Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • News Wrap: Taliban execute deadly attack on Afghan intelligence base

    Jan 21 2019

    In our Monday news wrap, Taliban fighters carried out a brazen and deadly attack at a heavily fortified Afghan intelligence base, killing dozens of military personnel. The attackers detonated a stolen military vehicle packed with explosives, allowing more militants to then infiltrate the complex and open fire inside. Also, British Prime Minister Theresa May unveiled her Brexit Plan B.

  • Why Trump is ‘edging closer’ to declaring a national emergency over border wall

    Jan 21 2019

    On day 31 of the partial government shutdown, the only deal on the table is the one President Trump proposed Saturday, which would provide temporary protection for DACA recipients in exchange for $5.7 billion for a border wall. Democrats immediately rejected the plan, but Sen. Mitch McConnell is expected to bring it to a vote. Judy Woodruff talks to Yamiche Alcindor for more.

  • How the shutdown is affecting programs that support survivors of domestic violence

    Jan 21 2019

    The government shutdown has blocked funding to programs providing protection and economic stability to survivors of domestic violence. Diana Brown and Cato Kraft of Estes Valley Crisis Associates in Colorado explain what the lack of resources means for the population they support. Meanwhile, TSA announced the rate of unscheduled employee absences on Sunday was nearly triple its level last year.

  • The ‘remarkable’ courtroom revelations in trial of ‘El Chapo’

    Jan 21 2019

    Joaquín Guzmán, commonly known as the Mexican drug lord “El Chapo,” is on trial in federal court in New York City for running a multimillion-dollar narcotics operation across the United States border. Keegan Hamilton of VICE joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss El Chapo's violent legacy as head of the Sinaloa drug cartel, how the FBI eventually tracked him down and the dramatic courtroom revelations.

  • Consumption of marijuana edibles rises amidst scarce research into their health impact

    Jan 21 2019

    As more states legalize recreational use of marijuana, edible forms of the drug are also becoming increasingly popular. But little research has been done on potential complications of consuming the substance, and some scientists believe they can cause hallucinogenic reactions. Special correspondent Lori Jane Gliha of Rocky Mountain PBS reports on the controversial trend.

  • Can the Women’s March sustain momentum and overcome internal tension?

    Jan 21 2019

    Three years in, the Women's March is facing criticism as it strives to sustain political momentum. While the first march is believed to be the largest single-day protest in American history, organizers have since come under fire from groups claiming they were left out or pushed aside. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on shutdown pressure, Mueller’s BuzzFeed rebuttal

    Jan 21 2019

    NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter from the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the now month-long partial government shutdown and whether congressional Democrats will begin to feel political pressure to compromise, a BuzzFeed article that was disputed by special counsel Robert Mueller’s team and Democrat Sen. Kamala Harris’ presidential bid.

  • On MLK Day, the need for a ‘deeply moral argument’ about American injustice

    Jan 21 2019

    On Martin Luther King Day, we return to a segment we first aired last year, about an effort to revive one of Dr. King’s signature programs, what he called the Poor People’s Campaign. Judy Woodruff sat down with Reverend William J. Barber, co-chair of the 2018 organization, to discuss its mission of reducing poverty and inequality and tackling issues of social injustice.

  • Honor Roll for January 21, 2019

    Jan 21 2019

    A silent tribute to Americans killed in military operations in Afghanistan and Syria.

  • Behind Purdue Pharma’s marketing of OxyContin

    Jan 20 2019

    In June, the state of Massachusetts filed a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma, which manufactures the prescription painkiller OxyContin, alleging that the family controlled-company misled patients about the dangers of the opioid drug. Now, new details about the company’s marketing strategy have emerged from the case. New Yorker’s Patrick Radden Keefe joins Hari Sreenivasan with the details.

  • Day 30 of shutdown: If compromise seems hopeless, what next?

    Jan 20 2019

    The hardest part about ending the government shutdown, now in it’s 30th day, is that both parties have long standing ideals about immigration that align with the people they represent, says NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield. So it might take something drastic to break the impasse, Greenfield tells Hari Sreenivasan.

  • Paralyzed outdoorsman designs bike to cycle woods again

    Jan 20 2019

    Christian Bagg was an avid outdoorsman when a 1996 accident left him paralyzed from the waist down. As a mechanical designer, he spent years attempting to create a wheelchair that could withstand the rugged trails of the Canadian Rockies near his home in Alberta. Then two years ago, his experiments finally paid off. NewsHour Weekend's Christopher Booker reports.

  • Trump’s proposal to end shutdown still includes $5.7 billion wall

    Jan 19 2019

    President Trump offered on day 29 of a partial government shutdown what he described as a proposal to end the impasse, but it was one that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had already rejected before his announcement. NewsHour White House Correspondent Yamiche Alcindor talks to Hari Sreenivasan about the latest.

  • Iraq’s war heroes feel forgotten after war with ISIS

    Jan 19 2019

    An estimated 30,000 Iraqis who joined security forces when Islamic State militants attacked their country in 2014 were injured in the war that persisted through 2017, in addition to thousands who lost their lives. And now, the survivors and families of those who died as well as wounded veterans say that the government is breaking promises it made to look after them. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Simona Foltyn reports.

  • Third Women’s March returns to D.C. amid anti-Semitism controversy

    Jan 19 2019

    Thousands gathered in Washington D.C. for the third annual Women’s March on Saturday, following controversy over alleged anti-Semitism against the organizers. With issues surrounding climate change and the government shutdown on the agenda, around 300 marches also took place in other cities. Megan Thompson joins Hari Sreenivasan from D.C. with details.

  • News Wrap: Death toll in Colombia car bombing rises to 21

    Jan 18 2019

    In our news wrap Friday, the death toll from a car bombing in Bogota, Colombia, rose to 21. Dozens of others were wounded in the country's deadliest attack in 15 years. Officials said the bomber was a member of rebel group ELN. Also, Sony Music’s RCA label has parted ways with R&B star R. Kelly over allegations of sexual abuse. The singer has been accused by multiple women of predatory behavior.

  • What it means for Trump if he ordered Cohen to lie to Congress

    Jan 18 2019

    BuzzFeed reported Friday that President Trump personally directed Michael Cohen, his former lawyer, to lie to Congress about a potential Trump hotel project in Moscow. In response, some congressional Democrats said ordering a subordinate to commit perjury "is an impeachable offense." Judy Woodruff is joined by Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., a member of the House Judiciary Committee, to discuss.

  • What a 2nd Trump-Kim summit could mean for the push to denuclearize North Korea

    Jan 18 2019

    President Trump plans to hold a second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un toward the end of February, the White House announced after Trump met with North Korea’s chief negotiator. In his first interview since retiring, Gen. Vincent Brooks, former U.S. commander in South Korea, talks to Nick Schifrin about the summit, delayed U.S.-South Korea exercises and how close the U.S. came to war.

  • Shutdown’s lost pay, dwindling business send more people to D.C. food banks

    Jan 18 2019

    The government shutdown has stifled business in the nation's capital. Many contractors are barely getting by without their paychecks, and unlike permanent federal workers, they will never recover the income they lose. Food banks are experiencing spiking demand, even though some visitors feel guilty about asking for help. And local shops and cafes sit empty. Lisa Desjardins reports.

  • Brooks and Marcus on shutdown stagnation, Michael Cohen report

    Jan 18 2019

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post deputy editorial page editor Ruth Marcus join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the historic government shutdown, a report that President Trump instructed Michael Cohen to lie to Congress and the growing list of possible Democratic candidates for president in 2020.

  • After racist taunts, youth hockey team rallies behind teammate

    Jan 18 2019

    After 13-year-old Divyne Apollon II became the target of racist taunts by opponents, his teammates jumped to his defense. The camaraderie caught the eye of Washington Capitals’ players John Carlson and Devante Smith-Pelly, one of the NHL’s few black members, who invited Apollon and his teammates for a game and VIP tour. Amna Nawaz has the story.

  • Giant ice disk forms in Maine river, enthralling residents

    Jan 18 2019

    In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, an unusual phenomenon has appeared in a river in Westbrook, Maine: A giant ice disk that spans about 100 yards across and spins counter-clockwise. The disk is a natural although uncommon occurrence documented in other parts of North America as well as in Scandinavia. Julia Griffin, in collaboration with Maine Public Television, has the story.

  • Trump’s move to cancel congressional trip during shutdown raises debate

    Jan 17 2019

    On day 27 of the partial government shutdown, President Trump rescinded approval for a military plane, effectively cancelling a trip to Afghanistan planned by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and a congressional delegation. The move comes after Pelosi asked to postpone the president’s State of the Union Address over safety concerns. Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff for an update on the shutdown.

  • News Wrap: Giuliani comments raise new questions about collusion by Trump campaign

    Jan 17 2019

    In our news wrap Thursday, President Trump's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, seemed to reverse himself on CNN Wednesday night, claiming he "never said there was no collusion between the [Trump] campaign" and Russia. He sought to clarify his remarks on Thursday. Also, Michael Cohen, the president's former lawyer, admitted he paid a tech company to boost Trump's standing in online polls.

  • Trump’s new plans for missile defense may spark arms race, critics say

    Jan 17 2019

    Since the end of the Cold War, the U.S. has built missile defenses primarily to counter rogue states. President Trump on Thursday expanded the program's ambition, including calling for updated space technology. Officials say the new policy responds to Russian advances. Nick Schifrin talks with Joe Cirincione of the Ploughshares Fund and Rebeccah Heinrichs of the Hudson Institute.