Podcast

Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace® is the leading business news program in the nation. We bring you clear explorations of how economic news affects you, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. The Marketplace All-in-One podcast provides each episode of the public radio broadcast programs Marketplace, Marketplace Morning Report® (First Edition and Mid-Day Update), Marketplace Tech® and Marketplace Weekend®, in addition to our digital-only podcasts. Visit marketplace.org for more. From American Pub...more

Episodes

  • Before facial recognition tech can be fair, it needs to be diverse

    Feb 18 2019

    As facial recognition software spreads, it brings the challenge of diversity along with it. So far, programs identify male, white faces far more accurately than they do black women, for example. A new IBM project aims to change that. Diversity in Faces is a data set of a million faces pulled from public domain pictures on Flickr. It gives computers a lot more to look at and process, and it introduces a way to better measure diversity in faces. John R. Smith is an IBM fellow and lead scientist of...more

  • About that spending bill ...

    Feb 15 2019

    Congress approved a spending bill this week to support broadband infrastructure in underserved areas. Besides keeping the government open, we look at what that means for rural America. Then: How businesses are preparing for a no-deal Brexit. Plus, we talk about the biggest economic stories of the past seven days in the Weekly Wrap.

  • Making money moves on border wall

    Feb 15 2019

    President Donald Trump has declared a national emergency to secure funding for the much-touted wall along the southern border, but he faces an uphill battle. New data out Friday confirms low retail sales numbers for December from earlier this week. Plus, California's bullet train plans get rejiggered. Today's show is sponsored by the Alliance for Lifetime Income, WordPress and Indeed.

  • Imagine a world with a 4-day work week

    Feb 15 2019

    What's next for New York City after Amazon announced its HQ2 will not be in The Big Apple anymore? The inspector general of the Dept. of Education says the agency is doing a lousy job of monitoring student loan servicing companies. Plus, what would the world be like if people worked four days a week? Two companies are trying out the idea. Today's show is sponsored by the Alliance for Lifetime Income, WordPress and Indeed.

  • The price of safety for Syrian refugees

    Feb 15 2019

    From the BBC World Service... Spain has just announced snap elections after separatist Catalan politicians refused to back the proposed budget. We explore what the implications are for the eurozone’s fourth-largest economy. Another country headed to the polls is Nigeria, which has the most extreme poverty in the world. We take a closer look at what's at stake. Then, it's the largest displacement crisis since World War II. The war in Syria has shattered lives and sent shock waves through the regi...more

  • What internet search is like behind China's Great Firewall

    Feb 15 2019

    This week, activist shareholders in Alphabet, the parent company of Google, spoke out against development of Google's Dragonfly. That's the internal code name for a project reportedly working on a censored search engine for China. We hear a lot about web censorship in China, but how does it work? What's it like to use? Host Jed Kim talks with Marketplace correspondent Jennifer Pak about it. Now based in Shanghai, Pak has reported from inside China for years. She says censorship is getting stron...more

  • Does this podcast spark joy?

    Feb 14 2019

    Thanks to her best-selling book and new Netflix show, Marie Kondo is inspiring Americans to get organized. But what happens to all the stuff that doesn't "spark joy"? We look at the cost of tidying up and who foots the bill. But first: What you need to know about Amazon and New York City's big breakup, and the challenges that come with putting the census online.

  • No Sweethearts deal this Valentine's Day

    Feb 14 2019

    Retail sales fell sharply in December, the biggest drop since The Great Recession. Auto sales are up, but a lot of people—particularly those in the younger set—aren't paying their car notes. We head to Colorado where the ski industry is voicing its concerns over dwindling snowfall and shorter seasons on the slopes. Plus, you know those candy hearts you get on Valentine's Day? Well, you're not getting any this year. Today's show is sponsored by Kronos, Pitney Bowes and Indeed.

  • The chemical bothers

    Feb 14 2019

    The EPA says it's taking action on harmful chemicals known as "PFAS," which are found in everyday objects. Germany's economy didn't grow last year, and that's good news. Plus, we hear from Efosa Ojomo, author of "The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty," about taking a Silicon Valley-style approach to development. Today's show is sponsored by Kronos, Pitney Bowes and Indeed.

  • Airbus calls time on A380 superjumbo

    Feb 14 2019

    From the BBC World Service… Showers and spa treatments while you fly. The Airbus A380 promised luxury when it first launched more than a decade ago. But the European aircraft manufacturer says it will stop making the world's largest passenger aircraft in 2021. Airbus boss Tom Enders explains the factors behind the decision. Then, Germany narrowly avoided falling into recession at the end of 2018. But with ongoing trade tensions threatening to undermine a nascent global recovery, will Europe's la...more

  • A major trade sticking point between the U.S. and China has deep roots

    Feb 14 2019

    This week, trade talks continue between the United States and China. U.S. officials complain that China has long failed to protect U.S. intellectual property rights, a charge China rejects. The U.S. wants China to put an end to what's known as "forced technology transfers." That's when U.S. companies have to share their valuable tech secrets with local partners in order to access China's much-coveted market. Finding a solution has been a big sticking point in trade negotiations. And the history ...more

  • The other "Dreamers"

    Feb 13 2019

    Some 600,000 American-born children whose parents have returned to Mexico, voluntarily or not, are believed to be in Mexican schools. Today, we look at the economics of them coming back to the United States. Plus: What you need to know about the potential Huawei and ZTE bans, and why Levis is trying to go public ... again.

  • A Norse-course meal

    Feb 13 2019

    A new report finds that, while unemployment around the world is relatively low, a lot of the jobs people have just stink. The consumer price index is also low, but will inflation stay down? Plus, there's paleo. There's keto. Now, there's the "Nordic diet." Today's show is sponsored by Kronos, WellFrame  and Indeed.

  • In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

    Feb 13 2019

    It's Oscar season, a time when we celebrate the history of film. But what if you want to sit down and watch some classics? That was the selling point of one streaming service, FilmStruck, that AT&T recently shuttered. FilmStruck showcased directors like Federico Fellini, Akira Kurosawa and Stanley Kubrick. It was the darling of cinephiles for the two years it existed. Given that streaming giants like Netflix and Amazon seem to be focused on making original content, could the golden age of stream...more

  • Do central banks or governments own gold reserves?

    Feb 13 2019

    From the BBC World Service… More than 200 flights in and out of Belgium, impacting tens of thousands of travelers, have been cancelled due to a 24-hour strike by the country's main transportation unions. And, reports estimate it could cost the local economy 14-million dollars. Then, as Italy’s government central bank and government tussle over gold ownership, we investigate which one really owns the precious metal reserves. Plus,  a U.S. executive order signed in April directed Homeland Security...more

  • A cannabis conundrum

    Feb 13 2019

    Sprint and T-Mobile head to Capitol Hill to talk about their proposed, giant merger, but will it be what consumers need? As the threat of another government shutdown looms, we take a look at the toll the previous one has already taken on some federal workers. Seven million Americans are 90 days or more late on their car payments. Plus, how can farmers grow hemp when cannabis is still illegal federally? Today's show is sponsored by Kronos, WellFrame  and Indeed.

  • How well do you know your economic history?

    Feb 12 2019

    "1888, have the press check it out," President Donald Trump said at a rally Monday night, citing one of his favorite historical precedents for tariffs. Well, we did. Plus: cross-border commerce in the Trump era and the race to make the perfect fake meat.

  • 100: The Oscars are a mess

    Feb 12 2019

    Between controversy over best picture nominees, changes to which awards are handed out during commercials and ever-plummeting ratings, this year's Academy Awards are a hostless mess. That's to say nothing of Hollywood's ongoing problems with representation and harassment. And what about the Grammys? New York Times critic-at-large Wesley Morris helps us sort through the awards noise and see if there are lessons to learn. Plus: It's our 100th episode! We have cake in the studio and surprise treat ...more

  • Why people quitting their jobs might be a good thing

    Feb 12 2019

    For all the talk of a booming economy, small businesses are pessimistic about the future, according to one recent survey. We look at what the coolest-sounding report on government data says about jobs in the U.S. Marco Rubio actually wants to raise one type of tax now. "Hamilton" isn't the only show taking on politics on and off The Great White Way. Today's show is sponsored by the Alliance for Lifetime Income, Kronos, WellFrame  and Indeed.

  • Means of the mid-aged

    Feb 12 2019

    The FDA cracks down on the dietary supplement industry. Car insurance in California is cheaper than in other states, and heavy regulation might be to thank. Plus, Marketplace Senior Economics Contributor Chris Farrell talks about his new book Purpose and a Paycheck: Finding Meaning, Money and Happiness in the Second Half of Life. And if you've ever wanted to own the the house where the richest man in the world lived, now's your chance. Today's show is sponsored by the Alliance for Lifetime Inco...more

  • Can a blackout save South Africa's state-owned power company?

    Feb 12 2019

    From the BBC World Service… Nissan sales took another tumble in 2018 and today slashed targets in key markets like China, the U.S. and Europe. So, can the company navigate slowing demand and executive turnover amid a troubled global economy? Then, South Africa's state-owned power company is struggling under tens-of-billions of dollars of debt, shrinking revenues and aging power stations. Now, a self-imposed blackout aimed at preventing a collapse of the company could end up adding pain to the ec...more

  • Expect a boom in the business of supersonic flight

    Feb 12 2019

    Can we agree that flying these days is kind of the worst? It feels like the changes airlines have made are rarely in our favor. Take smaller seats, narrower aisles and baggage restrictions. Plus, consumers have lost some technological ground. When the Concorde stopped flying more than 15 years ago, we lost access to super fast flights across the ocean. Now some companies are working on ways to bring supersonic travel back for commercial flights within the next decade. They're talking everything ...more

  • How often do you check your home's value?

    Feb 11 2019

    If you own a home, or want to own one, chances are you’ve spent some time with one of the many apps that estimate home values. Watching those prices rise, at least on paper, has become something of a national pastime — but it could be doing a number on you. But first, we look at the race with China to make better artificial intelligence. Plus, a conversation with Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg.

  • Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg on manufacturing in America today

    Feb 11 2019

    Dennis Muilenburg started as an intern at Boeing in 1985 and never left. The aerospace company is America's largest exporter, the Defense Department's second-biggest contractor, and since Muilenburg became CEO, its annual revenue topped $100 billion for the first time. We visited the company's headquarters in Chicago to talk with Muilenburg about biking 10,000 miles a year, his differences with the president, and why manufacturing in America today is “harder than it’s ever been."

  • Why a bathroom bluetooth speaker could be a renter's cause for alarm

    Feb 11 2019

    Everyday items like toilet paper and garbage bags are getting a little more expensive, at least more than official inflation numbers would suggest. It's no secret the rent is too darn high in the Golden State, but after Californians rejected a cost control measure last year, lawmakers are looking for other ways to protect renters from the skyrocketing cost of living. The U.S.-China tariff deadline looms. Plus, as Venezuela's political and economic crisis deepens, the government is on the hunt fo...more

  • The higher ed wealth gap

    Feb 11 2019

    Colleges and universities are bringing in a record amount of money in charitable donations, and it's no surprise which schools are getting the most. Construction in the U.S. appears to keep growing, but companies are having trouble hiring enough good workers to keep up with demand. A new report shows the powerful impact of breast cancer screenings over the decades. Plus, we take a brief look at Russia's looming Internet shutdown. Today's show is sponsored by Kronos, Pitney Bowes and Indeed. ...more

  • Equine flu threatens British horse racing industry

    Feb 11 2019

    Delegations from the U.S. and China are meeting again to restart talks aimed at ending the ongoing trade stalemate. But, what would a win for eitherside look like, and is China now more willing to give in as consumer spending continues to slip? Then, it's been 40 years since revolutionaries overthrew Iran's monarchy, but the economy is struggling today. Plus, horse racing is the second-biggest spectator sport in Britain, generating billions for the economy. But just a month to go until a key rac...more

  • And the Oscar goes to ... innovations in movie tech

    Feb 11 2019

    Over the weekend in Beverly Hills, California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences held its annual Scientific and Technical Oscars ceremony. These awards, handed out two weeks ahead of that "other" Oscars broadcast, are specifically for scientific and technical achievements. This year the academy honored technologies like a security system that lets production teams share raw footage or drafts over the internet without them being stolen or leaked. And, of course, there were awards fo...more

  • The government could shut down again next week and some workers still don't have back pay

    Feb 08 2019

    The government reopened two weeks ago, which means, yes, we're just one week from another potential shutdown. The thing is, it takes time to get an organization that large started again. Case in point: Thousands of workers still don't have back pay. We'll start with that, and the biggest economic headlines of the week. Plus: How streaming music is changing life for artists in Mexico.

  • What happens when the government just hands people money?

    Feb 08 2019

    What happens when you hand struggling people money? A study on Finland's universal basic income experiment concludes that not much, for the economy at least. We take a look at the mysteriously falling benchmark interest rate. America's liquefied natural gas industry is growing, but are China's tariffs on LNG actually hurting it as some predicted? Plus, Johnson & Johnson becomes the first company to put the prices of its products — drugs in this case — in its TV ads. Today's show is sponsored by...more