anxiety and pain. If approved, Oakland would become the second U.S. city to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms; Denver voters narrowly passed a similar initiative earlier this month. The Oakland resolution is expected to come to a full ...more

  • New Haven Teachers Strike Enters Second Week

    May 29 2019

    Negotiations are expected to resume Wednesday afternoon in the New Haven teachers strike. Nearly 600 teachers, counselors, and nurses walked off the job on May 20th demanding higher pay, smaller classes and more support services for students. The district serves about 11,000 students from Hayward and Union City, most of whom have stayed out of school since the strike began. Representatives of the teachers' union and the school district met over the long weekend but ultimately could not reach an ...more

  • Robert Mueller Speaks

    May 29 2019

    Special counsel Robert Mueller announced this morning that he’s resigning from the Justice Department. Mueller’s public comments were his first since he took over the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election two years ago. In his comments, Mueller emphasized that he that he was bound by Justice Department policy that prohibits an indictment … Continue reading Robert Mueller Speaks →

  • Warriors Head for Fifth Straight NBA Finals

    May 28 2019

    The Golden State Warriors kick off their fifth straight NBA Finals on Thursday. We'll talk about that remarkable achievement and preview the series -- the team's last in Oakland -- with author and longtime Bay Area sportswriter Marcus Thompson. We'll also talk to Thompson about his new biography of Warriors star Kevin Durant.

  • Political News in Review

    May 28 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.

  • Rebroadcast: The Science of ‘How Art Works’

    May 27 2019

    Psychology professor Ellen Winner studies how humans interact with art, including what we consider art, how art affects us and why we like what we do. Her new book, "How Art Works" also challenges some commonly held beliefs such as literature's ability to develop empathy. Winner joins us to discuss her book and her scientific approach to studying art.

  • Rebroadcast: Animals Experience Complex Emotions, According to Primatologist

    May 27 2019

    Ask a pet owner if animals have emotions, writes primatologist Frans De Waal and they'll say, "of course!" But ask a University professor, and they'll squirm. While the leading theories in science only recognize basic emotions in animals such as anger, happiness and fear, De Waal argues that animals share all emotions with humans, including complex ones like hope, disappointment, guilt and empathy. De Waal joins Forum to discuss his decades of research on the behavior and social intelligence o...more

  • New SAT ‘Adversity Score’ Sparks Controversy

    May 24 2019

    There’s another score students can get on the SAT now: an “adversity score” that takes into account environmental factors like poverty, neighborhood, and school funding. The College Board announced it will roll out this score to 150 colleges by the end of this year, and make it available to all colleges in 2020. The new … Continue reading New SAT ‘Adversity Score’ Sparks Controversy →

  • What Do You Love About San Francisco?

    May 24 2019

    National newspapers love to pile on about San Francisco's faults, and the city's sky-high rents, influx of tech wealth and homelessness crisis make it an easy target. The latest hate letter to San Francisco, published in the Washington Post this week, calls it "Patient Zero" of the country's urban woes and posits that "everyone agrees" the city has rotted. In this segment of Forum we want to hear from you: Despite its shortcomings, what do you love about San Francisco?

  • Six Migrant Children Die in US Custody in Eight Months

    May 24 2019

    This week, federal officials acknowledged that a 10-year-old girl from El Salvador died in September after being detained by border authorities. That is now six migrant children known to have died in U.S. custody in the past year. Authorities did not report the unnamed girl's death until CBS News broke the story earlier this week, prompting critics to accuse the administration of covering up the incident. Federal officials say they're committed to protecting children in their custody, while Demo...more

  • Musicologist Nolan Gasser on What Determines Musical Taste

    May 23 2019

    Why do we love some musical styles and dislike others? And what does the music we love reveal about our personality? Nolan Gasser sets out to answer those and other questions in his new book "Why You Like It: The Science and Culture of Musical Taste." Gasser oversaw Pandora Radio’s Music Genome Project, which created an algorithm to recommend music for listeners based on the specific characteristics of the songs they played. His new book draws on psychology, sociology and musicology to explain t...more

  • Pressure Grows on Pelosi Over Impeachment

    May 23 2019

    President Trump walked out of a meeting with Democrats Wednesday after just a few minutes, saying he won't work with Democratic leaders while they're investigating him. Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the president is engaged in a "cover up," but stopped short of calling for impeachment. Also Wednesday, a judge refused to block subpoenas of Trump’s financial records. We'll discuss the increasing tension between Democrats and the president.

  • ‘American Taliban’ Set for Release from Prison

    May 23 2019

    Marin native John Walker Lindh, who became known as the "American Taliban" after he was captured in Afghanistan in 2001, is set for release after nearly two decades in federal prison for providing support to the Taliban. Lindh, 21 at the time, was present at a prison uprising that claimed the first U.S. casualty of the war, 32-year-old CIA officer Johnny Micheal Spann. Forum discusses Lindh’s release, and the upcoming challenge of how to deal with hundreds of people convicted of jihadist-related...more

  • JR’s Larger Than Life Mural Lands at SFMOMA

    May 22 2019

    A 100-foot photo collage will be unveiled at the SFMOMA this Thursday. The collage is the work of French photographer JR and depicts the more than 1,200 people that he photographed at 22 locations across San Francisco in early 2018. JR's larger-than-life projects have taken place everywhere from Kenya to the Louvre to the U.S.-Mexico border. JR, who strictly adheres to using that pseudonym, joins Forum to discuss the new collage and how global immigration has affected his art.

  • Famed San Francisco Comedy Club Faces Closure, Fans Fight to Keep Laughs Going

    May 22 2019

    Comedian Dave Chappelle told a crowd gathered at City Hall Tuesday that moving the Punch Line comedy club would be like “burning down the Louvre.” The comedy institution faces displacement when its lease expires in August. The club has nurtured the careers of comics for over 40 years, including Robin Williams, Margaret Cho, W. Kamau Bell and others. District 3 Supervisor Aaron Peskin announced plans for a measure that would prevent any non-nightclub use of the building. Forum talks with comedian...more

  • California Sues Trump Administration For Cancelling Nearly $1 Billion in High Speed Rail Funding

    May 22 2019

    California Attorney General Xavier Becerra filed a lawsuit Tuesday to block the Federal Railroad Administration from withdrawing a $929 million federal grant for the state's high speed rail project. The lawsuit alleges that the decision to pull the funding violated agency procedure and was “precipitated by President Trump’s overt hostility to California." We’ll talk about the lawsuit and the future of California’s high speed rail.

  • Bay Area Experiences Wettest May in 20 Years

    May 22 2019

    We've come a long way since the mandatory water restrictions of 2015: atmospheric rivers have delivered almost two inches of rain to the Bay Area so far this month, Northern California reservoirs are near capacity and Sierra snowpack is close to double the average for this time of year. But should the state still be saving water in case of a drought? We'll check in on the health of the state's water supply and how the wet winter and spring may affect the upcoming fire season.

  • Overtreatment, Lax Scientific Standards Raise Concerns in Dentistry

    May 21 2019

    Chances are a dentist has told you to floss more. But studies from the Cochrane Institute and the American Dental Association have found that many common oral health recommendations such as biannual cleanings, yearly x-rays and flossing have not been verified through scientific research. Forum discusses efforts to steer dentistry toward more evidence-based practices and we'll talk about challenges facing the field, including charges that many dentists overtreat their patients.

  • As Abortion Bans Pass, All Eyes on Trump’s Supreme Court

    May 21 2019

    With multiple states recently passing strict restrictions on abortions, the Supreme Court's stance on the issue could soon be put to the test. In this hour of Forum, we take a look at the state of the high court and what its transformation under the Trump Administration means for contentious national issues. We'll also hear about a new PBS Frontline documentary that dives deep into how the current conservative majority on the court came to be.

  • Pico Iyer’s ‘Autumn Light’ Confronts Life’s Impermanence

    May 20 2019

    "Bright though they are in color, blossoms fall. Which of us escapes the world of change?" Travel writer Pico Iyer hears Japanese schoolchildren reciting these words as Americans might recite the Pledge of Allegiance, an anecdote shared in his latest book, "Autumn Light: Season of Fire and Farewells." The book explores the Japanese culture of impermanence in light of his father-in-law's sudden death. Pico Iyer joins Forum to talk about his experience confronting change and life's fragility.

  • Norman Mineta’s Groundbreaking Legacy

    May 20 2019

    The Japanese Americans interned during World War II included San Jose-born Norman Mineta, then 10 years old. Now 87, Mineta went on to become the mayor of San Jose, a member of Congress, the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of Transportation. Mineta joins us in studio to discuss his legacy, including his role in passing the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which gave reparations to interned Japanese Americans. We'll also hear Mineta's thoughts about the potential for a bipartisan infrastructu...more

  • New Federal Data Show Homeless Populations Surging Throughout Bay Area

    May 20 2019

    A combined 25,000 people are homeless in San Francisco, Alameda and Santa Clara counties, according to preliminary federal data released Thursday. Since 2017, when officials last conducted a census, homeless populations have risen by 17 percent in San Francisco and 43 percent in Alameda counties. The city of San Jose has seen a 42 percent increase. We'll discuss what's behind the region's intensifying homelessness crisis.

  • World Affairs Council’s Jane Wales Steps Down

    May 20 2019

    After 20 years leading the World Affairs Council, which convenes nonpartisan conversations around issues such as environmental policy and international affairs, Jane Wales is stepping down. She joins Forum to discuss the council's accomplishments, including the Global Philanthropy Forum and the relaunch of the weekly radio program "WorldAffairs." And we'll talk with Wales about the U.S.-China trade conflict, Brexit and more in international news.

  • I Was Your Biggest Fan: What Happens When Your Favorite TV Show Disappoints

    May 17 2019

    The highly-anticipated series finale of HBO’s Game of Thrones airs Sunday and disgruntled fans are already calling for a do-over. A petition calling for the network to redo the final season has surpassed 500,000 signatures, with many fans asserting that writers David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have compromised a number of the show’s beloved, previously … Continue reading I Was Your Biggest Fan: What Happens When Your Favorite TV Show Disappoints →

  • Dear Truth Be Told: Advice By, and For, People of Color

    May 17 2019

    "Is it OK to feel joy when the world is burning?" That's the question posed in the first episode of Truth Be Told, KQED's new advice podcast, which is "made by and for people of color." In each episode, host Tonya Mosley seeks counsel and answers to listener questions from "wise ones." We'll talk with Mosley about why she and other people of color feel mainstream sources of advice often don't speak to their experience. And we want to hear from you: Who do you turn to for advice?

  • Why Prescription Drugs are so Expensive in the U.S.

    May 17 2019

    One in four Americans who take prescription drugs have a difficult time affording their medicine. That's according to a recent report by the Kaiser Family Foundation, which also found that U.S. spending on prescription medication has increased more than a hundredfold since 1960. As lawmakers on both sides of the aisle work to address skyrocketing drug costs, we'll speak to UC Hastings Law Professor Robin Feldman about what she calls the systemic and perverse incentives that lead to high prices. ...more

  • Acclaimed Warhol Exhibit Pops into SFMOMA

    May 16 2019

    You may have seen Andy Warhol's paintings of Campbell's Soup cans or a handful of his silk-screened images, but beginning Sunday, SFMOMA offers the chance to explore Warhol's life "From A to B and Back Again." The exhibit contains more than 300 works from the duration of Warhol's four-decade career. We'll talk about the exhibit, which runs through Sept. 2, with Donna De Salvo, who curated the exhibit for New York's Whitney Museum of American Art, and Gary Garrels, the senior curator of paintings...more

  • State Investigators: PG&E Equipment Caused Deadly Camp Fire

    May 16 2019

    CalFire investigators concluded Wednesday that PG&E's transmission lines caused last November's Camp Fire, which claimed 85 lives, burned more than 150,000 acres and leveled the Butte County town of Paradise. The wildfire was the deadliest and most destructive in California history. We'll discuss the findings and their implications.

  • NPR’s Ron Elving Talks Politics and the Challenges of Covering President Trump

    May 16 2019

    Over his twenty-year career at NPR, senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving has covered four administrations, 11 Congresses and countless major political events. Elving joins us in studio to talk about the latest news from Washington, the state of political journalism and what it's been like covering the Trump Administration.

  • Biography Celebrates French Philosopher Denis Diderot, an ‘Intellectual Beast’ Before His Time

    May 15 2019

    Despite a strict Catholic upbringing in 16th century France, philosopher Denis Diderot grew to question the established views of his era, including God's existence, the French monarchy, slavery and sexual mores. Diderot's life and thought are explored in a new book, "Diderot and the Art of Thinking Freely," by Wesleyan University professor Andrew Curran. We'll talk to Curran about why Diderot was an "intellectual beast" ahead of his time, as well as the philosopher's fascination with American i...more

  • Alabama Passes Law Banning Nearly All Abortions

    May 15 2019

    The Alabama State senate voted Tuesday evening to pass a bill that criminalizes doctors who perform abortions at any pregnancy stage, unless the mother's life is in danger. Under the bill, which passed the Alabama house last month, doctors who perform abortions would face up to 99 years in prison. Four states this year have enacted so-called heartbeat bills, which effectively ban abortions after six weeks. Those laws are not in effect, owing to legal challenges. We'll discuss the Alabama bill an...more

  • ‘Black Death at the Golden Gate’: A Medical Drama from Old San Francisco

    May 15 2019

    The bubonic plague is typically associated with Europe and the Middle Ages. But historian David K. Randall's "Black Death at the Golden Gate" explores a little-known chapter in the disease's history: its near-spread from San Francisco to the rest of the U.S. in 1900. Randall joins us to talk about the incident, how racism influenced the response by authorities and what it reveals about life in the Bay Area at the turn of the last century.

  • San Francisco Bans City Departments from Using Facial Recognition Technology

    May 15 2019

    A vote to ban municipal use of facial recognition technology in San Francisco passed 8-1 by the Board of Supervisors Tuesday. The ban, the first for a major U.S. city, includes the county sheriff's department and city police but does not bar individuals or businesses from using the technology. City agencies will also be required to gain approval before acquiring automatic license plate readers or other types of surveillance technology. Critics of the technology say it violates privacy and is bia...more

  • Ani DiFranco Brings Her Radical, Indie Folk to the Page in New Memoir

    May 14 2019

    "I was on a mission," singer, songwriter, and activist Ani DiFranco says of her commitment to music at a young age. Known for her unique brand of indie folk and feminism, Ani DiFranco's memoir "No Walls and The Recurring Dream" recalls her journey from a 15-year-old living on her own to life as a 90s headliner grappling with fame. We'll talk to Ani DiFranco about how her music changed the industry, her fans and herself.

  • What Will the Trade War with China Mean for the Bay Area?

    May 14 2019

    The California economy – including the agriculture and wine industries–are likely to be hard hit by the U.S. trade war with China. The state exported approximately $16.3 billion in goods to mainland China in 2018–more goods than to any other country with the exception of Mexico. Joining us to discuss how the trade war is … Continue reading What Will the Trade War with China Mean for the Bay Area? →

  • Landmark California Housing Bill Clears Key Hurdles, Heads to Appropriations Committee

    May 14 2019

    California Senate Bill 50 is the latest attempt to mitigate the state's housing crisis. And, unsurprisingly, it is controversial. The bill, introduced by state Sen. Scott Wiener, is intended to spur housing development near transit and job-rich areas, and would override many local zoning laws. Supporters say the bill will provide a much-needed new tool to address the state's housing shortage. Critics say it's a one-size-fits-all approach that fails to address underlying inequality in the housing...more

  • Warriors, Sharks Give Bay Area Playoff Fever

    May 13 2019

    The Warriors and Sharks both made their Western Conference Finals. Forum will talk about the teams and what these playoffs mean to the Bay Area.

  • The Women Who Fought Sex Trafficking in San Francisco’s Chinatown

    May 13 2019

    In 1933, when Chinese teen Jeung Gwai Ying escaped forced prostitution in San Francisco, she fled to the Occidental Mission Home. Since 1874, the home had offered thousands of Chinese women refuge and the potential of a new life. In her book, "The White Devil's Daughters," Julia Flynn Siler chronicles the home and the people who passed through its halls. Siler joins Forum to discuss the often overlooked history of sex trafficking in San Francisco's Chinatown.

  • Journalist’s Home Raided in Relation to Leaked Police Report on Jeff Adachi’s Death

    May 13 2019

    On Friday morning, ten San Francisco police officers used a sledgehammer to raid the home of Brian Carmody, the freelance journalist who published previously undisclosed and salacious details about Adachi’s death. Carmody is vowing to protect his source, as free speech advocates call the raid outrageous and possibly politically motivated. We’ll discuss the story.

  • Van Jones Brings Victims and Offenders Together in ‘Redemption Project’

    May 13 2019

    "Face the past. Heal the future" is the tagline of Van Jones's new CNN series "The Redemption Project," which puts victims of life-altering crimes face to face with their perpetrator. The CNN political commentator and prison reform activist joins us to discuss the project, which explores punishment, forgiveness and restorative justice from the victim's perspective.

  • ‘Milk’ Screenwriter Pens “Mama’s Boy,” an Ode to Mothers’ Strength

    May 10 2019

    On this Friday before Mother's Day weekend, we'll talk with filmmaker and LGBTQ activist Dustin Lance Black about his memoir "Mama's Boy" a story that celebrates both his mom's love and her resilience. Black, who is best known for his Oscar-winning original screenplay for "Milk," was also instrumental in overturning Proposition 8, California’s ban on gay marriage. But before Black was front and center in the fight for marriage equality, he was a shy kid growing up in East Texas. "Mama's Boy" dig...more

  • Is It Time to Break Up Facebook?

    May 10 2019

    Mark Zuckerberg's power is unchecked, unprecedented, and un-American. That's according to Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, who in a New York Times op-ed Thursday called on federal government to break up the company. We'll talk about whether Facebook should be split into separate entities and whether a breakup would address ongoing concerns about the company's failure to protect its users' privacy and security.

  • House Judiciary Committee Votes to Hold Attorney General William Barr in Contempt

    May 09 2019

    We’ll talk about the constitutional showdown unfolding in Washington, one day after the House Judiciary Committee voted to hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress.

  • Nell Freudenberger’s ‘Lost and Wanted’ Connects Grief and Quantum Physics

    May 09 2019

    When Helen receives a phone call from her former college roommate Charlie in "Lost and Wanted," the event is unexpected not only because the two had lost touch, but because Charlie had died the night before. So begins Nell Freudenberger’s latest novel, which follows Helen, a theoretical physics professor at MIT, as she wraps her scientific mind around Charlie’s calls and texts from beyond the grave. Nell Freudenberger joins us in the studio to discuss science, human relationships and the laws of...more

  • The Benefits of Learning a New Language (According to Experts)

    May 09 2019

    Online language-learning programs like Duolingo, Babbel, and Rosetta Stone all claim to teach you a foreign language in record time. But do they deliver what they promise? We’ll get tips from linguists on how best to pick up a foreign tongue. And we want to hear from you: how has language fluency affected your world view?

  • Paradise Begins to Rebuild Six Months After Camp Fire

    May 08 2019

    Last November, the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history scorched over 150,000 acres in Butte County and killed 85 people. The Camp Fire burned almost the entire town of Paradise, displacing thousands of its residents, contaminating its drinking water and leaving millions of tons of toxic debris behind. But six months later, the community is beginning to rebuild. We'll reflect on the tragedy and talk about the progress made so far.

  • Emily Bazelon’s ‘Charged’ Pins Mass Incarceration on Prosecutors

    May 08 2019

    The prison population in the United States has quintupled since the 1980s, with nearly 2.2 million people imprisoned. Journalist Emily Bazelon argues that a major driver of mass incarceration is the "breathtaking power" of prosecutors whose discretion in setting bail, determining charges and offering plea deals often gives them more influence than judges in criminal cases. Bazelon joins Forum to discuss her new book, "Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incar...more

  • Uber and Lyft Drivers to Strike on Wednesday Ahead of Uber IPO

    May 07 2019

    Uber and Lyft drivers across the country plan to strike on Wednesday ahead of Uber's long-anticipated IPO, which is expected to raise about $9 billion. But drivers complain that they are not getting their fair share of the money, with many citing pay cuts and what they say are unlivable wages. Participating drivers are turning off their apps for the day and encouraging riders to do the same. Will you participate in the strike?

  • Glenn Close’s Starring Role in Promoting Conversations about Mental Health

    May 07 2019

    Actor Glenn Close has been a trendsetting force in film since her breakthrough in the 80s with her roles in "The Big Chill" and "Fatal Attraction." Close recently earned an Academy Award nomination, her seventh, for Best Actress in 2018's "The Wife." Less well-known however, is Close's work for Bring Change to Mind, a nonprofit that promotes open dialogue about mental health and the destigmatization of mental illness. Close joins Forum to discuss her career and how to foster conversations about ...more

  • ‘Alpha Girls’: Succeeding in the Male-Dominated World of Venture Capital

    May 07 2019

    Silicon Valley's gender gap is well-documented and the world of venture capital is no exception. Ninety-four percent of investing partners at venture capital firms are men and less than 2% of their funding goes to start-ups founded by women. That's according to Julian Guthrie, author of the new book “Alpha Girls: The Women Upstarts Who Took On Silicon Valley's Male Culture.” We'll talk with Guthrie and two of the pioneering investors she profiles about how they navigated the challenges facing wo...more

  • Piedmont Man Opens Home to Homeless Couple

    May 06 2019

    Homeless for more than 10 years, Marie Mckinzie and Greg Dunston lived on the streets of Oakland, sleeping in doorways and pushing their belongings in carts. But, as the San Francisco Chronicle’s Otis R. Taylor Jr. reports, that changed a few months ago when they moved into a nearly $4 million property in a wealthy neighborhood in Piedmont. The owner of the house, Terrence McGrath did something almost unheard of: he opened his doors to them. Otis Taylor joins us in the studio now to talk about ...more

  • Tom Steyer Leads Charge for Impeachment of President Trump, Removal of Barr

    May 06 2019

    Since 2017, when he founded the "Need To Impeach" movement, billionaire environmentalist and democratic donor Tom Steyer has been urging lawmakers, funders and the public to push for impeachment of President Trump. Steyer says that the president, who he calls lawless and unfit, has committed at least 10 impeachable offenses, including obstruction of justice and collusion. But impeachment remains unpopular among voters, with only 39% supporting it, according to a recent NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist po...more

  • Political News Roundup

    May 06 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.

  • It’s Official: Gov. Newsom Pulls Permits for Brown’s Twin Tunnels Project

    May 06 2019

    The Newsom administration has withdrawn permit applications for former Gov. Jerry's plan to build two tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The project was designed as a more reliable system of transporting water to Southern California, but has been criticized as a water grab and a danger to the Delta's ecosystem. Earlier this year, Gov. Newsom signaled his support for a smaller, one-tunnel plan, which is now in the beginning stages of environmental review. We'll get the latest o...more

  • High School Locks Up Cell Phones Hoping For More Attentive, Less Isolated Students

    May 03 2019

    In an attempt to get students to pay more attention to schoolwork and the non-virtual world, San Mateo High School will be locking up cellphones for the full school day beginning next year. Officials in other schools that have adopted the policy say phone-free kids are more attentive in class and less socially isolated, but some students complain the policy is too strict and penalizes those who use their devices responsibly. This segment is part of KQED’s "Youth Takeover,” a week featuring stori...more

  • House Democrats Weigh Contempt Charge Against Attorney General

    May 03 2019

    House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler threatened Thursday to hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena to produce the full Mueller report and its underlying evidence. The move came a day after Barr announced he'd skip the Judiciary Committee's Thursday hearing on the special counsel's report. Meanwhile, in a press conference House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused Barr of committing a crime by lying to Congress. We'll discuss the latest development...more

  • Philanthropist Melinda Gates on How Empowering Women Uplifts Everyone

    May 03 2019

    In Melinda Gates' childhood, she frequently watched rockets achieve their "moment of lift" when visiting her father at NASA. Her new book, "The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World," applies that concept to the process of uplifting women, both in her own community and globally. Filled with anecdotes about splitting household tasks with husband Bill Gates and tactics for fighting gender inequality worldwide, Gates' book argues that addressing gender discrimination makes a societ...more

  • Amazon Among 60 Fortune 500 Companies Paying Zero Federal Income Tax in 2018

    May 02 2019

    Sixty Fortune 500 companies -- including behemoths like Amazon, Chevron and General Motors -- paid no federal income taxes in 2018. That's according to a report issued recently by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, which also found that those companies received $4.3 billion in tax rebates. We'll discuss the rules that enable corporations to avoid income taxes and the impact of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. And we want to hear from you: Do corporations pay their fair share?

  • Ghost Ship Warehouse Fire Criminal Trial Begins

    May 02 2019

    Lawyers began presenting opening arguments in the Ghost Ship fire criminal trial in downtown Oakland on Tuesday. Defendants Derick Almena and Max Harris are on trial for 36 counts of involuntary manslaughter stemming from a 2016 fire at the Ghost Ship warehouse, an illegally converted artist collective and residence in Oakland. We discuss the case.

  • ‘Uninhabitable Earth’ Explores a Looming Climate Catastrophe

    May 02 2019

    "It is worse, much worse, than you think," begins David Wallace-Wells's new book on the impact of climate change. From there, Wallace-Wells presents the scope of global warming's challenge to human civilization, from feeding 50% more people with half the amount of productive land to whole cities that will be unlivable in the summer. Wallace-Wells joins Forum to talk about the book and about why he thinks the science shows it's time for "climate panic."

  • Bay Area Teens Share Their Experiences Struggling with Anxiety, Depression

    May 01 2019

    A recent Pew survey found that 70% of teens view anxiety and depression as a major problem among their peers, ranking higher than other concerns like bullying, drugs and drinking. Forum talks with Bay Area high school students about mental health and whether they agree with research that links the increase in anxiety and depression to academic pressure and social media use. This segment is part of KQED’s "Youth Takeover,” a week featuring stories developed and produced with high school student...more

  • David Brooks Urges Communalism Over Individualism in ‘The Second Mountain’

    May 01 2019

    Four years ago, New York Times columnist David Brooks published “The Road to Character,” an examination of the virtues – like courage and grit -- he considered necessary to lead a moral life. Now, Brooks says that when he wrote that book he was “enclosed in the prison of individualism,” falsely assuming that “character is something you build on your own.” His latest book, “The Second Mountain,” posits instead that good character comes from surrendering to and serving the greater causes of family...more

  • California Health Officials, Law Makers Look to Increase Vaccinations Amid Latest Measles Outbreak

    Apr 30 2019

    Over 700 measles cases have been reported in the United States this year, the largest outbreak since the disease was declared eliminated in 2000. Of the 38 cases reported in California so far this year, 36 are connected to international travel. In Los Angeles, approximately 700 members of the UCLA and Cal State Los Angeles communities have been quarantined after possibly being exposed to an infected student. We'll hear how you can reduce your risk of measles exposure and check in on a California...more

  • Bay Area Median Home Price Drop for First Time in 7 Years

    Apr 30 2019

    Home prices in the Bay Area fell .6 percent and the number of home sales 14 percent in March of this year compared with last year. That’s according to a report by real estate data company CoreLogic. It's the first fall in Bay Area home prices and sales in seven years. Joining us to discuss the report is Kathleen Pender, Business Columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle and Steve Levy, Director of the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy.

  • Bill McKibben Warns of Dire Consequences of Unchecked Climate Change

    Apr 30 2019

    It's been 30 years since activist Bill McKibben published his well-known environmental call to action "The End of Nature." Now, McKibben sees even more threats than he did in 1989. His new book "Falter" takes a hard look at the severe consequences of failing to act on climate change -- from devastating sea level rise to mass extinctions. The book also raises fresh concerns about the development of artificial intelligence and genetic engineering. McKibben joins us to discuss his latest work, huma...more

  • Bay Area Students Concerned about ‘Blackfishing’ and Cultural Appropriation

    Apr 29 2019

    "Blackfishing,” describes when a non-black person culturally appropriates black features to appear black or mixed race. The trend first made news when before-and-after photos of white social media influencers went viral in 2018. The issue continues to be on the minds of some Bay Area students who are concerned the trend negatively impacts communities of color. We'll discuss the "blackfishing" phenomenon and the lines between cultural appreciation and appropriation. This segment is part of KQED’...more

  • 2019 Goldman Environmental Prize Honors Grassroots Heroes

    Apr 29 2019

    For the past 30 years, the Goldman Environmental Prize has honored community-based, grassroots activists from 87 countries who've fought for environmental justice, sustainability and imperiled lands and species. We'll talk to two of this year's prize winners about their work and the communities they serve.

  • Synagogue Shooting, Sunnyvale Crash Investigated as Hate Crimes

    Apr 29 2019

    A 19-year-old suspect is in custody after a shooting at a synagogue in Poway, California on Saturday that left one person dead and several others injured. Officials are looking into reports that the suspect posted an anti-Semitic letter online prior to the shooting. We'll get the latest on the investigation and discuss last week's car crash in Sunnyvale, which is also being investigated as a possible hate crime. Officials say the driver intentionally ran over a group of pedestrians he believed t...more

  • Forum on the Road: Is Weed Threatening the Wine Business in Napa County?

    Apr 26 2019

    Some Napa vintners want to add cannabis to their offerings, hoping to benefit from California's legalization of recreational marijuana. The industries are not dissimilar: cannabis and wine are both naturally-derived, highly-regulated intoxicants. But some in the Napa Valley are concerned that cultivating weed will compromise the county's reputation as a wine producer. We'll talk about the cannabis and wine industries, and whether the Napa Valley is big enough for both.

  • Forum on the Road: Land Use Battles Continue as Napa County Passes Controversial Tree, Water Ordinance

    Apr 26 2019

    A Napa Valley ordinance that takes effect in May will increase protections that landowners must take to preserve trees and the watershed. The decision marks another chapter in the long-standing debate over the use of, and protections for, Napa's open space, trees and water. We'll hear about the new "Water Quality and Tree Protection Ordinance" and why many environmentalists and vintners are unhappy about it.

  • Forum on the Road: Napa Native Alexandria Brown Uncovers the Valley’s ‘Hidden History’

    Apr 26 2019

    Early Wappo American Indians in Napa Valley called the region "talahalusi,” meaning "beautiful land.” They shaped the region, as did the African American farmers, Chinese laborers and Mexican guest workers or "braceros" who followed them. Despite their influence, these communities are often left out of Napa Valley history. Alexandria Brown, a Napa native, sought to change that. She researched the daily lives of these influential groups for her new book “Hidden History of Napa Valley.” Brown join...more

  • Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt Recalls Silicon Valley’s ‘Trillion Dollar Coach’

    Apr 25 2019

    The new book "Trillion Dollar Coach" examines the lessons and legacy of Bill Campbell, a football coach who went on to advise executives at companies including Apple, Intuit and Facebook. Co-author and former Google CEO Eric Schmidt was one of many Silicon Valley giants mentored by Campbell, who died in 2016. We'll talk with Schmidt and his co-authors about Campbell's insights and influence.

  • Governor Seeks Answers as California Gas Prices Pass $4 per Gallon

    Apr 25 2019

    The average price for gas in California is just over $4 per gallon, about 43 cents higher than the next priciest state, Hawaii. That's according to the fuel price tracker GasBuddy, which also puts San Francisco's average gas price as the highest in the state. On Tuesday, Gov. Gavin Newsom asked the California Energy Commission to investigate what he called an "unaccounted-for price differential" in California. We'll talk about what's behind the high cost of gas.

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden Jumps Into Presidential Race

    Apr 25 2019

    Former Vice President Joe Biden is expected to declare his candidacy for president in a video announcement on Thursday. Biden would enter a crowded field of Democrats vying to take on President Trump in 2020. We’ll talk with KQED’s politics senior editor about Biden’s prospects, what issues are likely to drive his campaign and how the former senator and vice president could impact the 2020 race.

  • Study Reveals Student Debt Totals, Default Rates Rise Sharply in Bay Area

    Apr 24 2019

    A new study shows that Bay Area adults owed $26.6 billion in student debt in 2018, affecting around 12 percent of the region’s adults.

  • Rupa and the April Fishes Tackle Gentrification, Police Violence on ‘Growing Upward’

    Apr 24 2019

    Rupa Marya is the frontwoman of the band Rupa and the April Fishes, but that's only one item on her resume. Marya is an associate professor of medicine at UCSF, where she directs the Do No Harm coalition that fights against police violence in San Francisco. She also provided medical care at Standing Rock and fought for the "Happy Birthday" song to enter the public domain. Rupa and the April Fishes' latest release, "Growing Upward," takes on gentrification, indigenous rights, police violence, cli...more

  • Robocalls Surge As Consumers, Government Seek Ways to Fight Back

    Apr 24 2019

    Robocalls, those annoying prerecorded marketing calls that lay siege to our phones day and night, are on the rise. That's according to the phone spam tracking app RoboKiller, which found that Americans received almost 5.2 billion robocalls last month, up from about 3.6 billion calls for the same period last year. We'll talk about what's behind the surge in robocalls and what you can do to protect yourself from them. And we want to hear from you: What's your strategy for dealing with robocalls?

  • Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Major LGBTQ Rights Cases

    Apr 23 2019

    The Supreme Court has agreed to hear three high-profile cases that question whether a federal ban on sex discrimination in the workplace applies to sexual orientation and gender identity. Forum will discuss the cases, how the Supreme Court is likely to handle them and what they could mean for LGBTQ rights.

  • Researchers Unlock Genetic Code of California Redwoods

    Apr 23 2019

    Scientists with the Redwood Genome Project announced Tuesday that they have successfully sequenced the coast redwood and giant sequoia genomes. The project, dubbed by researchers a "23andMe for trees," is expected to aid in restoration and conservation of California's redwood forests, 95 percent of which have been lost to logging in the last 150 years. We'll talk about the study and what it tells us about the ancient trees and their environment.

  • Controversy Over School Mural Depicting Slavery, Colonization

    Apr 23 2019

    The San Francisco Unified School District superintendent and staff are considering a working group recommendation to remove and archive the "Life of Washington" mural at George Washington High School.

  • ‘Beach Blanket Babylon’ Bids Adieu

    Apr 22 2019

    After 45 years and more than 17,000 performances, San Francisco’s longest-running musical revue will close. Producer Jo Schuman Silver has decided to end “Beach Blanket Babylon.” The campy, irreverent show, filled with pop culture references, political gags and an iconic San Francisco skyline hat, plays Club Fugazi until the end of this year. We’ll talk with Schuman Silver and actor Curt Branom about the unexpectedly long tenure of “Beach Blanket Babylon,” and its place in San Francisco’s cultur...more

  • Close to 300 Dead in Sri Lanka Terror Attacks

    Apr 22 2019

    The Sri Lankan government has called a state of emergency in the wake of the Easter Sunday suicide bombings which killed nearly 300 people and injured more than 500. The government is blaming a small, local militant group, National Thowheeth Jama’ath, for the attacks. Officials say the group had the help of an  international network. But there has been no claim of responsibility. Sri Lankan authorities were warned at least 10 days before the bombings, but apparently did not act on the tip.

  • National Political News in Review

    Apr 22 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.