Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS ...more

Episodes

  • Law enforcement officials testify on security failures during siege at U.S. Capitol

    Feb 23 2021

    The men who were in charge of security during the U.S. Capitol assault told their stories in public on Tuesday for the first time. Their testimony at a Senate hearing was a tale of bad communications, bad intelligence and blame-laying. Lisa Desjardins reports, and Yamiche Alcindor joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Biden holds first bilateral meeting as president with Canada's Trudeau

    Feb 23 2021

    In our news wrap Tuesday, President Biden held the first bilateral meeting of his administration with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Biden's pick for U.N. ambassador was confirmed by the Senate, former Sen. David Perdue will not run for his old seat next year, U.N. nuclear inspectors confirmed Iran is enriching Uranium to 20% purity and Facebook agreed to lift a ban on Australian users. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Why the vaccine rollout in the U.S. has been slower than expected

    Feb 23 2021

    So far, 65 million Americans have received at least one shot of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines. As a country, the U.S. has recently picked up the pace of vaccinations, but there are concerns over supply and demand, which was the subject of a congressional hearing on Tuesday. Miles O'Brien joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Supply shortages and delays leave Europe's vaccination campaign in crisis

    Feb 23 2021

    Europe's vaccination rollout is in crisis with manufacturing delays causing supply shortages and thousands of appointments cancelled indefinitely. The European Union wants to see 70 percent of its population inoculated by the fall. But frustration is growing amongst its citizens amid the realization those targets could be out of reach. Special Correspondent Lucy Hough reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Britain cautiously plans to ease rigid lockdown restrictions

    Feb 23 2021

    Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced a cautious timetable ending the country's COVID lockdown, one of the strictest in the world with almost all foreign travel outlawed under the guidelines. But the full lockdown isn't due to finish until at least late June, while mental health issues are increasingly being amplified. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Raising children for a second time, 'grandfamilies' struggle during the pandemic

    Feb 23 2021

    More and more older adults are raising kids for the second time around because of illness, incarceration, addiction, or any number of reasons. And since the start of the pandemic, almost 40 percent of "grandfamilies" say they struggle to pay for housing, and a third have trouble accessing food. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Waning trust and a perilous financial landscape challenge the news business

    Feb 23 2021

    It is a tumultuous time in the news business, with a perilous financial landscape and significant percentages of Americans saying they fundamentally don't trust news sources that don't line up with their opinions. Gregory Moore, editor-in-chief at Deke Digital, and Radhika Jones, editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair, join Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • U.S. death toll from COVID-19 reaches 500,000

    Feb 22 2021

    The U.S. on Monday marked a new, watershed moment in the COVID-19 pandemic with 500,000 confirmed deaths. It comes even as daily increases in infections and deaths have slowed sharply in recent weeks. William Brangham reports, and Judy Woodruff speaks with Dr. Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at the Georgetown University Center for Global Health Science and Security, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: WHO concerned about COVID-19 vaccines reaching poor countries

    Feb 22 2021

    In our news wrap Monday, the World Health Organization head asked wealthy countries not to buy up all the COVID vaccines before poor nations get any, President Biden plans to funnel more federal pandemic aid to businesses owned by women and minorities, Virginia lawmakers voted to end capital punishment, and former President Trump lost bid to keep his tax records away from a New York prosecutor. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • In storm-ravaged Texas, 'a lot of black eyes' among state leadership

    Feb 22 2021

    Temperatures in Texas have warmed up considerably as experts try to determine just how many deaths in the state were tied to last week's winter storm. But as recovery efforts continue, the fallout is just beginning. Alana Rocha, a multimedia journalist with The Texas Tribune, joins Stephanie Sy for a deeper look at the cascade of issues facing Texans. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Bill Gates on tackling climate change and the ongoing pandemic response

    Feb 22 2021

    All of us face the risk that extreme weather events like the recent one in Texas will become more common and more destructive occurrences because of climate change. Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates has studied climate change for years, and he has prescriptions in his latest book, "How to Avoid a Climate Disaster." He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How a small but powerful band of women led the fight against ISIS

    Feb 22 2021

    In the years-long battle to retake northeastern Syria from ISIS, a small but powerful band of fighters led the way. The women of the YPJ, a Syrian-Kurdish force, fought alongside their male counterparts and face-to-face against ISIS. Author and journalist Gayle Tzemach Lemmon spent years reporting on their stories. She joins Amna Nawaz to discuss her new book, "The Daughters of Kobani." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Republican senators who voted to convict Trump face political peril at home

