Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • What William Taylor and George Kent shared during public impeachment hearings

    Nov 13 2019

    Wednesday marked the first public hearing of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump, which is looking at whether Trump violated his oath of office and jeopardized U.S. national security by pressuring Ukraine to conduct investigations to benefit him politically. Yamiche Alcindor, Lisa Desjardins, and Nick Schifrin join Judy Woodruff to review testimony from William Taylor and George Kent.

  • Collins says he's putting House Intelligence 'on notice' about rushing impeachment

    Nov 13 2019

    Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., is the highest-ranking Republican member of the House Judiciary Committee, which will play an important role in the impeachment process. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss his impressions from the inquiry's first public hearing, including that there was "nothing new" shared by witnesses William Taylor and George Kent, and why Adam Schiff can't "rubber stamp" impeachment.

  • Speier questions why White House won't let Mulvaney, Bolton testify in inquiry

    Nov 13 2019

    Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., is a member of the House Intelligence Committee, and she questioned witnesses William Taylor and George Kent during the impeachment inquiry's first public hearing Wednesday. She joins Judy Woodruff to discuss why she thinks President Trump is guilty of "committing bribery," how her Republican colleagues are in "lockstep" with the president and what's coming next.

  • Experts analyze the testimonies of career diplomats William Taylor and George Kent

    Nov 13 2019

    For a variety of reactions to the first day of public hearings in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump, Judy Woodruff speaks with Walter Dellinger, acting solicitor general under President Clinton; C. Boyden Gray, former U.S. ambassador to the European Union under President George W. Bush; Mieke Eoyang of Third Way National Security Program; and Michael Allen of Beacon Global Strategies.

  • Despite tensions over Syria, Trump offers Erdogan a warm welcome

    Nov 13 2019

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan visited Washington Wednesday, prompting protests by Kurdish Americans and others outside the White House. Erdogan received a warm welcome from President Trump, but some Republicans in the Senate expressed concern about the friendly treatment only weeks after the Turkish military aggression in Syria that both parties in Congress decried. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • News Wrap: Israeli airstrikes targeting terrorists kill 26 people

    Nov 13 2019

    In our news wrap Wednesday, new Israeli airstrikes targeting Islamic Jihad fighters in the Gaza Strip killed 26 people, including at least three minors, in the area's heaviest recent fighting. Israel's defense minister urged against Palestinian reprisals. Also, protests in Lebanon resumed after its president warned of more delays in forming a new government and a soldier killed a man overnight.

  • As Supreme Court takes up DACA, 'Dreamers' hope for another temporary reprieve

    Nov 12 2019

    The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on President Trump's move to end protections for migrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.The Obama-era program, known as DACA, currently blocks some 660,000 people from deportation. National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle and Bipartisan Policy Center's Theresa Cardinal Brown join Amna Nawaz to discuss the legal considerations and potential fallout.

  • News Wrap: Bolivia's ousted Morales goes into exile in Mexico

    Nov 12 2019

    In our news wrap Tuesday, ousted Bolivian President Evo Morales went into exile in Mexico, after first appealing for peace in Bolivia and expressing gratitude to the Mexican president for protecting him. Also, protesters in Hong Kong blocked traffic and battled police in a series of confrontations. They were met by tear gas and rubber bullets, one day after a demonstrator was shot by police.

  • What to expect as 4th impeachment process in U.S. history goes public

    Nov 12 2019

    The House impeachment inquiry will go public Wednesday, with its first open-door hearing on Capitol Hill. Members of the House Intelligence Committee, both Democrats and Republicans, will have opportunities to question two key witnesses in the ongoing investigation around President Trump's dealings with Ukraine. Nick Schifrin joins Judy Woodruff with an overview of each party's messaging.

  • Why lawsuit against Remington could have a ripple effect for gun industry

    Nov 12 2019

    On Tuesday, the Supreme Court denied an attempt by Remington Arms to block a lawsuit filed by families of the victims of the 2012 Sandy Hook massacre, who argue the maker of the AR-15-style rifle should be held liable for its marketing of the military-style weapons. Robert Spitzer, author of "Guns Across America," joins William Brangham to discuss what the decision means for firearm manufacturers.

  • How did we get here? A timeline of the Ukraine impeachment saga

    Nov 12 2019

    The impeachment inquiry has moved quickly, with more than a dozen witnesses, nearly 2700 pages of testimony and, now, public hearings. But how did we get here? Lisa Desjardins and Yamiche Alcindor take a look back at key events in the Ukraine saga and the previously obscure U.S. officials who will play important roles in the upcoming hearings.

  • For Israelis along the Lebanon and Gaza borders, even a normal day is plagued with tension

    Nov 12 2019

    Attacks and reprisals between Israel and its enemies occur regularly, now and then exploding into all-out war. In particular, Israeli security is threatened by militant groups like Hamas in the south and Lebanon's Hezbollah to the north. Ryan Chilcote reports from two Israeli border communities about how families there are seeking a normal life amid constant fear and uncertainty.

  • Why more media companies want in on the expensive 'streaming revolution'

    Nov 12 2019

    Media companies are spending billions to try to lock in Americans' entertainment dollars, and on Tuesday, the Walt Disney Company took its efforts to the next level with the launch of Disney+. But with such a broad assortment of streaming services available, how can consumers decide on the best entertainment options for them? NPR television critic Eric Deggans joins John Yang to discuss.

  • News Wrap: UN's nuclear watchdog raises new concerns about Iran

    Nov 11 2019

    In our news wrap Monday, the UN's nuclear watchdog raised new concerns about Iran's violations of its 2015 nuclear deal. Inspectors discovered manmade uranium particles that Tehran hadn't previously declared. Also, Turkey has begun sending captured foreign members of the Islamic State back to their home countries. The Turkish government estimates some 1200 ISIS fighters were imprisoned there.

  • Hong Kong's anti-government protests again turn violent

    Nov 11 2019

    Anti-government protests in Hong Kong erupted into chaos Monday, leaving two people critically injured. One person was shot at close range by police, while separately, a China supporter was set on fire. Hong Kong's leader, Carrie Lam, vowed to "spare no effort" to end the violent demonstrations that have gripped the semi-autonomous Chinese territory for five months. Judy Woodruff reports.

  • What's next for Bolivia, after President Morales steps down

    Nov 11 2019

    Bolivia, South America's poorest country, is politically divided -- and currently without a leader. President Evo Morales announced on state television Sunday that he was the victim of a coup and thus was resigning. But his political opponents contend he was a dictator who eventually succumbed to the powers of democracy. Nick Schifrin reports on how Bolivia is facing a government reconstruction.

  • Mulvaney objected to 2017 Ukrainian aid package, says State Dept. official

    Nov 11 2019

    Additional closed-door deposition transcripts from the impeachment inquiry were released Monday. Laura Cooper, deputy assistant secretary at the Department of Defense, testified during her appearance that her colleagues questioned whether aid appropriated by Congress for Ukraine could legally be frozen by President Trump. Yamiche Alcindor and Lisa Desjardins join Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • How Rudy Giuliani went from 'America's mayor' to Ukraine business broker

    Nov 11 2019

    Mentioned frequently in transcripts from closed-door testimonies in the impeachment inquiry, Rudy Giuliani stands at the center of the saga over President Trump's Ukraine policy. Giuliani is now the president's personal lawyer, but he first entered the national spotlight as New York's tough-on-crime mayor -- and later, a consoling figure amid the grief of September 11th. Yamiche Alcindor reports.

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on public impeachment hearings, Bloomberg's possible 2020 bet

    Nov 11 2019

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including whether open hearings could change Americans' minds about impeachment, implications for Joe Biden's presidential campaign, the potential entry of Michael Bloomberg into the Democratic race, Sen. Amy Klobuchar's comments about standards for female politicians and more.

  • After failed legislative attempts on DACA, fate of 'Dreamers' lies with Supreme Court

    Nov 11 2019

    On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments that could decide the fate of some 700,000 "Dreamers," members of a younger generation of undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children. They are currently protected from deportation by an executive order that President Barack Obama put in place in 2012, but that President Donald Trump has sought to cancel. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • With emphasis on arts, rural communities challenge national narrative of decline

    Nov 11 2019

    Americans have been drawn to rural areas in recent years partly due to the appeal of a higher quality of life. These regions have not traditionally been known as art hubs, but some residents say that trend is changing. Jeffrey Brown reports from northern Minnesota, where artists and community leaders are fighting the national narrative of rural America in decline.

  • Veterans Day observances from across the country

    Nov 11 2019

    Across the country, Americans paid tribute on Monday to members of the U.S. Armed Forces, who put their own comfort and wellbeing at risk to defend their country. Here are a selection of the commemorations and observances.

  • Migrant aid workers face arrests and prosecutions

    Nov 10 2019

    More than 3,000 undocumented migrants have died in Arizona during the last 20 years while trying to cross into the U.S. from Mexico, spurring the formation of aid groups along the border that aim to prevent the humanitarian crisis. Now, some aid workers are facing criminal charges due to renewed enforcement of harboring laws that say good Samaritans are breaking the law. Ivette Feliciano reports.

  • What to look for in this week's impeachment inquiry

    Nov 10 2019

    Three officials will testify this week as the impeachment inquiry enters a new phase with public hearings. House Republicans on Saturday submitted their wishlist of witnesses which included Hunter Biden and the whistleblower -- both names ruled out by the Democrats. NewsHour's Lisa Desjardin joins Megan Thompson to discuss the latest.

  • Graham Nash mines his catalog for some personal performances

    Nov 09 2019

    Two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Graham Nash has hits aplenty spanning his nearly six-decade career. But the 77-year-old singer-songwriter recently chose to perform a special run of shows featuring his lesser-known first two solo albums in their entirety, which together describe a crucial chapter in his personal and artistic life. Tom Casciato recently spoke to Nash to learn more.