Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS...more

Episodes

  • News Wrap: Pfizer says booster offers protection against omicron variant

    Dec 08 2021

    In our news wrap Wednesday, drug maker Pfizer says its double-dose vaccine -- plus a booster -- may offer significant protection against the omicron variant. Olaf Schultz has officially become Germany's chancellor -- marking the end of Angela Merkel's 16-year tenure. Canada and Britain are the latest to join the U.S. diplomatic boycott of the Winter Olympics in China. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Supreme Court mulls church-state separation again in religious school funding case

    Dec 08 2021

    The U.S. Supreme Court grappled once again with the issue of church and state. As John Yang reports, Wednesday's arguments about whether taxpayer funds can be used to pay tuition at religious schools in Maine comes on the heels of recent cases in which the justices sided with religious freedom advocates. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • As ex-officer faces trial in Daunte Wright killing, many worry systemic change unlikely

    Dec 08 2021

    Lawyers presented opening arguments Wednesday in the trial of former Minnesota police officer Kim Potter. Last April, she fatally shot Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man, during a traffic stop in a Minneapolis suburb. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the events that led to the trial. This report is part of our ongoing series, "Race Matters." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Afghanistan is on the brink of mass starvation. Where is international aid?

    Dec 08 2021

    In the nearly four months since the American withdrawal from Afghanistan, the world has witnessed the collapse of the Afghan government and the Taliban takeover. The country is now in freefall, with millions in danger and a spiraling humanitarian crisis. 23 million Afghans need food assistance, with 8.7 million nearing famine. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • As some hail bill to counter military sexual assault, others decry 'missed opportunity'

    Dec 08 2021

    Late Tuesday night, the U.S. House of Representative passed its version of the National Defense Authorization Act. The bill, which still needs Senate approval, includes a number of changes to how the military deals with its long-standing problem of sexual assault. But some members of Congress say the reforms don't go far enough and could even exacerbate the problem. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • The U.S. debt ceiling, explained

    Dec 08 2021

    U.S. Senators are deciding how they'll vote on a deal to raise the debt ceiling, after the U.S. House of Representatives passed the first piece of a plan to avoid a default Tuesday night. Leaders in both parties are projecting confidence, but the stakes are high. Congressional correspondent Lisa Desjardins explains why the debt limit has become so political, and what exactly it does. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Sen. Thune: Vaccine mandates will have 'countereffect,' must be overturned to save jobs

    Dec 08 2021

    The U.S. Senate will vote Wednesday evening on repealing President Joe Biden's vaccine mandate for businesses with 100 or more employees. The measure is expected to pass with support from Democrats Joe Manchin and Jon Tester. But the bill faces an uphill battle in the Democrat-controlled House. Sen. John Thune, the second-highest ranking Republican in the Senate, joins Judy Woodruff with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • A preacher and caregiver's Brief But Spectacular take on helping people

    Dec 08 2021

    Terrell Scruggs is a Tennessee native with a strong sense of his "life's calling." He is a preacher and caregiver, providing services to seniors in his Nashville community -- even throughout the pandemic. He shares his Brief But Spectacular take on living a life of service. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: U.S. will 'pay the price' for Beijing Olympics boycott, China says

    Dec 07 2021

    In our news wrap Tuesday, China warned that the U.S. will "pay the price" for a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics. French authorities have reportedly arrested one of the suspected killers of Saudi Arabian journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The U.S. House of Representatives moved to clear the way for raising the national debt ceiling. On Wall Street, stocks surged, led by tech companies. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Biden made consequences of Ukraine invasion 'crystal clear' in call with Russia's Putin

    Dec 07 2021

    President Joe Biden's video call with Russian President Vladimir Putin Tuesday was the fourth time the leaders have spoken or met this year. Russia now has more than 100,000 troops stationed on the border of Ukraine, and Biden gave Putin a "crystal clear" message, according to aides, that Russia faces significant economic reprisals if it were to invade. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What we know about Congress' unusual solution to the debt ceiling disagreement

    Dec 07 2021

    The clock has been ticking on the next potential fiscal crisis for the U.S. Government. The nation's debt ceiling could be reached as soon as next week, and the government might not have the funds to pay its bill. But a breakthrough between Republicans and Democrats Tuesday means they may have found a way out. Judy Woodruff is joined by congressional correspondent Lisa Desjardins with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Why Meadows will not cooperate with Jan. 6 panel, and what it means for the investigation

    Dec 07 2021

    It's been 11 months since the attack on the United States Capitol on Jan. 6. The House Select Committee investigating the attack has issued more than 40 subpoenas, many aimed at Trump administration officials and allies. Josh Gerstein joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the subpoenas and related cooperation and defiance. He's the senior legal affairs reporter for Politico. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Historically denied 'pivotal' loans, Black farmers still struggle to get support

    Dec 07 2021

    For decades, Black farmers have been excluded from federal farm programs -- a systematic pattern of discrimination that the U.S. Department of Agriculture acknowledged decades ago. Yet proposals to compensate farmers for past wrongs have languished in controversy and red tape. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro begins his report in northwest Kansas for our ongoing series, "Race Matters." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Navy's water contamination flub in Hawaii follows 8 years of warning signs

    Dec 07 2021

    U.S. military families stationed in Hawaii are dealing with tap water contaminated with petroleum. The cause is unknown, but investigators say a leak from a nearby fuel storage facility operated by the Navy may be to blame. On Monday, Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro issued an apology, calling the situation a "horrible tragedy." But as Stephanie Sy reports, warning signs went ignored. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Alex Gibney's 'The Forever Prisoner' reveals CIA torture tactics

    Dec 07 2021

    A new HBO documentary that debuted this week tells the story of a man once thought to be a top al-Qaida operative. It also reveals U.S. attempts to justify torture in the name of protecting Americans. Amna Nawaz recently sat down with the filmmaker, Alex Gibney, for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Tensions over Ukraine run high ahead of Biden-Putin call

    Dec 06 2021

    In our news wrap Monday, U.S.-Russian tensions over Ukraine are running high ahead of Tuesday's video call between Presidents Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin. Three more members of a U.S. missionary group were freed in Haiti, after being held hostage since October. A Myanmar court convicted ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi of incitement and violating COVID restrictions. She was given 2 years in prison. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Could omicron lead to more breakthrough COVID cases? Here's what we know

    Dec 06 2021

    For the first time in nearly two months, the United States is averaging more than 100,000 new coronavirus cases daily. Roughly one-third of states have also now detected the new omicron variant. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How the diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Olympics may play out for the U.S.

    Dec 06 2021

    The Biden administration will not send an official delegation to the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics. Administration officials say the diplomatic boycott aims to protest China's human rights abuses. To break down what this means for U.S.-China relations, Amna Nawaz is joined by Victor Cha of Georgetown University, who was former director of Asian affairs on the National Security Council. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • VA Sec. McDonough on benefits for veterans exposed to burn pits, preventing vet suicide

    Dec 06 2021

    President Joe Biden has vowed to improve veterans' access to health care, prevent their suicide, and specifically provide benefits to those exposed to toxic air through burn pits while serving in the military. Nick Schifrin talks to Denis McDonough, the veterans affairs secretary, about those goals and how former service members have responded to the administration's efforts. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Pope urges compassion toward migrants in Lesbos, but doesn't openly condemn Greek pushback

    Dec 06 2021

    During a multi-day trip to the Eastern Mediterranean, Pope Francis on Sunday returned to the Greek island of Lesbos, which he first visited five years ago. As special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports, the pope highlighted the plight of asylum seekers and castigated Europe over its treatment of refugees and migrants during his most recent trip. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • A look at the life and legacy of former GOP Majority Leader, presidential nominee Bob Dole

    Dec 06 2021

    Bob Dole's storied political career spanned five decades, taking him from the heights of power in Congress to the lows of failed presidential bids. During his career, Dole helped shape the Republican party as a senator from Kansas, and majority leader. Judy Woodruff reports on his lifetime in politics. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Bob Dole, Georgia Gov. race, rising COVID cases

    Dec 06 2021

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report with Amy Walter join Amna Nawaz to discuss the latest political news, including the passing of former Kansas Sen. Bob Dole, the gubernatorial race in Georgia, and the current state of the pandemic in the U.S. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Local community, businesses in the Bay Area band together to aid Afghan refugees

    Dec 05 2021

    The San Francisco bay area has the largest Afghan population in the US, making it an obvious place to resettle Afghan refugees. But it also has one of the country's most expensive and competitive housing markets. Special correspondent Mike Cerre speaks to new arrivals and those helping them make the transition to life in the US, as part of our ongoing series, 'Chasing the Dream: Poverty, Opportunity and Justice in America.' PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funder...more

  • Remembering Bob Dole: Veteran, GOP presidential nominee, Kansas senator

    Dec 05 2021

    Robert "Bob" Dole, who led the Republican party in the Senate for decades and was its presidential candidate, died on Sunday at 98. A veteran who was injured in World War II, and a politician for more than 50 years, he had been suffering from lung cancer. Known for his bipartisan abilities, he helped pass the Americans With Disabilities Act in 1990. Barbara Perry, Director of Presidential Studies at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://ww...more

  • Dictatorial governments are reaching beyond their borders to silence critics

    Dec 04 2021

    Paul Rusesabagina, whose heroic efforts during the Rwandan genocide were depicted in the film "Hotel Rwanda," was living in the U.S. when he was brought to Rwanda, against his will, to stand trial on charges of terrorism. Human rights advocates say the trial, riddled with violations of due process, is an example of "transnational repression." Special Correspondent Benedict Moran reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Maryland is the first state to formally reckon with its history of lynching and racial violence

    Dec 04 2021

    Healing wounds over and violence from years past can be an extremely difficult endeavor. South Africa's truth and reconciliation commission was the most famous attempt of its kind--but now, Maryland is the first U.S. state using the resolution model to reckon with its history of racial violence. Charles Chavis, assistant professor at George Mason University and the vice-chair of Maryland's truth and reconciliation commission, joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/abo...more