Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS ...more

Episodes

  • Breonna Taylor case outcome suggests officers are above the law, says legal expert

    Sep 23 2020

    The killing of Breonna Taylor at the hands of Louisville police galvanized a national protest movement. On Wednesday, one of the officers was indicted on criminal charges in the case -- but they weren't for Taylor's death. Many in Louisville and across the country are angry and frustrated with this outcome. Amna Nawaz reports and talks to author and professor Paul Butler of Georgetown Law School. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Fauci rejects Rand Paul's claims on herd immunity

    Sep 23 2020

    In our news wrap Wednesday, Dr. Anthony Fauci expressed cautious optimism during a Senate hearing about the outlook for a reliable coronavirus vaccine. But when Republican Sen. Rand Paul argued that herd immunity is working, Fauci shot back, "if you believe that...you are alone." Also, in Belarus, President Alexander Lukashenko was sworn in for his sixth term after weeks of protest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Ginsburg remembered at Supreme Court as battle over her seat flares

    Sep 23 2020

    Wednesday marked a somber day at the U.S. Supreme Court, where Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lay in repose. Her former law clerks lined the building's steps. Inside, her eight fellow justices gathered with family and friends to honor her contributions to the realm of American law and her personal spirit. Meanwhile, a political battle over her seat flares on Capitol Hill. Yamiche Alcindor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Durbin: Why is Senate GOP prioritizing Supreme Court seat over pandemic relief?

    Sep 23 2020

    Amid memorials for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the political fight over confirming her replacement is already in full swing. Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, the Senate's second-highest ranking Democrat, is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee. He joins Lisa Desjardins to discuss why he thinks Republicans are being inconsistent about filling this Supreme Court vacancy and what happens next. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • H.R. McMaster on Trump, trust and threats from Russia and China

    Sep 23 2020

    Retired Army General H.R. McMaster was still on active duty when tapped to replace Michael Flynn as President Trump's national security adviser in early 2017. He resigned the position himself about a year later. Now, McMaster has written a book, "Battlegrounds: The Fight to Defend the Free World," which offers a strategic analysis of the world in which we live. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Will Supreme Court fight galvanize voters in the Midwest?

    Sep 23 2020

    The fight over nominating a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is consuming Capitol Hill and upending the election, which is already underway in many states. How are American voters reacting to the court vacancy and other key political issues? John Yang talks to Washington Post columnist Gary Abernathy, who is based in Ohio, and author and journalist Sarah Smarsh, based in Kansas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How Ruth Bader Ginsburg became the 'Notorious RBG'

    Sep 23 2020

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg made legal history in academia beginning in her 20s, working her way through the legal ranks to become a Supreme Court justice at age 60. But when she was in her 80s, something surprising happened: she became a pop culture icon. Jeffrey Brown reports as part of our ongoing arts and culture series, Canvas. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: U.S. officially passes 200,000 pandemic deaths

    Sep 22 2020

    In our news wrap Tuesday, the United States has officially passed 200,000 deaths in the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Johns Hopkins University. About two-thirds of the fatalities were over age 65, but young people are driving increased infections in some states. Also, a weakened Tropical Storm Beta remains stalled over the Texas coast, where at least 14 inches of rain have caused flash floods. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • The Senate's tight timeline to confirm Trump's SCOTUS nominee

    Sep 22 2020

    President Trump has said he will announce his choice to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U.S. Supreme Court this Saturday. And although it appears the Republican-led Senate will have enough votes to move forward with confirmation hearings for the nominee, the timeline for them to approve the appointee before Election Day is tight. Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Barrasso: Why this Supreme Court battle is different from that of 2016

    Sep 22 2020

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death has left an opening on the Supreme Court only weeks before Election Day. President Trump and the Senate GOP say they plan to fill the vacancy before the country votes. Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso, the Senate's third-highest ranking Republican, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss why he supports moving forward with confirmation hearings for Trump's choice of successor. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • At UN General Assembly, little unity as Trump blasts China, WHO over pandemic

    Sep 22 2020

    The United Nations General Assembly is underway -- but it looks very different this year. For the first time in the body's history, the meeting is being held virtually due to the pandemic. Meanwhile, unity among member nations appears to be in short supply. President Trump used the summit to blast China and the World Health Organization over their coronavirus handling. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How a focus on cleaning surfaces can distract from actual virus spread

    Sep 22 2020

    Our understanding of how the novel coronavirus spreads is still evolving. Early in the pandemic, there was great concern about the potential for infection from surface contact. But since then, evidence has pointed to human-to-human transmission as the primary vehicle of infection. Yet this research is not necessarily being broadly communicated to the American public. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Research shows coronavirus spreads primarily through air. Here's how to reduce risk

    Sep 22 2020

    A growing body of evidence indicates that airborne transmission is the main way people are becoming infected with the novel coronavirus. Given that understanding, how should we change our behavior to reduce our risk of infection? William Brangham talks to Virginia Tech's Dr. Linsey Marr about aerosols vs. droplets, ventilation and more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How Maine's Colby College is striving to keep COVID-19 under control

    Sep 22 2020

    As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, many academic institutions across the country are dealing with outbreaks -- or offering only virtual learning in an attempt to prevent them. But one liberal arts school in Maine is seeking to avoid either fate. In partnership with Maine Public, Jeffrey Brown reports on Colby College's efforts to manage the virus through a robust testing and tracing plan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • In Colorado, law enforcement are on front lines of mental health crisis

    Sep 22 2020

    As shown by the case of Daniel Prude, who was killed by police in Rochester, New York, in March, there can be challenges when law enforcement is called to deal with someone who may have mental health issues. But a lack of funding for mental health support can mean the criminal justice system is the only way for those needing services to access them. John Ferrugia of Rocky Mountain PBS reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Supreme Court vacancy sparks political battle just weeks before election

    Sep 21 2020

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death has created an opening on the U.S. Supreme Court -- mere weeks before a presidential election. Now a major political battle is brewing over whether that spot should be filled by President Trump now or by the candidate who is elected in November and inaugurated in January. The result could determine the Court's trajectory for decades to come. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What's next in the fight over Ginsburg's Supreme Court seat?

    Sep 21 2020

    The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has already launched a high-stakes political battle over whether President Trump and Senate Republicans can push through a nomination and fill her seat before the November election. Yamiche Alcindor and Lisa Desjardins join Judy Woodruff to discuss names being considered to replace Ginsburg and the logistics involved in nominating and confirming a justice. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Sen. Hassan: GOP 'changed the rules' about SCOTUS hearings in 2016

    Sep 21 2020

    With Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death leaving an opening on the U.S. Supreme Court mere weeks from the presidential election, a political battle is escalating over whether President Trump and Senate Republicans should push through a nominee before the country votes. Can Democrats stop them? New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Ginsburg's legacy and what comes next. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Dozens of wildfires still burning on West Coast

    Sep 21 2020

    In our news wrap Monday, dozens of wildfires are still burning on the West Coast. Southern California's Bobcat Fire has doubled in size over the past week, fanned by high winds. Flames have scorched 165 square miles of Los Angeles County hillsides. Also, Tropical Storm Beta is due to come ashore in Texas Monday night. Heavy rains have already turned Galveston roadways into rivers. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Understanding the magnitude of the U.S. coronavirus death toll

    Sep 21 2020

    The United States is approaching another tragic marker of the coronavirus pandemic, with nearly 200,000 Americans dead from COVID-19 and related complications. The magnitude of the loss is difficult to comprehend. We examine how the virus has spread across the country, deeply affecting communities of all kinds, and evaluate this somber occasion in historical context. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • The U.S. has lost 200,000 people to COVID-19. How did this happen?

    Sep 21 2020

    Over the past six months, we have tried to capture and convey the heartbreaking loss of American life due to the coronavirus pandemic. As the country passes a somber threshold, with 200,000 people killed by COVID-19, Amna Nawaz talks to Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, and Dr. Megan Ranney, an emergency physician at Brown University. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • The international implications of new U.S. sanctions on Iran

    Sep 21 2020

    The Trump administration announced additional sanctions on Iran Monday, after declaring over the weekend that all United Nation sanctions initially lifted by the Iran nuclear deal had been reimposed. But that "snapback" of UN sanctions was rejected by much of the international community. Nick Schifrin reports and talks to Elliott Abrams, the State Department's special representative for Iran. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Supreme Court vacancy's political significance

    Sep 21 2020

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, how it affects the presidential race and the power dynamics at play in the Senate around the battle for her replacement. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • As the U.S. COVID-19 death toll borders 200K, what have we learned?

    Sep 20 2020

    The COVID-19 death toll in the U.S. is nearing the 200,000 mark, according to Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Research Center. Even though the death rate is lower than it was in the spring, 850 people on average are dying every day of the disease in the country, according to the New York Times. ProPublica reporter Caroline Chen joins to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Battle for Iowa heats up over rural issues

    Sep 20 2020

    Iowa, a competitive purple state which has leaned blue, voted for President Trump in 2016 by a big margin. This election, the Biden campaign has managed to narrow that lead, making the state a toss-up. Iowa PBS Senior Producer and Director Andrew Batt joins Hari Sreenivasan from Des Moines to discuss the race in the state as part of our ongoing series, "Roads to Election 2020." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders