Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • News Wrap: Purdue Pharma files for federal bankruptcy protection

    Sep 16 2019

    In our news wrap Monday, besieged drugmaker Purdue Pharma has filed for federal bankruptcy protection. The move was part of a plan by the manufacturer of OxyContin to settle thousands of lawsuits stemming from the opioid crisis. Also, after more violent protests in Hong Kong, a pro-democracy legislator there appealed to the U.N. to investigate police response to the months-long demonstrations.

  • What's at stake for GM and other automakers with UAW strike

    Sep 16 2019

    Nearly 50,000 workers at General Motors plants across the country went on strike at midnight Sunday, bringing production to an immediate halt. It's the first nationwide work stoppage since 2007 for United Auto Workers, which says it hasn't been able to agree with management on key issues like pay raises and limits on using temporary workers. John Yang reports and talks to USA Today's Nathan Bomey.

  • How tensions over Saudi oil attacks could 'spiral out of control'

    Sep 16 2019

    Airstrikes on Saudi oil facilities over the weekend disrupted markets and increased tensions between the U.S. and Iran. The U.S. blames Tehran for the attacks and has reportedly shared intelligence with Saudi Arabia to back up the assertion. Lisa Desjardins reports, and Judy Woodruff talks to Frederic Wehrey of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace about the risk of escalation.

  • Israelis prepare for 2nd election as Netanyahu faces corruption charges

    Sep 16 2019

    Israelis head to the polls this week for the second time this year, due to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's failure to achieve a critical parliamentary coalition after the April elections. Netanyahu has enjoyed historic popularity, but this vote comes as he faces corruption charges. Special correspondent Ryan Chilcote reports on the election's potential to reshape Israel's political landscape.

  • Stu Rothenberg and Domenico Montanaro on 2020 gun policy, Democratic debate takeaways

    Sep 16 2019

    Stu Rothenberg of Inside Elections and NPR's Domenico Montanaro join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including how gun policy is factoring into the 2020 presidential campaign, another sexual assault allegation against Justice Brett Kavanaugh, the contest between Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren for progressive voters and how helpful the Democratic debates are.

  • How Lilly Singh is making late-night TV history

    Sep 16 2019

    In less than a decade, YouTube star Lilly Singh has gone from internet sensation to host of a broadcast TV show, "A Little Late with Lilly Singh," which debuts Monday on NBC. Amna Nawaz sat down with Singh recently on her show's Los Angeles set to talk about being the only woman and person of color on network late night TV, what success means to her and how she writes for online viewership.

  • Angel Otero's brief but spectacular take on discovering his artistic voice

    Sep 16 2019

    Artist Angel Otero's brand of visual storytelling is a unique one: he creates oil skins from paint poured onto glass and peeled off in sheets once it dries. But as a child growing up in Puerto Rico, Otero had a very different understanding of what art was -- and a more traditional career path laid out before him. Otero shares his brief but spectacular take on his artistic process and body of work.

  • Sean Carroll: Universe a 'tiny sliver' of all there is

    Sep 15 2019

    The "many worlds" theory in quantum mechanics suggests that with every decision you make, a new universe springs into existence containing what amounts to a new version of you. Bestselling author and theoretical physicist Sean Carroll discusses the concept and his new book, "Something Deeply Hidden," with NewsHour Weekend's Tom Casciato.

  • Israeli elections a referendum on Netanyahu's political fate

    Sep 15 2019

    Two days before nationwide elections, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday held a cabinet meeting in the occupied West Bank, an area he says he would annex if re-elected. Netanyahu, Israel's longest-serving prime minister, is in his second tight race this year after being accused of corruption. Special correspondent Ryan Chilcote joins Hari Sreenivasan from Tel-Aviv with more.

  • Debates highlight growing divisions in the Democratic Party

    Sep 15 2019

    Much of the analysis from last week's Democratic debate focused on which candidates "won" or "lost," or had the best or worst moments. But NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield tells Hari Sreenivasan the debate also revealed a significant division among the candidates, as progressives and moderates battle for control of the party.

  • Convicted of murder, but a police officer pulled the trigger

    Sep 14 2019

    In 2015, an Alabama police officer shot and killed a teenager burglarizing a home. While the officer was cleared, four other teens who were involved in the crime were all charged with their friend's murder. But how can that be? NewsHour's Megan Thompson reports on the little-known legal doctrine behind the case, called the felony murder rule.

  • Trump to propose 'narrower definition' for water protection

    Sep 14 2019

    The Trump administration this week rolled back Obama-era regulations on the Clean Water Act, which was established to limit the amount of pollution in U.S. bodies of water and to protect sources of drinking water. Critics called the regulations an example of government overreach. Coral Davenport, a New York Times reporter covering energy and environmental policy, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.

  • News Wrap: Another tropical system hits the northern Bahamas

    Sep 13 2019

    In our news wrap Friday, a new tropical weather system has hit the northern islands of the Bahamas, with forecasts calling for up to four inches of rain and winds of 30 miles per hour. The storm complicates relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Dorian. Also, parts of southeastern South Dakota were submerged after two days of downpours delivered more than seven inches of rain in some areas.

  • Climate activist Greta Thunberg on the power of a movement

    Sep 13 2019

    Although more Americans than ever are worried about climate change, less than 40 percent expect to make "major sacrifices" to tackle the problem. But according to Greta Thunberg, a Swedish teenager and climate activist, drastic action is exactly what's needed to address the problem. William Brangham sits down with Thunberg to discuss galvanizing young people across the globe to the climate cause.

  • Admissions scandal highlights 'disconnect' between colleges' message and action

    Sep 13 2019

    The college admissions scandal that engulfed several Hollywood figures this year has essentially delivered a public indictment of some elite institutions. It has also sparked a larger conversation about admissions, access and inequity throughout American higher education. Paul Tough has written a book about this very topic, titled "The Years that Matter Most," and he joins Amna Nawaz to discuss.

  • Where 2020 Democrats agreed during longer debate -- and where they clashed

    Sep 13 2019

    On Thursday night, the top 10 Democratic presidential candidates faced off on a debate stage for the first time, in Houston. The extended debate duration -- three hours instead of two -- enabled longer, more in-depth policy explanations. For the most part, the tone was civil, but Julian Castro's attack on Joe Biden's memory struck some viewers as overly personal and mean. Lisa Desjardins reports.

  • Shields and Brooks on Democratic debate, Bolton's departure

    Sep 13 2019

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's political news, including the third Democratic debate of the 2020 presidential campaign, results of the special congressional election in North Carolina, the departure of John Bolton from the Trump administration and movement toward gun reform legislation.

  • Ken Burns on his country music love story

    Sep 13 2019

  • News Wrap: Supreme Court allows new asylum policy to take effect

    Sep 12 2019

    In our news wrap Thursday, the Trump administration began enforcing a new asylum policy after the Supreme Court allowed it to take effect nationwide. The rule requires migrants who pass through a country other than Mexico before reaching the U.S. to seek asylum there first. Also, the number of people missing in the Bahamas has dropped to 1,300, less than half of what was previously recorded.

  • House Judiciary Committee sets out rules for impeachment investigations

    Sep 12 2019

    On Capitol Hill, Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee are emphasizing that impeaching President Trump is still a real possibility. In a party line vote, the committee passed a resolution setting rules for future impeachment investigation hearings, with Chair Jerry Nadler vowing to scrutinize presidential behavior that "poses a threat to our democracy." Yamiche Alcindor reports.

  • What's at stake for the 10 candidates in the 3rd Democratic debate

    Sep 12 2019

    Thursday night's debate is the third of the 2020 presidential campaign, but the first in which the 10 Democratic candidates leading most public opinion polls will share a stage. Lisa Desjardins joins Amna Nawaz from Houston to discuss the different format of this debate, what's at stake for the candidates and whether it's the end of the campaign road for candidates who didn't qualify.

  • 'We're at a tipping point' on gun violence, says group of American CEOs

    Sep 12 2019

    On Thursday, a number of American business leaders joined the clamor of voices demanding meaningful legislation to reduce gun violence. CEOs from 145 major U.S. companies sent a letter to senators urging them to expand background checks and implement a "red flag" law. William Brangham talks to Richard Edelman, CEO of the public relations and communications firm Edelman, who signed it.

  • Former top U.S. military official in Mideast on the outlook for peace in Syria

    Sep 12 2019

    The war in Syria rages on, with President Bashar al-Assad's regime continuing its onslaught of airstrikes in northwest Idlib province -- the last rebel stronghold. Stephanie Sy reports and talks to retired Gen. Joseph Votel, who until recently oversaw U.S. military operations in the Middle East, about the outlook for a "political solution" in Syria, stability in Afghanistan and the threat of ISIS.

  • Enforcing foreign money ban in U.S. elections on hold without quorum at FEC

    Sep 12 2019

    The Federal Election Commission's mandate is to ensure that campaign financing is transparent and election laws are obeyed. Intended to have six members, the agency currently has only three -- and as a result, is unable to pursue the hundreds of election-related enforcement matters before it. Judy Woodruff sits down with the chair of the FEC, Ellen Weintraub, to discuss the current limitations.

  • How U.S-China trade war is pinching profits for Maine's lobster industry

    Sep 12 2019

    Trade tensions between the U.S. and China are not expected to ease anytime soon, and in New England, tariffs are clawing away at lobster profits. Lobstering is a $1.5 billion industry that helps keep Maine's economy afloat. But due to China's retaliatory 25 percent tariff on U.S. crustaceans, it's Canada that is gaining the competitive edge. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.