Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS ...more

Episodes

  • As the U.S. COVID-19 death toll borders 200K, what have we learned?

    Sep 20 2020

    The COVID-19 death toll in the U.S. is nearing the 200,000 mark, according to Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Research Center. Even though the death rate is lower than it was in the spring, 850 people on average are dying every day of the disease in the country, according to the New York Times. ProPublica reporter Caroline Chen joins to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Battle for Iowa heats up over rural issues

    Sep 20 2020

    Iowa, a competitive purple state which has leaned blue, voted for President Trump in 2016 by a big margin. This election, the Biden campaign has managed to narrow that lead, making the state a toss-up. Iowa PBS Senior Producer and Director Andrew Batt joins Hari Sreenivasan from Des Moines to discuss the race in the state as part of our ongoing series, "Roads to Election 2020." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • For Illinois voters, COVID-19 and recession are top of mind

    Sep 20 2020

    This November, Illinois will be going to the polls for the presidential, Senate and other local races, resulting in several competing ideologies on both sides of the political divide. At the national level, urban voters, especially in Chicago support Biden while President Trump has support among rural voters. WTTW News Director Hugo Balta joins to discuss how COVID-19 is impacting the races there. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Weeks after a derecho hit, Eastern Iowa is still struggling

    Sep 20 2020

    Eastern Iowa is reeling a month after a rare windstorm called a derecho devastated the region, destroying hundreds of homes and half a million acres of corn. Newshour Weekend's Christopher Booker reports on the financial burden of the derecho, made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • After RBG's death, a partisan battle over SCOTUS seat

    Sep 20 2020

    President Trump announced he intends to nominate a woman for Justice Ginsburg's seat and several Republican Senators, who in 2016 opposed filling a SCOTUS seat in an election year, are supporting a vote. The contentious issue of the SCOTUS seat, which helped the Trump campaign in 2016, has galvanized the liberal base six weeks before the election. Jeff Greenfield joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Justice Ginsburg leaves a legacy of fighting for equal rights

    Sep 19 2020

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg became the second woman to serve on the Supreme Court, a position she held for 27 years. Marcia Coyle, Chief Washington Correspondent for The National Law Journal and Amy Howe, Co-Founder of SCOTUSblog joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss Justice Ginsburg's long storied career and her fight for equal rights. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • 'She really didn't give up': Remembering the life and career of RBG

    Sep 19 2020

    Nina Totenberg, NPR's correspondent for legal affairs, first met Justice Ruth Bader Ginberg over the phone nearly 50 years ago, beginning a professional relationship, which eventually morphed into a close friendship. In a conversation with Hari Sreenivasan, Totenberg shares anecdotes about their bond and what she learned about life, law and even death from Justice Ginsburg. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg to be immortalized with statue in Brooklyn, NYC

    Sep 19 2020

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's legacy began in Flatbush, Brooklyn in New York where she was born and raised. On Saturday, New York Gov. Cuomo announced that a statue honoring her contribution will be built in the NYC borough. NewsHour Weekend Correspondent Ivette Feliciano joins Hari Sreenivasan from outside Ginsburg's childhood home. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Remembering Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, dead at 87

    Sep 19 2020

    Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who long stood for women's rights issues and became the court's second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington. She died at the age of 87 of complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Biden, Trump campaign in Minnesota as its early voting period begins

    Sep 18 2020

    The presidential campaign spotlight is on Minnesota Friday, with both Joe Biden and President Trump visiting a state that has become a new battleground -- and is one of the first in the country to begin early voting. Minneapolis officials say they're working to ensure a safe process for poll workers and voters alike. Meanwhile, the candidates' war of words is escalating. Lisa Desjardins reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: CDC rescinds guidance about not testing asymptomatic people

    Sep 18 2020

    In our news wrap Friday, the CDC rescinded guidance that discouraged coronavirus testing for people who have no symptoms. The New York Times reported officials at the Department of Health and Human Services had posted the language on the CDC website over scientists' objections. Also, China stepped up military drills near Taiwan, in a major show of force against a U.S. envoy's visit to Taipei. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How northern Minnesota went from Democratic stronghold to battleground

    Sep 18 2020

    President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden campaigned Friday in Minnesota -- a state Trump lost narrowly in 2016. They both visited the state's northern region, where voters are expressing concern over the economy, racial unrest and health care. Known as the "Iron Range," it was a Democratic stronghold but has moved right in recent years. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What Trump administration ban means for users of TikTok and WeChat

    Sep 18 2020

    The Trump administration is going ahead with plans to ban two popular Chinese social media apps. Starting Sunday, Americans will no longer be able to download TikTok or WeChat from Apple or Google app stores, although current versions of TikTok will still be usable. What are the concerns motivating the policy? Nick Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED Magazine, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Can Afghanistan-Taliban talks end America's longest war?

    Sep 18 2020

    The United States will soon enter its 20th year of fighting in Afghanistan. Nearly 3,600 American troops have died there, as well as hundreds of thousands of Afghans. But Afghanistan was at war decades before the U.S. invaded after 9/11. Can newly begun talks between the country's government and Taliban insurgents, brokered by the U.S., finally usher in an era of peace? Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Shields and Brooks on politics in science, Biden's working-class outreach

    Sep 18 2020

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including President Trump's vaccine rhetoric, the administration's political manipulation of science, Joe Biden's campaign message for working-class voters and Trump's approach to U.S. history education. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Remembering 5 victims of the coronavirus pandemic

    Sep 18 2020

    This Friday represents the 23rd in which we have paid tribute to casualties of the coronavirus pandemic. As the U.S. approaches another sad threshold -- that of 200,000 deaths from COVID-19 -- we remember five more of those lost. Judy Woodruff has their stories. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Medical professionals turn to music making as a tonic

    Sep 18 2020

    Where do healers find comfort? For some U.S. doctors and caregivers, the answer is in music. Jeffrey Brown went to Newton, Massachusetts, recently to see how medical professionals are regenerating their spirits -- and becoming better providers in the process. It's part of our ongoing arts and culture coverage, Canvas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • As Wray warns of Russian election meddling, Trump makes false claims about vote by mail

    Sep 17 2020

    With about six weeks remaining until Election Day, the security of elections and mail-in ballots were part of an ongoing, contentious debate Thursday. President Trump kept up his continued, unfounded attacks on mail-in voting as a threat to the election, while FBI Director Christopher Wray testified that ongoing Russian disinformation campaigns are the real danger. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • After Hurricane Sally, Gulf Coast residents face flooding, power outages

    Sep 17 2020

    The remnants of Hurricane Sally are moving east, still pouring rain onto parts of the Southeast. In the storm's wake, heavy flooding along the Gulf Coast is keeping rescuers busy, while others begin the work of cleaning up. Hundreds of thousands of people in Alabama and Florida are without power. John Yang reports on how residents are coping with the storm's trail of destruction. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: New York City delays in-person schooling again

    Sep 17 2020

    In our news wrap Thursday, New York City has again postponed in-person schooling for more than 1 million students. Mayor Bill de Blasio made the announcement, saying schools need more time to implement the "gold standard" in COVID-19 protocols. Also, smoke over parts of the fire-ravaged West Coast cleared some for the first time in days. Crews hope scattered weekend rain will help douse flames. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Is the U.S. government paying twice for coronavirus vaccine?

    Sep 17 2020

    COVID-19 vaccine development continues to be the subject of political jostling, with President Trump contradicting top U.S. health officials regarding timeline and efficacy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they expect to distribute vaccines publicly at no cost to the patient. But what will the government pay, and how much could drug companies profit? Paul Solman reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Bob Woodward: This is among 'the saddest, most disturbing chapters in American history'

    Sep 17 2020

    Recent reporting from veteran journalist Bob Woodward of The Washington Post created political shockwaves. Woodward's newest book, "Rage," features 18 on-the-record interviews and recordings of President Trump talking about topics from his handling of the pandemic to racial injustice. Woodward joins Judy Woodruff to discuss what he learned from the process about Trump's mindset and motives. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Venezuela's humanitarian crisis has only worsened under COVID-19

    Sep 17 2020

    In Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has presided over an economic and societal collapse. The country's health care system was already coming apart even before the coronavirus pandemic struck. Now, COVID-19 patients are filling ICUs that lack supplies, and doctors are dying. But criticism of the government's pandemic response is grounds for arrest. Special correspondent Marcia Biggs reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Gehry-designed Eisenhower Memorial unveiled after 20 years -- during a fraught moment

    Sep 17 2020

    A new memorial is being dedicated in Washington, D.C., to President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who also served as the supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe during World War II. The four-acre memorial comes to fruition after 20 years and internal controversy over its design -- and at a time when memorials are being examined. Jeffrey Brown reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What Trump is saying about 1619 Project, teaching U.S. history

    Sep 17 2020

    Speaking at the White House Conference on American History on Thursday, President Trump announced he would be signing an executive order to create the "1776 Commission" to promote a "patriotic education." Trump also blasted efforts to reexamine American history with a deeper emphasis on slavery and racism. Yamiche Alcindor joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Trump's perspective on race. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders