Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS...more

Episodes

  • FDA greenlights Pfizer vaccine for children ages 12 to 15

    May 10 2021

    New York became the latest state to require students at publicly funded colleges be vaccinated for the fall term -- a move that comes as overall, new infections in the U.S. have fallen to their lowest since last September. Vaccine manufacturer Pfizer announced Monday that it had received FDA approval to vaccinate children 12 to 15 years old. William Brangham has the latest COVID news. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: 13 dead after roadside bombings follow girls school attack in Afghanistan

    May 10 2021

    In our news wrap Monday, Roadside bombings have killed at least 13 people in Afghanistan after Saturday's bombing at a girls school in Kabul. In about 24 hours, over 2,100 migrants have reached the shores of Lampedusa, a small Italian island only about 8 square miles in size. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Palestinians face renewed violence in Jerusalem for protesting evictions

    May 10 2021

    For more than a week, Palestinians have protested throughout Jerusalem over attempts to evict Palestinian families from their homes. Tensions exploded in Jerusalem, and in Gaza, as Hamas militants on Monday fired rockets into Israel, and toward Jerusalem. In response, Israel conducted airstrikes in Gaza, killing more than twenty people, including at least nine children. Amna Nawaz has the story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What does the Colonial Pipeline hack tell us about the security of U.S. infrastructure?

    May 10 2021

    The federal government on Monday confirmed that a Russian criminal group is behind the hack of the Colonial Pipeline company. The pipeline -- the largest of its kind in the U.S. -- was shut down after a cyber extortion attempt. The Biden administration is working with the company to investigate the hack. William Brangham speaks to Megan Stifel of the Global Cyber Alliance about its implications. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Can Yemen exist as a unified state post-war? Here's what different forces want

    May 10 2021

    The war in Yemen shows little sign of ending despite the horrific humanitarian toll of the past seven years. Within the war between the Houthi rebels, backed by Iran, and the internationally-recognized government of Yemen, there are other battles that threaten to split the country in two. For her final report inside Yemen, special correspondent Jane Ferguson looks at the war to divide this land. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • In her bid to end TB, Mireille Kamariza is shattering stereotypes about scientists

    May 10 2021

    Before COVID-19, tuberculosis was the world's deadliest infectious disease. Though rare in the United States, the disease is prevalent in many parts of the world and kills millions. John Yang tells us of one scientist's journey to the discovery both of a new tool to fight TB, and of her own potential. It's part of "Breakthroughs," our series on invention and innovation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Liz Cheney, Trump and the GOP

    May 10 2021

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including internal Republican politics over Rep. Liz Cheney's House position, former President Trump's influence on the party, and bipartisanship on President Biden's plans. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Ziwe on using humor, vulnerability and honesty to discuss race in America

    May 10 2021

    There's a rising voice in late-night comedy: Ziwe Fumudoh. The comedian, who goes by her first name, debuted her no-holds-barred take on race and social issues in America on television on Sunday in a new self-titled sketch show. Amna Nawaz caught up with Ziwe for our ongoing arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Afghanistan's bomb attack exposes nation's ethnic and religious fissures

    May 09 2021

    The death toll from Saturday's car bomb attack on a girls' school in a minority Shiite neighborhood in Kabul has crossed 50 and at least 100 people have been injured. While no one has taken responsibility for the attack, the government has blamed the Taliban. NewsHour Special Correspondent Jane Ferguson joins Hari Sreenivasan with the latest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • JXN Project examines the history of one of the first Black urban neighborhoods

    May 09 2021

    As much of the US faced a reckoning following the death of George Floyd, towns across the country began to look at racial justice in their own backyards. Led by two sisters, the JXN Project is a new initiative working to preserve one of the first Black urban districts in America. Ivette Feliciano visited the Jackson Ward community in Richmond, Virginia as part of our series, 'Chasing the Dream.' PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Serbia's winning fight against COVID-19 raises questions about 'vaccine diplomacy'

    May 08 2021

    Serbia has had considerable success in its COVID-19 vaccination campaign, with the third-highest rate in Europe; supply is mostly from China and Russia. While Serbia's efforts have received high praise, experts are warning about unprecedented, growing Chinese influence in the country and the wider region through so-called 'vaccine diplomacy.' Jorgen Samson and Aleksandar Papajic report from Serbia. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • The jobs market is slowly recovering, but not so much for women and women of color

    May 08 2021

    While the economy is rebounding slowly and the U.S. is gradually adding more jobs 4.5 million women remain out of work compared with 3.7 million men. Valerie Wilson, director of race, ethnicity and economy at the Economic Policy Review joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss why women, especially women of color, continue to be disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Scottish National Party's win may reignite the independence referendum

