Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • Turkish ambassador to U.S. disputes that Erdogan agreed to a 'cease-fire'

    Oct 17 2019

    Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara on Thursday about Turkey's military offensive in northern Syria. They agreed to a five-day pause in the operation, but disagreed about whether or not it constitutes a "cease-fire." Judy Woodruff reports and sits down with Serdar Kilic, Turkish ambassador to the U.S., to discuss.

  • How impeachment inquiry and Senate trial could unfold

    Oct 17 2019

    There was confusion around the words of the Trump administration's acting chief of staff Thursday. Mick Mulvaney first connected the delay of military aid to Ukraine with an investigation into a DNC server in 2016 but then said the two were unrelated. Meanwhile, EU Ambassador Gordon Sondland testified on Capitol Hill. Lisa Desjardins reports and joins Judy Woodruff and Yamiche Alcindor to discuss.

  • News Wrap: Nor'easter knocks out power to 400,000 in Maine, Massachusetts

    Oct 17 2019

    In our news wrap Thursday, New England is cleaning up after a powerful nor'easter lashed the region with heavy rain and wind gusting to 90 miles an hour. Some 400,000 customers in Maine and Massachusetts lost power. Also, about 25,000 teachers and staff are striking in Chicago, the nation's third-largest public school district. They're demanding better pay and smaller classes, among other changes.

  • Congress mourns Elijah Cummings, veteran lawmaker and civil rights advocate

    Oct 17 2019

    Veteran Congressman Elijah Cummings of Maryland died early Thursday at age 68, after suffering long-standing health problems. The Baltimore Democrat was a highly regarded figure in both political parties, known for his advocacy on civil rights issues. Cummings was chair of the House Oversight Committee and had been playing a central role in the impeachment inquiry. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • The EU approved Boris Johnson's Brexit plan -- but will Parliament?

    Oct 17 2019

    European Union leaders unanimously backed a Brexit deal with the United Kingdom on Thursday. The next major hurdle is for British Parliament to approve the agreement -- no easy feat for Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Nick Schifrin reports and talks to Chatham House's Robin Niblett about how the deal would handle the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland and the outlook for passing it.

  • In tentative UAW deal, GM trades cash bonuses for future flexibility

    Oct 17 2019

    A month-long strike by the United Auto Workers appears to be nearing an end. The organization's leadership approved a tentative deal with General Motors on Thursday, but workers will remain on the picket line until rank-and-file members vote on it over the next week or so. William Brangham reports and talks to Micki Maynard, a journalist who covers the automotive industry, about the details.

  • How big data is transforming creative commerce

    Oct 17 2019

    Big data is disrupting nearly every aspect of modern life. Artificial intelligence, which involves machines learning, analyzing and acting upon enormous sets of data, is transforming industries and eliminating certain jobs. But that data can also be used to appeal more directly to what customers want. Special correspondent and Washington Post columnist Catherine Rampell reports.

  • Syria and impeachment put Trump on defensive as House condemns pullout

    Oct 16 2019

    President Trump on Wednesday dismissed criticism of his withdrawal from northeast Syria and the ensuing Turkish incursion, but a bipartisan vote in the House condemned his action. The fallout comes as another key witness testified in the impeachment inquiry. Amna Nawaz reports, then talks with Nick Schifrin and Yamiche Alcindor to track the developments and impact on Trump's agenda.

  • News Wrap: GM and UAW reach tentative deal to end strike

    Oct 16 2019

    In our news wrap Wednesday, General Motors and United Auto Workers reached a tentative deal to end a month-long strike. Union leaders meet Thursday to vote on the deal, which UAW said won major gains for some 49,000 workers. Also, the U.S. special envoy on Iran says the withdrawal from northeast Syria does not undermine efforts to pressure Iran.

  • Warren becomes debate target as moderates vie for breakout

    Oct 16 2019

    At Tuesday's Democratic presidential debate in Ohio, attacks on Sen. Elizabeth Warren started early and came from all sides, particularly from more moderate voices. But the candidates did agree on one thing: support for the impeachment inquiry. Yamiche Alcindor reports, then Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and Stuart Rothenberg of Inside Elections join Amna Nawaz to look at key moments.

  • Traditional Native foods are the key ingredient in the Sioux Chef's healthy cooking

    Oct 16 2019

    Sean Sherman, better known as the Sioux Chef, uses ingredients native to the Americas to draw attention to the long-forgotten Native culinary tradition. His research and cooking are also a way to push back against processed foods that he and others blame for grave health consequences in the U.S. today. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from St. Paul, Minnesota.

  • Nats' path to World Series is something to cheer for in divided D.C.

    Oct 16 2019

    For the first time since 1933, Washington, D.C., finally has a baseball team going to the World Series. William Brangham reports on the Nationals' unlikely run to the fall classic, and what hometown pride means for the nation's capital at a time when politics are roiled by controversy and division.

  • Why tackling the opioid crisis requires treating addiction like any other medical condition

    Oct 16 2019

    "The opioid epidemic is the greatest public health crisis of our generation," says clinical psychologist Navdeep Kang. But, he says, a lot of people struggle to get access to care, facing long wait times, when addiction should be treated just like any other chronic health condition. Kang gives his Brief but Spectacular take on rethinking addiction treatment.

  • As Giuliani defies subpoena, testimony reveals officials raised concern about his conduct

    Oct 15 2019

    Despite the White House's efforts to block the impeachment inquiry process, depositions from long-time diplomats have shed new light on the Trump administration's approach to Ukraine, and how officials were concerned about the actions of President Trump's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani. Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to take stock of the latest developments.

  • News Wrap: Hundreds charged in Barcelona protests

    Oct 15 2019

    In our news wrap Tuesday, violence erupted for a second night in Catalonia after nine separatist leaders were convicted of sedition. The night before, more than 170 people were hurt in clashes with riot police. Also, actress Felicity Huffman reported to federal prison in California in the wake of a college admissions scam.

  • This Syrian city embodies the consequences of Trump's decision

    Oct 15 2019

    In 2012, the Syrian city of Manbij joined nation-wide protests. In 2014, those Syrian rebels lost the city to the Islamic State group. In 2016, the U.S. fought back with the help of Kurdish forces, liberating the city. In 2018, U.S. troops arrived to help stabilize Manbij as it recovered. But last week the U.S. started to withdraw, and a free-for-all began. Nick Schifrin reports.

  • How a 'lens of fear' can make officers more likely to use deadly force

    Oct 15 2019

    Atatianna Jefferson was playing video games with her nephew when police arrived to check on a door left ajar. According to her nephew, Jefferson heard noises outside and pointed her gun at the window. Officer Aaron Dean shouted and immediately fired, killing Jefferson. Amna Nawaz discusses police training, race and the use of force with Seth Stoughton of the University of South Carolina.

  • Bipartisan sanctions are 'next best' way to influence Turkey now, Van Hollen says

    Oct 15 2019

    Lawmakers from both parties are angry with Turkey for its military campaign inside Syria against Kurdish forces, and at President Trump for withdrawing U.S. forces. Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., one of the lead authors of legislation that would sanction Turkey, tells Nick Schifrin that Trump's decision is having "a devastating impact" and has handed Russia "a lot more leverage in the region."

  • The hot topics 2020 Democrats could debate tonight

    Oct 15 2019

    Twelve candidates will take the debate stage in Westerville, Ohio, Tuesday night. The event comes soon after former Vice President Joe Biden's son spoke publicly about his former role as a board member of a Ukranian gas company. Will it come up in the debate? Yamiche Alincdor joins Judy Woodruff for a preview.

  • Why the founders let Congress define impeachment-worthy crimes

    Oct 15 2019

    The power to impeach a federal official such as the president has been exercised rarely in American history, and U.S. Constitution mentions the word only a handful of times. What were the founders thinking when they included that power, and how have public views of these powers evolved over time? Judy Woodruff looks back with presidential historian Michael Beschloss.

  • Soaring housing costs stretch already-strapped college students

    Oct 15 2019

    For many college students, living costs may exceed the cost of tuition and fees, as affordable housing options are becoming increasingly hard to find. Some find they struggle with debt, or paying for meals; others are at risk for homelessness. As part of our series Rethinking College, Hari Sreenivasan travels to Philadelphia to see how students there are coping.

  • How fiction draws Pulitzer-winner Elizabeth Strout home to Maine

    Oct 15 2019

    Olive Kitteridge is overbearing and hard to love, as well as complicated and compelling. The character at the center of Elizabeth Strout's 2009 Pulitzer-winning novel is also back -- in a new book called "Olive, Again." Strout takes Jeffrey Brown on a tour of some of the small towns in Maine that she's called home and have inspired her work.