Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • News Wrap: Trump trades verbal volleys with Tehran

    May 20 2019

    In our news wrap Monday, the U.S. and Iran traded new verbal volleys, as tensions in the Persian Gulf region remain high. After President Trump tweeted that aggression from Iran would result in its “end,” Tehran’s foreign minister responded, “Try respect -- it works!” Meanwhile, Google confirmed that many services on its Android operating system will no longer be updated on Huawei smartphones.

  • As Barr looks into Trump Tower intelligence briefing, Clapper denies leaking its contents

    May 20 2019

    Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper saw some of the early evidence of Russian meddling in U.S. elections. Now a frequent critic and target of President Trump, Clapper has recently published a book, “Facts and Fears: Hard Truths from a Life in Intelligence.” Judy Woodruff talks to Clapper about Trump’s showdown with Iran, confidence in U.S. intelligence and the Mueller report.

  • Some ‘Dreamers’ face painful reality of no country to call home

    May 20 2019

    The immigration policies of the Trump administration have dramatically changed life for young undocumented Mexicans who came to the U.S. as children. Under DACA, which President Obama implemented in 2012, they were protected from deportation. Now, many have been forced out of the U.S. or left out of fear of deportation, finding they belong in neither country. NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro reports.

  • Congo’s Ebola crisis threatens to spiral out of control

    May 20 2019

    More than 1,100 people have died from Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Despite information campaigns, new treatment facilities that reduce disease transmission and an effective new vaccine, the outbreak is spreading because of ongoing violence and residents’ deep distrust of government. Nick Schifrin talks to International Rescue Committee's David Miliband about the growing crisis.

  • How 2020 Democrats are reacting to state abortion restrictions

    May 20 2019

    On the campaign trail, 2020 Democrats condemned a new Alabama law that bans abortion even in cases of rape and incest. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., called the measure, as well as other recent state efforts to restrict abortion, “blatantly unconstitutional.” Many of the candidates vowed that if elected president, they would nominate only judges who would uphold Roe vs. Wade. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on 2020 Rust Belt stakes, abortion laws

    May 20 2019

    NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including restrictive new state abortion laws and whether they align with public sentiment, evolution within the Democratic Party on education policy and Rust Belt campaign efforts by 2020 candidates.

  • This San Francisco art exhibit takes another look at trash

    May 20 2019

    In San Francisco, art enthusiasts recently gathered for an exhibition of unusual pieces, in which every material used came from the nearby city dump. The works represented the culmination of an artist residency at Recology, San Francisco’s waste and recycling company. As special correspondent Cat Wise reports, artists hope the trash's transformation will also spark new ways of thinking.

  • Indian elections are a referendum on Modi’s politics

    May 19 2019

    Voting concluded in India on Sunday in the final phase of a weeks-long election. With more than 900 million registered voters, the final results expected Thursday will decide if Prime Minister Narendra Modi stays in power. Jeffrey Gettleman, The New York Times South Asia bureau chief, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss India’s election process and the issues facing the world’s largest democracy.

  • State abortion laws open possible Roe v. Wade challenge

    May 19 2019

    Alabama and Missouri enacted laws last week outlawing abortion under almost all circumstances, setting up a legal battle that may challenge Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark ruling on abortion. And in other political news this weekend, Michigan Republican Rep. Justin Amash accused President Trump of “impeachable conduct." Special correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.

  • Little support in U.S. for college students raising children

    May 19 2019

    There are nearly 4 million undergraduate students who are raising children, representing 22 percent of all students attending U.S. colleges. Yet only about 8 percent of single mothers in college will obtain associate's or bachelor's degrees within six years, while half of women without children finish their college programs in the same time frame. NewsHour Weekend's Christopher Booker reports.

  • Biden focuses on Trump in Philadelphia speech

    May 18 2019

    With 23 Democrats in the race for their party’s presidential nomination, former Vice President Joe Biden is the most recognizable name. But Biden used a campaign kick-off speech in Philadelphia to focus on President Trump and not on his Democratic rivals. NewsHour’s digital politics editor and senior writer, Daniel Bush, who covered the speech, talks with Hari Sreenivasan about Biden’s strategy.

  • Mural highlights Bronx teen’s death from gang violence

    May 18 2019

    It will be one year next month since 15-year-old Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, a Bronx, N.Y. teenager was killed, a victim of gang violence. After his death, the Instagram hashtag #JusticeForJunior began prompted artist George Fernandez to create a mural honoring the teenager’s life.Newshour’s Student Reporting Labs program with help from students at Bronx Arena High School report.

  • With Brexit looming, Britain will vote in European elections

    May 18 2019

    As Britain's departure from the European Union remains on hold, the country will participate next week in the European Parliament elections. Britain's new Brexit Party is forecast to win a majority of the United Kingdom’s seats in the EU's 28-nation legislative body. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.

  • South China Sea threatened by ‘a series of catastrophes’

    May 18 2019

    The South China Sea is home to more than a tenth of all the fish caught in the world, but fish stocks there are now on the verge of collapsing. Overfishing and the destruction of coral reefs have been exacerbated by maritime disputes and development projects. Greg Poling, of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.

  • News Wrap: Trump to lift aluminum tariffs on Canada and Mexico

    May 17 2019

    In our news wrap Friday, President Trump announced the U.S. will lift aluminum tariffs in a bid to ease trade tensions with Canada and Mexico, who will, in turn, scrap planned retaliatory tariffs on the U.S. Trump said he hoped the move would clear a roadblock to passing his "fantastic" proposed trade deal. Meanwhile, Missouri has become the latest state to approve a restrictive abortion bill.

  • Report says OSU doctor sexually abused students for decades — and school officials knew

    May 17 2019

    Disturbing new details are emerging about another college athletics sex abuse scandal, this time at the Ohio State University. The school says a physician who worked in the student health center and served as a team doctor committed the abuse from the 1970s through the 1990s. John Yang talks to Mike Thompson, news director at WOSU public media, which is independent of the university.

  • If bill allowing extradition to China passes, ‘nobody is safe’ in Hong Kong, says critic

    May 17 2019

    In Hong Kong, crowds are taking to the streets to protest a new law that allows extradition of suspected criminals to China. The city has long valued its independence, and opponents of the policy fear it will enable China to target critics and create a chilling effect on speech. Nick Schifrin talks to Martin Lee, an attorney and the founding chairman of the first pro-democracy party in Hong Kong.

  • This wildfire season, aging power infrastructure may leave parts of California dark

    May 17 2019

    California wildfires have been brutal recently. The worst in a century was last November’s Camp Fire, which killed 85 people and largely destroyed the town of Paradise. State investigators have confirmed a Pacific Gas & Electric transmission line caused the blaze. Amna Nawaz talks to The Wall Street Journal’s Russell Gold about how it started and whether PG&E has taken steps to prevent recurrence.

  • Tulsi Gabbard on why she wants to prioritize foreign policy

    May 17 2019

    After serving two tours of duty in the Middle East, Tulsi Gabbard became one of the first female combat veterans elected to Congress when she won her bid to represent Hawaii in 2012. Now the representative is one of 23 Democrats competing for their party’s 2020 presidential nomination. She sits down with Judy Woodruff to discuss how she would approach foreign policy and the Mueller report.

  • Shields and Brooks on abortion law battles, 2020 generational divide

    May 17 2019

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the role of foreign policy in the upcoming presidential election, restrictive new abortion laws, polling for presidential candidates and a generational divide in the Democratic Party.

  • What blockbuster ‘Game of Thrones’ meant for the fantasy genre

    May 17 2019

    For the millions of viewers around the world addicted to HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” winter is coming, this weekend. The television phenomenon, which upwards of 17 million people watch per episode, concludes its eighth and final season with no shortage of attention or critique. Jeffrey Brown reports on how the series became a sensation, where it fell short and what it means for the fantasy genre.

  • News Wrap: Trump proposes partial overhaul for U.S. immigration

    May 16 2019

    In our news wrap Thursday, President Trump announced his new plan to reform the nation’s immigration system, including admitting more highly skilled workers and giving them priority over those with family already inside the U.S. Trump said the current rules “discriminate against genius." Meanwhile, Trump is reportedly pushing diplomacy amid rising tensions with Iran, saying he doesn’t want a war.

  • Elizabeth Warren on why we should tax the ultra-rich to fund education

    May 16 2019

    There are now 23 Democrats vying for their party's presidential nomination in 2020, but Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren was among the first to enter the race. Amid the crowded field, Warren has distinguished herself for her detailed policy proposals. She joins Judy Woodruff to discuss why markets need rules, taxing the ultra rich to pay for college education and facilitating Mideast peace.

  • Why Sen. Scott blames Schumer for stalled Hurricane Michael relief

    May 16 2019

    More than 200 days have passed since Hurricane Michael hit Florida with devastating Category 5 force -- but a corresponding disaster relief bill is still yet to be passed. Amna Nawaz talks to Florida Sen. Rick Scott, who was the state’s governor during the storm, about the “frustrating” months of gridlock, funding Puerto Rico's recovery and why Scott blames Sen. Chuck Schumer for the stalemate.

  • How failing infrastructure and climate change leave many South Africans without water

    May 16 2019

    It's been 25 years since South Africa dismantled apartheid, and while political progress has occurred, the young democracy continues to face hurdles. In recent years, extreme drought pushed the country to the brink of disaster, and although rainfall finally mitigated the situation, persistent water shortages are now a part of daily life. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports.