Podcast

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace® is the leading business news program in the nation. Host Kai Ryssdal and our team of reporters bring you clear explorations of how economic news affects you, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. Airing each weekday evening on your local public radio station or on-demand anytime, Marketplace is your liaison between economics and life. Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which addit...more

Episodes

  • About that spending bill ...

    Feb 15 2019

    Congress approved a spending bill this week to support broadband infrastructure in underserved areas. Besides keeping the government open, we look at what that means for rural America. Then: How businesses are preparing for a no-deal Brexit. Plus, we talk about the biggest economic stories of the past seven days in the Weekly Wrap.

  • Does this podcast spark joy?

    Feb 14 2019

    Thanks to her best-selling book and new Netflix show, Marie Kondo is inspiring Americans to get organized. But what happens to all the stuff that doesn't "spark joy"? We look at the cost of tidying up and who foots the bill. But first: What you need to know about Amazon and New York City's big breakup, and the challenges that come with putting the census online.

  • The other "Dreamers"

    Feb 13 2019

    Some 600,000 American-born children whose parents have returned to Mexico, voluntarily or not, are believed to be in Mexican schools. Today, we look at the economics of them coming back to the United States. Plus: What you need to know about the potential Huawei and ZTE bans, and why Levis is trying to go public ... again.

  • How well do you know your economic history?

    Feb 12 2019

    "1888, have the press check it out," President Donald Trump said at a rally Monday night, citing one of his favorite historical precedents for tariffs. Well, we did. Plus: cross-border commerce in the Trump era and the race to make the perfect fake meat.

  • How often do you check your home's value?

    Feb 11 2019

    If you own a home, or want to own one, chances are you’ve spent some time with one of the many apps that estimate home values. Watching those prices rise, at least on paper, has become something of a national pastime — but it could be doing a number on you. But first, we look at the race with China to make better artificial intelligence. Plus, a conversation with Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg.

  • The government could shut down again next week and some workers still don't have back pay

    Feb 08 2019

    The government reopened two weeks ago, which means, yes, we're just one week from another potential shutdown. The thing is, it takes time to get an organization that large started again. Case in point: Thousands of workers still don't have back pay. We'll start with that, and the biggest economic headlines of the week. Plus: How streaming music is changing life for artists in Mexico.

  • Where's my tax return?

    Feb 07 2019

    As tax season carries on, states are trying to adjust to the new federal tax law and are putting thousands of tax returns on standby. We start today's show bringing you the latest. Then: the lingering debt of federal workers who borrowed to get by in the shutdown. Plus, maybe the only good comment section on the internet.

  • Returning to work after the shutdown

    Feb 06 2019

    The partial government shutdown may be over, but people going back to work are still feeling its effects. Today we hear from one contractor about her bittersweet return. Then: Hundreds of Texans are suing the government over how it handled relief efforts following Hurricane Harvey. The outcome of that lawsuit could shape the response to future disasters. Plus: The high-stress work of food delivery in Shanghai.

  • What's the World Bank do again?

    Feb 05 2019

    Once President Donald Trump gets his big speech out of the way this evening, he's expected to nominate David Malpass to lead the World Bank — and shake it up. We start today's show with a primer on what the bank does and how that's changed. Then: The new tax cap on state and local tax deductions has some people changing their permanent residences to lower-tax states. Plus, "The Price Is Right" has been thinking about consumer spending for 60 years. We talk to its executive producer.

  • Why is corn syrup in beer anyway?

    Feb 04 2019

    You might have heard during the Super Bowl last night that Bud Light is brewed without corn syrup. You might have said, "OK?" We'll tell you why it's such a common ingredient in many foods, including beer. But first: For Republican lawmakers in districts affected by the steel and aluminum tariffs, bridging the gap between constituents and the administration’s trade policies isn’t always easy. We start today's show talking with Rep. Jackie Walorski about it. Plus, a conversation with Jill Abramso...more

  • Why Americans are (finally) getting a raise

    Feb 01 2019

    This morning's jobs report showed that wages have grown for six straight months. On today's show, we look at the economic forces at work. Then: Amazon is trying to move into new markets like India. But can its competitive pricing model scale internationally? Plus, what's a "Zestimate" anyway?

  • Apples to apples

    Jan 31 2019

    The impacts of the trade war with China are widespread. Today we'll zoom in on agriculture, and a family farm in Washington that's feeling it. Plus, the latest on Foxconn, which now says it's backing away from building TVs in Wisconsin in favor of advanced manufacturing. Plus, after living through the government shutdown, discouraged federal workers might be seeking out other employment opportunities.

  • Who's excited for the "Big Game"?

    Jan 30 2019

    We can say "Super Bowl" as much as we want. Super Bowl, Super Bowl, S U P E R  B O W L. But if you're an Atlanta-area business or an advertiser hoping to capitalize on the game, you have to get creative because the NFL has that trademark locked down. But first, we bring you the latest from the Federal Reserve, which announced Wednesday it's not hiking rates any time soon. Plus, could you quit Google or Amazon for a week? (No, you couldn't.)

  • What do you do when your old boss runs for president?

    Jan 29 2019

    We've got big tech drama at home and abroad topping today's show: We'll get you caught up on the new charges against Huawei and an alarming iPhone bug. Plus, the latest on Brexit. Then: Former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz might be running for president in 2020, but can the brand insulate itself from politics?

  • How to reopen the government

    Jan 28 2019

    The government shutdown may be over, for now, but agencies that gather economic data could take a while to get caught up. We'll look at the effects and talk with Congressional Budget Office Director Keith Hall. Plus, the state of the iPhone in China and a conversation with "Wonder Woman" and "I Am the Night" director Patty Jenkins.

  • What the shutdown cost

    Jan 25 2019

    As President Donald Trump agreed to temporarily reopen the government Friday, mayors from all around the country were wrapping up a trip to Washington, D.C., to talk about what the shutdown has cost their communities. We'll talk to some today, plus what government data we've been missing during the standoff. Then: What it's like to be a female economist.

  • Modern monetary theory is a sink

    Jan 24 2019

    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said recently that modern monetary theory, or MMT, should “be a larger part of our conversation” when it comes to funding ambitious policies she’s proposed. On today's show, we'll explain how it works — it's kind of like a kitchen sink. But first, we'll take you inside the financial lives of furloughed federal government workers. Plus, more key moments in Trumponomics.

  • 10 million percent inflation

    Jan 23 2019

    That's where the situation is heading in Venezuela. We'll tell you what you need to know as President Nicolás Maduro is called to resign. Then, more from our series on President Trump's signature economic moments. Plus, why the government shutdown is hitting harder than what GDP lets on. 

  • Trumponomics

    Jan 22 2019

    In the past two years, President Trump has changed the way we talk about business and economic life in this country. He views the economy through a transactional lens: there are always deals to be made or renegotiated. He's the CEO of America, Inc., relying largely on his instincts and owning successes and stock market records. We’ve identified 10 moments that illuminate how the president thinks and what's changed, and we'll roll them out all week. Also on today's show: businesses with discounts...more

  • Day 1 at Davos

    Jan 21 2019

    Things weren't looking exactly glass half-full today at the World Economic Forum, the annual meeting of economists, bankers and world leaders. During a news conference, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said the global economy was growing “more slowly than expected.” We break down what that means in a larger context. Today also marks the 31st day of the partial government shutdown and no end appears to be in sight. Some furloughed workers, in trying to keep up with finances, are becoming t...more

  • The Fed's view on the shutdown

    Jan 18 2019

    During periods of economic uncertainty, many people look to what central bankers say as a forecast of what’s to come. In that spirit, we have Federal Reserve Gov. Lael Brainard on the show today to talk about the longest government shutdown in history. Then, why AT&T is pulling its ads from YouTube. Plus, as always, your recap of the week's news from our analysts.

  • Cardi B speaks the truth

    Jan 17 2019

    The rap superstar took to Instagram yesterday to make sure her followers were paying attention to the government shutdown: "this s**t is really f**king serious, bro." She's right! We'll start the show by looking at the newly "essential" employees President Donald Trump sent back to work, and whether other federal workers might file for unemployment. Then: The USDA is trying to bring Big Dairy back to school lunches. Plus, about that 10-Year Challenge.

  • Regulate me!

    Jan 16 2019

    With no end in sight to the partial government shutdown, some businesses are starting to miss the regulation that shielded them from risk. Then: The fallout from yesterday’s failed Brexit vote may not be isolated to Britain. We'll look at how uncertainty could ripple through the global economy. Plus: partially autonomous car features have the potential to save lives, but using them improperly could cause more accidents.

  • Deal or no deal

    Jan 15 2019

    British Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal was shot down today. We'll kick off our show with the latest and what's next. Then, speaking of "no deal": Under the partial government shutdown, some Trump advisers are seeing what a smaller government really looks like. Plus, why your Netflix is getting more expensive.

  • Unknown unknowns

    Jan 14 2019

    As of this weekend, we're in unprecedented territory. It's the longest partial government shutdown in history. We'll spend some time on today's show looking at how the effects of the shutdown could snowball over the coming days. Then: More than 30,000 are on strike today after negotiations fell out between the teachers union and Los Angeles Unified School District. A look at the economics behind America’s second-largest school district. Plus: Why taxes this year may be an even bigger headache th...more

  • Does this happen in other countries?

    Jan 11 2019

    While the American government shutdown turns into the longest ever, a crucial vote on Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal heads to Parliament next week, which could determine the fate of Britain’s future with the European Union. We'll bring you the latest. Then: Why Amazon is making a new streaming service, and how red carpet advertising works.

  • How'd retailers do this holiday season?

    Jan 10 2019

    Going into the holidays, consumer confidence was high and retail forecasts were looking rosy. Now, more than a week into the new year, it turns out the results are a bit of a mixed bag. We take a closer look at industry news out today. Then, government employees are feeling a lot of stress after 20 days of the partial government shutdown. How is that affecting their jobs? Also: A group of big finance companies is starting a new stock exchange, Members Exchange.

  • All the business that's not happening

    Jan 09 2019

    With today's talks falling through and federal workers about to miss a paycheck, this shutdown is on its way to becoming the longest-ever, and millions in missing income has ripple effects. We're devoting much of today's show to that, looking at how housing, food, taxes and more are impacted. Plus: Experts weigh in on trade negotiations between China and the U.S.

  • What it means to miss a paycheck

    Jan 08 2019

    Friday's payday — or it should be. If the government shutdown continues through the week, federal workers will miss out. We talked with some out-of-work employees about how the shutdown is affecting their personal economies. Then: High economic growth in the U.S. has fueled carbon dioxide emissions despite technological advances aimed to reduce them. Plus: Why are airline tickets priced like that anyway?

  • You can't manage what you can't measure

    Jan 07 2019

    With the government shutdown in its third week, the U.S. Census Bureau is still closed, leaving businesses and investors without valuable economic data. We'll look at what they're missing and talk with a hog farmer about how he's affected by the impasse in Washington. Plus: What does a trip to the emergency room really cost?