Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS...more

Episodes

  • In Michigan, an effort to take politics out of redistricting

    Sep 25 2021

    In a gerrymandered state, it's not unusual to see towns carved in half and shared school districts split into different political districts. This is by no means accidental -- the redistricting process has long been conducted behind closed doors, under the watchful eye of the very politicians hoping to tip voting lines in their favor. But Michigan may have found a way to break this pattern -- and take the politics out of the process. Christopher Booker reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - http...more

  • How the expulsion of Haitian migrants is affecting the crisis-torn nation

    Sep 25 2021

    Thousands of Haitian migrants who have been deported by the U.S. have been arriving home as authorities scramble for resources including food and medical supplies. Haiti is reeling from a convergence of crises -- a presidential assassination, an earthquake and chaos on the streets -- and critics say America's actions will worsen the humanitarian crisis. Widlore Merancourt, editor-in-chief of Ayibopost, joins from Port-Au-Prince. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/f...more

  • Biden again urges Congress to pass infrastructure, reconciliation bills amid stalemate

    Sep 24 2021

    The fate of the bipartisan infrastructure bill and a $3.5 trillion spending package is at risk amid Democratic infighting. On Friday, Biden acknowledged concerns, but urged Congress to pass both bills. Amna Nawaz begins our report, and joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: CDC approves boosters for older, high-risk Americans and frontline workers

    Sep 24 2021

    In our news wrap Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved booster shots for older and high-risk Americans, adding frontline workers to the list. Vice President Kamala Harris had her own COVID scare moments before an interview with ABC's "The View." A migrant encampment in Del Rio, Texas where thousands of Haitian migrants had converged this week has now been cleared. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How Arizona's election review is providing a national playbook for disgruntled politicians

    Sep 24 2021

    Republicans in the Arizona State Senate had commissioned a review of 2020 ballots in Maricopa County even though election officials found no large-scale fraud. But a partisan group called Cyber Ninjas undertook a controversial review of the vote and affirmed Joe Biden won Maricopa County and Arizona. Nate Persily, an election law scholar at Stanford University, joins William Brangham with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Germany faces tight race to replace Angela Merkel, with climate change as top voter issue

    Sep 24 2021

    Germany is one of America's most important allies. Nearly every American president since George W. Bush has worked closely with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. But for the first time since 2005, she will not be a candidate when Germans head to the polls this Sunday to vote for her successor. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant is in Berlin with a preview of this upcoming election. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Jury begins deliberating in R. Kelly case after weeks of harrowing witness testimony

    Sep 24 2021

    PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Brooks and Capehart on Democratic infighting, raising debt ceiling, border crisis

    Sep 24 2021

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the divide among Democrats over the $3.5 trillion spending bill, the looming debt ceiling deadline, and the Biden administration's response to the Haitian migrant issue on the southern border. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • A Brief But Spectacular take on going from crisis to opportunity post-pandemic

    Sep 24 2021

    Whether teaching NYU marketing students or co-hosting the podcast "Pivot," Scott Galloway rarely misses an opportunity to share his insight on the effects of big tech. Tonight, he shares his Brief But Spectacular take on this country's response to the pandemic. It's also the subject of his latest book: "Post Corona: From Crisis to Opportunity." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Artist Shahzia Sikander's work explores a plethora of extraordinary realities

    Sep 24 2021

    Artist Shazia Sikander is straddling worlds and using her art to examine how we see the past and present, east and west. Jeffrey Brown has the story from New York for our art and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How 'fits and starts' of booster science, rollout may affect U.S. vaccination goals

    Sep 23 2021

    An advisory panel for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday recommended the Pfizer booster shots for people 65 and older, nursing home residents, and younger adults with underlying health issues. For a deeper look at that decision, Amna Nawaz is joined by Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo. She is a physician, epidemiologist and professor at the University of California, San Francisco. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: California bars worker productivity quotas used by Amazon, other warehouses

    Sep 23 2021

    In our news wrap Thursday, California is now the first state to bar Amazon and other giant warehouse employers from punishing or firing workers over productivity quotas. Democratic congressional leaders now say they have a framework deal to pay for a huge spending measure covering social and environmental programs. A shooting today in Tennessee left 2 dead -- including the gunman -- and 12 wounded. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Here's the latest on the fate of Haitian migrants in Texas, Biden response to backlash

    Sep 23 2021

    Daniel Foote, the U.S. special envoy to Haiti, resigned in protest Thursday, over the Biden administration's move to deport Haitian migrants back to their troubled home country. Foote called the handling of migrants in Del Rio, Texas, "inhumane" and "counterproductive." White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor broke the story of the special envoy's resignation and joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Lack of access, infrastructure and government accountability hurt Ugandan vaccine goals

    Sep 23 2021

    The U.S. plan to donate 500 million vaccines to developing countries aims to address the lopsided distribution and exacerbated impact of the virus. In Africa, Uganda is still struggling to vaccinate those most at-risk. It has recorded more than 120,000 cases of COVID-19 and over 3100 deaths, but the true toll is likely much higher. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Justice Breyer on 'procedural decision' behind Texas abortion law, politics on the bench

    Sep 23 2021

    Justice Stephen Breyer heads into a new supreme court term soon, facing a docket of hot-button issues and pressure from progressives to retire. The court's senior liberal justice, Breyer joined Judy Woodruff to talk about his role and new book, "The Authority of the Court and the Peril of Politics." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • U.S. and E.U. climate envoys on how China, developing nations can help combat crisis

    Sep 23 2021

    The U.N. warns that unless the world acts faster than promised, Earth's temperatures will rise to catastrophic, irreversible levels. The U.S. calls the upcoming climate summit the last chance for the world to avoid disaster. Nick Schifrin discusses the crisis with John Kerry, the president's special envoy on climate, and Frans Timmermans, executive vice president of the European Commission. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How artist Roberto Lugo is upending porcelain traditions with his personal, cultural roots

    Sep 23 2021

    Special correspondent Jared Bowen of GBH Boston brings us a look at artist Roberto Lugo, who puts family, tradition, and historical figures like Harriet Tubman at the center of his work in New Hampshire. It's part of our ongoing arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • U.S. plan to share Pfizer shots globally 'too little and too late,' ex-CDC director says

    Sep 22 2021

    The Biden administration announced Wednesday that the U.S. was purchasing an additional 500 million Pfizer COVID vaccines to donate to other nations. The move is what critics and organizations like the WHO have been calling for -- a much more robust effort on behalf of rich countries. Yet some are saying this still isn't enough. William Brangham discusses with Tom Frieden, former head of the CDC. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • China's vaccine faces scrutiny as Indonesians die despite shots, U.S. pledges donations

    Sep 22 2021

    As the U.S. commits to vaccine distribution, Indonesia has recorded more than 4 million COVID cases. More than 140,000 people have died. Initially, Indonesia turned to China for vaccine aid. But Nick Schifrin explores how the U.S. and its allies are trying to achieve vaccine inroads in China's backyard. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Senate Dems, GOP end police reform talks, face stalemate over debt ceiling

    Sep 22 2021

    In our news wrap Wednesday, Democratic Senators say they ended bipartisan negotiations on police reform and collecting data on use of force. Senators have also reached a stalemate on the fight over the debt ceiling. There's word that large numbers of Haitian migrants in Texas are being released into the U.S. and told to report to immigration within 60 days. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • EU's top diplomat says it can deploy military forces without U.S., NATO approval

    Sep 22 2021

    President Joe Biden spoke with French President Emmanuel Macron Wednesday for the first time since France erupted with anger over a new Indo-Pacific defense alliance between the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. Nick Schifrin looks at European-U.S. relations with Josep Borrell, the high representative for foreign affairs and security policy and vice president of the European Commission. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Extending government funding and raising debt ceiling face uphill Senate battle

    Sep 22 2021

    Congress must act soon just to keep the federal government functioning. But Democratic leaders are navigating internal divides and logjams as they try to pass two bills that would together dole out trillions of dollars toward infrastructure, child care and combating climate change. The road ahead on all of these issues is bumpy. Lisa Desjardins walks us through what's happening on Capitol Hill. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Rep. Jayapal on progressive priorities, compromise on reconciliation and infrastructure

    Sep 22 2021

    Democratic Rep. Pramila Jayapal of Washington state, chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Congress' efforts around reconciliation and infrastructure. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Louisiana's parishes feel 'forgotten' in the dark weeks after Hurricane Ida

    Sep 22 2021

    Residents in Louisiana have begun the long process of recovery following Hurricane Ida, which destroyed or caused major damage for about 8,000 homes statewide. While the city of New Orleans has largely recovered, the coastal parishes of Lafourche and Terrebonne are struggling with prolonged power outages and a growing housing crisis. Community reporter Roby Chavez reports from the ground. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How America faced 'Peril' in final days of Trump presidency

    Sep 22 2021

    The first draft of history is being written about the final, chaotic days of Donald Trump's presidency and the earliest days of Joe Biden's. A new book by Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa reveals the alarm and lengths that then-president Trump's top advisors went to in order to prevent him from acting on his worst impulses. Woodward and Costa join Judy Woodruff with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • As Biden touts American democracy, here are the issues allies want U.S. to deliver on

    Sep 21 2021

    President Joe Biden on Tuesday delivered his first speech to the United Nations as part of its annual general assembly. Biden touted diplomacy and the endurance of democracy as he faces tensions with old allies, and global challenges, like COVID and climate change. Nick Schifrin reports from New York, and white house correspondent Yamiche Alcindor joins with more from the White House north lawn. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: White House continues deporting Haitian migrants in Texas as Dems decry move

    Sep 21 2021

    In our news wrap Tuesday, the Biden administration stepped up deportations of Haitian migrants gathered in Del Rio, Texas, on the border with Mexico. Johnson & Johnson says a booster for its single-shot COVID-19 vaccine triggers a strong immune response. The U.S. House of Representatives is set to fund federal operations into December and raise the debt ceiling. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How COVID-19's death toll and social impact compares to past U.S. pandemics

    Sep 21 2021

    The death toll from the COVID pandemic has put the U.S. at another tragic milestone -- more than 675,000 Americans, overall, have died of COVID as of Monday. That number surpasses the number of lives lost to the 1918 flu. The U.S. is averaging more than 2,000 daily deaths. William Brangham takes a wider look at COVID's toll on the country. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Bill Gates on vaccine equity, boosters, climate, his foundation and Epstein meetings

    Sep 21 2021

    With world leaders visiting New York this week for the United Nations General Assembly, Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates is calling on the world's richest nations to take what he says are urgent steps needed to end "the crisis phase of this pandemic." Judy Woodruff spoke with Gates about those steps earlier this afternoon in a wide-ranging discussion. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Inmates released to home confinement during pandemic fear 'devastating' reincarceration

    Sep 21 2021

    Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Justice Department has released more than 30,000 non-violent inmates to home confinement to try to limit the virus' spread in prison. But, as John Yang reports for our ongoing "Searching for Justice" series, some of these men and women could be forced to return to prison once the pandemic ends. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • As high temperatures hurt Sicily's food production, rising sea levels threaten housing

    Sep 21 2021

    Climate change experts in Sicily, Italy are warning that rising sea waters are threatening some of the island's most crucial heavy industrial plants. They are also forecasting food shortages because crops are being destroyed. The island endured record temperatures this summer. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports from Sicily for NewsHour's climate change series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders