Podcast

KQED’s Forum

KQED’s live call-in program presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.

Episodes

  • John Muir Trail Foundation Seeks to Protect Storied Route from Heavy Use

    Apr 11 2019

    In 2016, over 3,500 people hiked on the John Muir Trail (JMT) in California’s high sierra. That’s a lot more than anyone imagined when the 211 mile trail running from Yosemite Valley to Mt. Whitney was founded over a hundred years ago. With increased usage taking a toll on the route, we discuss new efforts to preserve the trail’s history and environmental integrity. If you’ve hiked the John Muir Trail, what makes it unique? What would you like to see its stewards prioriti...more

  • Armistead Maupin and Laura Linney Share New ‘Tales of the City’

    Apr 11 2019

    In 1974, Armistead Maupin’s “Tales of the City” premiered in the Pacific Sun, depicting a naive, Midwestern young woman who becomes immersed in San Francisco’s LGBTQ scene. The serialized story, featuring 1970s San Francisco, would go on to become nine novels and three TV miniseries. Mary Ann, Anna, et al., are back again, this time in a Netflix series starring many of the original cast. We’ll talk with Maupin and Linney about the legacy and newest iteration of R...more

  • WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange Arrested in London

    Apr 11 2019

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was charged by the U.S. with conspiracy to hack a government computer. The indictment, issued last year in the state of Virginia, alleges that Assange conspired in 2010 with former U.S. Army Intelligence Analyst Chelsea Manning to access classified information on Department of Defense computers. He faces up to five years in jail. We’ll discuss Assange’s arrest and what it means for the future of WikiLeaks and for freedom of the press.

  • Valerie Jarrett Reflects on Obama Administration, Public Service in ‘Finding My Voice’

    Apr 11 2019

    As President Obama’s longest serving senior advisor, Valerie Jarrett led the Offices of Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs and chaired the White House Council on Women and Girls. But before she entered public service, Jarrett was an unfulfilled corporate lawyer in an unhappy marriage. Her new memoir, “Finding My Voice,” describes how she overcame self-doubt and transformed herself into an influential policy adviser. We’ll talk to Jarrett about her book, her r...more

  • First Photos of a Black Hole Captured by Event Horizon Telescope Project

    Apr 10 2019

    The research team behind the Event Horizon Telescope project released their first images of a black hole at the center of galaxy Messier 87 (M87). The giant black hole is 55 million light years from Earth with a mass about 6.5 billion times that of our sun. We’ll explain the news and take your questions.

  • ‘Biddy Mason Speaks Up’ Introduces Kids to One of California’s Forgotten Figures

    Apr 10 2019

    In a new children’s book, “Biddy Mason Speaks Up,” Arisa White and Laura Watkins weave poetry and prose with historical facts to tell the story of Bridget “Biddy” Mason–a woman born into slavery in the early 1800s who later bought her freedom and became a prominent landowner, community builder and healer in Los Angeles. “Biddy Mason Speaks Up” is the second in HeyDay Books’s Fight for Justice series, which introduces young people to historica...more

  • Netanyahu Poised to Win Fourth Consecutive Term as Israeli Prime Minister

    Apr 10 2019

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu seems poised to win his fourth consecutive term after an extremely close election. Both Netanyahu and his main opponent, Benny Gantz, declared victory Tuesday, but Netanyahu likely has the edge in forming a coalition government because of the strong showing of other right wing parties. We’ll discuss the election, its results and the latest developments.

  • Ruth Reichl on Gourmet Magazine’s Heyday and the Evolution of Food Journalism

    Apr 09 2019

    Ruth Reichl, who considers herself a writer with Berkeley-hippie sensibilities, initially turned down an offer to be Gourmet magazine’s editor-in-chief, a corporate gig. But Reichl ultimately said yes to the job, in which she highlighted some of the world’s most exclusive restaurants and wielded tremendous influence. In her memoir, “Save Me The Plums,” Reichl describes lavish company trips and meals, her role in the magazine’s most groundbreaking and controversial s...more

  • Bureau of Land Management Proposes Crackdown on Burning Man, Including Drug Searches

    Apr 09 2019

    The Bureau of Land Management proposed new rules last month regarding Burning Man, the week-long arts event and temporary city built annually in Black Rock City, Nevada. The draft mandate, which is open for public comment until April 29, would impose new fees and environmental rules, as well as require organizers to hire a private security contractor to search for weapons and illegal drugs. Burning Man organizers say the proposals would “spell the end of the event as we know it.” We&...more

  • Proposed Education Tax Targets Corporations and Pay Inequity

    Apr 09 2019

    Three East Bay lawmakers have announced a bill that would increase taxes on California’s most profitable companies to help fund schools and childcare. The bill aims to increase education funding by at least $2.5 billion a year by targeting companies that have benefited from President Trump’s tax overhaul, which reduced the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. In a novel attempt to address inequality in compensation practices, the bill would base the tax burden on the ratio of the CEO&...more

  • Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen Stepping Down

    Apr 08 2019

    We’ll be talking about the departure of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

  • As Humanitarian Crisis in Venezuela Deepens, US Weighs Intervention Options

    Apr 08 2019

    The U.S. imposed a new round of sanctions on Venezuela Friday, targeting oil companies that the U.S. says are propping up President Nicolás Maduro’s regime. The sanctions come amid a worsening political and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela, as citizens cope with a collapsed health system and dire food, water and electricity shortages. Meanwhile, Venezuela’s opposition leader Juan Guaidó remains vulnerable to arrest after the government stripped him of immunity on Tuesday. We’ll talk about the on...more

  • Your Income Tax Questions, Answered

    Apr 08 2019

    The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which went into effect on Jan. 1, imposes a host of new rules governing federal tax rates, deductions and credits. As the April 15 federal filing deadline approaches, Forum opens its phone lines and takes your income tax questions.

  • Laila Lalami’s ‘Other Americans’ Explores Complexity of Immigrant Experience

    Apr 05 2019

    America embraces me with one arm, but it pushes me away with the other," Laila Lalami wrote in a 2017 New Yorker piece after President Trump instituted his travel ban. Lalami's new novel, "The Other Americans," opens with the hit-and-run murder of a Moroccan immigrant in a present-day Southern California suburb. This event affects nine narrators of various backgrounds, ethnicities and immigration statuses, each of whom shares their own story of being both embraced and pushed away by America. La...more

  • Senate GOP Invokes ‘Nuclear Option’ to Cut Debate Time on Some Nominees to Two Hours

    Apr 05 2019

    In an effort to speed confirmation of President Trump’s nominees, Senate Republicans voted Wednesday to reduce the amount of time lawmakers may debate district court and non-cabinet level appointments from 30 hours to two hours. The move was only the third use of the so-called “nuclear option,” a procedure that allows the Senate to change rules with a simple majority vote. Some Senate watchers predict that the drastic shortening of deliberation time may trigger a push by Democrats to eliminate t...more

  • Immersive Play Takes Audience Inside ‘The Jungle’ Refugee Camp

    Apr 04 2019

    A play at San Francisco’s Curran has transformed the theater into an Afghan restaurant inside a refugee camp in Calais, France. In “The Jungle,” audience members sit crammed at restaurant tables amid the buzz and drama of a makeshift society of refugees from various countries who dream of leaving the camp. Forum talks to the playwrights about the theater they ran out of the real refugee camp in Calais, known as the Jungle, and about the play that emerged from the stories they heard, and the peop...more

  • Newly Revealed Records Expose Police Misconduct in Departments Across the State

    Apr 04 2019

    Police departments across California must make public records of serious officer misconduct and use of force, according to a recent ruling by a state appellate court in San Francisco. The ruling affirmed that California’s new police transparency law requires the release of pre-2019 records, despite more than a dozen lawsuits brought by law enforcement unions. … Continue reading Newly Revealed Records Expose Police Misconduct in Departments Across the State →

  • After Losing Home in Northern California Wildfires, Cartoonist Brian Fies Shares His ‘Fire Story’

    Apr 04 2019

    Cartoonist Brian Fies started drawing the story of his family’s evacuation from the Tubbs Fire just one day after his Santa Rosa home burned down. KQED turned that comic into an animated video that got more than two million views and won a regional Emmy Award. Now, Fies has released a graphic novel “A Fire Story”which follows his family, and others affected by the 2017 California wildfires. We’ll talk with Fies about the book, the response he’s received in the community and his process of rebuil...more

  • Robert Alter Shares the ‘Art of Bible Translation’ After Translating the Entire Hebrew Bible

    Apr 03 2019

    Armed with a Cross mechanical pencil and thin-lined paper, UC Berkeley professor and translator Robert Alter spent almost a quarter-century translating the entire Hebrew Bible into English. His completed work, which includes commentary, aims to preserve the style and rhythm of the original Hebrew prose and poetry. Now, Alter has written a book about the process called "The Art of Bible Translation." He joins us in studio to discuss his vision, and why the world needed a new translation of its mo...more

  • For Some San Francisco Students, the Classroom is a Bus

    Apr 03 2019

    Five Keys Schools and Programs began in 2003 in the San Francisco County Jail as the first charter school for incarcerated adults in the country. Its latest project, in San Francisco's Sunnydale neighborhood, is a traveling classroom — in the form of a refurbished city bus, painted lime green. The bus, called the “Mobile Self-Determination Project,” is equipped with teachers, desks and a library, and caters to high school dropouts seeking a diploma or GED. Two Five Key staff members join Forum t...more

  • Former Water Board Chair Felicia Marcus on Lessons Learned from CA Drought, Water Wars

    Apr 03 2019

    The Oroville Dam spillway reopened Tuesday after two years and $1.1 billion spent on repairs, debris cleanup and emergency response efforts. That's only one of many water emergencies that California faced in recent years. The state just navigated one of the worst droughts in its history. Felicia Marcus, who stepped down as Chair of the State Water Resources Control Board early this year, joins us to discuss California's water challenges, what the state learned from the recent drought and the fut...more

  • Proposed Homeless Navigation Center in Embarcadero Community Sparks Opposition, Dueling Fundraisers

    Apr 03 2019

    Residents of San Francisco’s waterfront neighborhoods are pushing back on a plan by Mayor London Breed to build a 225-bed navigation center for the homeless on the Embarcadero. In public meetings about the proposal last month, opponents cited public safety concerns with having a center in such a housing-dense, tourist-heavy area. A coalition of residents called “Safe Embarcadero for All” launched an online fundraising campaign for legal costs to block the center. A counter coalition also launche...more

  • Dave Eggers Explores the Morals of International Development in ‘The Parade’

    Apr 02 2019

    Dave Eggers' newest novel 'The Parade' follows the construction of a road through an unidentified developing country that is recovering from a recent civil war. Written in spare prose, and with few identifying details about location and characters, the book becomes a parable of the increasing moral complexities involved in international aid. Eggers joins us to speak about the book and the questions it poses about the ethics of well-intentioned development projects.

  • Zuckerberg Asks Government to Help Regulate Hate Speech, Political Ads

    Apr 02 2019

    In an opinion piece in the Washington Post this weekend, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg detailed four areas where he says Facebook and other social media companies should be regulated, including election security, privacy and data protection. Forum talks with industry watchers about Zuckerberg's recommendations and the feasibility of government curtailing fake news, data breaches and extremism on social networks. Tell us: What did you think of Zuckerberg's op-ed? How, if at all, should government ...more

  • Former Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano Asks: ‘How Safe Are We?’

    Apr 01 2019

    In her new book, "How Safe Are We?," former Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano reflects on how secure the U.S. has been since 9/11. According to Napolitano, the most urgent threats America faces are climate change and cybersecurity -- not a crisis at the southern border. We'll talk to Napolitano, who implemented Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in 2012 under President Obama, about immigration policy under President Trump, the current state of the Department of Homeland...more

  • U.S. Companies to Sell Nuclear Technology to Saudi Arabia

    Apr 01 2019

    The Department of Energy revealed last week that it secretly authorized at least six U.S. companies to sell nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia, which wants to build two nuclear power plants. Separately, appearing on Capitol Hill last Wednesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo confirmed that North Korea has not taken steps to rid itself of its arsenal. We'll discuss what these developments mean for U.S. national security and foreign relations.

  • National Political News in Review

    Apr 01 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.

  • ‘Skip the Slip’ Legislation Seeks to Phase Out Paper Receipts in California by 2022

    Mar 29 2019

    A bill that would require California retailers to issue digital receipts instead of paper ones by 2022 passed the Assembly Natural Resources committee this week. Known as 'Skip the Slip,' the bill would ban paper receipts unless a customer specifically asks for one and impose penalties of up to $25 for each day a business violates the rule. Bill proponents argue that it will reduce waste and exposure to chemicals that coat paper receipts. But opponents say the shift to e-receipts would be expens...more

  • Comedian Adam Conover Explains How to ‘Ruin Everything’

    Mar 29 2019

    Hollywood. Death. Avocados. These are only a few of the things Adam Conover has "ruined" on his hit TV series, "Adam Ruins Everything." Shining a light on popular culture, standard practices and household items alike, Conover's series finds humor in the ugly truths behind, well, everything. We'll talk with Conover about his comedy tour, the upcoming season of "Adam Ruins Everything," and what he's learned as an "investigative comedian."

  • What is Going on with Brexit?

    Mar 29 2019

    Friday, March 29 was supposed to be Brexit Day, when the United Kingdom would officially leave the European Union. Instead, members of the British Parliament continue to reject Prime Minister Theresa May's negotiated deal for the split, delaying any final action. As a key vote is set to take place Friday, we'll check in on Parliament's options and what they'd mean for the U.K., Europe and the global economy.

  • California Succulents Attract Native Plant Enthusiasts … and Smugglers

    Mar 28 2019

    Dudleyas are squat succulent plants with red-tipped silvery leaves that grow abundantly along California's rocky coastline, sprouting stalks of brightly colored flowers during the spring bloom season. They're also an ongoing target of organized plant poachers, who've been illegally uprooting dudleyas for distribution as far away as China and South Korea. We'll talk about what's driving global demand for the plants and what's being done to protect them.

  • MacArthur Maze Construction May Worsen an Already Horrible Commute

    Mar 28 2019

    Caltrans is planning a major rebuild of the MacArthur Maze, the convergence of three major highways: 580, 880 and 80, near the toll plaza on the east side of the Bay Bridge. The new construction would increase the amount of clearance for trucks on overpasses, but could cause shutdowns on an already jam-packed thoroughfare. Forum talks about Caltrans' proposals for the rebuild and what it could mean for commuters in the short and long term.

  • California Lawmakers Propose Requiring State Approval for Vaccine Exemptions

    Mar 28 2019

    A bill introduced this week in the California legislature would require the state health department to approve and track all vaccine exemptions given by physicians. Since 2015, when California eliminated the "personal belief" dispensation for vaccination requirements, the rate of medical exemptions for kindergartners has more than tripled, to 0.7 percent for the 2017-2018 school year. According to the bill's sponsors, some of those exemptions were granted fraudulently. We'll discuss the proposal...more

  • San Francisco Supervisors Vow to Shut Down Juvenile Hall

    Mar 28 2019

    Three San Francisco Supervisors are pledging to end the jailing of youth in the city. The move comes after a San Francisco Chronicle investigation found that serious crime by youth is down more than 80 percent from its peak in the mid-'90s. That's left San Francisco's 150 bed juvenile hall, like most youth lock up facilities in the state, less than half full. Forum talks about why youth crime has been declining and what it would mean to replace the city's expensive juvenile hall with alternative...more

  • Futurist Amy Webb Warns Against Leaving AI in the Hands of Big Tech

    Mar 27 2019

    The future of humanity rests in the hands of just nine companies, according to futurist Amy Webb. In her new book, "The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity," Webb explores the evolution of artificial intelligence as it seeps into our everyday lives through smart appliances, transforming our homes into "data generation machines" for large corporations. Webb argues that AI should be regulated instead of allowing a few companies, market forces and geopolit...more

  • Preet Bharara Talks Justice System, White Collar Crimes and Mueller Investigation

    Mar 27 2019

    Preet Bharara, an Obama appointee, made national headlines in 2017 when he was fired by the Trump Administration despite earlier signals that the president would keep Bharara on as U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. But Bharara was already known in the legal world as an effective prosecutor, especially in cases of white collar crimes and public corruption. In his new book, "Doing Justice," Bharara shares his experiences of the U.S. justice system, what it's like being banned f...more

  • ‘Queen Bey’ Explores Why Beyoncé Transcends Classification

    Mar 26 2019

    "Queen Bey" a new anthology about Beyoncé, lays bare just how hard it is to define her influence and her work: she is a visual artist, a singer, a rapper, an activist, a social media influencer, a woman, a mother. In this segment we'll explore Beyoncé's creative force: how she has managed to transcend genre and make so many people feel seen while coming into her artistic self. Tell us: what effect has Beyoncé had on you? What is the secret to her genius?

  • ‘I’m Just a Bill’: How Laws are Made in California

    Mar 26 2019

    More than 2,500 bills have been introduced in the California Legislature to be considered this year. And unfortunately, the famous School House Rock song doesn't capture the nuance and complexities of how a bill gets signed into law. In fact, a bill can become a law without being signed at all! Forum discuses how the details in California's legislative processes, the many ways a bill can die and how well the whole system is working. What questions do you have about how a bill becomes a law in Ca...more

  • Governor Newsom Addresses Child Poverty with Tax-Credit, Expanding Public Assistance

    Mar 25 2019

    Governor Gavin Newsom says child poverty in California is a "moral outrage." The state has the highest rate of child poverty in the nation, with one in five kids affected. We'll hear why a state as wealthy as California has so many children living in poverty and how Newsom plans to mitigate the issue.

  • U.S. Attorney General Issues Summary of Mueller Report, Nation Reacts

    Mar 25 2019

    Special Counsel Robert Mueller submitted his report to Attorney General William Barr on Friday, bringing to a close a 22-month investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election and its possible collusion with the Trump campaign. The report, which calls for no new charges, may be disclosed in part to Congress this weekend. We'll discuss the latest developments.

  • What’s the Recipe for a Democratic Win in 2020?

    Mar 22 2019

    As the number of Democratic presidential hopefuls grows, so does an ongoing debate within the party: What is the key to defeating the Republicans in 2020? Should the party seize the energy of its progressive wing and embrace policies like the Green New Deal and Medicare for All? Or should Democrats move to the center in hopes of picking up disaffected Republicans? We'll take up the debate.

  • Crashed Boeing Jets Lacked Optional Safety Features

    Mar 22 2019

    The Boeing jets that crashed in Ethiopia and Indonesia both lacked safety features that Boeing charged an extra fee to install. That's according to a New York Times report that says the optional features could have helped pilots detect the problem that led to the crashes. Forum discusses the latest updates on the Boeing 737 Max crashes and whether the Federal Aviation Administration met its responsibility to ensure the safety of the planes.

  • Thousands Still Awaiting Rescue in Mozambique a Week After Cyclone Idai

    Mar 22 2019

    At least 1,000 people are feared dead and thousands await rescue amid flooding caused by Cyclone Idai, which struck Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi last week. Over 1,800 acres of land are underwater, and food, medical supplies and fresh drinking water are increasingly scarce. We'll talk about relief efforts underway and discuss the impact of the natural disaster on a region already facing steep economic, infrastructure and political challenges.

  • Animals Experience Complex Emotions, According to Primatologist

    Mar 21 2019

    Ask a pet owner if animals have emotions, writes primatologist Frans De Waal and they'll say, "of course!" But ask a University professor, and they'll squirm. While the leading theories in science only recognize basic emotions in animals such as anger, happiness and fear, De Waal argues that animals share all emotions with humans, including complex ones like hope, disappointment, guilt and empathy. De Waal joins Forum to discuss his decades of research on the behavior and social intelligence o...more

  • New York Times’ Ross Douthat on Trump, Meritocracy and the ‘Future of Catholicism’

    Mar 21 2019

    New York Times opinion writer Ross Douthat's recent columns have covered topics ranging from the college admissions bribery scandal to antisemitism to what he calls the Democrats' "culture problem". A Catholic and a self-described conservative, Douthat joins us to share his thoughts on the latest political news and the ongoing crisis in the Catholic Church.

  • A Portrait of Los Angeles in Letters and Diaries

    Mar 20 2019

    Opinions on Los Angeles tend to be strong. To Albert Einstein it was like a paradise, "Always sunshine and clean air, gardens with palms and pepper trees and friendly people who smile at one and ask for autographs." Not so for Truman Capote who said, "It's redundant to die in Los Angeles." David Kippen, Los Angeles Times critic-at-large, has assembled centuries of thoughts on the city, by those who lived there, in his book, "Dear Los Angeles: The City in Diaries and Letters, 1542 to 2018." Kippe...more

  • San Francisco Proposes Ban on All E-Cigarettes

    Mar 20 2019

    San Francisco officials introduced legislation on Tuesday that would outlaw the sale of e-cigarettes in the city and prevent e-cigarette companies from occupying city-owned property going forward. The bills would also prevent e-cigarettes from being mailed to addresses within San Francisco. Juul, which is headquartered at Pier 70, and is directly targeted by the legislation, says they don’t want to see tobacco products in the hands of youth, but believes the adult market should still have access...more

  • Marin Communities Split Over Putting the Brakes on E-Bikes

    Mar 20 2019

    Since 2011, electric bikes have not been permitted on Mount Tamalpais fire trails, with exceptions made for cyclists with disabilities. But this week, the Marin Municipal Water District will discuss loosening those regulations. Environmentalists warn that e-bikes will damage trails already crowded with hikers, mountain bikers and equestrians. Others argue that not all e-bikes are equal, and that the slowest group, Class 1, travel at a maximum speed of 20 mph and can assist bike riders who need o...more

  • San Francisco Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti Turns 100

    Mar 19 2019

    Publisher, activist, and mentor to many iconic figures of the Beat Generation, San Francisco's first poet laureate Lawrence Ferlinghetti celebrates his 100th birthday on March 24. Ferlinghetti's 65-year-old City Lights Books is hosting a series of birthday events, including a book release for his new novel, "Little Boy." And Mayor London Breed has declared March 24th "Lawrence Ferlinghetti Day." Join us as we discuss the ways in which Ferlinghetti has -- and continues -- to influence and reflect...more

  • Nation Eyes California’s Halt on the Death Penalty

    Mar 19 2019

    Some analysts are predicting that Governor Gavin Newsom's moratorium on executions in California could usher in the end of the death penalty nationally. Forum will discuss the impact Newsom's move could have on the rest of the country and we'll talk about the politics of his order, which comes just two years after voters rejected a ballot measure ending the death penalty. And we'll discuss what the moratorium means for the active court cases for the 737 inmates on California's death row. What q...more

  • California Lawmakers Consider Eliminating ‘Poverty-Related’ Car Tows

    Mar 19 2019

    On Monday State Assemblyman David Chiu announced legislation banning towing cars for “poverty-related” infractions such as parking in the same spot for more than 72 hours or having more than five unpaid parking tickets. Supporters of the measure say the cost of retrieving a towed vehicle can be devastating for those struggling financially and can result in job loss for people who have no other reliable transportation to work. We’ll talk to Chiu about his proposal and we want to hear from you: wh...more

  • The Science of ‘How Art Works’

    Mar 18 2019

    Psychology professor Ellen Winner studies how humans interact with art, including what we consider art, how art affects us and why we like what we do. Her new book, "How Art Works" also challenges some commonly held beliefs such as literature's ability to develop empathy. Winner joins us to discuss her book and her scientific approach to studying art.

  • Sea Level Rise, if Unmitigated, Will Devastate the Bay Area by 2100, Says USGS

    Mar 18 2019

    By 2100, rising seas will flood the homes of 600,000 coastal Californians and cause over $150 billion in property damage. That's according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey, which estimates that Bay Area residents will constitute two-thirds of those affected statewide. We'll talk about the Bay Area communities that are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise and what can be done to mitigate its effects.

  • Trump Administration Downplays Rise of White Nationalism Following New Zealand Attacks

    Mar 18 2019

    After the New Zealand attacks on Friday that left 50 dead, President Trump downplayed the rise of white nationalism around the world calling it a “small group of people.” He also came to the defense of a Fox News host who made anti-Muslim remarks. We’ll talk with a national security expert who believes Trump's views are undercutting the administration’s counter-terrorism policies.

  • ‘Deepfake’ Videos: How to Spot Them and Why They’re Dangerous

    Mar 15 2019

    Image-doctoring is nothing new: Joseph Stalin ordered his enemies airbrushed out of official photos and Cuba altered images of Fidel Castro to remove his hearing aid. But national security experts are worried about a new frontier in manipulated content: deep fakes. Deceptively realistic, deep fakes are AI-generated videos that use techniques like faceswaps, lip synchs, and even "digital puppeteers" to show people saying things they never said or doing things they never did. We'll talk about how ...more

  • At Least 49 Dead in New Zealand Mosque Shootings

    Mar 15 2019

    Forty-nine people are dead and at least 20 are seriously injured after two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand were attacked Friday around the time of afternoon prayers. We'll bring you the latest news.

  • Upcoming Tech IPOs Already Influencing Bay Area Real Estate

    Mar 14 2019

    With tech companies like Uber, AirBnB and Pinterest slated to go public this year the Bay Area will likely be gaining thousands of new millionaires. New York Times tech reporter Nellie Bowles recently wrote about what all that new money could mean for local real estate. We'll talk to Bowles about what she's hearing from community advocates who are nervous that the influx of IPO windfalls will lead to further displacement and gentrification in San Francisco. Tell us: how, if at all, are the upco...more

  • BD Wong Returns Home for ACT’s ‘The Great Leap’

    Mar 14 2019

    Actor BD Wong has made his mark on both Broadway and Hollywood. He won a Tony for his role in the original "M. Butterfly." But Wong may be best known for his work in films like Jurassic Park and TV's Law and Order SVU. Wong is also an outspoken advocate for a greater diversity of roles for Asian-American actors and for LGBTQ artists. He joins us to talk about his San Francisco upbringing, his acting career and his current role in “The Great Leap” at the American Conservatory Theater.

  • College Admissions Bribery Scandal Rocks Nation’s Top Schools

    Mar 14 2019

    Thirteen Bay Area parents, including Stanford's sailing coach, were among the 50 people charged Tuesday in in a major college admissions bribery scheme. The indictment alleges that suspects paid standardized test proctors to doctor their children's results and bribed college coaches to recruit kids who had never played a sport to gain entrance to schools such as Stanford, USC, and Yale. We'll talk about the latest developments and what the scandal says about merit and access in the U.S. higher e...more

  • Forum on the Road: Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe on the Mueller Investigation and ‘The Threat’

    Mar 13 2019

    President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort is set for his second and final sentencing on Wednesday. He could get more than a decade of cumulative prison time. In this hour, we'll check in with former FBI Acting Director Andrew McCabe about the Manafort sentencing and latest developments in Mueller probe. We'll also talk with him about his new book "The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump."

  • Forum on the Road: Checking In on ‘Next Generation Science Standards’

    Mar 13 2019

    California's public school students get tested according to new science standards for the first time this month. The “Next Generation Science Standards” mark a shift away from rote memorization toward hands-on projects, interpreting data and recognizing scientific concepts across disciplines. We'll hear how the new science standards are changing what goes on in the classroom and what the challenges are to implementation.

  • Naturalist Michael Ellis Talks Bay Area Wilderness

    Mar 12 2019

    Michael Ellis brings a sense of joy and adventure to his work as a naturalist and tour guide. He's hula hooped on top of a termite mound in Botswana and survived a near-death experience with a buffalo in Tanzania. He's also written about earthworms and rain for Bay Nature magazine and has joined Forum before to discuss the environmental impact of California wildfires. Ellis joins us to talk about the Bay Area’s natural landscape and his upcoming trip through the Mojave Desert.

  • Environmentalists Accuse Trump of Trying to Shortcut Science in Decisions Regarding California’s Water Supply

    Mar 12 2019

    President Trump is trying to speed up the approval process for a proposal to send more water to Central Valley farmers, something he promised to do during his 2016 campaign. A KQED investigation found that the president is pushing for a recommendation by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to be approved in 135 days, the minimum time required by federal law, and for the approval process to forego a public comment component. Environmentalists say that timeframe and insufficient staffing would make acc...more

  • Wells Fargo CEO to Appear Before Congress on Tuesday

    Mar 12 2019

    Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan will appear before the House Financial Services Committee Tuesday to detail what he calls the bank's "significant progress" in dealing with past scandals. Since 2016, the company has paid over $2 billion in fines and settlements stemming from a range of practices, including its creation of millions of fake bank and credit card accounts. Sloan's testimony comes just after a New York Times investigation found that Wells Fargo employees are still pressured to meet aggress...more

  • ‘Right to Repair’ Movement Fights Back Against Unfixable Devices

    Mar 11 2019

    The “right to repair” movement is growing. A range of D.I.Y. groups offer classes and online instructions for how to fix everything from discarded clothing steamers to iPhones and Wi-Fi enabled refrigerators. But technology companies have resisted consumer efforts to repair increasingly software-dependent electronic goods, citing safety concerns. Advocates contend that even modern electronics can be repaired safely, with less waste and expense, if people have access to the proper tools. Californ...more

  • Questions Arise for Boeing Following Ethiopian Airlines Crash

    Mar 11 2019

    On Sunday, an Ethiopian Airlines flight carrying 157 passengers, including eight Americans, crashed, killing everyone on board. The plan, being flown by a veteran pilot, was Boeing's new 737 Max 8, the same plane that crashed in Indonesia last October. China and Indonesia have already grounded all their 737 Max planes with other countries monitoring the situation.

  • National Political News Roundup

    Mar 11 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.

  • Talking Transportation with the Head of San Francisco MTA

    Mar 08 2019

    As Director of Transportation for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, Ed Reiskin is responsible for Muni trains and buses, parking policy, taxi regulation and bicycle and pedestrian safety. Reiskin joins Forum to take your questions and hear your concerns about transportation and parking in the city. What do you want to ask him?

  • Paul Manafort Sentenced to 47 Months in Prison

    Mar 08 2019

    Paul Manafort, President Trump's presidential campaign chairman was sentenced Thursday to less than 4 years in prison for financial fraud in a federal court in Virginia. The sentence is drawing wide ire for falling far short of the 19-25 year prison term recommended under sentencing guidelines.

  • Family Separation Continues as Policy Winds Through Courts

    Mar 08 2019

    A lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union last year continues to bear revelations on the practice of separating kids from their asylum-seeking parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. Despite District Judge Dana Sabraw's preliminary injunction last June to halt family separations, the practice continues. Meanwhile, Democrats took Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to task when she testified before the House on Wednesday, questioning her on what they view as inhumane treatment of ...more

  • NPR’s Scott Horsley on Nuclear Summits, Trade Rifts and Covering Trump

    Mar 07 2019

    We'll talk with Scott Horsley, who has been a White House correspondent for the past decade, about the latest political news and his experiences covering the Trump administration.

  • House to Vote on Resolution to Condemn Anti-Semitism

    Mar 07 2019

    Controversy has erupted over what some view as anti-semitic comments by Minnesota Representative Ilhan Omar. We'll discuss the controversy and the split among Democrats over a House resolution that would condemn anti-Semitism.

  • Cal Fire Report Prioritizes Fuel Reduction for Wildfire Prevention

    Mar 07 2019

    Cal Fire released a list of recommendations to help prevent wildfires Wednesday. The report, issued after a January executive order from Gov. Gavin Newsom, prioritizes fuel reduction projects like removing dead trees. This approach upset some ecologists and researchers who say the kind of forest clearing Cal Fire proposes could make future fires burn more intensely. We’ll discuss the Cal Fire report, and what the agency’s critics propose.

  • Uighur-American Activist Criticizes China; Her Aunt, Sister Go Missing

    Mar 06 2019

    Just six days after Rushan Abbas spoke on a panel that criticized China’s treatment of the ethnic minority Uighurs, her aunt and sister disappeared. Abbas’ family assumed they were sent to the “re-education camps," or internment centers where the Chinese government holds around one million Uighurs in the country’s far western Xinjiang region. Abbas is an American citizen and activist who has campaigned extensively for the rights of Uighurs in China, who are reportedly subject to religious discr...more

  • First Person: Peter Planteen, Serving Marin’s Homeless and Mentally Ill Populations

    Mar 06 2019

    Social services counselor Peter Planteen is most often driving around Bolinas, Pt. Reyes Station and other Marin communities, checking up on the area's homeless and mentally ill populations. Planteen relates to his clients, having had his own decades-long struggle with alcoholism and bipolar disorder. As part of Forum's First Person series profiling unique people in the Bay Area, we talk with Planteen about his work.

  • Irshad Manji Says ‘Don’t Label Me’

    Mar 06 2019

    Professor Irshad Manji thinks the American left needs to examine its own intolerance. A vocal and controversial advocate of reform within Islam, Manji warns in her book "Don't Label Me" that progressives' emphasis on categories like race, gender and sexuality undermine their own credibility. Manji joins us in the studio to speak about her new book and how to avoid the pitfalls of tribalism when pursuing diversity.

  • New Developments in HIV Research

    Mar 06 2019

    Following a stem cell transplant, an HIV positive British patient’s HIV has now become undetectable.  The case — reported in the journal Nature — was the second time a patient has become HIV-free after therapy involving stem cells.  We discuss the case with Jeff Sheehy, a board member for the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine.  He was also the first openly HIV positive San Francisco Supervisor.

  • New Study Confirms Measles Vaccine Does Not Cause Autism

    Mar 05 2019

    A large new Danish study confirms that the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine does not cause autism. The study, published Monday in Annals of Internal Medicine, looked at more than 650,000 children, some who were vaccinated with the MMR vaccine, and some who were not. It concluded that the vaccine did not increase a child's risk of developing autism or trigger autism in susceptible kids. Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions is holding a hearing Tuesday on...more

  • Dan Rusanowsky Shares Tales From the ‘Shark Tank’

    Mar 05 2019

    As the voice of the San Jose Sharks, Dan Rusanowsky has seen the team's ups, downs and everything in between. His book, "If These Walls Could Talk," gives us an insider's look at Sharks' history, from the team's inception in 1991 to its trip to the Stanley Cup Final in 2016 to the present day. Tell us: What's your favorite moment in Sharks' history?

  • California Sues Trump Administration Over Abortion ‘Gag Rule’

    Mar 05 2019

    California Attorney General Xavier Becerra sued the Trump Administration Monday in hopes to block new rules that ban clinics that receive federal family planning money from offering abortions or referring women to abortion services. Twenty other states say they will also file suit over the change to Title X, the federally funded program for family planning. Forum discusses the suit and the broader legal fights over reproductive rights.

  • Investigation Exposes Dark Side of Loosely Regulated Rehab Industry

    Mar 05 2019

    As drug use has ballooned over the last decade, so too has the demand for addiction treatment. But as Mother Jones reporter Julia Lurie reveals in a new investigation, unscrupulous rehab centers are proliferating in a loosely regulated industry. We'll talk to Lurie about the practices she uncovered, including the "Florida shuffle," in which centers woo recovering users with cash, free flights, and even drugs. We'll also hear about how to find a responsible rehabilitation center and we want to he...more

  • What America Can Learn from Rome’s Collapse into Tyranny

    Mar 04 2019

    Historian Edward Watts' new book "Mortal Republic" begins in the third century BC, when Rome developed democratic institutions that allowed it to expand its territory, grow economically and remain politically stable. But by the late second century economic inequality coupled with politicians' "constitutional trickery" led to violence and ultimately, to civil war. Watts joins Forum to talk about the collapse of Roman democracy and what it illuminates about today's political realities.

  • No Charges for Sacramento Police Over Stephon Clark Death

    Mar 04 2019

    Protesters shut down a downtown Sacramento shopping mall on Sunday, one day after prosecutors declined to file charges against the police officers who killed Stephon Clark last March. Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert announced Saturday that she would not press charges against the two officers, who have said they thought Clark, a vandalism suspect, had a gun. But investigators found only a cellphone. On Sunday, Clark's mother, SeQuette Clark, pledged to continue what she ca...more

  • Political News Roundup

    Mar 04 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.

  • ‘Ear Hustle’ Podcast Lives on After Creator’s Release from Prison

    Mar 01 2019

    When he was an inmate at San Quentin State Prison, Earlonne Woods co-founded a podcast called Ear Hustle, which is prison slang for listening to things "that may not be your business." Over its first three seasons Ear Hustle documented everyday life behind bars -- from cellmate dynamics to "getting a date" (for a parole hearing) to parenting from prison. In November, Governor Jerry Brown commuted Woods' 31-years-to-life sentence for attempted robbery, citing his work on the podcast. Woods and Ea...more

  • Sonoma County, other Northern California Communities Assess Flood Damage

    Mar 01 2019

    Governor Newsom on Thursday declared a state of emergency in Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake, Glenn and Amador counties due to flooding. And authorities in Humboldt County say that a Ferndale man died while trying to navigate flood waters to reach his three kids who were trapped in their house. We'll get the latest news on the floods in Northern California and find out what's next for communities along the Russian River, where more than 3,000 people were evacuated earlier in the week.

  • Debate Over Charter Schools Looms Over Oakland Teacher Strike

    Mar 01 2019

    More than a quarter of Oakland public school students were enrolled in charter schools last year and that has become a central issue for the city's teachers who have been on strike since last week. The union representing Oakland teachers has blamed charter schools, which are privately operated, publicly funded and mostly non-union, for diverting money from district schools. Forum talks about how charter schools affect school funding and about proposed laws to regulate charters in California.

  • A Retroactive #MeToo from Hollywood’s Golden Age

    Feb 28 2019

    In 2017, the #MeToo Movement began exposing Hollywood’s culture of sexual violence, which then broadened into a global rallying cry. But sexual coercion and abuse has long had a place in Hollywood as three recently-released books attest. The books examine the working conditions of women during Hollywood's Golden Age and the abuses of casting couch predators like Howard Hughes and Harry Cohn. We'll talk with the authors about the vast contributions --and challenges- for women in the studio era

  • President’s Former Fixer Michael Cohen Testifies Before House Committee

    Feb 28 2019

    President Trump's former personal lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, testified before the House Oversight Committee in a full day of hearings on Wednesday. Cohen characterized the president as a racist, a conman and a cheat. In confrontational questioning, Republican committee members attacked Cohen's credibility and motivation. Forum discusses the hearing and its political implications.

  • ‘Millenial Mayor’ Pete Buttigieg Eyes the White House

    Feb 26 2019

    South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg says that he has the right kind of experience to be president. Buttigieg, who is 37 years old, openly gay, a Rhodes scholar and a Navy veteran is a rising star in the Democratic Party. Though he is currently considered a long shot for the nomination, Buttigieg would make history as the youngest and first gay man elected to the White House. Buttigieg joins us in the studio to discuss his presidential bid and his new memoir "The Shortest Way Home."

  • Former FCC Chair Tom Wheeler on Gutenberg, Google and the History of ‘Network Revolutions’

    Feb 26 2019

    Wired magazine calls him "the man who saved net neutrality." A former industry lobbyist, Tom Wheeler surprised many when the Federal Communications Commission passed a number of consumer-friendly reforms under his leadership. We'll talk with him about the roll back of some of those policies under the Trump administration. We'll also discuss his new book on the history of revolutionary technologies, "From Gutenberg to Google: The History of Our Future."

  • Latest on Oakland Teacher Strike

    Feb 26 2019

    More than a quarter of Oakland public school students were enrolled in charter schools last year and that has become a central issue for Oakland teachers who have been on strike since last week. The teachers union blames charter schools for taking money away from district schools. Forum talks about the role of charter schools in school funding, particularly in Oakland, and proposed laws aimed at regulating charter schools across the state.

  • Sex Trafficking Persists in Bay Area Spas, Massage Parlors

    Feb 26 2019

    Florida prosecutors charged New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft Monday with soliciting prostitution at a local spa tied to an international human trafficking ring. Kraft's arrest was part of an ongoing investigation in Florida and New York into massage parlors that employ trafficked immigrant women who are forced to perform sex acts for clients. We'll talk about the prevalence of illicit spa and massage businesses in the Bay Area and what's being done to stop them.

  • Oscars 2019: Winners, Snubs and Favorite Moments

    Feb 25 2019

    The 91st annual Academy Awards take place on Sunday, and the best picture contenders range from the super hero blockbuster "Black Panther" to "Roma," a Spanish-language drama about a young domestic worker in Mexico City. Forum reviews the winners, the snubs and the highlights from the ceremony, which is host-less for the first time in 30 years. And we want to hear from you: Did your favorite film get a nod? How did this year’s ceremony stack up to past years?

  • National News In Review

    Feb 25 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.

  • Remembering San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi

    Feb 25 2019

    Forum looks back on the life and work of longtime San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi, who died Friday of an apparent heart attack. We welcome your memories and reflections on Adachi, a vocal advocate for criminal justice reform.

  • UCSF Researchers Call Out Brain Health Supplements as ‘Pseudomedicine’

    Feb 22 2019

    Dietary supplements that purport to improve brain health are "pseudomedicine," according to a recent paper published in JAMA by a team of UCSF researchers. They say that although there is no known nutritional supplement that prevents cognitive decline or dementia, a loosely regulated $3.2 billion brain health industry continues to market ineffective, costly and potentially dangerous products. We'll talk about how to avoid bogus brain remedies and what actually works to improve cognitive function...more

  • ‘Sí, Se Puede’: Oakland Symphony to Perform Dolores Huerta’s Playlist

    Feb 22 2019

    Dolores Huerta, a lifelong community activist and pioneering feminist, is best known for co-founding the United Farm Workers of America. She also came up with the movement's famous slogan: "Sí, Se Puede," which translates to "Yes, We Can." As part of the Oakland Symphony's "Playlist" series, Huerta curated a list of songs that have inspired her work and that the symphony will performed on Friday. We'll talk with Huerta about the songs she chose, her activism and the role of music in political mo...more

  • Silicon Valley and ‘The Right to Disconnect’

    Feb 22 2019

    Employees in the U.S. are finding it increasingly hard to disconnect from work, even when they're not physically there. A Yelp employee is suing the Bay Area-based company because he says he was fired for not responding to an email over Easter weekend. And New York City is considering a proposal to ensure that city workers get a break from texting, emailing or phone calls when they're not on the clock. In this hour, we'll dig into the what's being called "the right to disconnect." Tell us: do yo...more

  • Forum on the Road: Trump Revokes $929 Million for California High Speed Rail

    Feb 21 2019

    The Trump Administration announced this week that it will cancel a nine $929 million federal grant to the California High Speed Rail Authority and at the same time seek to claw back $2.5 billion in federal funds already spent on the bullet train project. The announcement came shortly after California and other states filed a lawsuit challenging the President's national emergency declaration to fund a southern border wall. In this segment we’ll talk about what all this means for the future of the...more

  • Forum on the Road: How Families are Dealing with the Oakland Teachers Strike

    Feb 21 2019

    While Oakland teachers are on strike, parents choosing to not cross the picket line need alternative options for their kids. Parent groups, community centers and religious organizations are offering alternative educational and recreational spaces for children to spend school hours. And it may be an ideal time to visit one of Oakland’s museum or take in a $1 show at Grand Lake Theater. In this segment will discuss options available to families, include sending their kids to school, all of which w...more

  • Forum on the Road: Oakland Teachers Strike Begins

    Feb 21 2019

    Oakland teachers start their picket lines on Thursday after months of failed negotiations with the Oakland Unified School District. The teacher's union is asking for a 12 percent pay increase and smaller class sizes. The district says they're too financially strapped to meet the demands. Forum broadcasts from Oakland on the first day of the teacher's strike and we'll hear from the school board, the union, teachers and parents about what's next for Oakland schools.

  • Delta Project Scaled Back to One Tunnel. Now What?

    Feb 20 2019

    Governor Newsom announced last week that he will scrap a controversial $19 billion plan to build two tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to carry water southward. Instead, state officials will pursue a downsized one-tunnel conveyance system. We'll talk about the future of the project, known as California WaterFix, and what the new plan means for farms, cities, and the environment.

  • Oakland Diocese Releases List of 45 Clergymen ‘Credibly Accused’ of Sexual Abuse

    Feb 20 2019

    The Diocese of Oakland this week published the names of 45 priests, deacons and religious brothers who have been credibly accused of the sexual abuse of minors. This comes as the Vatican prepares for a summit on clergy sexual abuse that will include Pope Francis and presidents of the world's bishops conferences. Forum talks about the scandals and how the church is responding.

  • Terrorist Attack Raises Tensions Between Nuclear-Armed India, Pakistan

    Feb 20 2019

    More than 40 Indian paramilitary officers were killed last week in Indian-administered Kashmir. India accuses Pakistan of backing the militant separatists who say they were behind the attack. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has threatened a strong response, with Pakistan warning India against military action. We'll get the latest on the conflict between the two nuclear-armed rivals.

  • Dani Shapiro Confronts Family Secrets and Identity in ‘Inheritance’

    Feb 19 2019

    When Dani Shapiro sent in a DNA sample as part of an at-home genetic testing kit, she had already spent a lifetime examining and writing about her family history. So when the test results revealed that Shapiro's late father was in fact not her biological father, her sense of identity was obliterated. We'll talk with Shapiro about her discovery, chronicled in "Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love." And we want to hear from you: Has genetic testing changed how you view yourself ...more

  • Oakland Teachers Set to Strike on Thursday

    Feb 19 2019

    Oakland teachers say they will on strike on Thursday, unless a deal can be reached with the district. The union is demanding higher pay and smaller class sizes. But the district says its hands are tied by a budget crisis. We'll get the latest on the strike, and whether it might be averted.

  • Tuesday Morning Political Roundup

    Feb 19 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.

  • Rebroadcast: Bottom Up Governance

    Feb 18 2019

    "I guess we'll just have to do it ourselves." That's a growing sentiment in many communities where individuals are tired of waiting for government to act. In this hour, live from the Night of Ideas festival in San Francisco, we'll talk about new models for communities to offer affordable housing, healthier food and more efficient and equitable use of tax dollars. Some of these ideas call for reclaiming the urban commons and come out of the "sharing cities" movement. We'll hear about some real-wo...more

  • Rebroadcast: Future of Cities in a Changing Climate

    Feb 18 2019

    With climate change comes rising seas, flooding and increased natural disasters. And those effects may be felt most acutely in cities. In this hour, broadcast live from the Night of Ideas festival at San Francisco's Main Library, we’ll be joined by a futurist, an architect/designer, a science fiction writer, and a landscape architect. We will look at some bold actions cities can take, and ask: How can we design cities for a changing climate?

  • ‘Maid’ Pulls Back the Curtain on Life in Low-Wage America

    Feb 15 2019

    Stephanie Land struggled to make ends meet while working as a maid for $9 per hour. In her new memoir, “Maid,” she writes about the physically taxing labor and the difficulties she faced as a single mother living in poverty, including domestic violence and challenges with public assistance. We'll talk with Land about her experiences as a maid and the grim reality faced by many of America’s working poor.

  • President Expected To Sign Spending Bill, Declare National Emergency

    Feb 15 2019

    The Senate passed a compromise spending and border security bill Thursday that provides significantly less than the $5.7 billion in southern border wall funding that President Trump sought. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the President will sign the bill to avoid another government shutdown and will simultaneously declare a national emergency to obtain border wall funds by other means. We'll talk about the politics and practicalities of the emergency declaration.

  • Julie Gottman on the ‘Eight Dates’ Every Couple Should Go On

    Feb 14 2019

    “Eight Dates,” by relationship experts Julie and John Gottman outlines conversation-based outings designed to rekindle connection in established couples and weed out mismatches in new ones. The recommended dates include an outing centered around conflict — the “agree to disagree” date — and others that focus on sex, work and commitment. This Valentine's Day, we talk with Julie Gottman about her latest book and her decades of research on marriage. And we want to hear from you: What kind of dates ...more

  • Gov. Newsom Dims Jerry Brown’s Grand Vision of California High Speed Rail

    Feb 14 2019

    Governor Newsom has put the grand vision of high-speed rail between San Francisco and Los Angeles on hold. The announcement came in Tuesday's State of the State address, where Newsom committed to 119-miles of high-speed rail between Merced and Bakersfield, but pulled back from former Governor Jerry Brown's larger plan, citing cost overruns and mismanagement. With uncertainty now surrounding the project, we'll discuss the new direction for California's high speed rail under Governor Newsom.

  • UC Research Shows Hummingbirds Fight for Nookie not Nectar

    Feb 13 2019

    A new UC Berkeley study utilizing high speed video reveals that some hummingbirds have evolved with an eye toward fighting, not feeding. The video shows how hummingbirds stab, spar and push each other in battles over territory and that some birds have developed beaks shaped to tear out the feathers of their competition. We'll hear about the groundbreaking 10-year study and celebrate these creatures whose tiny hearts beat 1,200 times per minute and who consume half their weight in sugar daily. Wh...more

  • Atmospheric River to Bring Heavy Winds, Potential Flooding

    Feb 13 2019

    A “Pineapple Express” storm is expected to batter the Bay Area for two days, starting late Tuesday. The storm is an atmospheric river heading toward the West Coast from the tropics south of Hawaii. Caltrans plans to close Highway 1 south of Big Sur as a precaution against mudslides and the National Weather Service issued flash flood warnings across the Bay Area. Forum considers the anticipated storm. What questions do you have?

  • San Francisco Struggles to Respond to Methamphetamine Epidemic

    Feb 13 2019

    San Francisco health officials are struggling to deal with a resurgance in methamphetamine use. In the past five years meth-related deaths have doubled, hospitalizations have spiked and nearly half of of the psychiatric emergency visits at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital are from people on meth. Forum talks about the toll the drug is taking on the city's public health and how officials are responding to what they are calling a new speed epidemic.

  • Newsom Prepares for State of the State Speech, Recalls National Guard from Border

    Feb 12 2019

    In his first State of the State address on Tuesday, Governor Gavin Newsom is expected to explain his decision to recall hundreds of National Guard members from the Mexican border, in defiance of President Trump. Newsom will also likely talk about the state budget and his proposals on affordable housing and early childhood education. We'll preview the speech and get your thoughts on what California's priorities should be. What do you want to hear the governor address?

  • ‘Exiled’ Describes Plight of Cambodian Refugees Facing Deportation

    Feb 12 2019

    An estimated 10,000 Cambodians live in the Bay Area, many of whom came here as children. In her recent book, "Exiled," journalist Katya Cengel follows four refugee families who fled the Pol Pot regime in the 1970s. We'll discuss their stories and how they are dealing with the threat of deportation as the White House seeks to remove some protections for immigrants who arrived before 1995.

  • Disagreement Over ICE Detention Bed Numbers Could Lead to Another Government Shutdown

    Feb 12 2019

    Another partial government shutdown is starting to appear likely, after weekend talks between Democrats and Republicans hit a new sticking point: funding for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention beds. Democrats want to cap the number of beds to limit detentions, but the White House wants $4.2 billion to fund 52,000 beds. The logjam comes as President Trump travels to the border town of El Paso, Texas for a campaign rally. Forum gets the latest on immigration news.

  • From Facebook Investor to Vocal Critic: Roger McNamee on Getting ‘Zucked’

    Feb 11 2019

    Venture capitalist Roger McNamee has not always been an outspoken critic of Facebook. He was an early investor in the company and a mentor to founder Mark Zuckerberg. In his new book, "Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe," McNamee tells the story of his growing disillusionment with the company. In particular, he looks at how Facebook's advertising tools, the key to their business model, have been easily manipulated by political interests and private companies. McNamee joins us in the s...more

  • What’s the Deal with ‘The Green New Deal’?

    Feb 11 2019

    President Trump is mocking it on Twitter. Democratic 2020 presidential candidates are rushing to embrace it. But what's really in the "Green New Deal"? Late last week, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) released an outline of the plan, which they say will stimulate the economy while addressing climate change and poverty. Coming up on Forum, we'll talk with one of Ocasio-Cortez's economic advisors about the proposal and get his response to criticism from Re...more

  • Navigating the Casual Carpool

    Feb 08 2019

    Casual carpool, a cross between hitchhiking and carpooling, has been moving Bay Area commuters since the 1970s. The phenomenon, which is particularly popular in the East Bay, has no official rules or guidebook, so passengers and drivers negotiate things like radio stations and bridge tolls among themselves. What are your expectations for drivers and passengers when you use the casual carpool? What "only in casual carpool" experiences have you had?

  • First Person: Nite Yun and Her Mission to Popularize Cambodian Food

    Feb 08 2019

    Nite Yun was born in a Cambodian refugee camp in Thailand, where her parents fled from the Khmer Rouge. Now, Nyum Bai, Yun's cheerful restaurant in Oakland's Fruitvale district, has been named one of the 10 best new restaurants in the country by Bon Appetit magazine. We talk to Nite Yun about her sudden fame and how researching her family's story led to a love of Cambodian food and a desire to share its flavors with the world. She joins us as part of our First Person series on the leaders, inno...more

  • President Trump’s Family Separation Policy Under Renewed Scrutiny

    Feb 08 2019

    On Thursday, the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee held the first of three congressional hearings to assess the practice of separating immigrant families at U.S. borders. The hearing comes on the heels of a report that found administration officials will likely never know the exact number of families separated. We'll discuss Thursday's hearing, possible policy solutions going forward, and what we can look for in the hearings to come.

  • Concrete Falls from Upper Deck of Richmond-San Rafael Bridge

    Feb 08 2019

    The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge was closed in both directions on Thursday after repeated incidents of concrete falling from the upper deck onto the lower deck. No injuries were reported and Caltrans officials said the falling concrete was caused by normal shaking that results from everyday use. We'll discuss what this all means for public safety and traffic, as well as the current state of the Bay Area's infrastructure.

  • Mining the Mystery of Why We Dream

    Feb 07 2019

    In her new book "Why We Dream," science writer Alice Robb argues that dreams are not "silly little stories" but rather help us form memories, manage anxiety and spark creativity. We'll discuss the latest science behind dreams with Robb and Harvard psychologist Deirdre Barrett. And we'd like to hear from you: have your dreams helped you solve a problem or cope with stress or trauma?

  • The Racist History and Role of Blackface in America

    Feb 07 2019

    Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring on Wednesday admitted that he wore blackface while he was in college at a party in the 1980s. This comes amid increased calls for the resignation of Virginia Governor Ralph Northam over his admission that he wore blackface in the 1980s while dressed up as Michael Jackson. Northam has also been accused of appearing in a photo featuring a person in blackface and another in a KKK robe. Forum talks about the history blackface and its role in dehumanizing and di...more

  • Citing FEMA Funding, Paradise Disallows RVs on Uncleared Property

    Feb 07 2019

    Paradise officials have rescinded an emergency ordinance that allowed property owners to temporarily live in trailers or RVs on their burned-out land. The move came after the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) warned that the town risked losing $1.7 billion in cleanup funds if it allowed people to live on properties with debris or hazardous material. We'll discuss the decision and hear what options people have in a region with a severe housing shortage.

  • Anorexia Treatment Hasn’t Improved in 40 Years, UCSF Study Finds

    Feb 06 2019

    A recent study from UCSF revealed flaws in the way anorexia nervosa, the deadliest psychiatric disorder, is currently treated. Based on 40 years of data, the analysis found that commonly used treatments, including medicine and cognitive behavioral therapy, did not have better results than standard, supportive counseling. We'll hear about the report, discuss where current treatments might be missing the mark and discuss new approaches that may move anorexia treatment past its long-standing platea...more

  • President Trump Delivers His Second State of the Union Speech

    Feb 06 2019

    We'll get analysis and reaction to President Trump's State of the Union address. And we want to hear from you. What did you think of President Trump's speech?

  • Marion Nestle Exposes Corporate Manipulation of Nutrition Science in ‘Unsavory Truth’

    Feb 05 2019

    You've splurged on Maine wild blueberries for their reputed power to boost immunity, and you've stocked up on avocados, sources of "healthy" fats. But, as Marion Nestle details in her new book "Unsavory Truth," the research supporting health claims for these and other foods is funded by the companies that profit from their sale. We'll talk to Nestle about how the food industry shapes perceptions of a healthful diet, and how consumers can find accurate nutritional information about the foods they...more

  • Oakland Teachers Vote to Authorize Strike

    Feb 05 2019

    Oakland's 3,000 member teachers union has authorized a district-wide strike. Among the union's demands are a 12 percent raise over three years and reduced class sizes. The school district, which has offered a 5 percent pay raise, is in the midst of deciding on substantial cuts to address its expected $30 million budget shortfall next year. We'll talk about the strike, which could begin later this month, and what it means for Oakland teachers, students and parents.

  • David and Nic Sheff Want You to ‘Just Say Know’ to Drugs and Alcohol

    Feb 04 2019

    David and Nic Sheff discuss their new book for young readers, “High: Everything You Want to Know About Drugs, Alcohol and Addiction.”

  • US to Pull Out of Major Nuclear Arms Control Treaty With Russia

    Feb 04 2019

    The State Department announced Friday that the U.S. is suspending the landmark 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, claiming that Russia violated the treaty "without remorse." Full U.S. withdrawal will take place in six months, unless Russia dismantles what the administration calls objectionable missile programs. We'll talk about the national security implications of the withdrawal, and we'll analyze the intelligence community's recently issued "Worldwide Threat Assessment."

  • National Political News in Review

    Feb 04 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington, D.C.

  • Special Broadcast: Bottom Up Governance

    Feb 02 2019

    "I guess we'll just have to do it ourselves." That's a growing sentiment in many communities where individuals are tired of waiting for government to act. In this hour, live from the Night of Ideas festival in San Francisco, we'll talk about new models for communities to offer affordable housing, healthier food and more efficient and equitable use of tax dollars. Some of these ideas call for reclaiming the urban commons and come out of the "sharing cities" movement. We'll hear about some real-wo...more

  • Special Broadcast: Future of Cities in a Changing Climate

    Feb 02 2019

    With climate change comes rising seas, flooding and increased natural disasters. And those effects may be felt most acutely in cities. In this hour, broadcast live from the Night of Ideas festival at San Francisco's Main Library, we’ll be joined by a futurist, an architect/designer, a science fiction writer, and a landscape architect. We will look at some bold actions cities can take, and ask: How can we design cities for a changing climate?

  • Brewing Talent and Trends on Display at SF Beer Week

    Feb 01 2019

    Starting Friday, the Bay Area beer scene will be hopping, with SF Beer Week drawing fans to local taprooms. We'll hear about this year's events and get beer tips, including why the word "craft" on a label can be misleading. Tell us: What are you drinking these days?

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Border Security, Investigating Trump and Priorities for 2019

    Feb 01 2019

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is not budging on President Trump's proposed border wall. “There's not going to be any wall money in the legislation,” she said at a press briefing on Thursday. For his part, Trump says that he will not accept a government spending plan that doesn't include funding for the wall. Pelosi joins us in the studio to talk about the ongoing negotiations and what we can expect from the 116th Congress.

  • California Debates Cutting Taxes on Cannabis

    Feb 01 2019

    California grows a lot of pot. As in 13.5 million pounds. But much of it remains on the black market, despite recreational cannabis becoming legal in 2018. The lawmakers behind Assembly Bill 286 hope to change that by reducing California's 15 percent cannabis excise tax to 11 percent. A similar bill failed to pass last year when opponents argued that it was too soon to know if taxes were driving people to the black market. Now a year into licensed sales, the legal cannabis market hasn't performe...more

  • Oral Arguments to Begin in Major Net Neutrality Case

    Feb 01 2019

    A federal appeals court in Washington D.C. will hear arguments Friday in a challenge to the Federal Communications Commission's 2017 decision to end net neutrality. The challengers, a coalition of tech companies and digital rights advocates, are asking the court to reinstate Obama-era rules that barred internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon from blocking or prioritizing internet traffic. The FCC defends the rollback as encouraging innovation and easing unnecessary regulatory burdens...more

  • New ACT Artistic Director Makes San Francisco Debut with ‘Seascape’

    Jan 31 2019

    In Pulitzer-Prize winning playwright Edward Albee's "Seascape," a middle-aged couple reflects on their lives during a picnic when they encounter another couple, who are, wait for it, lizards. Enormous talking lizards. We'll talk with new American Conservatory Theater (ACT) Artistic Director Pam MacKinnon about why she chose the play for her San Francisco directing debut. We'll also discuss her vision and priorities for ACT, the largest theater company in the Bay Area.

  • Dan Hoyle Examines Borders, Political Divides in One-Man Show

    Jan 31 2019

    After Donald Trump was elected president, Oakland-based actor and playwright Dan Hoyle headed for the U.S.-Mexico border. Trump had made illegal immigration the hallmark of his campaign and Hoyle--who specializes in a genre he calls "journalistic theater"--wanted to capture the complex stories behind the president's rhetoric. The interviews Hoyle conducted became the basis of the 11 characters who populate his one-man show, "Border People," now playing at The Marsh San Francisco. Hoyle joins us ...more

  • Trump Stands by Guaidó as Turmoil Continues in Venezuela

    Jan 31 2019

    President Nicolás Maduro on Wednesday rejected calls for new presidential elections, as the U.S. and 20 other nations continue to support opposition leader Juan Guaidó as interim president. We'll get the latest developments out of Caracas and hear how Venezuelans--many of whom who are facing shortages of food, fuel and medical supplies--are faring amid the crisis.

