Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • Migrant aid workers face arrests and prosecutions

    Nov 10 2019

    More than 3,000 undocumented migrants have died in Arizona during the last 20 years while trying to cross into the U.S. from Mexico, spurring the formation of aid groups along the border that aim to prevent the humanitarian crisis. Now, some aid workers are facing criminal charges due to renewed enforcement of harboring laws that say good Samaritans are breaking the law. Ivette Feliciano reports.

  • What to look for in this week's impeachment inquiry

    Nov 10 2019

    Three officials will testify this week as the impeachment inquiry enters a new phase with public hearings. House Republicans on Saturday submitted their wishlist of witnesses which included Hunter Biden and the whistleblower -- both names ruled out by the Democrats. NewsHour's Lisa Desjardin joins Megan Thompson to discuss the latest.

  • Graham Nash mines his catalog for some personal performances

    Nov 09 2019

    Two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Graham Nash has hits aplenty spanning his nearly six-decade career. But the 77-year-old singer-songwriter recently chose to perform a special run of shows featuring his lesser-known first two solo albums in their entirety, which together describe a crucial chapter in his personal and artistic life. Tom Casciato recently spoke to Nash to learn more.

  • Paradise rebuilds a year after the Camp Fire

    Nov 09 2019

    Residents and officials in Paradise, California on Friday marked the one-year anniversary of the Camp Fire that devastated the Northern California community and killed 85 people. San Francisco Chronicle reporter Lizzie Johnson joins Megan Thompson for the latest on the rebuilding efforts and how the residents are coping.

  • Tidying guru Marie Kondo: kids can learn her methods, too

    Nov 09 2019

    Celebrity decluttering expert Marie Kondo has gained millions of fans with her famous folding techniques and advice to keep only things that "spark joy." This past week, she put out her first children's book, "Kiki and Jax: The Life-Changing Magic of Friendship." Kondo says she believes children as young as age one can start learning about her methods. NewsHour Weekend's Megan Thompson reports.

  • How Mick Mulvaney plays into the Ukraine impeachment inquiry saga

    Nov 08 2019

    House committees involved in the impeachment inquiry have released nearly 2700 pages of closed-door deposition transcripts. Many of the officials interviewed echoed the whistleblower's concerns about President Trump's policy toward Ukraine. Trump, meanwhile, renewed claims that the whistleblower was guilty of wrongdoing. Lisa Desjardins reports and joins Nick Schifrin and Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • News Wrap: Anonymous official's book says Trump is unfit to lead

    Nov 08 2019

    In our news wrap Friday, a new book by an anonymous administration official claims senior officials considered resigning last year in protest of an unfit president with "trouble synthesizing information." The White House has dismissed the book as lies. Also, the leading Shiite cleric in Iraq, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, appealed for the government to stop using violence against protesters.

  • Why German divisions remain, 30 years after fall of the Berlin Wall

    Nov 08 2019

    It's been 30 years since one of the 20th century's biggest historic events: the fall of the Berlin Wall. Although the East German dictatorship subsequently collapsed, cultural and political divisions remain, more than a generation after reunification. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports on the wall's legacy, the polarizing issue of immigration and the lingering stain of anti-Semitism.

  • Shields and Brooks on public impeachment hearings, Kentucky election results

    Nov 08 2019

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's political news, including the impact of released impeachment inquiry transcripts, what we might learn from the upcoming public hearings, the possible entry of Michael Bloomberg into the 2020 presidential race and results from state elections in Kentucky, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

  • Scott Aukerman's Brief But Spectacular take on 'Between Two Ferns'

    Nov 08 2019

    Scott Aukerman helped launch one of the internet's most popular talk show spoofs, "Between Two Ferns." He explains the unexpected origin of the program, what his goal is with interviewing celebrities and how it feels to play an entertaining buffoon -- but don't take anything he says too seriously. Aukerman shares his brief but spectacular take on his life in comedy.

  • Blockbuster da Vinci exhibition showcases the master's 'endless curiosity'

    Nov 08 2019

    The blockbuster exhibit of the year celebrates Leonardo da Vinci, 500 years after his death. People are flocking to the Louvre Museum in Paris to see the work of the master, who was born in Italy, died in France and personified the expression Renaissance man. Jeffrey Brown went to see firsthand why da Vinci's art is drawing massive crowds.

  • News Wrap: Trump Foundation ordered to settle lawsuit for $2 million

    Nov 07 2019

    In our news wrap Thursday, a state judge in New York ordered President Trump to pay $2 million to settle a lawsuit alleging he funneled money from his charitable foundation to his 2016 presidential campaign. The Trump Foundation denied wrongdoing but has closed its doors and will disburse remaining funds to other nonprofits. Also, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo accused Iran of "nuclear extortion."

  • What diplomat George Kent said about Rudy Giuliani -- and Hunter Biden

    Nov 07 2019

    In his impeachment inquiry testimony, career State Department official George Kent alleged that Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's personal attorney, sought to manipulate U.S. policy on Ukraine and oust former Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. Kent also said he had expressed concern over Hunter Biden's position on the board of a Ukrainian energy company in 2015. Nick Schifrin talks to Judy Woodruff.

  • How the Saudi government may have used Twitter to target dissidents in the U.S.

    Nov 07 2019

    The Department of Justice alleges that the government of Saudi Arabia is surveilling people living in the United States -- by leveraging Twitter. Specifically, the indictment charges that a Saudi official is recruiting Twitter employees to share personal details of critics of the Saudi government, so that those dissidents can be targeted for persecution. Nick Schifrin talks to Judy Woodruff.

  • Could selling PG&E to its customers help solve California's power problems?

    Nov 07 2019

    During California's recent wildfires, the intentional blackouts PG&E implemented to reduce danger frustrated residents. The utility's poorly maintained infrastructure is blamed for at least five previous fires. Now, the mayors of over a dozen California cities are suggesting PG&E should be sold to its customers. William Brangham talks to San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, who first proposed the plan.

  • Amid roiling health care debate, the share of uninsured Americans is growing

    Nov 07 2019

    Health care is a top 2020 political issue. Democratic candidates are debating whether to build upon the Affordable Care Act, or 'Obamacare,' or replace it with Medicare for All. Meanwhile, President Trump wants to dismantle the ACA entirely. As millions of Americans enter the time of year when they choose their health plans, Amna Nawaz gets the latest from Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times.

  • A father took an at-home DNA test. His son was then falsely accused of murder

    Nov 07 2019

    Genetic genealogy, the technique millions of people are using to learn about their family history, has now become a potent tool with which law enforcement can solve crimes. But the method has major privacy implications that are prompting some critics to urge that we slow down in our adoption of it. William Brangham shares a "cautionary tale" of how one person's DNA testing can have a wide impact.

  • What's behind extreme air pollution in India

    Nov 07 2019

    A toxic brew lingers in the skies over India, created by everything from agricultural burning to industrial pollution. Cars are also a major contributor, with roughly 1400 vehicles added to the roads daily. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro examined this problem roughly two years ago and returns with this update on the cultural and economic challenges of making Indian air safer to breathe.

  • Why Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line to fight climate change

    Nov 07 2019

    Jane Fonda has been a household name for decades due to her prolific acting career, both on-screen and on stage. She has also drawn sustained attention for her enduring -- and sometimes controversial -- activism. Judy Woodruff sits down with Fonda to discuss her climate advocacy, what it's like to spend a night in a D.C. jail and how young activists like Greta Thunberg are shaping a new movement.

  • The nationwide trends Tuesday's off-year election results reinforced

    Nov 06 2019

    Tuesday's election outcomes represented successes and failures for both parties. In Kentucky, Democrat Andy Beshear beat Republican Gov. Matt Bevin by a very slim margin, while Mississippi elected a Republican governor. And Virginia voters put both houses of the state's legislature under Democratic control. Amna Nawaz reports and Judy Woodruff speaks with the University of Virginia's Kyle Kondik.

  • News Wrap: Mexico still looking for gunmen who killed 9 Americans

    Nov 06 2019

    In our news wrap Wednesday, authorities in northern Mexico are still hunting for the drug cartel gunmen who killed nine Americans, including six children, in a brutal ambush on Monday. Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador insisted the attacks would not go unpunished. Also, federal prosecutors accused Roger Stone, a longtime confidant of the president, of repeatedly lying to Congress.

  • Why William Taylor's testimony is central to the impeachment inquiry

    Nov 06 2019

    House committees involved in the impeachment inquiry said Wednesday that the investigation will go public next week, with senior State Department officials scheduled for open hearings beginning November 13th. Meanwhile, Amb. William Taylor's deposition transcript illuminates why U.S. military aid to Ukraine was withheld. Nick Schifrin reports and talks to Yamiche Alcindor and Lisa Desjardins.

  • Pete Buttigieg on election results, paying for health care and bringing America together

    Nov 06 2019

    Recent polls in early voting states show Pete Buttigieg's popularity surging among Democratic voters. The mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is now in the top tier of candidates vying for the chance to challenge President Trump in the 2020 presidential election. But with that growing support comes rising scrutiny. Judy Woodruff talks to Buttigieg about health care, taxes and uniting a divided country.

  • How at-home DNA tests helped solve this 30-year-old murder

    Nov 06 2019

    In 2019, American law enforcement agencies have identified over 70 suspects using a new technique called genetic genealogy, which California detectives leveraged in 2018 to identify the Golden State Killer. In the first of a two-part series, William Brangham shares the story of the first genetic genealogy case to go to trial -- and how the science behind it solved a 32-year-old double murder.

  • In Missouri, why relying on a public defender can mean you slip through the cracks

    Nov 06 2019

    A new podcast from the NewsHour examines the public defender system in the United States -- and the enormous gaps and problems that undermine its effectiveness. Amna Nawaz and producer Frank Carlson reported from Missouri for this five-part series, and they join Judy Woodruff to discuss the heartbreaking stories they heard and what the flawed system says about American criminal justice.