Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • News Wrap: Activists protest Trump’s national emergency

    Feb 18 2019

    In our news wrap Monday, activists staged scattered demonstrations outside the White House and from coast to coast to protest President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency. Meanwhile, Trump blasted former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe for saying in an interview with “60 Minutes” that the president's firing of FBI Director James Comey in May 2017 may have constituted a criminal offense.

  • Of pushing out Maduro, Guaido says ‘Venezuela already decided for change’

    Feb 18 2019

    President Trump has again called for Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro to resign and hand over power to Juan Guaido, president of the National Assembly, whom the U.S. and 60 other nations recognize as interim president. Special correspondent Nadja Drost sat down with Guaido to discuss the country’s humanitarian crisis, whether he could negotiate with Maduro and the “decisive” role of the U.S.

  • Why shutdown’s impact will continue to be felt for ‘years to come’

    Feb 18 2019

    Although a second government shutdown has been averted, Yamiche Alcindor reports that repercussions from the one that ended in January are still being felt -- and they extend far beyond federal employees. She also talks to the Partnership for Public Service's Max Stier about the shutdown's long-lasting effects and how they could make federal hiring more difficult.

  • Is expanding presidential power inherently bad for democracy?

    Feb 18 2019

    The fallout from President Trump’s national emergency declaration over immigration is sparking questions about the scope of executive power. For analysis, Judy Woodruff talks to Andrew Rudalevige, professor of government at Bowdoin College and author of “The New Imperial Presidency: Renewing Presidential Power after Watergate,” and Douglas Brinkley, professor of history at Rice University.

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on national emergency poll, 2020 challengers

    Feb 18 2019

    NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter from the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including public reaction to President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency over immigration, how Democrats eager to dive into the 2020 presidential contest are courting voters in strategic states and what a Republican primary challenger could mean for the president.

  • Jazz musician Terence Blanchard on the hardest thing about composing for film

    Feb 18 2019

    Jazz musician and composer Terence Blanchard has six Grammy Awards, but this year, he's received his first Oscar nomination, for his original score in the 2018 film “BlacKkKlansman.” Jeffrey Brown sits down with Blanchard, who grew up in New Orleans, to discuss the role of music in film, why writing it requires “putting your ego aside” and how he feels about being considered for an Academy Award.

  • ‘Tidying Up’ sells Americans on the joy of decluttering

    Feb 18 2019

    A popular Netflix show featuring Japanese organizing expert Marie Kondo encourages people to discard items in their home that do not “spark joy.” The philosophy emphasized in “Tidying Up” has inspired a decluttering phenomenon across the U.S., prompting an unusual flood of donations to secondhand stores and provoking questions about consumerism and waste. Rhana Natour has the story.

  • Why we should think differently about classical music

    Feb 18 2019

    Musician and critic Jennifer Gersten wants us to transform the way we think about classical music. Perceived by many as “inaccessible, elitist, incomprehensible,” the genre is often marketed by producers and performers primarily as relaxing. Gersten shares her humble opinion on why that characterization is selling classical music short.

  • ISIS affiliate expands territory in West Africa

    Feb 17 2019

    While President Trump is declaring military victory over ISIS in Syria, an Islamic terrorist group in West Africa is gaining territory in northeast Nigeria and surrounding countries. Wall Street Journal reporter Drew Hinshaw joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the how the Islamic State West Africa Province is growing as counter-terrorism efforts in the region decline.

  • How Venezuela’s political crisis began and what’s next

    Feb 17 2019

    The U.S. and dozens of other countries are pressuring Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro to resign and allow Juan Guaido to take over. Monday, President Trump is expected to address the escalating political crisis in Venezuela during a speech in Florida. How did the crisis begin and what’s next in the region? Columbia University's Christopher Sabatini joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.

  • Academy Award-nominated film ‘End Game’ examines end-of-life care

    Feb 17 2019

    The Academy Award-nominated documentary "End Game" looks at different approaches in palliative care for people with terminal illness. The film follows medical practitioners, patients, and their families, as they tackle the difficult questions that arise during end-of-life care. NewsHour Weekend's Hari Sreenivasan sat down with the film's directors, Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman, to learn more.

  • Pope sends ‘signal’ by defrocking ex-cardinal for sexual abuse

    Feb 16 2019

    Pope Francis has defrocked ex-Cardinal and Archbishop Theodore McCarrick after officials at the Vatican found him guilty of sexually abusing both minors and adults.The announcement made Saturday comes less than a week before international church leaders meet to address the sexual abuse crisis in the church. Rev. James Martin, editor-at-large for America magazine, joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss.

  • Violent protests in Haiti may mean a humanitarian crisis

    Feb 16 2019

    Violent protests in Haiti against the government are threatening the country with a humanitarian crisis. President Jovenel Moïse is refusing to resign, there is mounting debt, and allegations of corruption. Both the U.S. and Canada are warning citizens not to travel to haiti and some tourists are stranded there. Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles updates Hari Sreenivasan on the situation

  • On the front lines: One doctor’s decades-long fight to heal Haiti

    Feb 16 2019

    A devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti created an unprecedented health crisis that led the U.S. to grant Haitians Temporary Protected Status. But with the Trump administration's plan to eliminate TPS, 60,000 Haitians living in the U.S. may be deported. NewsHour Weekend's Ivette Feliciano reports on one doctor's efforts to confront Haiti's health challenges amid a possible influx of deportees.

  • Which funding sources does Trump plan to use for wall money?

    Feb 15 2019

    President Trump declared a national emergency Friday over immigration at the U.S.-Mexico border, so he can redirect billions of dollars to build additional sections of wall there. Trump plans to take roughly $6 billion from the Defense Department and millions from other sources. Judy Woodruff talks to Yamiche Alcindor about expected legal challenges and why the president's data is problematic.

  • News Wrap: Upon court order, ICE stops force-feeding 2 detained asylum seekers

    Feb 15 2019

    In our news wrap Friday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement has stopped force-feeding two asylum seekers at an El Paso detention center who had been on a hunger strike. Also, the top Pentagon official says the U.S. will not abandon the fight against ISIS, despite plans to leave Syria. In Germany, acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said the U.S. will “continue to support” the coalition.

  • California attorney general calls Trump’s national emergency ‘reckless’

    Feb 15 2019

    Several states and organizations are preparing legal challenges to President Trump’s national emergency declaration over immigration at the U.S.-Mexico border. One of them is California, whose attorney general, Xavier Becerra, talks to Amna Nawaz about why Trump’s “reckless” action inappropriately reallocates taxpayer money, is without precedent and could violate the Constitution.

  • Kobach: Illegal immigration constitutes emergency under ‘extraordinarily broad’ act

    Feb 15 2019

    Although some Republicans have criticized President Trump's national emergency declaration, others endorse it. One of them is Kris Kobach, former Kansas secretary of state, who talks to Amna Nawaz about the “extraordinarily broad” nature of the National Emergencies Act, why a wall is a "force multiplier" and how we don’t know the true volume of illegal drugs coming across the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • What should happen to thousands of foreign ISIS fighters?

    Feb 15 2019

    In Syria, U.S.-backed Kurdish forces are retaking the final territory of the Islamic State. As the caliphate dissolves, however, what will happen to the 40,000 foreign fighters who joined the terror group’s ranks over the past few years? Many of them have been detained, but the path for prosecuting them, and preventing them from driving an ISIS resurgence, remains unclear. Nick Schifrin reports.

  • Why Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg believes he’d make a good president

    Feb 15 2019

    Pete Buttigieg, Democratic mayor of South Bend, Indiana, recently announced he has formed an exploratory committee to consider a run for the presidency in 2020. Only 37 years old and with no federal government experience, Buttigieg might seem an unlikely candidate. He sits down with Judy Woodruff to discuss tax policy, his new book and why he believes his generation's voices aren't being heard.

  • Shields and Brooks on Trump’s national emergency, Democratic platform shift

    Feb 15 2019

    Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to analyze the week in politics, including the president’s national emergency declaration, how congressional Republicans are reacting to it, the 2020 presidential field and whether Democrats are pushing their platform too far to the left.

  • Oscar nominee Regina King says ‘Beale Street’ a reminder of black resilience

    Feb 15 2019

    Set in New York City in the 1970s, “If Beale Street Could Talk” is the film adaptation of a James Baldwin novel about Tish and Fonny, a devoted young couple almost torn apart by racism and wrongful imprisonment. Jeffrey Brown sits down with actress Regina King to discuss her Oscar-nominated performance as Tish's mother in the film, pledging to work with women and the hardest thing about parenting.

  • Trump and Congress gear up for a fight over national emergency plan

    Feb 14 2019

    Congress is preparing to send a government funding package that contains a compromise on allocations for border security to President Trump, who has announced his intention to sign the bill. However, Trump also plans to declare a national emergency in order to access additional money for a border wall. Judy Woodruff talks to Lisa Desjardins and Yamiche Alcindor about what comes next.

  • News Wrap: Pence blasts European allies over Iran nuclear deal

    Feb 14 2019

    In our news wrap Thursday, Vice President Pence criticized European allies for staying in the Iran nuclear deal, saying they were intending to break U.S. sanctions against Iran. His remarks came at a conference discussing peace and stability in the Middle East. Also, the Senate confirmed William Barr as attorney general. He previously served in the role under former President George H.W. Bush.

  • Why Trump’s national emergency plan could present a ‘major constitutional test’

    Feb 14 2019

    After signing a congressional funding bill, President Trump plans to declare a national emergency to obtain additional money for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. But would such an executive action be lawful? Judy Woodruff speaks with former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta about who decides what constitutes a national emergency and whether the president is attempting to circumvent Congress.