Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Brooks and Capehart, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS...more

Episodes

  • The Supreme Court will hear the case against Texas' abortion law. Here's what to expect

    Oct 22 2021

    Texas' new abortion restrictions remains in effect Friday after the U.S. Supreme Court issued an order where the justices opted not to block the state's SB8 abortion law, although they did agree to hear a case challenging it. The law bans most abortions in the state after six weeks of pregnancy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Pfizer says its vaccine is 91% effective at preventing COVID among kids 5-11

    Oct 22 2021

    In our news wrap Friday, Pfizer announced that its low-dose COVID vaccine is nearly 91 percent effective in 5- to 11-year-olds. A federal jury in New York has convicted Lev Parnas, a former associate of Rudy Giuliani, of making illegal campaign contributions. Actor Alec Baldwin expressed shock and sadness after a fatal shooting on a movie set in New Mexico. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What you need to know about mixing and matching COVID vaccines, getting boosters

    Oct 22 2021

    Beginning Friday, COVID-19 booster shots for both Moderna and Johnson & Johnson are available to eligible populations. The CDC and FDA also authorized mixing and matching vaccines and boosters. Amna Nawaz discusses the latest with Dr. Leana Wen, an emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Internal DHS documents reveal migrant abuse as border crossings hit record high

    Oct 22 2021

    Detentions and arrests at America's southern border hit an all-time high in 2021, according to new federal documents. More than 1.7 million migrants were detained at the border, in the 2021 fiscal year 61% of those were expelled under Title 42. William Brangham discusses the issue with Gil Kerlikowske, who served as commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection under President Barack Obama. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Brooks and Capehart on voting rights, Build Back Better agenda, VA Gov. race

    Oct 22 2021

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week in politics, including voting rights, President Joe Biden's Build Back Better agenda, and Virginia's gubernatorial election. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How artist Mariano Rodríguez's work honored his Cuban heritage while breaking rules

    Oct 22 2021

    One of Cuba's most celebrated avant-garde painters, Mariano Rodríguez, was a prolific 20th century artist whose exposure in the U.S. was cut short after the Cuban Revolution. But now there's a resurfacing of his work at the McMullen Museum of Art at Boston College. Special correspondent Jared Bowen of GBH Boston has the story for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Journalist Terence Smith reflects on decades of reporting on American presidents, wars

    Oct 22 2021

    On our bookshelf tonight, NewsHour's old friend and former longtime media correspondent Terence Smith's memoir: "Four Wars, Five Presidents: A Reporter's Journey from Jerusalem to Saigon to the White House." Smith spoke with Judy Woodruff about the book. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Nebraska couple dedicate life to breeding rare San Clemente Island goats

    Oct 22 2021

    Among the 200 or so breeds of goats across the United States, the San Clemente Island goats are one of the rarest. Nebraska Public Media's Dennis Kellogg reports on one Nebraska couple that is doing what they can to save them. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Haitian gang threatens to kill captive U.S. missionaries unless ransom is paid

    Oct 21 2021

    In our news wrap Thursday, a Haitian gang is now threatening to kill 17 kidnapped members of a U.S. missionary group unless its random demands are met. Democrats are sending mixed signals on whether they'll agree on a giant social spending package by the weekend. Attorney General Merrick Garland insisted he is not out to silence parents who confront school boards over curricula and mask mandates. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Here's what to expect after House vote holding Bannon in contempt

    Oct 21 2021

    Thursday marked a critical step in the investigation into the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, as the U.S. House voted to hold former Trump aide Steve Bannon in criminal contempt for defying a congressional subpoena. Democrats' rebuke was joined by nine Republicans, with a final vote of 229-202. Judy Woodruff discusses the vote's implications with Josh Gerstein, senior legal affairs reporter for Politico. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How Dem debate over Biden climate agenda could affect U.S. economy

    Oct 21 2021

    The coming weeks will be pivotal for President Joe Biden's domestic agenda as Congress and the White House debate the trade-offs of a major bill that could affect the pocketbooks, working conditions and social safety net for Americans. William Brangham looks at what it could mean for coping with climate change with congressional correspondent Lisa Desjardins and ProPublica's Abrahm Lustgarten. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Group aims to reintroduce Jaguars -- once nearly hunted to extinction -- to Argentina

    Oct 21 2021

    The Jaguar, the biggest cat in the Americas, was hunted and poached to extinction in parts of Argentina about 70 years ago. They are in critical danger of vanishing completely. Only a few hundred are left in the country. Rewilding Argentina, a conservation nonprofit, has embarked on an audacious plan to reintroduce the species to its long lost home. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How this 'vulture' hedge fund's gutting of local newsrooms could hurt Americans

    Oct 21 2021

    The hedge fund Alden Global Capital has been acquiring scores of U.S. newspapers across the country -- then gutting newsrooms and selling off assets. It's part of a larger trend in the erosion of local news and related jobs in the last decade. A look at Alden Global Capital is the cover story of the latest issue of The Atlantic. Staff writer McKay Coppins joins John Yang with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Uganda's Batwa tribe, considered conservation refugees, see little government support

    Oct 21 2021

    The Batwa people are one of the oldest surviving Indigenous tribes in Africa. They live high in the mountain forests, straddling several East African countries. The Batwa are now also called conservation refugees, as governments scramble to cope with the pressures of population growth and climate change. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from western Uganda. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • A Brief But Spectacular take on the disability rights movement

    Oct 21 2021

    Since childhood, Judy Heumann has faced ableism -- institutionally, socially, and personally. New York's public school system prevented her from enrolling, and she was often bullied or excluded by her own peers. After a lifetime of activism, she is finally seeing a shift in how people with disabilities are viewed and treated. She gives us her Brief But Spectacular on the disability rights movement. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: NYC to mandate COVID vaccine for all public employees

    Oct 20 2021

    In our news wrap Wednesday, New York City ordered 46,000 police, firefighters and other city employees to get vaccinated by Nov. 1 -- or get placed on unpaid leave. Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered most Russian workers to take off for at least a week as COVID cases and deaths keep rising. Nikolas Cruz pleaded guilty to murdering 17 people at a high school in Parkland, Florida in 2018. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What parents need to know about vaccinating young children against COVID-19

    Oct 20 2021

    The White House laid out plans Wednesday for children between the ages of 5 and 11 to soon receive the COVID-19 vaccine. If approved, shots could begin as soon as November. But many parents are still wondering about whether to get their children vaccinated. Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo, lead epidemiologist for the Johns Hopkins COVID-19 testing insights initiative, joins William Brangham to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Sen. Kaine on next moves for voting reform after GOP blocked Dem measure

    Oct 20 2021

    The partisan divide in Washington was on full display Wednesday as a Democrat-backed voting bill failed to move forward in the U.S. Senate. Every Republican lined up in opposition to the Freedom to Vote Act, which Democrats say would have improved voting access and election integrity. Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine co-sponsored the legislation and joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Why Biden's approval rating is sinking and how Americans view democracy, justice

    Oct 20 2021

    A new national poll paints a troubling picture of an American electorate worried about the future of democracy, sharply divided on issues of personal freedom and dissatisfied with President Joe Biden's leadership. Judy Woodruff walks through the results with Ann Selzer, president of Selzer & Company, which wrote the poll in collaboration with Grinnell College. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Idlib, Syria's final rebel stronghold, struggles to get lifesaving aid amid COVID spike

    Oct 20 2021

    Government shelling killed a dozen people in Syria's northwest Idlib province Wednesday. Idlib is the final stronghold for rebels still fighting the Assad regime. But the province is also under attack from a different threat -- its most severe wave of COVID-19. The delta variant is hitting hospitals already weakened by war. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Chappelle Netflix special is 'hate speech disguised as jokes,' advocate says

    Oct 20 2021

    The blowback to Dave Chappelle's latest comedy special, produced by Netflix, has reached a boiling point. Netflix employees walked off the job Wednesday, demanding the company better support its transgender workers. Imara Jones, creator of TransLash Media, a media non-profit that focuses on the transgender community, joins Amna Nawaz with more perspective on the matter. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Pilot oxygen backup system offers new hope for Ugandan hospitals plagued by power cuts

    Oct 20 2021

    The pandemic is bringing new attention to a critical health care challenge plaguing many countries: A shortage or unreliable supply of medical oxygen. It's also prompting many medical providers to look at ways to fix the problem. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one example in Uganda. This report is part of our "Breakthrough" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Tuba player Richard Antoine White's journey from homelessness to 'belonging' on stage

    Oct 20 2021

    Jeffrey Brown reports on musician Richard Antoine White's unlikely journey from the streets of Baltimore, Maryland, to concert halls around the globe -- thanks to his mastery of the tuba. This story is part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Progressives, moderate Dems close to agreement on Biden's legislative agenda

    Oct 19 2021

    After public feuds between moderate and progressive Democrats cast doubt on a path forward toward agreement on the infrastructure and Build Back Better agenda, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer expressed optimism Tuesday that the dust has settled in his ranks, paving the way to a compromise. Lisa Desjardins and Yamiche Alcindor join Judy Woodruff with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: DHS Sec. Alejandro Mayorkas tests positive for COVID-19

    Oct 19 2021

    In our news wrap Tuesday, U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas tested positive for COVID-19. He's fully vaccinated and is isolating at home with mild congestion. Kidnappers in Haiti who abducted 17 members of a U.S. missionary group are demanding a million dollars for each captive. North Korea stoked new tensions after firing a short-range ballistic missile into the Sea of Japan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Why the Jan. 6 panel is pursuing a contempt vote for Steve Bannon

    Oct 19 2021

    The special congressional committee investigating the January assault on the U.S. Capitol meets Tuesday to consider whether to recommend charging Steve Bannon with contempt of Congress for refusing to comply with a subpoena and sit for a deposition. Ambassador Norman Eisen, who was a counsel to the House Judiciary Committee for the first Trump impeachment, joins Judy Woodruff with more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How federal emergency aid helped offset costs for students in historically Black schools

    Oct 19 2021

    The pandemic has posed unprecedented financial challenges for U.S. colleges and students. The federal government has provided more than $70 billion in relief. Over $3 billion specifically for historically Black colleges and universities and more than $1 billion to minority-serving institutions where many students face fiscal hardship. Yamiche Alcindor reports for our "Rethinking College" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Sec. Cardona on combating COVID's impact on student mental health, forgiving student loans

    Oct 19 2021

    Leading child health care groups -- including the American Academy of Pediatrics -- said Tuesday the pandemic has triggered a "national state of emergency" in mental health among U.S. youth, and policy makers need to act. The Education Department issued new guidance for how to address the crisis in K-12 schools and bolster mental health. Secretary Miguel Cardona joins Amna Nawaz with the details. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How Ahmaud Arbery's killing spurred a national reckoning on race

    Oct 19 2021

    Jury selection is underway in the high profile case of white men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, in Georgia -- one of the cases that set in motion a wave of racial justice protests nationwide in the summer of 2020. For our ongoing "Race Matters" series, William Brangham discusses the case with Gerald Griggs , vice president of the NAACP Atlanta chapter. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Many Jews fleeing Nazi rule spent years hiding in forests. A new book tells their stories

    Oct 19 2021

    During the early Nazi occupation of Europe, they forced more than a million Jews to live and work in ghettos. Most were killed in a brutal process called liquidation, or sent to concentration camps. Some 25,000 Jews escaped the ghettos and hid in Eastern European forests. The members of one family that survived years in the woods tell their story in Rebecca Frankel's new book, "Into the Forest." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Roger Dangel's replica Oval Office holds historical artifacts that transcend time

    Oct 19 2021

    For many Americans during the pandemic, the home office has seen a lot of activity. But, as Maya Trabulsi of station KPBS reports, one San Diego man dedicated his home's workspace to his passion: American history. It's part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Jury selection begins in Ahmaud Arbery trial

    Oct 18 2021

    In our news wrap Monday, jury selection began in the murder of Ahmaud Arbery. Human rights activists disrupted the Olympic torch lighting in Greece - for the Beijing Winter Games. Former President Donald Trump filed suit to block release of his White House records about the January assault on the U.S. Capitol. Russia suspended its diplomatic mission to NATO. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How Biden's legislative agenda is faring in Congress

    Oct 18 2021

    Negotiations over Democrats' multi trillion-dollar work and family bill continue on Capitol Hill. Congressional correspondent Lisa Desjardins provides an update on the state of play. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Kidnapping of American missionaries in Haiti a jab at the U.S., expert says

    Oct 18 2021

    A group of majority American missionaries in Haiti have not been heard from since their kidnapping over the weekend, a. As Yamiche Alcindor reports, there has been a growing number of abductions in Haiti, amid a number of crises there. Gary Pierre-Pierre, founder of The Haitian Times, an English-language publication serving the Haitian diaspora, joins Yamiche to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • 'Striketober' : Growing number of U.S. workers are pushing back against employers

    Oct 18 2021

    The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees union reached an agreement on a new film and TV contract this weekend, averting a strike that would have ground productions around the country to a halt. But it's not the only showdown between workers and businesses, especially after over a year of risky and demanding work on the front lines of the pandemic. Stephanie Sy reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Can the world's whitest paint save Earth?

    Oct 18 2021

    A special experimental white paint that recently made it into the Guinness World Records could one day help keep the world from heating up. John Yang explains from West Lafayette, Indiana. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Remembering the life and legacy of Colin Powell, a national security trailblazer

    Oct 18 2021

    Colin Powell, the first Black secretary of state died Monday from complications related to COVID-19, but his family says he also suffered from multiple myeloma, which compromised his immune system. Nick Schifrin looks back at his life and career. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • How Colin Powell was the nexus of America's 'momentous' decisions

    Oct 18 2021

    Judy Woodruff discusses Colin Powell's legacy with two men who knew him well: Richard Haass was the director of policy planning at the State Department when Powell was secretary of state during the George W. Bush administration. He's now president of the Council on Foreign Relations. Michael Gordon reports on the Defense Department, and has authored several books about the U.S. military. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Democratic negotiations over Biden agenda, voter views

    Oct 18 2021

    Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including how the Democratic stalemate in Congress is influencing President Joe Biden's legislative agenda, and how voters are influenced by the various ongoing debates in Congress. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders