Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • U.S. restrictions on movement likely to persist as death toll tops China's

    Mar 31 2020

    The U.S. death toll from novel coronavirus has now exceeded that of China. While Italy and Spain have recorded many more deaths, the U.S. has the most confirmed cases of the illness. Dozens of states have limited residents' movement outside their homes. And in New York, the national epicenter of the outbreak, a convention center has been converted into an overflow hospital. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • News Wrap: Dow Jones concludes worst quarter since 1987

    Mar 31 2020

    In our news wrap Tuesday, Wall Street ended a brutal first quarter with fresh losses. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 23 percent during the first three months of 2020 -- the largest percentage decline since 1987. Also, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell claimed that President Trump's impeachment trial earlier this year diverted government attention from the looming coronavirus crisis.

  • Amid economic crisis, food banks are struggling to keep all the newly hungry fed

    Mar 31 2020

    With unemployment soaring, the COVID-19 outbreak is taking a staggering toll on workers. Food banks are ramping up their services to meet the rising demand, even as donations, volunteers and supplies are limited. Meanwhile, organizations worry about keeping their own workers safe from the virus. Stephanie Sy reports as part of our Chasing the Dream series on poverty and opportunity in America.

  • How learning changes when school happens at home and online

    Mar 31 2020

    More than 55 million American students are staying home amid the coronavirus pandemic. The impacts are huge -- affecting students, parents and teachers. Learning is happening with a host of new challenges. Kate Gardoqui of the Great Schools Partnership joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • Why scientists need to learn more about how COVID-19 behaves within a human body

    Mar 31 2020

    How much do we know about COVID-19, the virus spreading misery across the globe? Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss understanding the dynamics of the virus within people it has infected, why some experience much more severe forms of illness than others, how we can limit asymptomatic transmission and the need to buy medical researchers time to develop treatments.

  • Why Trump wants to relax automotive fuel efficiency standards now

    Mar 31 2020

    The Trump administration wants to roll back another federal regulation intended to reduce global warming. Obama-era automobile fuel efficiency rules require U.S. vehicles to increase mileage standards by an average of 5 percent per year from 2021 through 2026. Tuesday's move would reduce the improvement threshold to 1.5 percent. The Washington Post's Juliet Eilperin joins John Yang to discuss.

  • Trump warns of more 'very tough' days ahead as death toll passes that of 9/11

    Mar 31 2020

    President Trump's Coronavirus Task Force held a briefing Tuesday evening to provide an update on the U.S. fight against COVID-19. The tone at the news conference was sober, as Trump urged Americans to prepare for a "very tough" period ahead. Yamiche Alcindor joins Judy Woodruff to discuss how Trump's pandemic messaging has evolved and what might be in the next piece of crisis legislation.

  • U.S. Navy says it won't evacuate ship housing infected sailors

    Mar 31 2020

    The USS Theodore Roosevelt, a Pacific-based aircraft carrier, is facing its own outbreak of the novel coronavirus. With several sailors testing positive, the ship's captain made the extraordinary request for it to be almost entirely evacuated. But the admiral in charge of the U.S. Pacific Fleet says that maintaining military readiness comes first. Nick Schifrin joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • 'Inheritance' author Dani Shapiro answers your questions

    Mar 31 2020

  • Astronaut Christina Koch on women in space and 11 months without gravity

    Mar 31 2020

    For nearly a year, astronaut Christina Koch was away from the planet, working on the International Space Station and orbiting Earth more than 5,200 times. Her mission was the longest continuous spaceflight by a woman and the second longest for any U.S. astronaut ever. Koch joins Amna Nawaz to discuss how her body reacted to 11 months without gravity and what it means to see more women in space.

  • More U.S. states lock populations down as COVID-19 cases climb

    Mar 30 2020

    The coronavirus pandemic keeps burning through the U.S. population. The country now has 160,000 confirmed cases of the illness and 2,900 deaths -- and infections are still rising. In New York state, the nation's worst hot spot, Gov. Andrew Cuomo continues to appeal for outside help. But health care systems across the country are straining to support the surge in patients. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • Why the U.S. is still 'severely constrained' in ability to test for COVID-19

    Mar 30 2020

    Despite recent signs of advancement, many health experts say the U.S. capacity to test for the novel coronavirus remains too limited and progress too slow. President Trump has previously claimed anyone could be tested -- but that isn't what we're hearing from people who have tried. Jennifer Nuzzo, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • 'Everyone is afraid' as Illinois virus cases spike

    Mar 30 2020

    Illinois has become another national hot spot for coronavirus, with a surging number of confirmed cases. Most are in Cook County, the region that is home to Chicago. William Brangham talks to Dr. Claudia Fegan, chief medical officer for Cook County Health, about how her employees are holding up amid the stress and why they continue to worry about a shortage of critical medical supplies.

  • At Greek refugee camp, there are few defenses against COVID-19 threat

    Mar 30 2020

    Human rights activists and medical nonprofits are calling on the Greek government to evacuate overcrowded refugee camps on islands in the Aegean Sea, where an outbreak of COVID-19 would likely cause humanitarian catastrophe. Concerns are especially grave regarding Moria camp on the island of Lesbos. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.

  • News Wrap: Van Gogh painting stolen from Dutch museum

    Mar 30 2020

    In our news wrap Monday, police in the Netherlands are searching for a Vincent van Gogh painting, "The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring (1884)." Investigators say thieves stole the artwork from the Singer Laren museum east of Amsterdam after breaking in by smashing a glass door. Also, Afghanistan began releasing some 10,000 prisoners; members of the Taliban were not among them.

  • As more people order delivery, workers fear virus exposure

    Mar 30 2020

    More than 250 million Americans in 30 states have been asked or ordered to stay at home. Although some still buy essentials in person at stores, many are ordering online instead. As a result, warehouse and delivery workers and professional shoppers have become central to the current economy -- and a growing number are concerned about the risks they face by doing their jobs. Paul Solman reports.

  • Trump bristles amid questions about testing, states' supply requests

    Mar 30 2020

    President Trump's Coronavirus Task Force held a briefing Monday evening on the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Yamiche Alcindor was there, and she joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Trump's latest update on virus testing as well as an exchange she had with the president on Sunday regarding states' requests for more medical supplies.

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on how voters think Trump is handling COVID-19

    Mar 30 2020

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including how President Trump's approval ratings have changed amid the coronavirus pandemic, the tendency of American voters to rally around leaders during a crisis and what these unprecedented circumstances mean for the 2020 presidential election.

  • The particular pain of losing a loved one during quarantine

    Mar 30 2020

    The quarantine orders that define the current moment are changing nearly everything about American life. For families facing loss, that means an inability to gather and grieve as they normally would -- even if coronavirus is not the specific cause of death. Gail Grzybowski of Milwaukee PBS shares her family's experience of coping during this extraordinary time.

  • How Mexico City became a global center for contemporary art

    Mar 30 2020

    Mexico is a country where violence often dominates headlines. But in recent years, its capital has experienced something of a contemporary arts boom. Mexico City's annual Zona Maco festival has grown to become Latin America's largest art fair -- and a global center of creative culture. Jeffrey Brown reports on how the impact of Mexico's artistic surge can be felt far beyond museums.

  • How the outbreak's economic disruption is impacting renters

    Mar 29 2020

    There are 44 million households that are renting in the U.S., but even before the massive economic disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic many were already stretching their budgets to afford housing. But what will happen to them now? Hari Sreenivasan spoke with Jenny Schuetz, a housing economist at the Brookings Institution, to learn more.

  • Incarcerated people face potential disaster during outbreak

    Mar 29 2020

    With more than 2 million prisoners held in thousands of detention centers across the U.S., advocates for the incarcerated have been sounding the alarm about the dangers posed to this vulnerable population during the current pandemic. Ivette Feliciano spoke with lawyers, activists and families with loved ones in prison, who say detention centers are the perfect breeding ground for the outbreak.

  • Giving birth in the epicenter of the pandemic

    Mar 29 2020

    Thousands of women in the U.S. have given birth over the last month, many in the very hospitals where medical professionals have been preparing for an onslaught of patients stricken with COVID-19. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Karla Murthy spoke with one woman living in New York City about her recent experience giving birth amid the pandemic.

  • How prison has shaped one artist's view on social distancing

    Mar 29 2020

    Millions of Americans across the country are now staying inside due to the pandemic. That includes artist Fulton Leroy Washington, who became known as "Mr. Wash" while serving 21 years in prison for a non-violent drug offense. NewsHour Weekend's Christopher Booker spoke with Washington about why his time being incarcerated allows him to see social distancing differently than many Americans.

  • Pandemic intensifies universal health care conversation

    Mar 28 2020

    More than 3 million Americans last week filed for unemployment benefits. Many who lost their jobs may now have to go without health insurance as well. And with a growing pandemic, the national conversation about universal health care is intensifying. Hari Sreenivasan spoke about with Sara Collins, vice president for health care coverage and access at the Commonwealth Fund, to learn more.