    May 08 2021

    The Scottish Nationalist Party is set to win in Scotland's parliamentary election and is expected to call for a pro-independence referendum, setting the stage for a clash with Prime Minister Boris Johnson. NPR Correspondent Frank Langfitt joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the election and what the outcome means for the pro-independence movement in the UK. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Harris appeals for Mexican cooperation on immigration

    May 07 2021

    In our news wrap Friday, Vice President Kamala Harris appealed for cooperation in a virtual meeting with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador to curb the rise in migrants arriving at the U.S. border. Pfizer has started the application process for a full FDA approval of its COVID vaccine for people 16 and older. April's jobs report fell far short of what many analysts expected. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Why the latest jobs report was disappointing, and what it means for the economy

    May 07 2021

    With millions of people still out of work during the pandemic, Friday's mediocre jobs report puzzled many analysts who expected hundreds of thousands more new jobs. Lisa Desjardins discusses its implications with Ellen Hughes Cromwick, a former chief economist at the commerce department during the Obama administration, and Michael Strain, an economist with the American Enterprise Institute. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How the US can address the 'moment of crisis' facing the AAPI community

    May 07 2021

    Amna Nawaz speaks to Russell Jeung, a co-founder of the Stop AAPI Hate group and a professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco State University, about a growing and disturbing trend -- a rise in hateful acts from slurs to physical violence -- against Asian Americans and people of Pacific Islander descent. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Warren: Latest jobs report shows the need for universal child care

    May 07 2021

    Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren is working with President Biden on infrastructure, education and a number of other issues. She also just released a new book, "Persist," about her own campaign experiences and plans. It emphasizes her personal stories as a working mother. She joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Biden's policies, and the experiences that inspired the book. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Brooks and Capehart on jobs report, Liz Cheney and election laws

    May 07 2021

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the latest jobs report, the internal politics in the Republican party as it attempts to oust Rep. Liz Cheney, and the latest string of election law changes in conservative states. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Honoring 5 American lives lost to COVID-19

    May 07 2021

    Each week, the PBS NewsHour pauses to remember five Americans lost to the COVID-19 pandemic, and shares memories and highlights from their lives. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Newton Minow's concern for children transformed TV. Here's what he'd still change

    May 07 2021

    60 years ago this Sunday -- on May 9, 1961 -- then Head of the FCC, Newton Minow, gave his first major speech, declaring U.S. television programming a "vast wasteland," because he saw the missed opportunities of what TV could offer. The phrase helped lead to the genesis of PBS. Minow joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the legacy of that speech. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • India records 400,000 new infections for the second time during second wave

    May 06 2021

    In our news wrap Thursday, the COVID emergency is growing ever more desperate in India as new infections top 400,000 for a second time, with nearly 4,000 deaths in 24 hours. French President Emmanuel Macron voiced support for releasing COVID vaccine patents in a bid to increase access for poorer nations. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken warned that global vaccinations must move faster. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Liz Cheney was a rising Republican star until Jan. 6. Here's what changed

    May 06 2021

    Internal divides over last year's election and the future of the party have come to a head as House Republicans seem to be moving to replace their No. 3 leader, Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney. Lisa Desjardins reports on where Republicans are drawing the line on her comments about President Trump and the party itself. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Exploring the 'unprecedented,' secretive efforts to review millions of ballots in Arizona

    May 06 2021

    Though the 2020 presidential election is six months behind us, a review of nearly 2.1 million ballots in Arizona's largest county is currently underway, ordered by the state's Republican-led Senate. Stephanie Sy explores the growing controversy and what it means for our democracy with Tammy Patrick of the non-partisan Democracy Fund. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Robert Gates on US action in Iran, Afghanistan and China

    May 06 2021

    Over 100 days into the Biden administration, how is the president dealing with national security issues? Judy Woodruff explores the question with former Defense Secretary, and former CIA Director, Robert Gates. He served in both Republican and Democratic administrations, and authored "Exercise of Power: American Failures, Successes, and a New Path Forward in the Post-Cold War World." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Waiving the vaccine patent may come down to giving pharmaceutical companies incentives

    May 06 2021

    President Joe Biden has given the initial nod for the U.S. to waive patent rights on COVID vaccines to boost international production. But there are real questions over how effective these moves would be, what other countries feel about it, and when this would translate into action. William Brangham discusses the matter with Rachel Silverman, a policy fellow at the Center for Global Development. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders