Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • NASA looks to return astronauts to the moon

    Jul 20 2019

    Fifty years ago today, astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the surface of the moon. Now, for the first time since the Apollo program ended in 1972, NASA is planning an ambitious launch in 2024 to return astronauts to the moon, and to sustain a human presence there by 2028. Hari Sreenivasan reports from the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

  • NASA opens a new collection of moon rocks to researchers

    Jul 20 2019

    Johnson Space Center in Houston houses more than 2,000 samples collected over six Apollo missions between 1969 and 1972 from various parts of the moon. The collection includes rocks, core samples, pebbles and dust that scientists are still learning from 50 years later. Hari Sreenivasan reports on the laboratory keeping these artifacts safe.

  • This retired astronaut captured hundreds of images in space

    Jul 20 2019

    Retired astronaut Scott Kelly spent a record-setting 340 days on the International Space Station. And while he was there, he took hundreds of photographs that he compiled into a book: "Infinite Wonder: An Astronaut's Photographs From A Year In Space." He spoke with NewsHour Weekend about his experiences in space and the spectacular views of Earth.

  • News Wrap: Trump defends rally supporters, doubles down on Omar attacks

    Jul 19 2019

    In our news wrap Friday, President Trump defended supporters at his North Carolina rally who chanted "Send her back!" about Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., an American citizen who was born in Somalia whom he attacked on Twitter earlier this week. Also, three white supremacists were sentenced to prison for attacking counter-protesters at a 2017 white supremacist rally in Virginia.

  • In U.S.-Iran conflict, Iranian foreign minister asks 'who's being provocative'

    Jul 19 2019

    U.S.-Iran tensions have again escalated, amid reports Iran seized at least one tanker in the strategic Strait of Hormuz, while a U.S. ship apparently shot down an Iranian drone. Judy Woodruff sits down with Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif to discuss which country is "being provocative," how to end the war in Yemen and what Zarif wants the American people to know about the Iranian government.

  • With more extreme heat, air conditioning becomes a matter of life and death

    Jul 19 2019

    According to NASA, last month was the hottest June documented in the past 139 years. And the National Weather Service forecasts record highs, at potentially deadly levels, through the coming weekend. How is climate change related to the extreme heat, and how can individuals and governments prepare for more days of it? William Brangham talks to Astrid Caldas of the Union of Concerned Scientists.

  • As Trump administration pushes for new space exploration, critics question its costs

    Jul 19 2019

    The 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission is being commemorated extensively, including at the White House, where President Trump recognized the crew's two surviving members. Their conversation included discussion of a new push to travel to the far side of the moon and beyond. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien looks at NASA's ambitious agenda and how private companies might achieve it first.

  • On the 2020 campaign trail, Biden and Sanders clash over health care plans

    Jul 19 2019

    On the 2020 campaign trail, former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders are at odds over their respective health care plans, with Biden proposing to build on the existing Affordable Care Act, while Sanders wants to move to a single-payer system. Meanwhile, fundraising numbers for April through June are out, and 20 candidates are preparing for the second debate. Lisa Desjardins reports.

  • Shields and Brooks on Trump's attacks, Biden vs. Sanders on health care

    Jul 19 2019

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's political news, including President Trump's attack on four congresswomen of color, the Republican response to Trump's controversial rhetoric, whether race politics is smart election strategy and the battle over health care policy among 2020 Democrats.

  • What The Black Keys' Dan Auerbach is doing in Nashville

    Jul 19 2019

    The Black Keys debuted its first album in five years at the top of the U.S. charts. But band vocalist and guitarist Dan Auerbach has been making a name for himself in another setting over the past few years. Jeffrey Brown visited him in Nashville to discuss his record label, Easy Eye Sound, the unique vintage studio in which he records and why he believes he's doing what he was meant to do.

  • Former Sen. Jeff Flake on why Republicans aren't disavowing Trump's 'awful' words

    Jul 18 2019

    It's been a tumultuous week in Washington, amid fallout from President Trump's racist attacks on four members of Congress, all women of color. On Thursday, Trump held a rally in North Carolina, where his words -- and the crowd's -- took the controversy to a new level. Former Arizona Senator and CBS Contributor Jeff Flake joins Judy Woodruff to discuss what he calls Trump's "awful" rhetoric and the Republican response.

  • News Wrap: Trump says U.S. ship shot down encroaching Iranian drone

    Jul 18 2019

    In our news wrap Thursday, President Trump said a U.S. warship destroyed an Iranian drone when it came too close to the vessel and ignored warnings to move off. He criticized "Iran's attempt to disrupt freedom of navigation and global commerce." Also, Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan drew fire from Congress over conditions for detained migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • The opioid industry fought hard to keep this database hidden. Here's what it shows

    Jul 18 2019

    Over the past two decades, hundreds of thousands of Americans have died during a national opioid addiction crisis. As the drug manufacturers face a possible legal reckoning from multiple lawsuits, a newly uncovered database sheds more light on the scope of the disaster. William Brangham talks to Scott Higham, an investigative reporter for The Washington Post, about the "jaw-dropping" data.

  • How FaceApp highlights a gap in U.S. privacy protections

    Jul 18 2019

    The growing popularity of FaceApp, a photo filter app that allows users to transform their features by adding or removing wrinkles, is sounding alarm bells among privacy advocates and lawmakers. There are questions about how the images of people's faces could be used, especially as the app's company is based in Russia. Amna Nawaz talks to the Center for Democracy & Technology's Joseph Jerome.

  • Lonnie Bunch on how the Smithsonian can help America understand its identity

    Jul 18 2019

    Lonnie Bunch, founding director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, has just become the 14th head of the Smithsonian Institution -- and its first black leader. He sits down with Judy Woodruff to discuss the challenges facing the world's largest museum and research complex and why the Smithsonian is as much about today and tomorrow as it is about the past.

  • Why small cannabis growers want to produce the Champagne of pot

    Jul 18 2019

    The state government of California is currently developing rules that will define whether a geographic area can be deemed a marijuana growing region. For small farmers, who are threatened by industrial competitors and the cost of regulation, survival may depend on customers caring about the specific location and soil in which their cannabis is grown. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports.

  • Filmmaker RaMell Ross on the black experience in documentary film

    Jul 18 2019

    The documentary "Hale County This Morning, This Evening," about a community in the Alabama Black Belt, received an Academy Award nomination for best documentary earlier this year. RaMell Ross spent more than five years making the film, exploring the South as a black American from the North. He offers his brief but spectacular take on the black experience in documentary film.

  • News Wrap: House Democrats move closer to holding Barr, Ross in contempt

    Jul 17 2019

    In our news wrap Wednesday, House Democrats have moved closer to holding Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress. The two men had refused to provide documents behind the administration's plan to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Meanwhile, Mexican drug kingpin "El Chapo" was sentenced to life in a U.S. prison, without parole.

  • Trump's racist tweets and the 'politics of distraction'

    Jul 17 2019

    President Trump's attacks on women of color in the House have launched fierce debate about whether his meaning was racist. There is no doubt, though, that his words echo threats and insults that have been lobbed against perceived outsiders in America for generations. To explore the painful history, William Brangham talks to the University of Minnesota's Erika Lee and UC-Berkeley's Ian Haney Lopez, the author of "Merge Left."

  • Why Trump thinks this is the moment to resolve Israeli-Palestinian conflict

    Jul 17 2019

    U.S. presidents have long tried, and failed, to resolve the decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In June, President Trump's team unveiled the first part of its peace plan, an economic proposal. The plan's all-important political component is yet to come. Judy Woodruff speaks with Jason Greenblatt, a former Trump real estate lawyer helping lead the U.S. effort, about what's at stake.

  • Where U.S.-Turkey relations stand after dispute over purchase of Russian missiles

    Jul 17 2019

    The White House announced Wednesday that the U.S. will not sell billions of dollars of next-generation fighter planes to Turkey, after the NATO ally purchased advanced Russian surface-to-air missiles. Amna Nawaz talks to Admiral James Stavridis, who served as NATO's top military officer from 2009 to 2013, about what these latest developments mean for U.S.-Turkey relations that were already tense.

  • What Apollo 11 pilot Michael Collins feared most during critical NASA mission

    Jul 17 2019

    This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, which first landed American astronauts on the moon's surface. Of the intrepid crew, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin have tended to dominate public attention, but it was pilot Michael Collins who flew the command module to the moon -- and faced his own distinct concerns about the return trip. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports.

  • How Justice John Paul Stevens hoped to be remembered

    Jul 17 2019

    Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died Tuesday at age 99. Stevens grew up in Chicago, served in the Navy and as a law clerk and worked in private practice before becoming a federal appeals judge in 1970. Five years later, President Gerald Ford nominated Stevens to the Supreme Court, where he remained for 35 years. Judy Woodruff remembers Stevens' legal record and personal legacy.

  • How Trump's controversial tweets are exposing a party divide on race

    Jul 16 2019

    Lawmakers continue to react to racist tweets President Trump posted Sunday about four women of color in the House. So far, most Republicans have defended the president or tried to reframe the conversation as about ideology rather than race, but House Speaker Nancy Pelosi moved to officially condemn Trump's remarks. Lisa Desjardins reports and joins Judy Woodruff to discuss an ongoing divide.

  • News Wrap: Esper criticizes Turkey for purchase of Russian-made air defenses

    Jul 16 2019

    In our news wrap Tuesday, Army Sec. Mark Esper criticized Turkey's purchase of Russian-made air defenses during his Senate confirmation hearing for defense secretary. Esper called the NATO ally's decision "very disappointing." Also, federally funded family planning clinics can no longer refer women for abortions. Courts ruled the administration's referral ban could proceed amid legal challenges.