    Feb 22 2021

    It is a time of political peril for the seven Republican senators who voted to convict the dominant figure of their party. State and local Republican parties have censured -- or are thinking about censuring -- several of those senators. And Donald Trump himself is set to re-emerge for his first public appearance as former president this coming weekend. Yamiche Alcindor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Biden's relief package and the deepening GOP war over Trump

    Feb 22 2021

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Yamiche Alcindor to discuss the latest political news, including President Biden's COVID-relief package, his handling of the pandemic since taking office and former President Trump's continued impact on the Republican Party. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Immigration advocates want Biden to do more to prevent discriminatory policies

    Feb 21 2021

    On his first day in office, President Biden rescinded the Trump-era so-called "Muslim Travel Bans," which affected travel from several Muslim-majority nations. And while immigration advocates praised the reversal of what they called discriminatory policies, NewsHour Weekend's Ivette Feliciano reports on the call for the Biden administration to go even further. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • As the COVID-19 vaccination rollout continues, when will children be vaccinated?

    Feb 21 2021

    As COVID-19 vaccinations continue to expand to new groups of people, there is the question of when children can begin to get shots. Dr. Fauci recently said children as young as first-graders may be vaccinated by the start of school in September. Caroline Chen covers public health at ProPublica, and joined Hari Sreenivasan for more on what we know about kids and COVID-19. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Blocking roads and banging pots, Myanmar protests continue despite military crackdown

    Feb 21 2021

    Hundreds of protesters held a candlelight vigil outside the U.S. embassy in Yangon, Myanmar, for those killed in the protests over the last 21 days. Across the nation, pro-democracy demonstrators continued to oppose the military coup, holding photographs of jailed leader Aung Sang Suu Kyi and imploring the U.N. to do more. Rudabeh Shahid, a nonresident fellow at the Atlantic Council's South Asia Canter joins for more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Recovery may take months even as more help reaches storm-hit Texas

    Feb 20 2021

    President Biden declares a disaster in Texas on Saturday, allowing affected Texans to apply for emergency grants for housing and low-cost loans to cover losses from the winter storm, which has left millions in the state without heat, power and water. For more on community impact and response to the winter storm, Hari Sreenivasan spoke with Texas U.S. Representative Colin Allred from Dallas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • As peace talks with the Taliban stall, deadline to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan looms

    Feb 20 2021

    Last February, former President Trump made a deal with the Taliban to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan by May 1st, 2021. After two decades of partnership with the U.S. and its NATO allies, foreign forces are preparing to go home, leaving the Afghan National Security forces to fight the Taliban alone--at a time when peace negotiations with the Taliban have stalled. Special Correspondent Jane Ferguson reports the final installment in the series: "The Longest War." PBS NewsHour is supported by...more

  • Power largely restored in Texas, but millions remain without drinking water

    Feb 19 2021

    The lights are back on in much of Texas, but for millions the water isn't working. It is the latest crisis in a grinding week of winter storms that have claimed at least 60 lives. Stephanie Sy reports, and speaks to Dr. Esmaeil Porsa, president and CEO of Harris Health System in the Houston area, to learn more about how water outages are severely impacting hospitals. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: White House says vaccine shipments delayed by arctic storm

    Feb 19 2021

    In our news wrap Friday, the White House confirmed the arctic storm has set back COVID-19 vaccine shipments, the U.S. is once again part of the Paris climate accord, the U.S. began allowing the first of thousands of asylum seekers from Mexico, President Biden appealed to the world's democracies to tackle new challenges, and U.S. Capitol police force suspended six officers after the Jan. 6 attack. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Health officials try to rebuild trust of vaccines among Indigenous Americans

    Feb 19 2021

    Native Americans have been among the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, but a history of medical mistreatment has led some Indigenous leaders to brace for challenges in vaccinating their communities. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on those efforts. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • U.S. military grapples with a rising epidemic of sexual assault in its ranks

    Feb 19 2021

    A video posted by a female U.S. Marine about sexual assault in the military rocketed across the internet and into a Pentagon press-briefing room Friday. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin promised to take additional steps to stop such violence. But as Nick Schifrin reports, sexual assault in the military continues to rise and individual families continue to be ripped apart. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Brooks and Capehart on President Biden's first month in office and Rush Limbaugh's legacy

    Feb 19 2021

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including Republican infighting, the legacy of Rush Limbaugh and President Biden's first month in office. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Remembering 5 remarkable people who lost their lives to COVID-19

    Feb 19 2021

    As the death toll from the pandemic nears 500,000 in the United States, we take a moment to remember and pay tribute to five remarkable people who have lost their lives to COVID-19. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders