Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • Reports of domestic violence prompt Shanahan to step down

    Jun 18 2019

    Another personnel disruption is rocking the White House, as Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan withdrew from consideration for the permanent role Tuesday amid reports of domestic violence in his past. The Washington Post’s Aaron Davis spoke with Shanahan about the allegations. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss, and Judy gets reaction to the news from Lisa Desjardins and Yamiche Alcindor.

  • Why Europe is caught in the middle of U.S.-Iran tensions

    Jun 18 2019

    Although tensions between the U.S. and Iran are high, officials from both countries insist they don't want a military confrontation. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani says Iran will resist sanctions but not wage war, while Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called sending more U.S. troops to the region a "deterrent." Meanwhile, U.S. allies in Europe are sharply divided on Iran. Nick Schifrin reports.

  • News Wrap: Hong Kong’s leader apologizes — but doesn’t withdraw bill

    Jun 18 2019

    In our news wrap Tuesday, Hong Kong's chief executive, Carrie Lam, issued an apology but did not withdraw the extradition bill that has sparked mass demonstrations. Millions have protested the proposal, which would allow China to extradite people from Hong Kong to the mainland for trial. Also, President Trump says he will hold trade talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping at Japan's G-20 summit.

  • Tim Kaine on Shanahan allegations, Mark Esper and tensions with Iran

    Jun 18 2019

    President Trump announced Tuesday that Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan will not seek confirmation for the permanent version of the role. Reports then surfaced about possible incidents of domestic violence in Shanahan’s past. Judy Woodruff talks to Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., about the “troubling” allegations, why not having a permanent Secretary of Defense is risky and tensions with Iran.

  • Former Bush Pentagon official on Iran, Shanahan and ‘terrible’ vetting process

    Jun 18 2019

    Tensions between the U.S. and Iran are inflamed, with the U.S. sending more troops to the Mideast amid what it calls provocation by Iran. Now, a new disruption: Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan is stepping down amid reports of domestic violence in his past. Former Pentagon comptroller Dov Zakheim of the Center for Strategic and International Studies joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • ICE director on due process, rule of law and upcoming deportations

    Jun 18 2019

    On Twitter Monday night, President Trump announced plans for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to step up removal of undocumented immigrants from the U.S. next week. How will these people be located and what happens to them next -- especially the families? Amna Nawaz talks to ICE Acting Director Mark Morgan, who served as chief of U.S. Border Patrol during the Obama administration.

  • With Florida rally, Trump aims for a 2020 campaign ‘reset’

    Jun 18 2019

    Ahead of a Florida rally President Trump is calling the kickoff for his 2020 reelection campaign, live music, food trucks and Trump swag adjoined Orlando’s Amway Center. Some supporters waited in line overnight to get into the event. Meanwhile, undocumented workers once employed at Trump properties gathered to criticize his immigration stance. Yamiche Alcindor reports and updates Judy Woodruff.

  • Why another flu pandemic is likely just a matter of when

    Jun 18 2019

    Despite the availability of vaccines, the flu still kills tens of thousands of people in the U.S. each year, and hundreds of thousands more worldwide. But public health officials fear that an even graver threat lies ahead: the emergence of a new, much more deadly flu virus. As William Brangham reports, the scenario has occurred before.

  • News Wrap: Iran warns it will soon exceed treaty’s uranium limits

    Jun 17 2019

    In our news wrap Monday, Iran warns that it will exceed its limit on stockpiling uranium in the next 10 days. A spokesman for the country’s atomic energy agency said it is “suspending” the commitments established by the 2015 nuclear accord. Meanwhile, former Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi died after collapsing in court. The Muslim Brotherhood leader had been imprisoned since his 2013 ouster.

  • What Hong Kong’s backpedal on China extradition law means for Beijing

    Jun 17 2019

    Huge demonstrations in Hong Kong protesting a proposed Chinese extradition law seem to have paid off, as the city’s chief executive has indefinitely suspended the controversial legislation. What does the backtracking mean for Hong Kong and Beijing? Nick Schifrin talks to Lee Cheuk Yan, a co-founder of Hong Kong’s Democratic Party, and Doug Paal of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  • Why cyber warfare represents diplomatic territory

    Jun 17 2019

    The New York Times reported over the weekend on U.S. military attempts to infiltrate the Russian power grid. The effort represents the latest offensive in an increasingly digital conflict with Russia, whose 2016 election interference is well documented. John Yang talks to R.P. Eddy, a former National Security Council official and founder of an intelligence consulting firm, about this new frontier.

  • Across the country, 2020 Democrats focus on race and poverty

    Jun 17 2019

    Several candidates for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination appeared at a forum in Washington, D.C., on Monday, to discuss issues of poverty, race and inequality. Raising the minimum wage was a high-profile topic there, as well as at other campaign events around the country. Meanwhile, candidates also emphasized voting rights and closing the racial wealth gap. Yamiche Alcindor reports.

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Trump campaign kickoff, Democratic debates

    Jun 17 2019

    NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including President Trump’s Tuesday rally in Florida, campaign stops and strategy among 2020 Democrats and what to expect from the first Democratic debates.

  • Why U.S. pedestrian deaths are at their highest level in almost 30 years

    Jun 17 2019

    U.S. pedestrian deaths are at their highest level since 1990. Possible explanations include wider roads, sprawling cities, heavier traffic in residential areas due to navigation apps and increasing distractions from digital devices. And according to victims’ families and safety advocates, the problem is a crisis state and local governments have been slow to address. Arren Kimbel-Sannit reports.

  • Actress Maddie Corman on being ‘brave’ after a family ordeal

    Jun 17 2019

    In 2015, actress Maddie Corman’s life became a nightmare when her husband was arrested for having child pornography on his computer. Now Corman has written an emotional play, "Accidentally Brave," about the harrowing experience. Hari Sreenivasan sits down with Corman to discuss how the ordeal affected her, whether she’s still with her husband and why she chose to write her story into a play.

  • 2 gay veterans on their 25 years of love

    Jun 17 2019

    The 1969 police raid at Stonewall Inn in New York City was a watershed moment in LGBTQ history. After years of police harassment and mistreatment, the bar’s patrons fought back. As part of the NewsHour’s coverage of the 50th anniversary, we share an animated StoryCorps conversation between two gay veterans about their 25 years of love. It's part of StoryCorps' “Stonewall Outloud” collection.

  • Hurricane Michael’s toll on Florida children’s mental health

    Jun 16 2019

    People in Florida’s panhandle are still grappling with the devastation from last October’s Hurricane Michael. The most powerful storm to hit the region in history left many residents homeless and in search of aid. Now, children in particular are facing another after effect of the devastation -- mental health issues. Miami Herald reporter Elizabeth Koh joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.

  • Will ‘opportunity zone’ tax breaks help low-income communities?

    Jun 16 2019

    The 2017 tax law created more than 8,700 “opportunity zones” around the country, where investors receive tax breaks in exchange for putting money in designated, low-income areas. It’s an approach that, according to its supporters, will spur economic development. But critics say it may not do much for the residents it was designed to help. Hari Sreenivasan reports from Tempe, Arizona.

  • The case for a nutrition revolution

    Jun 16 2019

    In the run-up to NewsHour Weekend’s special series, ‘The Future of Food’, Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Amanda Little, writer-in-residence at Vanderbilt University, about her new book, ‘The Fate of Food’ that focuses on the global challenges and possibilities in food production and nutrition.

  • As pressure mounts, Iran denies role in tanker explosions

    Jun 15 2019

    Between the strictest U.S. sanctions in history and accusations that Iran attacked two tankers in the Gulf of Oman, tensions between the two countries are their worst in 40 years, says Barbara Slavin, director of the Atlantic Council’s Future of Iran Initiative. She joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss how Iran is responding to the mounting pressure.

  • Following Father Theodore Hesburgh through the Civil Rights era

    Jun 15 2019

    The new documentary, "Hesburgh," explores the life of Father Theodore Hesburgh, who served as a long-time president of the University of Notre Dame and is recognized now as one of the most important civic and educational leaders of the 20th Century. NewsHour Weekend's Christopher Booker traces Hesburgh’s steps through his priesthood and role as a presidential advisor on civil rights.

  • News Wrap: Former Hong Kong officials side with protesters over extradition law

    Jun 14 2019

    In our news wrap Friday, pressure is rising in Hong Kong to scrap a bill that would allow extradition to mainland China. The proposed law has sparked mass protests and violent clashes with police, and now, several former senior officials are backing its opponents. Also, President Trump says he won't fire Kellyanne Conway over violating the Hatch Act, despite a government watchdog’s recommendation.

  • After apparent attacks on oil tankers, what’s next for the U.S. and Iran

    Jun 14 2019

    After two oil tankers near the strategically critical Strait of Hormuz were damaged Thursday, the U.S. said Iran was responsible. The UN, meanwhile, has called for an independent investigation. Judy Woodruff talks to Vali Nasr, a Middle East scholar and former State Department official, and Reuel Marc Gerecht, a former CIA operations officer in the Middle East, about this precarious situation.

  • After multiple tragedies, how Colorado schools are securing the classroom

    Jun 14 2019

    School shootings have become a tragic reality of modern American life. How can school administrators prepare for the worst-case scenario? John Ferrugia of Rocky Mountain PBS in Denver reports on how Colorado’s multiple deadly school shootings in the past 20 years have driven the state to develop new safety protocols -- some of which have been adopted across the country.