Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS ...more

Episodes

  • News Wrap: Istanbul trial begins for Saudi suspects in Khashoggi murder

    Jul 03 2020

    In our news wrap Friday, a trial is underway in Istanbul for 20 Saudis charged in the October 2018 slaying of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. None of the accused were in court, as Saudi Arabia rejected demands for their extradition. Also, Ethiopia's prime minister called out protesters for refusing to end a week of violent unrest following the shooting death of singer Hachalu Hundessa. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Major U.S. cities struggle to keep residents compliant as virus surges

    Jul 03 2020

    As the Fourth of July approaches, coronavirus cases are rising across the country, with businesses and public spaces again closing down as a result. Where does the U.S. stand in terms of managing this public health crisis? Judy Woodruff talks to top elected officials of two major metropolitan areas: Judge Lina Hidalgo of Harris County, Texas, and Mayor Carlos Gimenez of Miami-Dade County, Florida. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Why this pro-democracy Hong Kong activist decided to flee his home

    Jul 03 2020

    The reverberations from China's new national security law, which restricts freedom of speech in Hong Kong, continue. Nathan Law is a prominent pro-democracy activist who fled Hong Kong after the crackdown. He joins Nick Schifrin to discuss what protesters on the ground need from the international community, whether he has hope for Hong Kong's future and the challenge of deciding to leave his home. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How advertiser boycott could yield 'watershed moment' for Facebook

    Jul 03 2020

    Facebook is under increasing pressure to regulate and remove extremist and hateful content from its platform. Several major corporations have pledged to stop buying ads on the social media site during July unless the company acts. With advertising comprising 98 percent of Facebook's revenue, its share value has already dropped. But will the boycott effect major change? Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • A tipping point for Washington, D.C., football team's name

    Jul 03 2020

    A decades-old controversy over the name of the Washington, D.C., football team has reached a tipping point. After years of public outcry condemning the name as a racial slur aimed at Native Americans, the organization is finally considering a change. Amna Nawaz reports and talks to Washington Post columnist Kevin Blackistone, who is producing a documentary on Native American mascots in sports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart on coronavirus failures, anti-Trump Republicans

    Jul 03 2020

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to analyze the latest news, including the possibility that the Washington Redskins will change their name amid growing pressure for racial justice, the failures that have driven a massive surge of coronavirus and Republicans who oppose the president. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • A book that teaches children 'Why We Stay Home'

    Jul 03 2020

    The uncertainty of the coronavirus pandemic has upended the daily lives of children across the globe, leaving parents and caregivers struggling to explain the changes. Two medical students in California say their desire to help bridge that gap in understanding inspired them to write a free children's book, titled "Why We Stay Home." Authors Samantha Harris and Devon Scott share their story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • In memory of 5 more U.S. victims of the coronavirus

    Jul 03 2020

    We remember five more victims of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, including a beloved Virginia postal carrier, a Holocaust survivor and a 35-year-old DNA scientist. Judy Woodruff has their stories. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: U.S. sees record 50,000 new virus cases in a single day

    Jul 02 2020

    In our news wrap Thursday, the U.S. saw a record 50,000 new cases of COVID-19 in a single day as infections rise in 40 states. Florida set its own record for new cases with more than 10,000 -- but Gov. Ron DeSantis insisted the state is equipped to handle the crisis. Also, there were signs of U.S. economic recovery, with the Labor Department reporting the country added 4.8 million jobs in June. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Economist Paul Romer: To save American jobs, we must bring virus to 'screeching halt'

    Jul 02 2020

    The Labor Department's June jobs report seems to reflect a strengthening economy. After all, businesses across the country reopened during that month. But now coronavirus cases are soaring, raising questions about how we can have a functioning U.S. economy without adding fuel to the raging pandemic. Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Romer joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the dilemma. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • With Hong Kong crackdown, Xi Jinping signals he'll pay a high price for power

    Jul 02 2020

    Hong Kong is reeling from the impact of a new national security law imposed by the central government in Beijing. After nearly 25 years of relative freedom, residents are confronting a new reality in the semi-autonomous city. And the change has major implications for U.S. foreign policy. Nick Schifrin talks to Susan Shirk, a top State Department official for Asia during the Clinton administration. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Trump insists on using racist language. Will that approach win him support?

    Jul 02 2020

    At a moment the U.S. is facing crises on multiple fronts, President Trump continues to use language that sparks controversy and highlights the nation's racial divides. He recently retweeted a video of a man chanting "white power" at a Florida retirement community and still refers to the novel coronavirus as "kung flu." Yamiche Alcindor reports on Trump's habit of stoking American culture wars. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How American voters view Trump's handling of racial unrest and COVID-19

    Jul 02 2020

    President Trump is campaigning for reelection as the U.S. faces a challenging moment. To analyze how his rhetoric on race and his response to coronavirus are resonating across the country, Yamiche Alcindor talks to Chris Buskirk of the website and journal American Greatness and Cynthia Tucker, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and journalist-in-residence at the University of South Alabama. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Arrest of Ghislaine Maxwell yields another twist for saga of Jeffrey Epstein

    Jul 02 2020

    The child sex abuse case against disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein has taken a new turn with the arrest of his longtime companion and confidante, Ghislaine Maxwell. Epstein killed himself in jail in August 2019. Now, survivors of his abuse may be able to face Maxwell, charged with recruiting and grooming underage girls, in court instead. John Yang talks to the Miami Herald's Ben Wieder. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How the pandemic is reshaping American manufacturing

    Jul 02 2020

    Long before the coronavirus pandemic, manufacturing in the U.S. was transformed -- and with it, daily life. Now COVID-19 is delivering a new blow to the industry. But some companies are pivoting to create the personal protective equipment that the U.S. had previously outsourced overseas. Paul Solman reports on how a family textile business nearly 200 years old is adapting to this latest challenge. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • An electrical line worker's Brief But Spectacular take on empowering her community

    Jul 02 2020

    During the pandemic, we've profiled front-line workers whose jobs have been deemed essential. One such employee is Savoya Taylor, a line-worker for ComEd, the utility that powers Chicago. She's the company's first female overhead electrician -- and now she's training one of her daughters to follow the same path. Taylor shares her Brief But Spectacular take on empowering her family and community. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Businesses struggle to adjust to quickly changing reopening plans

    Jul 01 2020

    The U.S. epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic has shifted to the South and West, where cases have ballooned to record highs. At least 14 states are now pausing their reopening plans or moving back toward lockdown, and the national death toll from the disease has topped 127,000. Still, the majority of states are continuing to lift their restrictions on movement and activities. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Seattle police clear 'occupied zone' after violence

    Jul 01 2020

    In our news wrap Wednesday, Seattle police cleared protesters from a so-called "occupied zone" near the city's downtown. Violence had flared there recently, with two people killed and six others wounded in shootings. Also, lawmakers in New York City agreed to shift $1 billion in police funding to education and social service programs. Mayor Bill de Blasio called the move "the right balance." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Russian voters appear to approve constitutional changes that could extend Putin's reign

    Jul 01 2020

    Initial results from Russia's election indicate it will pave the way for President Vladimir Putin to retain power until 2036. Polls closed Wednesday after seven days of voting on a package of constitutional changes, including those that could allow Putin two more terms in office. But election monitors say the contest has been neither free nor fair. Special correspondent Lucy Taylor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Why kids should be in the classroom this fall -- and how to keep them safe there

    Jul 01 2020

    Millions of children and parents are desperate to know what the fall might look like in terms of school. Recently, a group of public health and pediatrics experts made the case that kids need to be in the classroom and not at home. William Brangham reports and talks to Sean O'Leary of the American Academy of Pediatrics about strategies for mitigating the risk of coronavirus spread in schools. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Hong Kong residents mull whether to leave amid Beijing's crackdown

    Jul 01 2020

    In Hong Kong, a new set of national security laws imposed by the central government in Beijing has gone into effect. The legislation restricts many freedoms enjoyed in the semi-autonomous territory, ushering in a new and ominous era for the previously freewheeling hub of international business. On the 23rd anniversary of the city's handover from the United Kingdom to China, Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Pramila Jayapal on her path to Congress and creating political change

    Jul 01 2020

    Rep. Pramila Jayapal, a Democrat from Washington state, was elected to Congress in 2016. She is the co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus and has become a leader in pushing the party on issues such as Medicare for All. Now Jayapal has a new book out, titled "Use the Power You Have: A Brown Woman's Guide to Politics and Political Change." She joins Judy Woodruff to discuss her story. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How doctors are innovating to treat COVID-19

    Jul 01 2020

    One of the reasons COVID-19 presents such a significant global medical challenge is that there are few effective therapies for it so far. As cases fill hospital beds across many parts of the country, doctors and scientists are coming up with inventive ways to treat the disease, if not to cure it. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Reasons for hope amid America's racial unrest

    Jul 01 2020

    As the United States grapples with the novel coronavirus, nationwide protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd insist the country must confront a second epidemic: racism. Despite a longstanding belief that we are a nation divided, some say there are reasons for hope. Special correspondent Charlayne Hunter-Gault talks to New York Times columnist and author David Brooks for Race Matters. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Author Lauren Wilkinson answers your questions about 'American Spy'

    Jul 01 2020

    Lauren Wilkinson, author of our June pick for the NewsHour-New York Times book club, Now Read This, joins Jeffrey Brown to answer reader questions about "American Spy." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders