Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • As pressure mounts, Iran denies role in tanker explosions

    Jun 15 2019

    Between the strictest U.S. sanctions in history and accusations that Iran attacked two tankers in the Gulf of Oman, tensions between the two countries are their worst in 40 years, says Barbara Slavin, director of the Atlantic Council’s Future of Iran Initiative. She joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss how Iran is responding to the mounting pressure.

  • Following Father Theodore Hesburgh through the Civil Rights era

    Jun 15 2019

    The new documentary, "Hesburgh," explores the life of Father Theodore Hesburgh, who served as a long-time president of the University of Notre Dame and is recognized now as one of the most important civic and educational leaders of the 20th Century. NewsHour Weekend's Christopher Booker traces Hesburgh’s steps through his priesthood and role as a presidential advisor on civil rights.

  • News Wrap: Former Hong Kong officials side with protesters over extradition law

    Jun 14 2019

    In our news wrap Friday, pressure is rising in Hong Kong to scrap a bill that would allow extradition to mainland China. The proposed law has sparked mass protests and violent clashes with police, and now, several former senior officials are backing its opponents. Also, President Trump says he won't fire Kellyanne Conway over violating the Hatch Act, despite a government watchdog’s recommendation.

  • After apparent attacks on oil tankers, what’s next for the U.S. and Iran

    Jun 14 2019

    After two oil tankers near the strategically critical Strait of Hormuz were damaged Thursday, the U.S. said Iran was responsible. The UN, meanwhile, has called for an independent investigation. Judy Woodruff talks to Vali Nasr, a Middle East scholar and former State Department official, and Reuel Marc Gerecht, a former CIA operations officer in the Middle East, about this precarious situation.

  • After multiple tragedies, how Colorado schools are securing the classroom

    Jun 14 2019

    School shootings have become a tragic reality of modern American life. How can school administrators prepare for the worst-case scenario? John Ferrugia of Rocky Mountain PBS in Denver reports on how Colorado’s multiple deadly school shootings in the past 20 years have driven the state to develop new safety protocols -- some of which have been adopted across the country.

  • Idlib’s ‘relentless’ onslaught vs. northeastern Syria’s ‘fragile stability’

    Jun 14 2019

    In northwest Syria, Idlib province -- the final stronghold of opponents of the Assad regime -- is under relentless attack, and a source of tension between Syria and Turkey. Land liberated by the U.S. and its Kurdish allies in northeast Syria faces a very different situation. Nick Schifrin talks to Gayle Tzemach Lemmon of the Council on Foreign Relations and Hassan Hassan of the Center for Global Policy.

  • Shields and Brooks on Trump and foreign campaign help, Democratic debates

    Jun 14 2019

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including President Trump’s comments about willingness to accept foreign opposition research, the status of election security legislation, candidate lineups for the upcoming Democratic presidential debates and the politics of Democratic socialism.

  • With the Juke Joint Festival, a Mississippi city aims to lose its economic blues

    Jun 14 2019

    In Mississippi’s Clarksdale, the heart of the rural Delta, a celebration of the blues has been drawing thousands of fans to the area for the past 16 years. The Juke Joint Festival, named for bars and informal music venues scattered throughout the African American South in part as a response to whites-only clubs, has helped revitalize a city whose economy was struggling. Jeffrey Brown reports.

  • News Wrap: White House dismisses agency call to fire Conway

    Jun 13 2019

    In our news wrap Thursday, the White House dismissed a federal watchdog agency’s call to fire Kellyanne Conway. The U.S. Office of Special Counsel said Conway violated the Hatch Act by using her official capacity to disparage Democratic presidential candidates. Also, President Trump announced that Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders would be leaving the White House at the end of the month.

  • Why Trump’s view of accepting foreign opposition research is ‘textbook illegal’

    Jun 13 2019

    President Trump has caused a new outcry by declaring that he would accept information about a political opponent provided by a foreign government. The admission comes after Robert Mueller warned of significant Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign. Yamiche Alcindor reports, and Judy Woodruff talks to former federal prosecutor Shan Wu and Trevor Potter of the Campaign Legal Center.

  • After suspected attacks on Mideast oil tankers, U.S. blames Iran

    Jun 13 2019

    Two oil tankers near the strategically important Strait of Hormuz were damaged Thursday. After the U.S. Navy rushed to assist evacuating sailors, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo blamed Iran, calling the suspected attacks a "clear threat to international peace and security." They come amid heightened tensions with Iran and an increased U.S. military presence in the Mideast. Nick Schifrin reports.

  • Beto O’Rourke says Trump administration is gunning for war with Iran

    Jun 13 2019

    Former Texas Rep. Beto O’ Rourke burst onto the national stage when he came close to defeating Republican Sen. Ted Cruz in the 2018 midterms. Now running for the Democratic presidential nomination, O’Rourke is emphasizing his ability to bring together diverse groups over a progressive agenda and his focus on the future. He talks to Judy Woodruff about climate change, health care and Iran.

  • Can ‘baby bonds’ help the U.S. close its staggering racial wealth gap?

    Jun 13 2019

    Whites in the U.S. have much greater household and individual wealth than blacks and other minorities. In fact, the typical black household has about 10 cents for every dollar of wealth in a typical white household. Some economists and politicians believe this racial wealth disparity will continue to widen unless it's addressed. As Paul Solman reports, one idea for closing it begins at birth.

  • How this Palestinian music festival is breaking down cultural barriers

    Jun 13 2019

    Typically, the Palestinian West Bank is referenced in the context of Middle East peace talks. But for the past three years, the organizers of the three-day Palestine Music Expo, or PMX, have sought to encourage people to open their minds, and their ears, to what Palestinian artists have to offer. John Yang reports from the Palestine West Bank on an effort to exchange culture and create connection.

  • Artist Miguel Colon on community and learning to see himself

    Jun 13 2019

    New York artist Miguel Colon suffered for years before finally receiving a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type, during a hospitalization. In the psychiatric ward, he did a lot of drawing, working on a graphic novel and realizing the “life-affirming” nature of creativity and how it brought other people to him. Colon offers his brief but spectacular take on learning to see himself.

  • Mass protests over Hong Kong extradition law turn violent

    Jun 12 2019

    Protesters in Hong Kong are promising more mass demonstrations after some erupted into violence. Police battled crowds in a growing crisis over Hong Kong officials’ granting mainland China greater control over the city -- including the power to extradite people from Hong Kong for trial in China. Debi Edward of Independent Television News reports on the “dogged determination” of the law’s critics.

  • News Wrap: Trump says U.S. to send more troops to Poland

    Jun 12 2019

    In our news wrap Wednesday, President Trump hosted Polish President Andrzej Duda and announced plans to send 1,000 more U.S. troops to the former Soviet bloc state as part of a growing alliance. That’s on top of 4,500 Americans already stationed there. Also, Congo's Ebola outbreak has now claimed a life in Uganda, in addition to the nearly 1,400 people in Congo who have died since August.

  • What’s at stake in the battle over the 2020 census citizenship question

    Jun 12 2019

    The House Oversight Committee voted Wednesday to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress for not turning over documents related to the decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. While President Trump defends the question, critics say it's intended to benefit Republicans politically. Judy Woodruff talks to NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang.

  • On the U.S.-Mexico border, crowds of migrants and a ‘broken’ system

    Jun 12 2019

    May saw the highest number of crossings at the U.S.-Mexico border since 2007. Due to the surge and a new Trump administration policy that keeps asylum seekers in Mexico until their claims are processed, communities on both sides of the divide are struggling to handle the population influx. Many asylum seekers are families fleeing instability and violence in their countries. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • Compensation for 9/11 first responders is running out. Will Congress act?

    Jun 12 2019

    It’s been nearly two decades since the terrorist attacks of September 11th, and many first responders continue to suffer dire health consequences from exposure to hazardous materials at the disaster sites. Meanwhile, Congress still struggles with how to compensate them, as allocated funding runs dry. Lisa Desjardins talks to Michael McAuliff, a journalist who has covered the story for years.

  • Why survivors aren’t surprised by sexual abuse inside Southern Baptist churches

    Jun 12 2019

    The Southern Baptist Convention is the largest Protestant denomination in the U.S., with nearly 15 million members. Now, it’s facing a reckoning over allegations of sex abuse and concealment revealed by a Houston Chronicle investigation. Judy Woodruff speaks to Rachael Denhollander, a survivor of sexual abuse both by the church and Larry Nassar, about her optimism for the forthcoming reforms.

  • Why ‘deepfake’ videos are becoming more difficult to detect

    Jun 12 2019

    Sophisticated and inaccurate altered videos known as “deepfakes” are causing alarm in the digital realm. The highly realistic manipulated videos are the subject of a House Intelligence Committee hearing on Thursday. As Miles O’Brien reports, the accelerating speed of computers and advances in machine learning make deepfakes ever more difficult to detect, among growing fears of their weaponization.

  • Novelist Nathan Englander on how ritual fuels his writing

    Jun 12 2019

    Novelist Nathan Englander grew up in a highly observant Jewish family. As such, he was accustomed to discipline and observing ritual. When he left his religious community, Englander landed as far away from Orthodox Judaism as he could -- and then was surprised to find the lessons of his faith coming back to him. Englander shares his humble opinion on the role of ritual in creativity.

  • News Wrap: House votes to let committees sue over subpoenas

    Jun 11 2019

    In our Tuesday news wrap, the House voted to let committees sue agencies and witnesses who defy subpoenas, such as Attorney General William Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn. Meanwhile, President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden exchanged insults, with Trump referring to Biden as "weak mentally" and Biden calling the president "a threat to our core values."

  • Where do House Democrats stand on impeachment?

    Jun 11 2019

    Congressional Democrats remain conflicted about whether to pursue impeachment against President Trump. When asked about her plans investigating the president, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi responded that “what we’re doing is winning in court.” Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest from Capitol Hill and why “there is so much pressure” on Democratic lawmakers over this issue.