  • Exploring San Francisco’s Hometown Foods, from Green Goddess Dressing to Pisco Punch

    Jan 30 2019

    San Francisco's been long associated with sourdough bread, ever since a Gold Rush miner reportedly passed on his starter to baker Isidore Boudin. But the city also lays claim to a number of other classic dishes, including turkey tetrazzini, which the Palace Hotel created in honor of opera singer Luisa Tetrazzini, and pisco punch, a status symbol of the late 1800s. We'll talk about some of the food and drink that make San Francisco unique and we want to hear from you: what's your favorite San Fra...more

  • New Transparency Law Sheds Light on How Police Departments Discipline Officers

    Jan 30 2019

    The Bay Area News Group and KQED have sifted through newly-released files outlining how Bay Area police officers are disciplined for major offenses. The files became available for the first time under a new police transparency law took that took effect this year. KQED reporters Sukey Lewis and Alex Emslie join us in studio to share their findings into how police misconduct is handled, from a Burlingame cop who asked a woman to trade sex for help with a DUI charge to a Rio Vista cop using excessi...more

  • ‘We Want to Negotiate’ Challenges U.S. Policy on Not Paying Ransom for Hostages

    Jan 30 2019

    The mantra "We will not negotiate with terrorists" has long guided American policy on rescuing hostages, the idea being that paying ransom only encourages kidnapping and terrorism. But in his new book, "We Want to Negotiate: The Secret World of Kidnapping, Hostages and Ransom," journalist Joel Simon argues for a different approach, one he calls "strategic ambiguity." Simon compares U.S. hostage situations with those involving European nations that routinely pay ransom. We'll talk with Simon abou...more

  • If Workers Hate Open Office Plans, Why Do They Keep Getting Built?

    Jan 29 2019

    Approximately 70 percent of U.S. offices use open environments, without office cubicles or walls according to a 2017 Gallup poll. But when Apple presented its employees with a more open floor plan, some workers threatened to quit. The open work space has been gaining popularity for years despite employee complaints about distractions, loud coworkers and a lack of privacy. Advocates for the plan often cite increased collaboration but a recent Harvard Business School study found that office spaces...more

  • PG&E Files for Bankruptcy, Effects Loom Large

    Jan 29 2019

    PG&E is expected to file for bankruptcy protection as early as Tuesday, as the utility faces more than $30 billion in potential wildfire liabilities. We'll discuss what bankruptcy could mean for ratepayers, employees, investors and fire victims.

  • Jason Rezaian on Being Political Collateral and his 544 Day in Iranian Prison

    Jan 28 2019

    In his new memoir "Prisoner," former Washington Post Tehran bureau chief Jason Rezaian details the year and a half that he spent in an Iranian prison. Rezaian describes his encounters with his jailers, who had complete control over him and were "the most hardheaded and least sophisticated people I had ever encountered." Rezaian's captivity occurred as the Obama administration was negotiating a nuclear deal with Iran, and Rezaian was released on the day that the deal was formally announced. He jo...more

  • Political News Roundup

    Jan 28 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington. And we'll hear about the rally on Sunday in Oakland, kicking off Senator Kamala Harris' presidential campaign.

  • Native American History Re-Envisioned in ‘The Heartbeat Of Wounded Knee’

    Jan 25 2019

    In his new book, "The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee," anthropologist David Treuer purposefully expands the narrative often associated with Native Americans by writing "adamantly, unashamedly, about Indian life rather than Indian death." We'll speak with Treuer, an Ojibwe from the Leech Lake Reservation in Minnesota, about his approach to writing the book and what the past may tell us about the current experiences of indigenous people in the U.S.

  • Berkeley Passes Far-Reaching Ban on Disposable Foodware

    Jan 25 2019

    The Berkeley City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to ban all take-out foodware--including containers, straws and utensils--that cannot be composted. The ban, to take effect in January 2020, will also require merchants to charge customers 25 cents for a disposable cup. Starting in July 2020, all dine-in foodware must be reusable. We'll talk about the new ordinance with its author, Berkeley Councilmember Sophie Hahn.

  • Cal Fire Finds Private Electrical System, Not PG&E, Caused Tubbs Fire

    Jan 25 2019

    Cal Fire announced Thursday that the 2017 Tubbs Fire, which burned over 36,000 acres across Calistoga and Santa Rosa, was started by a private electrical system, not PG&E equipment. The Tubbs Fire is the state's second most destructive fire ever, destroying more than 5,000 homes and killing 22 individuals. We'll discuss how Cal Fire's finding will affect the hundreds of lawsuits against PG&E, and what it means for the company's bankruptcy filing.

  • Mueller Probe: Trump Ally Roger Stone Indicted

    Jan 25 2019

    Political strategist Roger Stone was arrested Friday morning, charged with seven counts in the Mueller probe, including witness-tampering, false statements, and obstruction of an official proceeding. We’ll discuss what the arrest of the longtime ally and associate of President Trump means for the special counsel’s investigation.

  • Have You Tidied Up with Marie Kondo Yet?

    Jan 24 2019

    Marie Kondo has once again inspired people to go through their closets and kitchens, assessing what brings joy and what should go into the donation box. Kondo, who became known to American audiences in 2014, when her book “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” was published in the U.S., now has a Netflix show. The series, “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo” has spurred more purging and self-reflection in people who hope following her method can bring order and joy to their lives. Have you tried Marie...more

  • What the Covington Catholic Controversy Says About America’s Political Divide

    Jan 24 2019

    The fallout from a viral video involving Catholic school students continued on Wednesday when Nick Sandmann, one of the teens from the video, was interviewed on NBC's "Today Show". In this hour, we'll talk with journalists and thinkers about what the incident says about this political moment in the United States. We'll also talk with a political psychologist about the latest research on bias, partisanship and tribalism.

  • DJ Spooky on Creating a ‘Sonic Celebration’ of Internet History

    Jan 24 2019

    Paul Miller, otherwise known as DJ Spooky, has written music based on Antarctic weather patterns, remixed D. W. Griffith's film "Birth of a Nation," and currently scores Jeremy Scahill's "Intercepted" political podcast. Spooky's newest piece "Quantopia" is a sonic celebration of the history of the Internet. DJ Spooky joins Forum to discuss a career spent defying labels and "Quantopia," which premieres at San Francisco's Yerba Buena Center for the Arts this week.

  • Mary Pipher Celebrates Power of Older Women in ‘Women Who Row North’

    Jan 23 2019

    Clinical psychologist Mary Pipher is best known for her 1994 bestseller "Reviving Ophelia," which looked at the societal pressures on adolescent girls. In her latest book, "Women Rowing North," Pipher explores how women contend with aging in a society that often values them less as they get older. Pipher takes on misconceptions about older women and celebrates their accumulated resilience and ability to find joy in a world filled with tragedy.

  • The Rivalry that Gave Rise to the Electric Guitar and a Revolutionary Sound

    Jan 23 2019

    In his new book, "The Birth of the Loud," former SF Weekly music critic Ian S. Port traces the history of the the foremost iconic solid-body electric guitars, the Fender Stratocaster and the Gibson Les Paul. Port also explores the rivalry between guitarmakers Les Paul and Leo Fender, who competed to get their instruments into the hands of rockstars and at the forefront of a music revolution. We will discuss the sounds of the 50s and 60s that changed American popular music and the surprising stor...more

  • BART Approval Rating Hits Historic Low

    Jan 23 2019

    BART released its 2019 customer satisfaction study on Tuesday and the news is not good for the beleaguered rail agency. Just 56 percent of riders are satisfied with BART's services, down from 69 percent in 2016. Passenger complaints centered around security, cleanliness, fare evasion and the presence of homeless people throughout the system. We'll talk about the survey and what BART is doing to improve its services.

  • Writer and Activist Helen Zia Explores Exile and Immigration in New Novel

    Jan 22 2019

    Writer and Activist Helen Zia weaves together a timely tale of exile, immigration and dislocation in her latest book, "Last Boat Out of Shanghai". Today we talk to her about this tumultuous period in China's modern history and how these stories, inspired by hundreds of interviews from people who were there, tell us about the choices people are faced with when leaving their homes.

  • Supreme Court Allows Trump’s Military Transgender Restrictions

    Jan 22 2019

    We’ll discuss today’s decision by the U.S. Supreme court to allow the the Trump administration to restrict military service by transgender men and women while court challenges continue.

  • Michael Lewis on the Government Shutdown and His Latest Book, ‘The Fifth Risk’

    Jan 22 2019

    The day after the 2016 election, officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture awaited the arrival of the President-elect’s transition team, ready to present thousands of pages of briefing materials on the workings of the 100,000-employee agency. In best-selling author Michael Lewis’s recounting, no one showed up until weeks later when a single volunteer paid … Continue reading Michael Lewis on the Government Shutdown and His Latest Book, ‘The Fifth Risk’ →

  • Revisiting MLK’s Fight Against Poverty

    Jan 21 2019

    On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we focus on the issue the civil rights leader championed before his death: the plight of poor people in America. Stanford Professor Clayborne Carson, editor of the King Papers and author of “Martin’s Dream: My Journey and the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.,” joins us to speak about King's legacy and the Poor People's Campaign, then and now.

  • California Senator Kamala Harris Announces Presidential Bid

    Jan 21 2019

    Senator Kamala Harris, the California Democrat and prosecutor who is the second black woman to serve in the United States Senate, declared her candidacy for president today. Harris picked quite a day to enter the race, on this holiday celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Harris has been a dynamic presence among Senate Democrats during her short tenure there. The question now is whether she’ll be able to win over Democrats outside of Washington DC and … should she win the primary … American voters....more

  • Major Housing Plan Gets Approval from MTC, Association of Bay Area Governments

    Jan 21 2019

    Since the summer of 2017, the Committee to House the Bay Area, known as CASA, has been tasked with creating a broad legislative package to address the Bay Area's housing crisis. The committee's ten-point plan has now been endorsed by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG). While not law, the group hopes its recommendations will drive major action by the California State Legislature. The plan calls for a cap on rent increases, more hous...more

  • State Poised to Set New Rules on “Gig Economy” Jobs

    Jan 18 2019

    Last year, a California Supreme Court ruling made it harder for companies like Uber and Lyft to label workers independent contractors. Now, several bills that would define independent contractors have been proposed in Sacramento. But some labor groups fear that lawmakers will water down the court’s intent. Related Coverage: Can Gavin Newsom Broker a Deal … Continue reading State Poised to Set New Rules on “Gig Economy” Jobs →

  • Report: President Trump Directed Michael Cohen to Lie to Congress

    Jan 18 2019

    President Trump personally directed his lawyer Michael Cohen to lie to Congress about a proposed Moscow development project, according to a BuzzFeed report Thursday.  Meanwhile, a new report from the Health and Human Services Department’s Office of the Inspector General found the Trump Administration may have separated thousands more migrant children from their parents at … Continue reading Report: President Trump Directed Michael Cohen to Lie to Congress →

  • California Monarch Butterfly Population at Lowest Numbers Ever Recorded

    Jan 18 2019

    Conservationists are alarmed at a huge drop in the number of western monarch butterflies that spend the winter in California. Scientists think pesticides, habitat loss, and fewer native plants — like milkweed where the monarch lays eggs — are causing the more than 95 percent decline since the 1980’s. We’ll hear why this colorful butterfly … Continue reading California Monarch Butterfly Population at Lowest Numbers Ever Recorded →

  • As Government Shutdown Continues, California’s Federal Workers Suffer

    Jan 17 2019

    The federal government has been partially closed for nearly a month now, as President Trump continues to insist on funding for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. For some 800,000 federal employees, that's meant weeks of being furloughed or working without pay. In this segment, we'll hear from government workers in the Bay Area about how the shutdown is affecting their lives and the local economies. If you or your business are being affected by the government shutdown, please tell us how.

  • Two Months On, Chico Struggling to Accommodate More Than 20,000 Displaced by Camp Fire

    Jan 17 2019

    After the Camp Fire devastated the town of Paradise, many evacuees sought shelter in the nearby city of Chico. As traffic accidents spike and classrooms overflow, we'll examine how Chico is coping with more than 20,000 additional residents. We'll also get the latest on where 657 evacuees will go as the Red Cross shelter at the Chico fairgrounds closes at the end of the month.

  • Oakland Teachers to Stage ‘Sickout’ on Friday Over Pay, Class Size

    Jan 17 2019

    Some Oakland teachers will take to the streets instead of their classrooms on Friday for a "sick out" rally to call for higher wages and smaller class sizes. The Oakland Unified School District's teachers have been without a contract for 18 months. The sick out, which is not sanctioned by the local union, comes in the midst of a strike by teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District, the second largest public school district in the nation.

  • UCSF’s Dean Ornish on How to ‘Undo’ Chronic Diseases

    Jan 16 2019

    In their new book, "Undo It!," Dean and Anne Ornish outline lifestyle changes that they say can help prevent, and even reverse, the effects of chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes and depression. Dr. Dean Ornish joins us in studio to share what he sees as the components of a healthy diet, explain why meaningful relationships matter and discuss how going vegan can turn the tide on heart disease.

  • Governor Newsom Proposes Withholding Funds from Cities that Don’t Meet Housing Goals

    Jan 16 2019

    In his proposed budget, Governor Newsom allocated $2 billion for housing initiatives. But perhaps the bigger housing news is money that Newsom has threatened not to distribute. Specifically, the governor says that he will withhold transportation funding from regions that fail to meet new housing goals. Supporters of the idea like the additional incentive for communities to build. But critics say that homebuilding is complex, ruled by market forces and that cities shouldn't be punished for forces...more

  • Attorney General Nominee Barr Testifies Before Congress

    Jan 16 2019

    President Trump's Attorney General nominee, William Barr, answered a second round of questions from senators at his confirmation hearing on Tuesday. The former attorney general under President George W. Bush told lawmakers that he will allow special counsel Robert Mueller to complete his investigation into Russian election interference despite any possible pressure from the President. Barr also said that he supports Trump's call for funding a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Forum recaps the h...more

  • Peter Sagal Talks Running, News and ‘Not My Job’

    Jan 15 2019

    Peter Sagal, the host of NPR's "Wait Wait, Don't Tell Me!" has been running for most of his life. His new memoir, "The Incomplete Book of Running," reflects on how that simple exercise, of which 60 million Americans participated in during 2017, has brought him solace throughout his life. Sagal joins Forum to discuss what it's like making fun of the news for a living and what he's learned after 14 marathons and innumerable miles logged.

  • East Bay Express Slashes Newsroom Staff, Calling Its Future into Question

    Jan 15 2019

    The 40-year-old East Bay Express laid off six employees Friday, including most of its editorial staff. The weekly newspaper, which has been struggling financially for the last several years, will now rely on freelancers for content. The newspaper has won national recognition for its local watchdog journalism, including its 2016 expose of a sex abuse scandal in the Oakland Police Department. We'll discuss the future of the East Bay Express, and what the lay-offs say about the future of local jour...more

  • PG&E Customers, Employees Brace for Fallout from Bankruptcy Announcement

    Jan 15 2019

    Whether you are a customer, an employee or a fire victim, you likely have a question following Pacific Gas & Electric's announcement on Monday that it will file for bankruptcy by month's end. In this segment we'll discuss the latest news about the San Francisco-based energy company and how it might navigate bankruptcy, including a market share drop of 52 percent on Monday.

  • Pack Your Bags: Where to Travel in 2019

    Jan 14 2019

    Whether you travel alone, or en famille, most of us dream of taking a break from our day to day lives. Last week, The New York Times released their "52 Places to Go in 2019." As the lucky traveler picked to visit all 52 places prepares to embark on his journey, we turn to you: What destinations will you be visiting this year? What getaways would you recommend to others?

  • PG&E To Declare Bankruptcy

    Jan 14 2019

    San Francisco-based Pacific Gas & Electric Co. said today it plans to file for bankruptcy. This comes as the company faces tens of billions of dollars in liabilities for its possible role in starting California wildfires.  Yesterday PG&E announced that its chief executive Geisha Williams will step down. We’ll talk about what bankruptcy might mean … Continue reading PG&E To Declare Bankruptcy →

  • President Trump: “I never worked for Russia”

    Jan 14 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington D.C.

  • Musical ‘Come From Away’ Celebrates Human Compassion in the Aftermath of 9/11

    Jan 11 2019

    On Sept. 11, the small town of Gander, Newfoundland became host to 7,000 international travelers whose flights were grounded following the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The Tony-nominated musical 'Come From Away,' which opened in San Francisco this week, tells the stories of the stranded passengers and the kindnesses, small and large, extended to them by Gander's residents. Forum talks with the show co-creator, one of its performers, and a passenger who spent five...more

  • Governor Newsom Proposes Increasing General Fund Spending by 4 Percent

    Jan 11 2019

    Governor Newsom unveiled his first budget proposal on Thursday, which included increased expenditures in education, health care and wildfire safety. The $144 billion general fund budget--4 percent larger than the previous one--includes details on the Governor's plan to make prescription drugs more affordable and to expand state-funded health care to undocumented residents. We'll get the budget lowdown from KQED reporters Katie Orr and April Dembosky.

  • Are Smart Speakers a Smart Choice for Kids?

    Jan 11 2019

    In an increasing number of households "Hey Alexa" or "Hey Google" is becoming as common a refrain as "Moooom!" The adoption of smart speakers has grown exponentially with Nielsen reporting in late 2018 that now nearly a quarter of U.S. households have one. Like many new technologies, increased use of smart speakers has led to concerns about their effects on the brain and behavior, especially in kids. We discuss the latest research on and best practices for voice command devices and we want to he...more

  • Random House Copy Chief Advises on Writing Rules in ‘Dreyer’s English’

    Jan 10 2019

    Benjamin Dreyer, Random House's longtime copy chief, explains the do’s and don'ts of good writing in his forthcoming book, "Dreyer's English." His tips include: utilize the semi-colon, split infinitives without fear and rid your prose of the terms "very," "rather," and "of course," which Dreyer dismisses as "Wan Intensifiers" and "Throat Clearers." Dreyer joins us to share stories from the publishing world and to give advice to writers and editors of all types.

  • Government Shutdown Takes Toll on Bay Area’s National Parks

    Jan 10 2019

    As the partial government shutdown continues, visitors to many of the Bay Area's national parks, including Muir Woods and Point Reyes National Seashore, are finding overflowing trash, locked bathrooms and a lack of ranger presence. We'll discuss the shutdown's ecological impacts on the parks and what can be done to mitigate the damage.

  • Dixie School District Debating a Name Change

    Jan 10 2019

    Since 1864, a small school district in San Rafael has been called the Dixie School district. Now, residents are in a heated debate regarding whether or not the "Dixie" name, which some say hearkens back to the Confederate South, is appropriate and should be changed. Those supporting a name change claim that "Dixie" is unwelcoming and reflects poorly on the community, whereas those who wish to keep the name say it is associated with a good school district and shouldn't be altered.

  • History is Being Taught Wrong (and How to Fix It)

    Jan 09 2019

    With even obscure historical information readily available online, what's the point of memorizing facts like the names of the original 13 colonies or the major battles of the Civil War? Not much point, according to Stanford education professor Sam Wineburg. But what kids do need, he argues, are the skills to differentiate between accurate and inaccurate information and the ability to overcome confirmation bias. The former high school history teacher joins us to discuss navigating online informat...more

  • Analysis of President Trump’s Oval Office Address

    Jan 09 2019

    We'll bring you analysis of President Trump's Tuesday night address from the Oval Office. We'll also talk about revelations that former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort shared polling data with an associate tied to Russian intelligence during the 2016 campaign.

  • ‘Lifeboat’ Puts a Human Face on Europe’s Refugee Crisis, Shortlisted for Oscar

    Jan 08 2019

    A new documentary short, "Lifeboat," highlights the plight of refugees and migrants who flee the coast of Libya under the cover of darkness. Director Skye Fitzgerald joins us to discuss his Academy Award-shortlisted film, "Lifeboat." We'll also talk with Oakland-based Asylum Access about the ongoing migrant crisis in the Mediterranean.

  • Jazz Vocalist Somi Takes on Gentrification with ‘Petite Afrique’

    Jan 08 2019

    The daughter of immigrants from Rwanda and Uganda, jazz vocalist and songwriter Somi's music weaves together elements of American jazz, African rhythms, pop and soul. Her most recent album, "Petite Afrique" was inspired by West African immigrants in Harlem and their struggles with gentrification. We'll talk to Somi about the album and her human rights activism.

  • As Presidential Election Cycle Begins, Questions about Covering Politics, Trump Loom Large

    Jan 08 2019

    On Tuesday evening President Trump will deliver a prime-time speech to address the ongoing government shutdown and make his case for a wall along the U.S. southern border. As several television networks weigh whether to air the address, some media critics argue that the press shouldn’t give President Trump uninterrupted airtime without adequate rebuttal or … Continue reading As Presidential Election Cycle Begins, Questions about Covering Politics, Trump Loom Large →

  • Report: Zuckerberg SF General Leaves Privately Insured Patients on the Hook for Thousands

    Jan 08 2019

    Some privately insured patients who received emergency care at Zuckerberg San Francisco General are finding themselves stuck with tens of thousands of of dollars in hospital bills that their insurers refuse to pay. That's according to a new report by Vox senior health policy correspondent Sarah Kliff, who spent a year studying the billing practices of emergency rooms around the country. Zuckerberg SF General says it does not accept private insurance in accordance with its mission to serve those ...more

  • From Doctor to Patient, An Oncologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer

    Jan 07 2019

    "You have cancer" are terrifying words for anyone to hear, as UCSF oncologist Pamela Munster knows well, having delivered that news to her patients for years. But then, at the age of 48, on a phone call she thought was about a patient, Munster was told there were "irregularities" in her mammogram. Munster's new memoir "Twisting Fate" describes her journey from doctor and caregiver to patient and cancer survivor. Dr. Munster joins Forum to discuss life on both sides of a cancer diagnosis.

  • What Californians Can Expect Under Governor Newsom

    Jan 07 2019

    Monday in Sacramento, Gavin Newsom will be sworn in as the 40th governor of California. He takes over a state flush with a $14.5 billion dollar rainy day fund and a budget surplus of at least $10 billion. But Newsom also inherits a state experiencing a housing crisis, rising income inequality and a growing vulnerability … Continue reading What Californians Can Expect Under Governor Newsom →

  • Exploring ‘The World Before Your Feet’ in San Francisco, New York City

    Jan 04 2019

    Matt Green wasn't born in New York City, but he might know it better than many people who were. Seven years ago, Green embarked on a project to walk every block of all five boroughs. His walks are now the subject of a documentary called “The World Before Your Feet.” Locally, Greens' expedition helped inspire runner Rickey Gates to run every street in San Francisco. Green and Gates join Forum to discuss their respective challenges, and the unique, urban beauty they find along the way.

  • What Newbies at the Gym Need to Know

    Jan 04 2019

    It's the first week in January, which means a lot of people are starting healthy habits like going to the gym, running or swimming. If you're a longtime athlete -- what advice do you have for newbies? What are the unwritten rules where you work out? And if you yourself are the new face at the gym or in the pool, what questions do you have?

  • Casey Gerald on the American Dream and Structural Inequality

    Jan 04 2019

    “There Will Be No Miracles Here,” a new memoir by Casey Gerald, is a coming-of-age story that straddles the complex intersection of race, class, religion, sexuality and masculinity. On the surface, Gerald’s story is a classic rags-to-riches tale: a poor boy from a rough neighborhood gets recruited by Yale to play football and ends up … Continue reading Casey Gerald on the American Dream and Structural Inequality →

  • UC Takes on Publishing Giant, Fights for Open Access to Publicly-Funded Research

    Jan 03 2019

    The University of California, which publishes about 10 percent of the country's scientific research, paid more than $10 million in 2018 to access and publish its own research in scientific journals owned by the publisher Elsevier. Now, UC is taking the lead on a push for "open access" content, which would make publicly-funded research free and immediately accessible to the public. We'll discuss what the conflict between UC and Elsevier reveals about the scientific publishing industry and changes...more

  • Are Online Grade Books a Valuable Tool or TMI?

    Jan 03 2019

    A concerted effort to keep parents in the know about their children's academic performance has pushed many schools to adopt online or "open" grade books. The thinking goes that weekly or even daily updates on a student's performance can lead to intervention before academic problems become crises. But some parents and mental health experts warn that these online tools may be doing more harm than good by over-emphasizing grades, discouraging risk taking and causing kids stress. If you're at school...more

  • Wells Fargo Resolves Investigations with $575 Million Settlement

    Jan 03 2019

    San Francisco-based Wells Fargo has agreed to pay $575 million to resolve multiple investigations into misconduct at the bank, including inquiries stemming from the 2016 revelation that bank employees were opening accounts for customers without their knowledge. The agreement, reached at the end of 2018, awards money to all 50 states and the District of Columbia, with California receiving nearly $149 million. We'll hear the details of the settlement and check in on the bank.

  • Peter Laufer on How the World Dreams ‘in Turtle’

    Jan 02 2019

    Peter Laufer’s new book “Dreaming in Turtle” explains that human fascination has placed the creatures under great strain.

  • National Political News in Review

    Jan 02 2019

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington D.C.

  • 10 Years Later: Oscar Grant, Black Lives Matter and Police Accountability

    Dec 28 2018

    From the rise of Black Lives Matter to Charlottesville, Forum looks back at how police, citizen journalism and our understanding of race has changed in last decade.

  • 10 Years Later: Oscar Grant’s Legacy Continues to Inspire Artists and Activists

    Dec 28 2018

    Forum remembers Oscar Grant and talks with some of the people his life and death inspired.

  • Johnny Funcheap’s New Year’s Eve Picks

    Dec 27 2018

    What great ideas do you have for ringing in the New Year?

  • Bruce Talamon on Photographing the Glory Days of Soul and Funk

    Dec 27 2018

    Like the singers he chronicled, Talamon’s images are iconic.

  • California Laws Going Into Effect in 2019

    Dec 27 2018

    From stricter gun control legislation, to women on the boards of publicly traded companies, hundreds of new California laws will take effect in 2019.

  • The Christmas Bird Count and a New Generation of Birders

    Dec 27 2018

    Experts tell us why the Christmas Bird Count is important and how they’re training a new generation of birders.

  • As Resolutions Approach, Heather Havrilesky Asks ‘What if This Were Enough?’

    Dec 26 2018

    It seems everywhere we turn, we are reminded about something we could better: eat healthier, work smarter, learn faster. Heather Havrilesky sees this insatiable need for improvement up-close: she herself writes the popular "Ask Polly" advice column for The Cut. In her new collection of essays, "What if This Were Enough?" Havrilesky breaks down the larger cultural forces behind the drive for perfection and urges us to find fulfillment in the flawed moment. Tell us: what imperfection about yoursel...more

  • 2018: The Year in Immigration

    Dec 26 2018

    Immigration dominated the headlines in 2018. News about family separation, asylum policy and the deployment of U.S. troops prompted intense debate and provoked numerous lawsuits. In this segment of Forum, we discuss what happened in immigration news in 2018 and what might be ahead in the new year.

  • Rebroadcast: Listeners’ Favorite Books of 2018

    Dec 24 2018

    It's time for Forum's annual holiday books show! Listeners and New York Times Book Review editor Pamela Paul share their favorite books of 2018. What was your best read and why?

  • Rebroadcast: Yuval Harari’s ’21 Lessons For The 21st Century’

    Dec 24 2018

    Israeli author Yuval Noah Harari rose to international prominence with his bestseller "Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind." His new book, "21 Lessons for the 21st Century," is a plea for humans to address our most pressing problems. Chief among them, Harari writes, may be the convergence of biotechnology and artificial intelligence, which has turned humans into "hackable animals." Harari joins us to talk about the book and to take your questions.

  • Paula Poundstone Returns to San Francisco Roots

    Dec 21 2018

    Paula Poundstone may be best known to NPR listeners as a panelist on the comedy quiz show “Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!” But she has been making fun of current events and cultural norms since the 1980s when she got her start in San Francisco's comedy scene. We'll talk to Poundstone about how comedy has changed over the past 40 years, her new podcast, “Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone," and her special connection to the Bay Area.

  • Your Memories on Facebook: A Year of Scandals

    Dec 21 2018

    2018 was a tumultuous year for Facebook, the latest controversy being reports that Russians used the network to discourage African-American voter turnout in the 2016 election. The world's largest social media company, which also owns Instagram, has repeatedly sparked outrage over its handling of user data, its lack of transparency and its attempts to discredit its critics. In this segment, we discuss where Facebook stands with its users and with regulators in DC. And we'd like to hear from you: ...more

  • Defense Secretary James Mattis Resigns

    Dec 21 2018

    Defense Secretary James Mattis resigned on Thursday, writing in his resignation letter that President Trump has "a right to have a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned" with his. According to the New York Times, Mattis resigned after an unsuccessful attempt to convince the president to not pull American troops out of Syria. Forum will talk about what Mattis's departure means for national security policy, the military and for a Trump Administration already roiled by turnover.

  • The Bay Area’s Best Music of 2018

    Dec 20 2018

    With the new year around the corner, Forum partners with KQED Arts to look (and listen) to the best local music of 2018. From Girlz n' the Hood to the Tune-Yards, the Bay Area music scene reflected the region's political activism and diversity. We discuss the can't miss music from 2018 and what's next for Bay Area music.

  • The Bay Area’s Best Visual Art of 2018

    Dec 20 2018

    From a “Falling Wall” of dancers to the surrealist work of René Magritte, visual artists gave Bay Area residents plenty of reasons to stop, watch and think this year. But even as artists pushed boundaries and created standout works, the local art world faced fresh challenges: 2018 saw the trimming of curatorial staff and programs. … Continue reading The Bay Area’s Best Visual Art of 2018 →

  • President Trump Orders Withdrawal of U.S. Troops from Syria

    Dec 20 2018

    On Wednesday, President Trump tweeted that ISIS has been defeated in Syria and called for an immediate removal of American troops. In this segment, we'll speak to Middle East experts about the declaration of victory and get their thoughts on who are the winners and the losers of an American exit from Syria.

  • Adam Hochschild Shares ‘Lessons From A Dark Time’

    Dec 19 2018

    In "Lessons From A Dark Time," Bay Area journalist Adam Hochschild has assembled essays from his reporting on issues of human rights and social justice. Written through a historical and activist lens, Hochschild's book takes readers from the 1898 Battle of Omdurman to Nelson Mandela's campaign trail to a gun show at the Cow Palace. We'll talk to Hochschild about his new book and how history informs his present view.

  • ‘I’m Here to Enlighten You’: The Legacy of Jerry Brown

    Dec 19 2018

    Outgoing California Governor Jerry Brown shared some farewell thoughts at the Sacramento Press Club on Tuesday, including a quintessential Brown disclaimer:“I’m not here to make news, I’m here to enlighten you." Brown's remarkable career includes serving as California governor (twice), state attorney general and mayor of Oakland. He leaves his successor, Gavin Newsom, a budget surplus and a slew of globally-recognized environmental protections. We'll take stock of Brown's legacy and look at his ...more

  • Critic Soleil Ho Brings New Perspective to SF Chronicle’s Food Section

    Dec 18 2018

    Soliel Ho is the San Francisco Chronicle's new restaurant. A trained chef and host of the podcast "Racist Sandwich," Ho is expected to push local food writing forward with a focus on culture and issues such as appropriation, race and access. Forum talks with Ho about her views on food writing and what stories and cuisines she's excited to explore. And we want to hear from you: What restaurants should Soliel Ho check out?

  • de Young’s ‘Contemporary Muslim Fashions’ Exhibit Showcases Modern Takes on Modest Style

    Dec 18 2018

    The de Young's " Contemporary Muslim Fashion” exhibit is the first at a major museum to examine the breadth of contemporary Muslim women's clothing. Although mainstream narratives about traditional Islamic dress often focus on burkas and the hijab, practitioners of Islam make up 24 percent of the global population and their sartorial choices span innumerable styles. We’ll discuss the de Young’s current foray into fashion, which is open until January 6th. If you’ve had a chance to visit, tell us,...more

  • Tess Vigeland Reports on Life “After Paradise”

    Dec 18 2018

    The last remaining evacuation orders were lifted in and around Paradise, California on Saturday, more than a month after the Camp Fire broke out. The fire was the most deadly and destructive in state history, killing at least 86 people and destroying 14,000 homes. We’ll get the latest on the recovery with Tess Vigeland, host of “After Paradise" on North State Public Radio, a show dedicated to covering the aftermath of the Camp Fire.

  • Survey: Percentage of Teens Vaping Doubled in Past Year

    Dec 18 2018

    One-fifth of high school seniors questioned in a recent survey had vaped nicotine in the past month. That's double the number of teens who reported doing so in last year's annual survey conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Critics of e-cigarettes say that the industry targets kids with flavored products and is creating a new generation addicted to nicotine. We'll discuss the potential long-term health effects of vaping and the growing popularity of e-cigarettes.

  • Robert Friedman Proposes Universal Savings for All Americans

    Dec 17 2018

    In his new book "A Few Thousand Dollars," Prosperity Now founder Robert Friedman puts forward a plan to curtail wealth inequality in the United States. Building on initiatives from the past such as the Homestead Act and the GI Bill, Friedman proposes a “Prosperity Bill” that would match, on a sliding scale, several thousand dollars in savings for every American. Friedman sees this as key to changing a system that currently punishes low-income Americans who seek to improve their lives via a highe...more

  • Political News in Review

    Dec 17 2018

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington. Mentioned on Air: Forum’s Interview with Bill Browder

  • Tips and Tricks for Better Holiday Baking

    Dec 14 2018

    On your marks, get set, bake! It’s the holidays, which for many people is the season to bake! Whether you’re looking to step up your cookie decorating game or you’re a Great British Bake Off fan who wants to wow your guests with a showstopper, we have a panel of bakers on hand to offer … Continue reading Tips and Tricks for Better Holiday Baking →

  • Delta Bans Emotional Support Animals on Long Flights

    Dec 14 2018

    Beginning December 18, Delta Airlines will ban emotional support animals on flights longer than eight hours, citing an 84 percent increase in sanitation and biting incidents from 2016 to 2017. The new rule also bans all service animals under four months of age on flights of any length. We'll talk about laws and guidelines for the use of service animals in public spaces and we want to hear from you: What do you think of Delta's ban?

  • Raiders, Oakland at Odds … Again

    Dec 14 2018

    Christmas Eve will likely be the last time the Raiders play football in Oakland. The team ended talks to play its next season at the Oakland Coliseum after the city filed a federal lawsuit against the Raiders, the NFL and all other teams in the league. Oakland asserts that the Raiders' planned move to Las Vegas breaks antitrust laws and caused the city hundreds of millions of dollars in losses. We'll discuss the suit and how Raiders fans are reacting.

  • Prop. 13 is Over the Hill. How’s it Holding Up?

    Dec 13 2018

    Back in 1978, 65 percent of Californians voted for Proposition 13, which capped residential and commercial property tax increases at two percent annually. That change, along with the proposition's mandate that future tax increases pass with a 2/3 vote, have reshaped California's economy and politics. Forty years on, we'll discuss the legislation's history, impact, and the ongoing efforts to reform it.

  • Ex-Trump Lawyer Michael Cohen to Serve Three Years

    Dec 13 2018

    On Wednesday a New York federal judged sentenced Michael Cohen to three years in prison for violating campaign finance laws by enabling hush money payments to a Playboy model who alleged having an affair with then-candidate Trump. The president responded on Twitter that he did nothing wrong and never directed Cohen to break the law. … Continue reading Ex-Trump Lawyer Michael Cohen to Serve Three Years →

  • Theresa May Survives No-Confidence Vote, but Brexit Future Still Uncertain

    Dec 13 2018

    British Prime Minister Theresa May survived a no-confidence vote brought by her fellow Conservative Party lawmakers on Wednesday over her handling of Brexit. But the way forward for Brexit remains murky. After the vote, which she won 200-117, May pledged to “to get on with the job of delivering Brexit." We'll discuss the latest developments over the UK's withdrawal from the European Union.

  • Live Performance: Kitka Sings ‘Wintersongs’ of Eastern Europe

    Dec 12 2018

    The Oakland-based vocal ensemble, Kitka, is nearing it's 4th decade of wowing audiences with beautiful, intricate harmonies and distinctive vocal techniques. The all-female group focuses mostly on the music of Eastern Europe, singing in nearly a dozen languages. Kitka joins Forum for a live, in-studio performance and a conversation about their latest projects including a new album and their Wintersongs concert series.

  • Google CEO Faces Questions from House Judiciary Committee on Political Bias, Privacy

    Dec 12 2018

    Scrutiny of big tech firms continued Tuesday as Google CEO Sundar Pichai faced questions over alleged censorship of conservatives at a House Judiciary Committee hearing. We'll discuss Pichai's testimony, ongoing concerns about Google and privacy, and the company's plans to launch a censored search engine in China.

  • Senate to Vote on Bipartisan Criminal Justice Bill

    Dec 12 2018

    On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced the Senate will vote on a long-anticipated, bipartisanship criminal justice bill. If passed, the bill, also known as the First Step Act, would strengthen rehabilitation efforts, soften mandatory minimum sentences, and allow for reforms made by the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010 to apply retroactively. The bill only impacts the federal system, which according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons accounts for approximately 180 million prisoners...more

  • ‘Threshold’ Explores Work of First Responders Along U.S.-Mexico Border

    Dec 11 2018

    From President Trump's proposed wall to the most recent migrant caravan in Tijuana, the US-Mexico border has become a politically contentious area. However, for firefighters and EMTs working in border communities, the region is often a site of binational cooperation. Harvard anthropologist Ieva Jusionyte embedded with American and Mexican first responders to learn how Trump's immigration policy and environmental emergencies are changing border security. Jusionyte joins Forum with Chief Mario Nov...more

  • Kaiser Mental Health Workers Start Week-Long Strike

    Dec 11 2018

    Mental health workers at Kaiser Permanente facilities throughout California started a week-long strike on Monday. The National Union of Healthcare Workers (NUHW) is advocating for better pay and benefits for employees, who include psychologists, therapists, psychiatric nurses and social workers. Kaiser says it has added more than 500 staff and invested $175 million in mental health after being fined by state regulators in 2013 for not providing adequate mental health care to its members. But NUH...more

  • The Economy is Booming, So Why All The Empty Storefronts?

    Dec 11 2018

    By most accounts, the Bay Area economy is humming along. Yet, to even the casual observer, empty storefronts have a strong presence on Bay Area streets, even in desirable neighborhoods. Among the causes, experts say, is the rise in online shopping and landlords holding out for tenants who will pay higher rents. Another culprit is the cost and hassle of doing business in San Francisco, according to Mayor London Breed. She announced a plan Monday to streamline regulations in the hopes of filling v...more

  • ‘The Dakota Winters’ Recreates 1980s New York City

    Dec 10 2018

    Tom Barbash joins Forum to discuss his new novel “The Dakota Winters.”

  • ‘Flyover Country’ Explores Rural Life, Modern Day Violence

    Dec 10 2018

    Austin Smith draws together the abstract and the intimate in his new book of poetry “Flyover Country.” The collection explores what rural life, violence and belonging mean in today’s world through subjects as diverse as barn cats, drone strikes and the house where Anne Frank hid. Smith joins Forum to discuss how his childhood in the Midwest informs his creative process, and the issues he hopes to spotlight in his writing.

  • Monday Political News in Review

    Dec 10 2018

    Forum reviews, analyzes and answers your questions about the latest news from Washington.

  • Musical ‘Dear Evan Hansen’ Takes on Teen Suicide, Alienation

    Dec 07 2018

    "Dear Evan Hansen" took Broadway by storm last year, winning 7 Tony Awards, including Best Musical. The show explores themes such as teenage depression, suicide and the struggle to find authentic connection in the age of social media. "Dear Evan Hansen" opened in San Francisco this week. We'll talk with two of the actors about why the show resonates with audiences of all ages

  • Muni Bus Driver Shortage Worse Than Previously Disclosed

    Dec 07 2018

    According to a new report by San Francisco's Budget and Legislative Analyst, the Muni driver shortage is worse than SFMTA officials previously estimated. The agency has 411 fewer full-time bus and train operators than it currently needs to operate, and with a steadily dwindling applicant pool, the problem seems far from over. Drivers say poor pay and unsafe working conditions makes their job unappealing to new recruits. Forum discusses the driver shortage and what it could mean for the future of...more

  • New Revelations in Russia Investigation Expected Friday

    Dec 07 2018

    Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team has until Friday to file documents detailing why it believes former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort lied to investigators and violated his plea agreement. Friday's also the deadline for Mueller and federal prosecutors to recommend a sentence for former Trump fixer Michael Cohen for New York financial crimes. We'll discuss the status of the investigation and its implications for President Trump.

  • Exploring California’s African-American History

    Dec 06 2018

    This Thursday marks the 153rd anniversary of the ratification of the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery. Forum marks the occasion by talking about the Bay Area and California's rich, but often overlooked, African-American history.

  • ‘There There’ Author Talks Success, Native American Experience and Oakland Roots

    Dec 06 2018

    “There There” is the debut novel of Oakland native Tommy Orange. The story follows multiple generations of Native Americans living in and around the East Bay, exploring how place and culture can influence the complex legacies and identities of Native peoples. Orange joins us to discuss his East Bay roots and his novel. What's your question for him?

  • Wisconsin GOP Weakens Powers of Incoming Democratic Governor, Attorney General

    Dec 06 2018

    Amid statehouse protests, Wisconsin’s Republican-controlled legislature passed bills Wednesday to strip key powers of Democratic Governor-elect Tony Evers and Attorney General-elect Josh Kaul. The plan, which Democrats called a power grab, would give lawmakers control over the state’s economic development agency, limit the governor’s ability to protect the Affordable Care Act and restrict early voting … Continue reading Wisconsin GOP Weakens Powers of Incoming Democratic Governor, Attorney Gener...more

  • San Jose City Council Approves Parcel Sale, Clearing Way for Google Campus

    Dec 05 2018

    San Jose City Council was expected to vote Tuesday night to greenlight a Google development on more than 10 acres of public land adjacent to the Diridon Station. Supporters of the project say it will bring an estimated 25,000 jobs to the city. We’ll hear about the new campus, which opponents fear will lead to rent increases and aggravate the city's housing shortage.

  • Stanford’s Francis Fukuyama on the Root of ‘Identity’ Politics

    Dec 04 2018

    Stanford scholar Francis Fukuyama believes America’s increased political polarization can be traced back to a universal desire for recognition. His latest book, “Identity,” digs into the factors that gave rise to President Trump, Brexit and even violent extremist groups. Fukuyama joins Forum to discuss identity politics, the road back to a united American identity and … Continue reading Stanford’s Francis Fukuyama on the Root of ‘Identity’ Politics →

  • Task Force Outlines Plan to Cut Childhood Poverty in California by 50 Percent

    Dec 04 2018

    According to the State Poverty Task Force, one in five children in California lives below the federal poverty line. In a new report, the task force provides a detailed plan for how to end extreme childhood poverty, advocating for increased social services, guaranteed childcare and universal preschool, and a targeted child tax credit. The plan comes out weeks before Governor-elect Gavin Newsom prepares to release his first budget to the state Legislature in January. We'll discuss child poverty in...more

  • UCSF Study: Fentanyl Suppliers Behind Spike in Opioid Deaths

    Dec 04 2018

    Fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 30 to 40 times more potent than heroin, caused more than 29,000 overdose deaths in the United States last year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We'll discuss what's driving the fentanyl crisis and what policy makers and public health officials can do to keep fentanyl off the streets.

  • PG&E Faces Renewed Scrutiny After Devastating Camp Fire

    Dec 03 2018

    Emotions flared at last week's California Public Utilities Commission meeting in San Francisco as many people expressed anger at the possibility of another PG&E bailout. The commission renewed a call by CPUC President Michael Picker to open a new inquiry into PG&E’s corporate governance structures and unanimously approved a proposal that requires the company to adopt various safety measures. This comes after a federal judge demanded that PG&E detail any responsibility it may have had in sparking...more

  • Housing Emergency Persists for Paradise Evacuees

    Dec 03 2018

    More than 90 percent of Paradise housing stock was destroyed by the Camp Fire in Butte County, creating a housing emergency that is far from resolved. FEMA said last week that as many as 2,000 trailers could soon be available to provide temporary housing, but the agency acknowledged that trailers alone won't solve the problem. More than 17,000 people displaced by the fire have applied for housing aid, which could include cash for apartments or hotels. Meanwhile, weary evacuees are being asked to...more

  • Mueller Probe Casts Shadow Over Trump’s G-20 Trip

    Dec 03 2018

    President Trump’s former personal lawyer Michael Cohen lied to Congress about plans to build a Trump Tower in Moscow, according to court documents filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Thursday. Cohen’s guilty plea contradicts statements made by the president about his business involvement with Russia. It came just as Trump was preparing to attend the G-20 summit in Buenos Aires. We’ll get the latest on the Mueller investigation, and discuss the summit, where the U.S., Canada and Mexico sig...more

  • Taylor Mac’s Irreverent Take on Christmas

    Nov 30 2018

    Taylor Mac loves Christmas music but hates the lyrics. The MacArthur Genius-winning playwright, singer, actor and drag artist has opened an extravagant new show, "Holiday Sauce," which reframes traditional Christmas songs to highlight the dysfunction of the holidays. The show is a celebration of being queer and embracing, in one's own way, the holidays and traditions you feel alienated from.

  • SF Supervisor Wants ‘Zuckerberg’ Taken Off SF General

    Nov 30 2018

    Earlier this week San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin asked the city attorney to look into the possibility of removing the "Zuckerberg" name from Prescilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. Peskin is exploring the renaming in response to Facebook's use of opposition research firms and misuse of user data. Controversy around the name of the city's public hospital is not new. Formerly "San Francisco General Hospital," the name was changed after Chan and Zuckerberg donated...more

  • What’s Next for the California Republican Party?

    Nov 30 2018

    California Democrats crushed state Republicans in the recent midterm election, reducing the GOP to seven of the state's 53 seats in the House of Representatives. We'll talk with California republicans about how the party plans to move forward.

  • Study: 1 in 40 Kids Has Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Nov 29 2018

    Estimates of the number of Americans diagnosed with autism have increased from about 1 in 1000 in the 1960s, to about 1 in 40 today. Despite its prevalence, misinformation about autism persists, says Bryna Siegel, director of the Autism Center of Northern California. We'll talk to Siegel about her new book, "The Politics of Autism," and where autism diagnosis and treatment is going wrong. We'll also discuss resources for parents and Siegel's call for a more integrative approach to autism.

  • Report: China is Trying to Influence American Politics and Society

    Nov 29 2018

    A group of experts on China-U.S. relations have released a report detailing what they say are China's expanding attempts to meddle in American democracy. The report says, "except for Russia, no other country's efforts to influence American politics and society is as extensive and well funded as China's." The authors,many of whom have long advocated for engagement with China, describe new efforts by the Chinese government to influence universities, media outlets and think tanks.

  • Oakland A’s Release New Stadium Plan

    Nov 29 2018

    On Wednesday, the Oakland A's announced their plan to build a new baseball stadium at the Port of Oakland’s Howard Terminal, north of Jack London Square. In conjunction, they are also planning to redevelop the Coliseum site in Oakland with housing, retail and a scaled-down sports stadium. We'll discuss the A's ambitious proposal, which has been endorsed by top city officials but faces a lengthy approval process.

  • Does Intermittent Fasting Live up to the Hype?

    Nov 28 2018

    Intermittent fasting is gaining attention, with followers of diets like the the 5:2 plan crediting calorie restriction with increased energy, smaller waistlines, and better overall health. Some in Silicon Valley say fasting leads to higher productivity. We'll hear about the newest research on fasting including possible long-term benefits, side-effects and dangers.

  • Scientist’s Claim of Genetically-Edited Babies Renews Ethics Concerns

    Nov 28 2018

    A scientist in China announced this week that he had created the world's first genetically-edited human babies. In an announcement that shocked many, including scientists and ethicists, He Jiankui said he altered a gene in the embryos of twin girls to make them resistant to H.I.V. Forum talks about the future and ethics of using new gene editing tools like CRISPR to create genetically-altered humans.

  • Activist Randy Shaw Takes on San Francisco and Urban America’s Housing Crisis

    Nov 27 2018

    San Francisco has become the "poster child for urban unaffordability," Randy Shaw declares in the opening pages of his new book, "Generation Priced Out." Shaw, the longtime director of San Francisco's Tenderloin Housing Clinic, argues that conflicts between homeowners and renters have stymied efforts to expand affordable housing and reduce inequality. Shaw joins Forum to talk about the continuing housing crisis, and what citizens and cities can do to encourage more inclusive neighborhoods.

  • Federal Climate Reports Finds Communities Already Affected, Economic Losses to Come

    Nov 27 2018

    A major federal climate report released last week presents a comprehensive account of how global warming is impacting U.S. communities, including the increased frequency of wildfires. The report, which was mandated by Congress, also projects that climate change will have drastic effects on the American economy, causing a 10 percent decrease in GDP by 2100. On Monday, President Trump responded to the report's economic findings, saying, "I don't believe it." Forum discusses the report's many findi...more

  • Interior Secretary Visits Paradise After Comments about Forest Mismanagement

    Nov 27 2018

    On Monday, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke visited Paradise, the Northern California town devastated by the deadly Camp Fire. Zinke's second visit to the area came after he made comments linking “radical environmental groups” and forest mismanagement to California's wildfires. In this segment, we'll get an update on search and rescue efforts in Paradise and dig into the very different stances California officials and the Trump administration have on what is contributing to California's fierce wild...more

  • Listeners’ Favorite Books of 2018

    Nov 26 2018

    It's time for Forum's annual holiday books show! Listeners and New York Times Book Review editor Pamela Paul share their favorite books of 2018. What was your best read and why?

  • Rep. Jackie Speier Remains ‘Undaunted’

    Nov 26 2018

    In 1978, Congresswoman Jackie Speier was shot five times and left for dead in the midst of the Jonestown killings in Guyana. Since then, she’s tried to be a “fearless voice against injustice and inequality,” and has now documented the process of finding that voice in her new memoir “Undaunted.” Congresswoman Speier, who represents an … Continue reading Rep. Jackie Speier Remains ‘Undaunted’ →

  • Rebroadcast: Anand Giridharadas on the Dark Side of Elites and Philanthropy

    Nov 23 2018

    Why should the world's biggest problems be solved by an unelected network of rich and powerful thought leaders, rather than public institutions and elected officials? That's one of the central questions that journalist and political analyst Anand Giridharadas explores in his new book "Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World." Giridharadas joins Forum to discuss the ways that entrepreneurs, philanthropists and tech billionaires are affecting the world -- and perhaps making thing...more

  • Rebroadcast: Jill Lepore Tells America’s Story in ‘These Truths’

    Nov 23 2018

    In her new book, "These Truths," New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore pens a comprehensive history of the United States, exploring the origin and realization of so-called American ideals. Lepore joins Forum to discuss how America's history, full of demagogues and technological disruptions, can help shape and inform our understanding of the present.

  • The Turkey Has it Easy: Navigating Awkward Family Situations

    Nov 21 2018

    Many of us spend the holidays seeing people who are easier to love in theory than in practice. From sitting next to your nosy uncle to meeting your daughter's girlfriend, there is serious potential for things to get awkward, if not, dangerously offensive. On today's Forum, we want to hear about the sticky family situations you're facing on Thursday and offer you advice on how to handle it with wit and grace. So, tell us -- what situation do you need help navigating on Thursday?

  • An Update on the Camp Fire

    Nov 21 2018

    The Camp Fire in Butte County has killed at least 79 people with almost 600 still missing. In this segment, we'll get an update on the fire and hear from KQED's reporters who are covering the blaze and the affected communities.

  • More than 10 Percent of Bay Area Residents are Food Insecure

    Nov 21 2018

    While some people plan elaborate meals for the holidays, others are struggling to get by. Even while unemployment remains historically low, 11.5 percent of Bay Area residents — about 870,000 people — are food insecure, or have limited or unstable access to adequate food. Just 14 percent of the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank's clients are homeless -- the remaining 193,000 are the working poor. We'll talk through the Bay Area's hunger crisis with people in and around local food banks to see what yo...more

  • Trump’s Asylum Changes Reach Court and Reflections on Life as an ‘Undocumented Citizen”

    Nov 20 2018

    Last week, a large part of the migrant caravan headed to the U.S arrived in Tijuana, Mexico. The migrants, most of whom are from Honduras, faced riot police and protesters this past Sunday. Meanwhile, President Trump's proposed changes to who is eligible for asylum and where people can apply for it, are being litigated. We'll check in on the status of the migrant caravan and unpack what Trump's proposals could mean for U.S. asylum policy. We'll also talk to Jose Antonio Vargas about his memoir, ...more

  • Staying Emotionally Healthy Amid Disaster

    Nov 20 2018

    The Camp Fire has destroyed almost 16,000 structures and killed at least 77 people, with almost 1,000 still missing. But beyond the numbers is a negative effect that's harder to quantify: stress and emotional toll. Forum looks at how to cope with living through, or near, a natural disaster. We'll also get an update on efforts to fight the fire.

  • Documentary Highlights Impact of Late SF Mayor George Moscone

    Nov 19 2018

    Forty years ago next week, San Francisco was rocked by the double assassination of Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk. In the years since, the story of Milk, a pioneer in the fight for gay rights, has been frequently told. But the story of San Francisco's progressive mayor has gotten far less attention. A new documentary, "Moscone: A Legacy of Change," sets out to fix that. It examines at the life and career of the progressive mayor, and how his life mirrored a political evolution ...more

  • ‘American Hate’ is on the Rise and Survivors are Speaking Out

    Nov 19 2018

    Hate crimes rose 17 percent in 2017, with anti-Semitic crimes increasing 37 percent, according to a new FBI report. While statistics are important in highlighting a disturbing upward trend, they don't capture the stories or voices of the victims. Activist and lawyer Arjun Singh Sethi's new book, "American Hate: Survivors Speak Out," re-centers the conversation around those most impacted by hate crimes. Forum talks with Sethi about how communities are responding to them, what he learned from tal...more

  • Latest on the Camp Fire

    Nov 19 2018

    California’s most deadly and destructive wildfire on record continues to burn. The Camp Fire in Butte County has killed at least 77 people, has destroyed more than 10,000 structures and there are nearly a thousand people still missing. Forum gets the latest on the Camp Fire burning in Butte County.

  • Studies Indicate Young People Are Having Less Sex. But Why?

    Nov 16 2018

    Adolescents and people in their early twenties are becoming sexually active later and are having sex less often than previous generation, according to several recent studies. Kate Julian delves into the the possible reasons behind this reported dip in sexual activity for December's issue of the Atlantic. Forum talks with Julian and other guests about changing sexual practices and notions of intimacy. And we'd like to hear from you -- if you're having less sex these days, tell us why.

  • General Stanley McChrystal on Leadership

    Nov 16 2018

    Retired four-star General Stanley McChrystal, who was in charge of U.S. and allied forces in Afghanistan, joins us to discuss his new book, "Leaders: Myth and Reality." The book profiles 13 famous figures throughout history who took unconventional paths to becoming successful CEO's, politicians, or revolutionaries. McChrystal joins Forum to lay out the sometimes surprising traits that make up a great leader.

  • Update on California Wildfires and Bay Area Air Quality

    Nov 16 2018

    We’ll get the latest news on efforts to contain the Camp Fire and an update on search and rescue efforts. Then we’ll also discuss the Bay Area’s air quality, which has caused many schools to close and weekend events to cancel. Tell us: How is the smoke affecting you? How are you coping? And please, … Continue reading Update on California Wildfires and Bay Area Air Quality →

  • Psychiatrist’s Novel Takes on WWI, Love and History of PTSD

    Nov 15 2018

    Daniel Mason's new novel, "A Winter Soldier," follows Lucius, a 22-year-old medical student who finds himself performing emergency surgeries in a field hospital during World War I. When he gets a patient who is so shell-shocked he can only communicate by drawing pictures, Lucius struggles to find a cure. Forum talks to Mason about his third novel, balancing writing with practicing psychiatry, and about the history and treatment of PTSD.

  • Camp Fire Continues to Burn as Search and Rescue Efforts Continue

    Nov 15 2018

    The Camp Fire in Butte County has killed at least 48 people with more than 100 still missing. In this segment, we'll get an update on efforts to contain the fire and hear how the community is faring, as evacuees pitch tents and park RV's in various parking lots around Chico.

  • The Tragedy of Jonestown, 40 Years Later

    Nov 14 2018

    Forty years ago this week, more than 900 people died at Jonestown, a settlement in Guyana created by the Peoples Temple church. Until 9/11, it was the largest loss of U.S. civilian life in a deliberate act. Victims, many from the Bay Area, were drawn to Jonestown by leader Jim Jones and his promise of a Utopian society with racial and gender equality . Forum talks about the Jonestown tragedy, new information about the event from FBI records and the profound impact the mass death had on the Bay ...more

  • Wildfire Smoke, Air Quality and Your Health

    Nov 14 2018

    Even for healthy adults wildfire smoke can cause problems. Symptoms include coughing, airway irritation and difficulty breathing. The threat of smoke pollution is much more serious for the young, elderly and chronically ill who may be more susceptible to bronchitis or pneumonia. In this segment we'll find out what to do when the air is smoky and hear tips on understanding the air quality index. We'll also discuss what the newest research tells us about toxins in wildfire pollution.

  • How Climate Change Helped Create California’s ‘Fire Siege’

    Nov 14 2018

    Last year was California’s most destructive fire season. That is, until this year. And while climate change cannot be blamed for individual fires like those currently burning at both ends of the state, scientist Daniel Swain says climate change is a “threat multiplier,” creating conditions that will lead to more large, fast-moving and dangerous wildfires. … Continue reading How Climate Change Helped Create California’s ‘Fire Siege’ →

  • Trailblazer Jo Anne Wallace Looks Back on Five Decades in Public Radio

    Nov 13 2018

    KQED is one of the most-listened-to public radio stations in the country. A large part of that success is due to Vice President and General Manager Jo Anne Wallace’s leadership and vision. Wallace joined KQED in 1990 from NPR and immediately began to grow the station’s news department by extending Forum to two hours in … Continue reading Trailblazer Jo Anne Wallace Looks Back on Five Decades in Public Radio →

  • As Key Races Remain Undecided, Trump Calls Florida Ballots “Massively Infected”

    Nov 13 2018

    Results in some critical races were still too close to call on Monday, a week after the 2018 midterm elections. In Florida, machine recounts were underway in both the senate and gubernatorial contests, prompting President Trump to claim Monday that an “honest vote” is not possible in the state. Meanwhile, Georgia’s secretary of state ordered … Continue reading As Key Races Remain Undecided, Trump Calls Florida Ballots “Massively Infected” →

  • Marvel Comics Legend Stan Lee Dies, Leaving Legions of Fans

    Nov 13 2018

    Writer, editor, and comics icon Stan Lee died at the age of 95 on Monday. After coming into the industry in 1939 as an office gopher, Lee would eventually co-create some of the most famous characters in pop culture, including Spider-Man, Iron Man, Thor, Black Panther, and the Hulk. As the figurehead of Marvel Comics, … Continue reading Marvel Comics Legend Stan Lee Dies, Leaving Legions of Fans →

  • Rep. Adam Schiff: Acting A.G. Whitaker Should Have No Role in Mueller Investigation

    Nov 13 2018

    Southern California Congressman Adam Schiff, who’s poised to lead the House Intelligence Committee, said Monday that President Trump’s ousting of Attorney General Jeff Sessions is his “most direct challenge yet to the rule of law.” We’ll talk to Schiff about why he thinks Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker must recuse himself from Special Counsel Robert … Continue reading Rep. Adam Schiff: Acting A.G. Whitaker Should Have No Role in Mueller Investigation →

  • Former NPR Host Neal Conan on ‘The Democracy Test’ and Honoring Veterans

    Nov 12 2018

    What happens to a democracy when trust in government erodes? That's the question discussed in the sixth and final episode of "The Democracy Test," a new podcast series hosted by longtime NPR journalist Neal Conan. We'll talk to the former Talk of the Nation host about the state of American democratic institutions in the Trump era. We'll also hear about his involvement with "Between War and Here," a theatrical collaboration between journalists and musicians honoring U.S. military veterans wounded...more

  • Fires Continue to Burn Across California

    Nov 12 2018

    Forum gets an update on the major fires burning in California.

  • Gustavo Arellano’s ‘Ask a Mexican’ Column Inspires Play About Food, Stereotypes

    Nov 09 2018

    Journalist Gustavo Arellano joins Forum to discuss the new play "¡Interview with a Mexican!," which is based on his work.

  • Effectiveness of Gun Laws Questioned After Mass Shooting in Thousand Oaks

    Nov 09 2018

    Forum gets the latest on the shooting in Thousand Oaks, and discusses the effectiveness of California's gun regulations.

  • California Wildfires Destroy Thousands of Structures, Force Evacuations

    Nov 09 2018

    A state of emergency was declared Thursday in Butte County, where a wildfire destroyed parts of the town of Paradise. The Camp Fire is at least 20,000 acres and evacuations are in place. Meanwhile Cal Fire is urging residents to remain vigilant as fires burn across the state and dry weather conditions continue.

  • Election 2018: California Ballots Continue to be Counted

    Nov 08 2018

    On Tuesday, California voters rejected a measure to allow cities to expand rent control and said no to a repeal of the state's gas tax. In San Francisco, big businesses will be taxed to pay for homeless services and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf will serve a second term. As California ballots continue to be counted, we'll discuss state and local election results. And we want to hear from you -- what results surprised you? What was the issue you cared most about this election?

  • Sessions Out as Attorney General; Replaced with Vocal Critic of Mueller

    Nov 08 2018

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions resigned at the president’s request Wednesday. Sessions has been replaced by his Chief of Staff Matthew Whitaker, who is on record as saying that special counsel Robert Mueller has exceeded his authority. Sessions, an early ally of President Trump, has been repeatedly criticized by the president for recusing himself from the investigation into collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. We’ll learn more about Whitaker and discuss what Sessions...more

  • Why Civics Education Matters

    Nov 06 2018

    A 2016 survey by the Annenberg Public Policy Center found that only 26 percent of American respondents could name all three branches of government. And only one in three Americans would be able to pass a multiple choice U.S. citizenship test, according to a new poll from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Why are so many Americans struggling to understand how their government works? Today on Forum, we take a look at how civics education is being taught -- or not -- in California ...more