Podcast

Latino USA

Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.

Episodes

  • 'Hatemonger': Author Jean Guerrero On Stephen Miller

    Sep 18 2020

    Maria Hinojosa talks with reporter Jean Guerrero about her new book, "Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, and the White Nationalist Agenda," which chronicles the rise of one of President Trump's most influential advisors. Guerrero discusses Miller's California roots, the right-wing figures who mentored him as a young man, and how he's transformed the United States' immigration system.

  • A Conversation With Maria Hinojosa And Lulu Garcia-Navarro

    Sep 15 2020

    Today, September 15th, marks the launch of Maria Hinojosa's new book, "Once I Was You: A Memoir of Love and Hate in a Torn America." So we are bringing you an extended version of the conversation Maria had with Lulu Garcia-Navarro for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday. An edited version of this interview first aired on NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday on September 13th.

  • Alzheimer's In Color

    Sep 11 2020

    Latino USA and Black Public Media bring you Alzheimer's In Color. It's the story of Ramona Latty, a Dominican immigrant, told by her daughter Yvonne, and it mirrors countless other families of color navigating a disease that is ravaging the Latino community. It's been four years now since Ramona was diagnosed. Four years of the lonely journey, which in the end her daughter walks alone, because her mom has no idea what day it is, how old she is or where she is. Ramona lives in a nursing home and ...more

  • How I Made It: A Trip To Sesame Street With Rosita

    Sep 08 2020

    Can you tell us how to get to Sesame Street? Rosita can! In this installment of our How I Made It series, we visit the friendliest block on television to speak with the first full-time bilingual muppet on Sesame Street: Rosita, la Monstrua de las Cuevas. The fuzzy, turquoise-colored 5-year-old first appeared on the show nearly 30 years ago with muppeteer Carmen Osbahr, who helped create the muppet's bright look and personality. Rosita and Carmen talk about their journeys moving from Mexico to Se...more

  • How I Made It: Lido Pimienta On 'Miss Colombia'

    Sep 04 2020

    Colombian-Canadian singer-songwriter Lido Pimienta tells us how her experience of migration led to her love of Afro-Colombian music, how a beauty pageant and its underlying anti-blackness inspired her new album, and how she came to collaborate with the legendary Afro-Colombian ensemble, Sexteto Tabalá, in her track "Pelo Cucú."

  • The Strange Death Of José De Jesús, Part 2

    Sep 01 2020

    In part two of our two-part special, we continue our investigation into the death of a man in a U.S. immigration detention center in 2015. José de Jesús turned himself into Border Patrol saying somebody was after him. Three days later, he died by suicide after stuffing a sock down his throat. In part two of this story, surveillance video reveals clues about what happened inside his cell, and an internal investigation from Immigration and Customs Enforcement answers many of our questions about wh...more

  • The Strange Death Of José De Jesús, Part 1

    Aug 28 2020

    A man dies in a U.S. immigration detention center, under unusual circumstances. He is found unresponsive in his cell, with a sock stuffed down his throat. His death is ruled a suicide, but little information is put out about what happened, and the family wants answers. In this first part of a special two-part series, Latino USA investigates why José de Jesús died in the custody of the U.S. government, and what his death tells us about conditions—especially mental health services—inside the immig...more

  • José Ralat, Taco Editor

    Aug 21 2020

    José Ralat is the Taco Editor at Texas Monthly Magazine and consequently the only taco editor in the United States. In his book, "American Tacos: A History and Guide," Ralat dives into the evolution of tacos in the United States and its history in the borderlands. According to Ralat, tacos were introduced into the U.S. in the late 1800s. Since then, tacos have evolved into fusions —like Korean and Cajun tacos— as cultures blended with one another and chefs across the country experimented with di...more

  • The Migrant Student Club

    Aug 18 2020

    Over 300,000 students in the U.S. migrate every year to work in agriculture, from spring to fall. At a high school in South Texas, when these students return, they gather at the Migrant Student Club to discuss their experiences and get support from a migrant student counselor. At a special gathering of the club we met Reyes, who started picking asparagus in Michigan to help support his family when he was 9 years old. And over the course of his last semester of school, we follow him as he works t...more

  • Reporter's Notebook: Puerto Ricans Living In The Center Of The COVID-19 Outbreak

    Aug 14 2020

    The Puerto Rican population living in the United States is largely concentrated in New York, New Jersey, and Florida — all of which are regions hit hard by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. An investigation by the Puerto Rico-based Center for Investigative Journalism (or CPI in Spanish) found that stateside Puerto Rican communities live in areas that are at the highest risk of infection and death by COVID-19, a vulnerable position only compounded by factors such as poverty, high unemployment rat...more

  • The Children Of Smithfield

    Aug 11 2020

    Maira Mendez's parents work at a massive pork processing plant in Nebraska. Last March, as meatpacking plants across the nation quickly became invisible hotspots for the coronavirus, it became clear to her that the plant, owned by Smithfield Foods, wasn't able to ensure social distancing or provide enough protective equipment. Maira was alarmed at the conditions—and that workers found it difficult to speak up. So she became part of a group called the "The Children of Smithfield," joining other f...more

  • After The Mississippi Raids

    Aug 07 2020

    August 7th, 2019 was the day that tore apart an unlikely community of Guatemalan immigrants in central Mississippi. A year ago, hundreds of ICE agents arrived at seven chicken processing plants and arrested 680 workers. Many of them were fathers and mothers whose kids were left behind for days, weeks, or even months. Today, many families are still dealing with the consequences of those arrests, many remain unable to work, as they grapple with the traumatic psychological repercussions. Latino USA...more

  • Alice Bag And A Quinceañera Reimagined

    Aug 04 2020

    For Alice Bag, punk is much more than just a genre, it is an attitude and a way to challenge the expectations and limitations placed on her due to her race, gender, or age. Alice Bag was the lead singer and co-founder of "The Bags," one of the first bands in LA's punk scene in the 1970's. In 2019 Alice performed at "Quinceañera Reimagined," a party that brought together women of color artists across disciplines to challenge the patriarchal history of the quinceañera tradition, and celebrate mile...more

  • And They Will Inherit It

    Jul 31 2020

    Almost 70 years ago, a group of majority Mexican-American miners in New Mexico readied themselves for a showdown with their bosses. The miners were going on strike to demand an end to discriminatory practices at the mines. The events inspired the 1954 film "Salt of the Earth"—made by filmmakers who had been blacklisted in Hollywood for supposed leftist sympathies. Latino USA heads to Grant County, New Mexico, to uncover the history of the The Empire Zinc Strike, to find out how a sleepy mining t...more

  • How I Made It: Kichwa Hatari

    Jul 28 2020

    In this segment of our "How I Made It" series, Charlie Uruchima shares his journey with his ancestral language and tells us how he created "Kichwa Hatari," the first Kichwa-language radio station in the U.S. From a bedroom-turned-radio studio, to building an entire community of radio hosts and language activists, Charlie tells us how he discovered the power of radio to build solidarity that defies borders.

  • Portrait Of: Anthony Ramos

    Jul 24 2020

    When Anthony Ramos discovered theater in high school, it changed his life. As a teenager, he had his sights set on baseball, but an injury led him down a very different path. Ramos first burst onto the scene in the 2015 smash Broadway hit "Hamilton," but since then he's had roles in major Hollywood films and television. In October of 2019, Ramos released his debut album 'The Good and the Bad', a personal journey set to funky bass lines and R&B vocals. Latino USA sits down with Ramos to discuss g...more

  • Allyship And #BlackLivesMatter: A Conversation Across Cultures

    Jul 21 2020

    The nationwide protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd have started a firestorm of activism. Crowds of people have taken to the streets to support Black Lives Matter, many of whom are non-black. YR Media and Latino USA bring you a discussion with four young adults from different racial backgrounds to discuss what it means to be an effective ally in the fight to end anti-Blackness, the role young people are playing in this new wave of activism, and the importance of "unlearning" long-held...more

  • In The Bronx, A Progressive Battleground

    Jul 17 2020

    In late June, Ritchie Torres made history when he took the lead in the Democratic primary to represent New York's 15th Congressional District, which is in the Bronx. While absentee ballots are still being counted, Torres is now poised to become the first openly LGBTQ Afro-Latino member of Congress. Torres was one of 12 candidates, among them a Pentecostal minister who opposes gay marriage and a political newcomer endorsed by Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. In this episode, Latino US...more

  • Kat Von D At Home

    Jul 14 2020

    In an interview from before the pandemic, Latino USA visits the home of tattoo artist, entrepreneur, reality star, and goth icon Kat Von D. She first became famous in the early aughts as the first female tattooer on the hit reality television show 'Miami Ink'. Beloved for her artistry and straight shooting banter, she would soon get her own spinoff, 'LA Ink.' She gives us a tour of her baroque home, talks about scaring her Catholic mother, and the backlash she has gotten for her previous relatio...more

  • Omar Jimenez: On Air And Under Arrest

    Jul 10 2020

    While covering the protests sparked after George Floyd's murder in May, CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez was arrested by the Minnesota State Patrol. He was reporting live on the air at the time, and the video of that moment would go viral, as a symbol of racist comportment by the police. Omar Jimenez, who is Afro-Latino, reflects on that moment and talks about the role of his identity in his reporting.

  • Portrait Of: Arca

    Jul 07 2020

    Alejandra Ghersi, the experimental musician from Venezuela known as Arca, has been at the forefront of a movement that has pushed the boundaries of the pop music landscape. Since dropping her first mixtapes in 2011, she has produced album after album of boundary-defying music, and has been tapped as a producer for Kanye West, Bjork and FKA twigs. In this episode Arca talks with Maria Hinojosa about growing up in Venezuela, her philosophies around music, and about finding herself as a trans woman...more

  • Bobby Sanabria Reimagines West Side Story

    Jul 03 2020

    Growing up as a Nuyorican kid in the Bronx, Bobby Sanabria first watched "West Side Story" in the movie theaters, on the 10th anniversary of the film's release. "I was mesmerized," said the Latin Jazz drummer and composer. In 2017, the Broadway classic celebrated its 60th anniversary and to honor this milestone, Sanabria re-envisioned what Latino New York City actually sounds like. The result was his album, "West Side Story Reimagined." Maria Hinojosa talks to the drummer and composer about what...more

  • I'm Not Dead

    Jun 30 2020

    In the early 70s, Miguel Angel Villavicencio was focused on making his most ambitious dream possible: to become a famous singer in Bolivia and across the world. And he was halfway there—his love songs were on the radio and he was appearing on TV. But to take his singing career truly international, he needed money. So he decided to work for Bolivia's most powerful drug cartel in the 80s—a major supplier for Pablo Escobar. Choosing this path would lead him on a journey of self-destruction, unexpec...more

  • How Brazil Became The Epicenter Of COVID-19

    Jun 26 2020

    Brazil recorded its first death from COVID-19 on March 17th and by mid-June the country was the world leader in daily deaths. Overall, Brazil is only behind the United States both in the number of cases and deaths due to coronavirus. But Jair Bolsonaro, the country's right-wing nationalist president, continues to be dismissive about the threat posed by the virus. In this episode, we find out why Brazil, one of the largest economies in the world and a nation often in the forefront of innovative p...more

  • DACA Stands, But The Future Is Anything But Certain

    Jun 24 2020

    On Thursday, June 18th, the Supreme Court issued a ruling that upheld the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. This comes over two years after the Trump administration moved to eliminate the program. About 700,000 people are currently enrolled in DACA, which grants temporary stays of deportation to undocumented immigrants who moved to the U.S. as children. As DACA recipients and supporters celebrate this win, they're also looking to the future. DACA could still be challenged ...more

  • Resistance And Loss In The Age Of COVID-19 With Edwidge Danticat

    Jun 19 2020

    According to Haitian American author Edwidge Danticat, stories are a way of finding inspiration and comfort during the times we're living through. Her award-winning writing portrays the immigrant experience, Haitian American identity, and loss. In conversation with Maria Hinojosa, Danticat dives into the history of resistance to the police violence that was all around her as a young adult in New York City, the loss of her own uncle who died at the hands of immigration authorities, and how she's ...more

  • The Lone Legislator

    Jun 17 2020

    In 1919, an intrepid Texas state representative, José Tomás Canales, decided to lead an investigation into the abuse of power by the Texas Rangers. For several years, residents of South Texas had been reporting that members of the law enforcement agency were going rogue: beating, torturing, and even killing people, in the name of protecting Anglo settlers. The subsequent investigation into these abuses would illustrate the difficulties of reforming and creating oversight over policing on the bor...more

  • Rosa Clemente On Allyship And Confronting Anti-Blackness

    Jun 12 2020

    The killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police sparked worldwide protests against racism and police brutality. To many, this moment seems inevitable — and for the Latinx community, it's bringing up complex conversations on identity, race, and allyship with the Black community. In the first of several conversations we will be having on Latino USA, we're joined by Afro-Puerto Rican activist, organizer, and scholar Rosa Clemente to understand how we got to this crucial moment. We ta...more

  • How Puerto Rican Scientists Hacked The COVID-19 Response

    Jun 09 2020

    In late February, the government of Puerto Rico was in denial over COVID-19. Top health officials were saying that the coronavirus would not reach the island—but the pandemic did arrive in early March. With hospitals that are still recovering from hurricanes and earthquakes, there was concern that the spread of COVID-19 would overwhelm a fragile health system. To prevent that from happening, a group of Puerto Rican scientists banded together to ramp up testing. In this episode, two scientists s...more

  • Willie Perdomo Comes Home

    Jun 05 2020

    In the early 1990s, Willie Perdomo was a teenager growing up in East Harlem. He saw and experienced firsthand a tumultuous moment in New York City, including the crack epidemic and the consequences of the war on drugs. In his latest book of poetry, "The Crazy Bunch," Perdomo wrangles with that history and the ghosts of that time. Latino USA's Antonia Cereijido takes a walk with Perdomo through his old neighborhood of Harlem to discuss his teenage years and how memories of that time inspired his ...more

  • Dispatch From Atlanta's Nights Of Protests

    Jun 03 2020

    It's been over a week since the death of George Floyd – a black man in handcuffs who died after being suffocated under the knee of a white officer in Minneapolis. Since Floyd's death, protests have erupted all over the country, calling for an end to police brutality on black citizens. One of the cities where residents have taken to the streets is Atlanta. The hometown of Martin Luther King, Jr. the city has a long history of protesting and was pivotal in the Civil Rights movement. Julieta Martin...more

  • Love & Walkouts

    Jun 02 2020

    Today we're bringing you an episode from our vault — a love story of student activism. We're taking you back to 1968, when thousands of students participated in a series of protests that helped spark the Chicano Movement, historically known as the East L.A. Walkouts. It's also when high school sweethearts and student organizers Bobby Verdugo and Yoli Ríos danced to a Thee Midniters song and fell in love. This story originally aired in February of 2019.

  • A Moment On The Farm

    May 29 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is a moment in which our broader food supply chains have been challenged—dairy farmers dumping unused milk, farmers plowing over produce, meatpacking plants closing, and grocery store shelves running empty. In some communities, that means people are now turning to smaller, local farms for their produce. One of those farms is run by the Hernández family in Edinburg, Texas. Amid COVID-19, 26-year-old daughter Civia Hernández has been working to adapt and bring the farm online...more

  • The Moving Border: Part Two, The South

    May 27 2020

    In Part 2 of The Moving Border, we visit Tapachula, Mexico in search of a young man whose life is in danger. And we find a new frontier where refugees trying to make it to the U.S. are increasingly stuck, thanks to an international effort to make Mexico a destination state for asylum. The Moving Border series was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center, with additional support provided by the Ford Foundation.

  • Inside An Intensive Care Unit In The Heart Of The Pandemic

    May 22 2020

    As the coronavirus spread in New York City and reached its peak in April, some disturbing statistics were revealed: Black and Latino patients were disproportionately affected by the disease, and they were dying at twice the rate of other patients. Even after the peak of the outbreak in New York, intensive care units in hospitals across the city are still busy caring for COVID-19 patients. In this episode of Latino USA, we go inside the frontlines in Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital, part of the NYC...more

  • The Moving Border: Part One, The North

    May 20 2020

    In this two-part investigation, "The Moving Border" from Latino USA, we delve into the increasing pressure put on refugees seeking safety in the United States via its southern border. It reveals the surprising support the Trump administration has received to create an impenetrable policy wall that pushes asylum seekers south, away from the U.S. In episode one, "The North," we visit Juárez and tell the story of a mother and daughter who are mired in a web of changing policy and subjected to ongoi...more

  • Behind The Scenes With Documented

    May 14 2020

    For our latest episode of Latino USA, we partnered up with Documented, a nonprofit news site that covers immigrants in New York City, to get a behind the scenes look at the experience of trying to navigate the immigration courts as an asylum-seeker under the Trump Administration. Maria Hinojosa sat down with co-founders of Documented, Max Siegelbaum and Mazin Sidahmed, to talk about what they observed in New York's immigration courts, and how federal policy changes have impacted the people movin...more

  • At The Mercy Of The Courts

    May 13 2020

    In this episode of Latino USA we partner up with Documented, a nonprofit news site that covers immigrants in New York City, to get a behind the scenes look at the experience of trying to navigate the immigration courts as an asylum-seeker under the Trump Administration. We follow the story of Wendy and Elvis, Guatemalan newlyweds who flee violent extortion threats only to find themselves in a maddening and punishing U.S. court system that is now the norm for immigrants seeking safety.

  • Latino-Owned And Without A Lifeline, Small Businesses Struggle To Survive

    May 08 2020

    The COVID-19 shutdown has changed the lives of many across the country, including small business owners who are struggling to pay their rent, meet their payrolls and stay afloat. Texas has one of the highest rates of Latino-owned businesses in the country. Maria Hinojosa checks in with entrepreneurship reporter Paul Flahive of Texas Public Radio, who has been covering this story across Texas. He shares the story of two Latino-owned businesses who have been trying to access relief funds and have ...more

  • Portrait Of: Immortal Technique

    May 06 2020

    Felipe Coronel, aka Immortal Technique, is a legendary underground hip-hop artist known for his skills on the mic and his raw, highly political lyrics. Today, Immortal Technique spends his time working on philanthropic causes. Much of his work has been centered in Harlem, especially in the past two months of the coronavirus pandemic. Along with donating to various charity organizations, he is going out in the neighborhood to deliver food and run errands for those unable to go outside due to COVI...more

  • Portrait Of: Enrique Bunbury

    May 01 2020

    Enrique Bunbury is a rock legend in Spain and Latin America, and he's been touring in the United States for years. A pioneer of the "rock en español" movement, Bunbury's eclectic solo career spans decades. During this time he has taken his loyal fans on a musical journey from cabaret to electronic music, all driven by his rock and roll ethos. In this episode Bunbury sits down with Maria Hinojosa to talk about his most recent album, titled "Posible", his self-described "impossible tour" in the U....more

  • Across The River From Boston

    Apr 28 2020

    New York City continues to be the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, but the state with the third most coronavirus cases —after New York and New Jersey— is Massachusetts. And just across the river from Boston is a city that has the highest per capita rate of infection in that state. It's the city of Chelsea. For generations, its residents have been primarily Latino or newly-arrived immigrants who commute to Boston to work. Maria Hinojosa sits down with Boston-based reporter and co-host of th...more

  • With You, Peru

    Apr 24 2020

    The 1970s were a golden age for soccer in Peru, one that producer Janice Llamoca only heard about growing up in Los Angeles in the '90s. The Peruvian soccer team went to three World Cups in that era. But after that, the team did poorly for decades — failing to qualify for the World Cup year after year. Then, in 2017, Peru qualified for the World Cup after 36 years — giving the Llamocas the opportunity of a lifetime to travel to Russia to see their team play on soccer's biggest stage. This story ...more

  • Hola Papi's Advice For Life In Self-Isolation

    Apr 21 2020

    In recent weeks, many of us have had to adjust to living and working remotely. It's a necessary precaution to keep yourself and your community safe during the coronavirus pandemic — but it's not always easy to do. John Paul Brammer, author of the popular advice column "Hola Papi," gets it. He's been getting lots of questions from readers about how to make it through life in self-quarantine, from navigating romantic relationships to creating your own space in a busy home. On this week's Latino US...more

  • Reporter's Notebook: Afro-Puerto Ricans Fighting To Be Visible On The Census

    Apr 17 2020

    The 2020 census is underway, which counts everyone living in the U.S. and its five territories including Puerto Rico. The form consists of questions like name, age, sex and race, but some of these answers are complicated. One example is the race question. In Puerto Rico, residents choose "Puerto Rican" to describe their Hispanic origin, but historically residents have overwhelmingly identified as white on the census, despite the island's rich African history. In this segment, journalist Natasha ...more

  • With Sanders Out, What Happens To The Latino Vote Now?

    Apr 15 2020

    Latinos could play a decisive role in the swing state of Pennsylvania in November's presidential election. In 2016 Trump won the state by about 44,000 votes, and the campaign of Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders had been courting Latino voters there for months. Now that Sanders has dropped out of the presidential race, many wonder if former Vice-President Joe Biden will be able to win them over. In this episode of Latino USA, Maria Hinojosa speaks with reporter Gisele Regatao, who has been on the g...more

  • Intuition

    Apr 10 2020

    Light your candles and schedule your limpia because today's episode is all about the power of intuition. Reporter Cindy Rodriguez talks to scientist Galang Lufityanto about his research into intuitive decision-making. Then, we head to the Brooklyn Brujeria festival, and learn about how intuition has been part of a growing Latinx feminist movement. Finally we hear about Cindy's journey to accept her own sense of intuition, through her relationship to her mother.

  • Immigrants In ICE Detention Face The Threat Of COVID-19

    Apr 07 2020

    There are currently over 35,000 immigrants in detention in the United States, and most of them are in centers under the control of ICE, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency. As the spread of COVID-19 overwhelms some areas of the country, the situation that many immigrants in detention are facing has become an urgent concern. ICE has already started to report that some immigrants and employees have tested positive for the virus. In this episode of Latino USA, we speak with Noah Lanard, ...more

  • The Remarkable Rebirth Of Medellín

    Apr 01 2020

    Medellín, Colombia, is lauded as one of the most innovative and tourist-friendly cities in the world. But 30 years ago, the city was the world's cocaine capital—ravaged by the cartel war led by Pablo Escobar. Latino USA travels to Medellín to hear how the city's violent and narcotic history changed the lives of one family and how Medellín went from being one of the most dangerous places in the world to the "model city" it is today.This story originally aired in June of 2018.

  • Checking Up On The Clinic During COVID-19

    Mar 27 2020

    A few months ago, we aired a story in which we spent 72 hours at CommunityHealth, a free health clinic in Chicago that only serves people without health insurance, and that's run primarily by volunteers. As the number of cases of COVID-19 rises rapidly, free health clinics are an important line of defense against the disease. The communities they serve, like older patients, patients with chronic conditions, and undocumented immigrants, are particularly vulnerable to the disease. For this episode...more

  • For Immigrant Communities, Coronavirus Is A Different Kind Of Threat

    Mar 25 2020

    Public health experts are urging people to stay at home during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic — but not everyone can afford to. Here in the United States, low-income immigrant communities are facing high risks during the outbreak. Many migrants are still working in essential retail, labor, and service industry jobs. Getting access to healthcare is also a challenge, especially after the Trump administration enacted a new policy measure limiting certain immigrants' access to federal benefits lik...more

  • From Boyle Heights To Netflix... And Back To The Neighborhood

    Mar 20 2020

    In February, Netflix premiered a comedy-drama series that features a Mexican-American family from the Los Angeles neighborhood of Boyle Heights. The show is called 'Gentefied' and it's a blend of two words: "gente", the Spanish word for people, and "gentrified." In Latino USA, we wanted to get the community's perspective on the show, so we reached out to the Boyle Heights Beat—a bilingual community newspaper produced by youth reporters—and handed them the mic. The result is a conversation that t...more

  • An Acid Attack In Milwaukee

    Mar 18 2020

    Over the last few years, as immigration has become a heated topic of discussion, there are more and more stories about racist comments and instances of violence against Latinos. And that's reflected in FBI data on hate crimes—a 2018 report showed that personal attacks motivated by bias or prejudice had reached a 16-year high and that hate crimes specifically against Latinos and Latinas were rising. To better understand these trends, on this episode of Latino USA, Maria Hinojosa goes with reporte...more

  • The Few Let In To Wait

    Mar 13 2020

    In January 2019, the Trump administration began enforcing the Migrant Protection Protocols, more widely known as the "Remain in Mexico" policy. It forced an estimated 60,000 people, many of them Central American, to remain in Mexico while U.S. courts decide their fate. While the door has essentially been shut on newly arrived migrants, a few who are deemed "vulnerable" are still being allowed to enter. Mother Jones reporters Fernanda Echavarri and Julia Lurie went to Santa Fe, New Mexico to talk...more

  • Sanders, Biden, And The Latino Vote

    Mar 12 2020

    The Latino electorate has long been considered a sleeping giant in U.S. politics, but in the 2020 election, that giant is waking up. About 32 million Latinas and Latinos will be eligible to vote this year, the second largest voting bloc in the country. On this episode, Latino USA speaks with Sonja Diaz, Founding Executive Director of the UCLA Latino Policy Initiative, and Julio Ricardo Varela, co-host of the In The Thick podcast, about what we've learned about the Latino vote from the Democratic...more

  • The Election Glitch That Sparked A Dominican Uprising

    Mar 06 2020

    On February 27, thousands of Dominicans from around the country gathered for a massive rally in Santo Domingo. That date is normally one filled with carnival festivities to mark Independence Day. But this year—it had a completely different tone. Instead, protestors took to the streets, after the municipal elections were abruptly cancelled. The electoral board cited glitches with voting machines as the reason behind the cancelation, but for the public, this was the last straw in a series of conce...more

  • Portrait Of: Residente

    Mar 03 2020

    In 2005, a duo of Puerto Rican artists released their eponymously titled debut album "Calle 13." Their mix of reggaeton and rap took the Latinx music scene by storm and got them three Latin Grammy awards. In 2017, one half of that duo, René Juan Pérez Joglar—better known as Residente—released his first solo album. To find inspiration, he took a genealogical DNA test and traveled to every part of the world that showed up in the test, where he collaborated with local musicians. Now, Residente is w...more

  • The Persistent Problem Of Hunger

    Feb 28 2020

    There are more than 800 million starving people on the planet, and more than 20,000 people on average continue to die from hunger every day. But the world produces more than enough food to feed the entire human population. Award-winning author and journalist Martín Caparrós traveled the globe to understand why people are still hungry, and wrote the international best-selling book, "Hunger," in the process. The book was recently published in English for the first time. Maria Hinojosa speaks with ...more

  • How I Made It: Yasser Tejeda & Palotré

    Feb 25 2020

    The musical genres most people associate with the Dominican Republic are merengue and bachata. Yet, there's another set of rhythms that are essential to the spirit of the country, and that's Afro-Dominican roots music. That's where the band Yasser Tejeda & Palotré come in. They blend some of the country's black roots rhythms like palo, salve and sarandunga, with jazz and rock to bring a new spin to local sounds—and to reimagine what it means to be Dominican. In this segment of "How I Made It," t...more

  • A Conversation With Elizabeth Warren

    Feb 20 2020

    Latino USA continues its coverage of the Democratic field for the presidential nomination. This time, we sit down with the senator from Massachusetts, Elizabeth Warren. Senator Warren is a relative newcomer to politics—she was first elected in 2012. Now, a year after she declared her run for the presidency, primaries have started. Senator Warren has not had a strong start, but she plans to continue to fight for the nomination. Maria Hinojosa speaks with her about her views on immigration, Puerto...more