Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • News Wrap: Russia blasts Senate conclusions on influence campaign

    Dec 18 2018

    In our Tuesday news wrap, a spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin dismissed Senate findings that Russia tried to influence U.S. elections via a sweeping disinformation campaign, calling them “baseless.” Also, after losing to Sen.-Elect Kyrsten Sinema in November, Republican Rep. Martha McSally is appointed to Arizona's other Senate seat, the one long held by Republican Sen. John McCain.

  • Why a federal judge delayed Michael Flynn’s sentencing

    Dec 18 2018

    A federal judge postponed Michael Flynn’s sentencing Tuesday to better enable him to cooperate with the special counsel’s investigation. The judge also told Flynn, "Arguably, you sold your country out." William Brangham asks former Department of Justice official Carrie Cordero about the judge's strong rhetoric, the credibility of Flynn's lawyers' arguments and what the delayed sentencing means.

  • How Trump may have used his charitable foundation for personal and political gain

    Dec 18 2018

    As the New York attorney general investigates allegations of criminal misconduct by the Trump Foundation, the president announced he is shutting it down. The Washington Post’s David Fahrenthold has been reporting on scrutiny of the organization since before the 2016 election, and he joins William Brangham to discuss how the president may have leveraged his charity for personal and political gain.

  • What’s next in the showdown over a government shutdown?

    Dec 18 2018

    In a reversal from its previous demands, the White House is signaling openness to a funding bill that would avoid a government shutdown, even if it doesn't include $5 billion for a border wall. Days before a partial shutdown would take effect, Judy Woodruff talks to Yamiche Alcindor and Politico’s Jake Sherman about the ongoing negotiations and why congressional Democrats are feeling “heartened.”

  • Critical Yemeni port city clings to fragile truce

    Dec 18 2018

    Houthi rebels control the critical Yemeni port of Hodeidah, but they are now encircled by fighters loyal to the country’s internationally recognized government. In the ravaged city, fighting between the two sides continued up until a UN-brokered cease-fire took effect Tuesday. Special correspondent Jane Ferguson obtained rare access to Hodeidah and reports on the fragile situation there.

  • Diphtheria takes a deadly stranglehold on war-torn Yemen

    Dec 18 2018

    Yemen is already suffering from a devastating civil war and widespread hunger. Now, circumstances caused by the conflict have also paved the way for diphtheria to thrive. The airborne disease kills 1 of every 10 patients even with medical treatment--and most victims in Yemen receive too little, too late. Special correspondent Beth Murphy of The GroundTruth Project has one family's tragic story.

  • Do the recommendations from the school safety commission go far enough?

    Dec 18 2018

    Citing a "holistic" approach to school safety, a federal commission led by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has released proposals on student mental health, cyber bullying and discipline. For different perspectives on the report, Amna Nawaz talks to Catherine Lhamon, former assistant secretary for civil rights at the Department of Education, and Jeanne Allen, CEO of Center for Education Reform.

  • How these photographers used a camera to tell stories of rural America

    Dec 18 2018

    Photographers Fred Baldwin and Wendy Watriss traveled and worked abroad for years before meeting in the late 1960s. As a couple, they decided to shift their professional focus to the U.S., and specifically to the rural south. Their imagery documents churches, farms and families, as well as the racial and social tensions of each era. Jeffrey Brown reports on their prolific work and lasting legacy.

  • News Wrap: U.S. airstrikes in Somalia kill 62 members of terrorist group

    Dec 17 2018

    In our news wrap Monday, the U.S. military said that airstrikes over Somalia killed 62 members of the Islamist group al-Shabab and prevented a major terrorist attack. A U.S. air campaign across the horn of Africa has intensified under President Trump. Also, former FBI director James Comey lambasted Republicans for tolerating President Trump’s criticism of the U.S. intelligence community.

  • Sen. Wyden on social media’s ‘excruciatingly slow’ response to Russian interference

    Dec 17 2018

    A Senate intelligence committee has released bipartisan reports exposing further efforts by Russia to influence American elections via social media. Judy Woodruff speaks with committee member Sen. Ron Wyden, R-Ore., about how sophisticated the Russian efforts are, what social media platforms are doing in response and the responsibility that falls to all Americans to scrutinize information.

  • How a global effort could deliver solutions on climate change

    Dec 17 2018

    In Poland, a U.N. climate conference concluded with consensus on several ways to achieve the Paris Agreement's goal of limiting global temperature increases. But with a lack of U.S. support, is the progress enough? Nat Keohane, senior vice president of the Environmental Defense Fund, joins William Brangham to discuss international transparency, renewable energy and "urgency" around climate change.

  • Responding to Ebola in Congo is hard work, but made that much harder by violence

    Dec 17 2018

    Ebola has been reported in a number of locations in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, making the current outbreak the second worst in history. Getting medical care to the sick is complicated by ongoing violence. Nancy Aossey of International Medical Corps speaks with Nick Schifrin about prevention, treatment options and why the health crisis is likely to get worse before it gets better.

  • Why helicopter parenting may jeopardize kids’ health

    Dec 17 2018

    Has protective parenting gone too far? Several high-profile news stories, along with increasing rates of childhood obesity, anxiety and depression, have sparked a movement encouraging parents to allow their children greater freedom. The nonprofit Let Grow is leading the call for what’s known as “free range parenting,” in which kids can just be kids. William Brangham reports.

  • Why invalidating the ACA could cause ‘enormous disruption’ to American health care

    Dec 17 2018

    The day before this year's deadline to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, a judge in Texas ruled the law unconstitutional. As the case makes its way through the appeals process, Amna Nawaz sits down with Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News to discuss who's involved in the legal challenge and the "enormous disruption" that would result from invalidation of the law.

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on administration turnover and political ‘elasticity’

    Dec 17 2018

    NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter from the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss “off-the-charts” levels of staff turnover in the Trump administration, current poll numbers, the role of the president’s core supporters and the early field of Democratic contenders for the 2020 presidential election.

  • A poet’s take on looking to language for ‘radical hope’

    Dec 17 2018

    In this digital and divided society, it can often seem that language is used primarily to deliver criticism and express rage. But poet Ada Limón shares her humble opinion on why she sees people turning to poetry for language that reflects nuance, mystery and even “radical hope.”

  • Marshall Islands: A third of the nation has left for the U.S.

    Dec 16 2018

    A third of the Marshall Islands’ population has moved to the U.S., leaving a country reeling from high unemployment and the looming effects of climate change. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Mike Taibbi reports. This story is part of an ongoing series called "Chasing the Dream," on poverty and opportunity in America, and was funded in part by Pacific Islanders in Communications.

  • How Rukmini Callimachi searches for humanity on the ISIS beat

    Dec 16 2018

    After the international community and local security forces won a series of hard-fought victories against the Islamic State in recent years, ISIS is regrouping in Iraq, Syria, Libya and elsewhere. Rukmini Callimachi, a foreign correspondent for The New York Times who covers ISIS, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss her 10-part podcast “Caliphate” and her search for the militant group's motives.

  • Millions of Americans’ health care under a ‘possible cloud’ after federal court ruling

    Dec 15 2018

    A coalition of states with Democratic leadership is promising to appeal a Texas federal court ruling on Friday that aimed to invalidate the entire Affordable Care Act. The case was brought by a group of Republican state attorneys general and is expected to go to the U.S. Supreme Court. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Jeff Greenfield joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.

  • For decades, Chicago punk rockers embrace their unconventional hobby

    Dec 15 2018

    In Chicago, members of a punk rock band called The Bollweevils have been balancing their conventional day jobs -- as a physician, a principal, an electrician and a college administrator -- with their unconventional hobby for more than two decades. Reporter Jay Shefsky from Chicago PBS Station WTTW has their story.

  • Nils Lofgren: 50 years of ‘just being a guy in the band’

    Dec 15 2018

    As we learned a few years ago in the Oscar-winning film “20 Feet from Stardom,” sometimes the best singers in the band are those who are seldom center-stage. They have the game, just not quite the fame. The same can be said for guitar players as well, including one rock and roll hall-of-famer who is celebrating his golden anniversary in the business. NewsHour Weekend's Tom Casciato has the story.

  • News Wrap: Trump’s inaugural funds reportedly under investigation

    Dec 14 2018

    In our news wrap Friday, federal prosecutors are reportedly in the early stages of investigating potentially illegal contributions to Trump’s inaugural committee, while Michael Cohen spoke out for the first time since being sentenced. Also, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary James Mattis met with their Canadian counterparts to denounce China’s detention of two Canadian citizens.

  • How a 7-year-old migrant girl died while in U.S. detention

    Dec 14 2018

    Attention is being refocused on the U.S. border after news that a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl died in U.S. detention, within hours of being picked up after crossing illegally with her father. Amna Nawaz also briefs William Brangham on the growing number of immigrant children in government shelters.

  • Why Affordable Care Act insurance signups are down

    Dec 14 2018

    With just two days left in most states for people to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, preliminary numbers are showing enrollment down about 12 percent from last year. To explain the drop, John Yang learns more from Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News.

  • New report offers chilling picture of Sandy Hook killer’s troubled mind

    Dec 14 2018

    Six years since the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, a new report from The Hartford Courant paints a chilling picture of the killer, who who struggled with loneliness, disdain for humanity and multiple psychiatric problems. William Brangham talks with reporter Josh Kovner about whether the new revelations could offer lessons for preventing future violence.