Podcast

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace® is the leading business news program in the nation. Host Kai Ryssdal and our team of reporters bring you clear explorations of how economic news affects you, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. Airing each weekday evening on your local public radio station or on-demand anytime, Marketplace is your liaison between economics and life. Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal is part of the Marketplace portfolio of public radio programs broadcasting nationwide, which addit...more

Episodes

  • Attacking the supply — The Uncertain Hour season 3, episode 5

    Apr 20 2019

    It’s not easy being an undercover cop in a county with just 40,000 people. But drugs were making it hard for Bucky Culbertson to run his business, so now he makes his business getting rid of drugs. Subscribe to The Uncertain Hour wherever you get your podcasts.

  • Fleece power vests are big business

    Apr 19 2019

    As tech and finance businesses have loosened up their dress codes in recent years, one garment has ascended to near ubiquity: The Vest. Usually fleece, worn over casual business attire with a company logo on the right breast, the vest is a big part of the way business looks right now. Today, we look at why. Plus: Why T-Mobile wants in the banking business, and who's really to blame for slow Brexit negotiations.

  • How "The Tick" stands among the superhero giants

    Apr 18 2019

    With the new "Avengers" movie poised to dominate screens in about a week, you’d think there wouldn’t be room for anyone else in the superhero landscape. Tell that to Ben Edlund, creator of “The Tick,” a show and character that’s found a small but lasting foothold in superhero culture. We also examine the struggles faced by regional grocery stores and how Texas factors into the discussion about immigration and the economy.

  • The story of the housing market in one home

    Apr 17 2019

    For most people, buying or selling a house is the biggest single financial transaction they'll ever make. But it's an emotional process, too — is that thing you love about your home turning off buyers? Today, our housing reporter revisits her childhood home 30 years later and discovers just how much homeownership has changed — and stayed the same. Plus: The big business of Queen Bey and why luxury retailers are getting in the secondhand clothing business.

  • Summer travel might be more hectic this year

    Apr 16 2019

    Chances are you won’t be traveling on a Boeing 737 Max during your summer vacation. Southwest, American and United airlines have canceled their flights with the plane through summer. For airline schedulers, the year's busiest season is going to get even more complicated. Plus, a new study from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York found the 2017 tax overhaul may have caused a decline in new home sales last year. We'll look into it and play you a first-person account of addiction from this season ...more

  • Wishing you and yours a happy(?) Tax Day

    Apr 15 2019

    Just 10% of taxpayers file by mail these days, but Tax Day used to be a big deal for U.S. post offices, there were protests and parties. Today, we take a trip to the tax-filing past. Plus, the most audited county in the United States and the latest in the negotiations between Hollywood's writers and agents.

  • Welcome to Wise County — The Uncertain Hour season 3, episode 4

    Apr 12 2019

    It’s the deadliest drug epidemic our country has ever faced. We go to ground zero, where “nothing changes except for the drug.” Subscribe to The Uncertain Hour wherever you get your podcasts.

  • Disney enters the streaming war

    Apr 12 2019

    The House of Mouse revealed its new streaming service yesterday, Disney+. It launches in November and will cost $6.99 a month, just under Netflix's cheapest plan. Today we look at what Disney brings to the streaming war and the consumer psychology behind pricing these services. Plus, we talk with the the showrunner of "The Chi" and a look at the companies disrupting the $7.2 billion bra business

  • Foreclosures are at a 10-year low, but not everywhere

    Apr 11 2019

    In several American cities, foreclosures are higher than pre-recession levels. But property values are rising, loan defaults are way down and the job market is still strong, so what's going on? Today we look into it. Plus, we check in on the Midwest's devastating floods and head back to Wise County, Virginia, to look at one attempt to reduce the cost of the opioid epidemic.

  • "Jini Jereser" is "This is Marketplace" in Dothraki

    Apr 10 2019

    "Game of Thrones" is huge business for HBO, and Sunday is the beginning of the end. The show's spared no expense on costumes, sets and even whole languages. Today we talk with the linguist whose job it is to make them. Plus: What you need to know about the Fed meeting, and why rail is so expensive to build in the United States.

  • File your taxes by hand, we dare you

    Apr 09 2019

    The tax-filing process is supposed to be simpler than ever, but most filers pay for software or an accountant to help. Today, we look at how fear, history and very effective marketing have kept Americans from going DIY on their tax returns. But first: The International Monetary Fund cut its outlook for global economic growth to the lowest it’s been since the financial crisis. Plus: Would requiring prices in pharmaceutical ads make drugs cheaper?

  • The internet without Google and Facebook

    Apr 08 2019

    When you go online in China, you won't find tech giants like Facebook and Google, or news organizations like The New York Times and even the South China Morning Post. It's part of the country's strict regulation of speech, but China's internet is still vibrant. Today we take a look beyond the Great Firewall. But first: This is shaping up to be the biggest year for IPOs since the peak of the dot-com boom. We look at how investing has changed since then. Plus: Paying taxes in bitcoin?

  • There's a lot of money to be made on the nostalgia circuit

    Apr 05 2019

    Get out your parachute pants, because MC Hammer begins his first major concert tour since 1991 on Saturday. Hammer joins the Backstreet Boys, the Spice Girls and other '80s and '90s pop acts on the road, where there's still a lot of money to be made. Plus: Turning chaos into core strength with "Brexercise" and the economics of 3-pointers.

  • Why can't America build bullet trains?

    Apr 04 2019

    After decades of challenges, construction is finally underway on the largest public works project in the U.S.: California’s high-speed rail. Today, we look at why bullet trains have been an elusive American goal for more than 50 years. But first, the latest on the Ethiopian Airlines crash, Boeing and its grounded planes. Plus, the story of an undercover police officer whose career has been shaped by his county’s drug problems.

  • Why the NFL is undefeated

    Apr 03 2019

    Just eight weeks into its inaugural season, the Association of American Football appears to be throwing in the towel. With the XFL set to return next year, we look at why every NFL alternative seems to fail. But first, what you need to know about the recent spike in mortgage and refinancing applications. Plus, the professional shoppers of China who report mislabeled products for a share of the fine.

  • What if we just ... closed the border?

    Apr 02 2019

    President Donald Trump threatened to unilaterally shut down the southern border this week if Mexico doesn't take steps to reduce illegal border crossings. Today we look at the economic consequences, starting with putting the brakes on the auto industry. Plus, the fight against robocalls and why that tote bag might not be as environmentally friendly as you think.

  • If Congress regulates Facebook, who else gets caught up?

    Apr 01 2019

    After several high-profile scandals, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg laid out the case for regulating his own company. But regulating one tech giant will likely mean regulating others, and they might not be as keen on letting Congress in. But first we do the numbers on Saudi Aramco, which just released figures revealing it's the world's most profitable company. Plus: what you need to know about a big snack food merger.

  • What happened to Keith? — The Uncertain Hour season 3, episode 2

    Mar 29 2019

    One day, early in the semester, Keith Jackson didn’t show up to class. He’d been arrested for selling crack, but for his classmates, that wasn’t the surprising part. Subscribe to The Uncertain Hour here or wherever you get your podcasts.

  • Are we headed for a no-deal Brexit?

    Mar 29 2019

    Theresa May’s Brexit deal has been voted down a third time, and the chance of a no-deal Brexit has gotten higher. On today's special broadcast from London, Kai Ryssdal talks with business owners and regular folks about how they're getting by amid all this uncertainty.

  • The street-level view of Brexit

    Mar 28 2019

    It's our second day of special Brexit coverage in London, and today we're talking with entrepreneurs and American expats just trying to get by here, living and working at the heart of Brexit negotiations but feeling very far from resolution.

  • The most pro-Brexit city in the U.K.

    Mar 27 2019

    It's been 1,007 days since the U.K. voted to leave the European Union. That's nearly three years of political paralysis and economic uncertainty. For the rest of this week, we're coming to you from London. The first in our series of special reports from around Britain comes from the town of Boston, about three hours outside London, which had the highest proportion of votes in favor of leaving the EU in 2016. Plus, we take more of your Brexit questions.

  • The view of Brexit from outside Parliament

    Mar 26 2019

    Kai Ryssdal's in London this week, reporting on the slow plod of Brexit and how it's affecting people, businesses and the economy. Today he was out in front of the Parliament building. But first: The Trump administration is taking the Affordable Care Act to court ... what happens if it wins? Plus, the history of anti-drug public service announcements and why McDonald's bought an artificial intelligence company.

  • Can Apple's streaming service really think different?

    Mar 25 2019

    Apple already makes so many of the devices we use to stream TV and movies. Now the tech giant is trying to make some TV of its own. We kick off today's show talking about what Apple brings to the streaming wars. Then: Some farmers are struggling to pay back government loans, thanks to trade wars and low prices for key crops. Plus, a preview of our Brexit coverage from London.

  • Bonus: The Uncertain Hour season 3 premiere

    Mar 23 2019

    Our documentary podcast The Uncertain Hour is going inside America's drug war this season. We're starting with the strange and little-known story of how, 30 years ago, George H.W. Bush came to hold up an baggie of crack in his first televised speech in the Oval Office — a baggie he said was seized in front of the White House. Later, we'll explore how the policies Bush launched reverberate through today's opioid crisis, trying to answer the question: How does an epidemic end? Subscribe to The Unc...more

  • The legacy of the war on drugs

    Mar 22 2019

    We're in the middle of one of the deadliest drug epidemics in history, with nearly 50,000 people dying from opioid overdoses in the United States in 2017. On this season of our podcast The Uncertain Hour, we look at how these kinds of crises end. Today, we'll play you a bit from the first episode, all about an Oval Office address from George H.W. Bush that turbocharged the war on drugs. Plus, the latest home sales numbers and the struggle to fight extremism online.

  • Smart cars are getting smarter

    Mar 21 2019

    Volvo is planning to introduce tech that monitors the health and wakefulness of drivers. But do the benefits outweigh the privacy costs? Plus, China's tight video game regulations and what you can expect this season on our podcast The Uncertain Hour.

  • Political fundraising's new math

    Mar 20 2019

    Fundraising is a huge part of running for president, but in this primary season, where candidates receive their money may be as important as how much they make. Plus: Fallout from Facebook's job discrimination settlement and the "femtech" apps that help women control their health — while collecting a lot of personal data.

  • The end of recycling as we know it

    Mar 19 2019

    For years, most of the plastic bottles, aluminum cans and other recyclables Americans put by the curb ended up in China, which used those raw materials in its factories. But the country stopped buying foreign trash last year, and that's putting municipal recycling programs into a panic. Plus: We take apart the White House Council of Economic Advisers’ 2019 economic report and wonder if Instagram's in-app purchases could threaten Amazon.

  • Why younger people are getting Botox

    Mar 18 2019

    When it hit the market 17 years ago, Botox was pitched at 40- and 50-somethings looking for smoother skin. Now, the number of 18- to 37-year-olds getting injectable fillers has grown more than 20 percent in the past five years. Plus: The latest on the FAA and Boeing, and the big business of pumping and dredging in flooded Nebraska.

  • Lilly Singh and the changing face of late night

    Mar 15 2019

    Seventeen years after NBC hired Carson Daly to host its 1:30 a.m. late show, it's now turned to Canadian YouTube sensation Lilly Singh to replace him. We look at what that means. Plus, we'll explore a few contradictions: Solar is roaring back amid barriers from the Trump administration, and consumer confidence is up despite an economic downturn on the horizon.