Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS...more

Episodes

  • Gun laws, abortion rights: upcoming SCOTUS hearings to be impacted by RBG's death

    Sep 18 2021

    It's been a year since Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died. Her seat on the bench is now occupied by Justice Amy Coney Barrett, the third judge appointed by former President Donald Trump. On October 4th, the court will resume in-person hearings -- and will also be the first time the bench will meet since RBG's passing. Amy Howe, co-founder of SCOTUSblog, a website covering the Supreme Court, joins to discuss how the court has changed -- and what lies ahead. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://ww...more

  • A new book examines ways to end unconscious bias

    Sep 18 2021

    When freelance writer Jessica Nordell started pitching under a gender neutral name, she suddenly found more of her pitches were accepted. She's since dedicated her work to examining solutions to unconscious bias, which affects everything from education to health care to criminal justice. She recently spoke to Special Correspondent Megan Thompson about her new book, "The End of Bias: A Beginning." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Pro-insurrectionists gather for a small, short rally at Capitol Hill

    Sep 18 2021

    A rally outside Capitol Hill drew only a few hundred protesters. Called "Justice For J6," the event was held in support of the January 6th insurrectionists who were detained and was organized by a member of Trump's re-election campaign. Police in riot gear lined the area and a temporary fence was re installed to prevent access to the Capitol. NewsHour's Lisa Desjardins joins to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Key FDA advisory committee rejects COVID vaccine boosters for the general population

    Sep 17 2021

    A key advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration overwhelmingly rejected vaccine boosters for the general U.S. population for now, but it voted unanimously in favor of giving boosters to those 65 and older as well as high risk individuals.The recommendations mark a pivotal moment in the debate around boosters. William Brangham joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Pentagon admits error in U.S. drone strike that killed 10 civilians in Afghanistan

    Sep 17 2021

    The U.S. military on Friday acknowledged that a drone strike in Kabul they initially said killed an ISIS suicide bomber had in fact killed only civilians. The strike took place three weeks ago as the U.S. and allies were evacuating following the Taliban takeover. Nick Schifrin joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: France recalling ambassadors from U.S., Australia over submarine deal

    Sep 17 2021

    In our news wrap Friday, France is recalling its ambassadors from the U.S. and Australia in a fury over a submarine deal, more than 170 people including some Americans boarded a flight out of Afghanistan, Republican Rep. Anthony Gonzalez says he won't run again after voting to impeach former President Trump, and a U.N. report found greenhouse gas emissions are set to rise 16 percent by 2030. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Thousands of migrants amass at the Texas border as federal authorities ramp up relief

    Sep 17 2021

    Over the last several days a crowd of migrants awaiting U.S. processing outside a Texas border community has grown to more than 10,000. The migrants, mostly from Haiti, have been sheltering under a major bridge as the Biden administration tries to speed up processing. Washington Post reporter Arelis Hernández joins Amna Nawaz from Del Rio, Texas to discuss the scene. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • U.S. Capitol Police prepare for far-right rally in support of Jan. 6 insurrectionists

    Sep 17 2021

    U.S. Capitol Police warned Friday there have been threats of violence ahead of this weekend's rally by Trump supporters. It's being staged to support more than 600 people charged in the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol, and Capitol Police Chief Thomas Manger says it's unclear how many people will show up, or just how serious the threats could be. Lisa Desjardins joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Russian government continues to silence rivals as parliamentary elections begin

    Sep 17 2021

    Russians on Friday began three days of voting to determine their next parliament, with the outcome largely expected to be preordained. But there was an unexpected development Friday, when Google and Apple blocked Russians from downloading the main opposition party's app. As Nick Schifrin reports, it's just the latest successful attempt by the Russian government to silence its rivals. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Brooks and Capehart on border politics, Biden's job approval, U.S. and France tensions

    Sep 17 2021

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week in politics, including immigration, President Biden's job approval ratings, and tensions between the U.S. and France over a nuclear submarine deal. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • An inside look at Ken Burns' latest film 'Muhammad Ali'

    Sep 17 2021

    Ken Burns' latest four-part documentary "Muhammad Ali" will premiere Sunday on PBS for four nights. Jeffrey Brown visited Burns at his studio for a behind-the-scenes look at how he makes his films, and the larger context and conflicts in telling America's story in a time of racial reckoning. This report is part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: New migrant emergency builds along the Texas border with Mexico

    Sep 16 2021

    In our news wrap Thursday, more than 8,000 people have crossed the border at Del Rio, Texas in the past few days as federal agencies rush to provide assistance, storm-battered Louisiana and other areas of the south saw another day of heavy rains from the remnants of Hurricane Nicholas, and the U.N. warns only immediate, large-scale cuts in carbon emissions can avoid a climate disaster. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • France furious over new U.S. pact meant to confront China's growing ambitions in Asia

    Sep 16 2021

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Thursday tried to calm tensions with France over a new defense pact between the U.S., United Kingdom and Australia. Australia had scrapped a $40 billion submarine contract with France in favor of U.S. nuclear-powered subs. France's ambassador to the United States, Philippe Etienne, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Democrats push to pass 'historic legislation' but major obstacles remain

    Sep 16 2021

    Democrats are pressing to pass a $3.5 trillion piece of legislation called the "Build Back Better" plan that would address many issues including paid-family leave, child care and climate change. But as they started this week to move on important portions of the bill, their efforts also exposed major obstacles ahead. Congressional correspondent Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Hospitals in sparsely vaccinated areas prepare to ration care

    Sep 16 2021

    Last week we heard how some hospitals in Idaho were overflowing and starting to ration care. That crisis has now spread statewide, and is forcing hospitals to start sending sick patients to neighboring states. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Ordinary people are taking the law into their own hands to counter cartel threat

    Sep 16 2021

    In the mountain top village of Ayahualtempa in Guerrero state Mexico, children are learning how to use firearms and preparing for an attack by a nearby drug cartel. In our third and final story on the ravages of the cross-border drug trade with Mexico, special correspondent Monica Villamizar and producer Zach Fannin report with support from the Pulitzer Center. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Facebook probe looks at how the company handles its 'negative side effects'

    Sep 16 2021

    The social media giant Facebook is the subject of a Wall Street Journal investigative series out this week that highlights the ways in which Facebook handles -- or doesn't handle -- a range of issues across its vast digital empire including misinformation and violent content. John Yang spoke with Jeff Horwitz, the series' lead reporter, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Actor Riz Ahmed on increasing Muslim representation in Hollywood

    Sep 16 2021

    Riz Ahmed's acting and music careers have always gone hand-in-hand. And in his new film "Mogul Mowgli," which he co-wrote, the two art forms collide, with a story that hits close to home. Amna Nawaz speaks to Ahmed about his upcoming films, increasing Muslim representation in Hollywood and 9/11's lasting impact on Muslims 20 years later. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What returning to school looks and feels like in 'unpredictable, unprecedented times'

    Sep 16 2021

    Millions of students are heading back to school in person after a year of online learning. We asked students in our Student Reporting Labs network what returning to in-person learning looks and feels like amid new delta variant concerns, vaccinations debates and mask mandates. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How U.S., UK and Australia plan to counter China's rise through strategic partnership

    Sep 15 2021

    Wednesday evening at the White House, President Joe Biden -- joined by the prime ministers of the United Kingdom and Australia -- announced a new partnership in the Indo-Pacific region, including an effort to build nuclear-powered submarines for Australia. The one unspoken issue clearly driving this move: a rising China. Foreign affairs correspondent Nick Schifrin joins Judy Woodruff with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Afghanistan's women's soccer team escape to Pakistan

    Sep 15 2021

    In our news wrap Wednesday, members of the Afghan women's soccer team along with coaches and families crossed into Pakistan and will seek asylum in other countries. North and South Korea traded missile tests amid rising tensions. Pope Francis says Catholic clerics should not mix politics with Communion. Boston voters have chosen Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi George for a mayor's run-off. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Simone Biles, Aly Raisman and other gymnasts on how FBI 'betrayed' them, 'enabled' Nassar

    Sep 15 2021

    The Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday heard testimony from four elite U.S. gymnasts about the FBI's mishandling of sexual abuse allegations against former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar. Simone Biles, Aly Raisman, McKayla Maroney and Maggie Nichols criticized the agency and pressed lawmakers to demand further accountability for those who enabled Nassar. Amna Nawaz reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Trump may be losing popularity, but is 'Trumpism?' Here's what California's recall shows

    Sep 15 2021

    Californians have voted overwhelmingly to keep Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom in office until the end of his term. Newsom improved on his share of the vote from his first election three years ago. To discuss the results and any lessons they hold for the midterm elections, as well as the role of former President Trump in the GOP, we turn to Washington Post columnists Perry Bacon and Gary Abernathy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Fentanyl is making its way into various drugs sold in the U.S. Here's how it gets there

    Sep 15 2021

    For the second part of our series on the ravages of the synthetic opioid fentanyl, we take a look at the deadly cost of the drug just across the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona. With the support of the Pulitzer Center, special correspondent Monica Villamizar and producer Zach Fannin report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Can understanding business strategy help you parent better? One economist thinks so

    Sep 15 2021

    Schools around the country are now back at in-person classes. But there has been a jump in the number of students quarantined, and some places are allowing distance learning again. All too often, parents are facing difficult choices. Stephanie Sy has the story of an economist who is trying to help parents navigate such challenges. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders