Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • As New York's death toll approaches 2,000, Cuomo warns other states of what's to come

    Apr 01 2020

    New York's death toll from COVID-19 is nearing 2,000, and experts warn it will continue to rise. But many other areas of the country are also seeing cases climb and taking steps to try to limit them. President Trump sounded a grave warning during a Tuesday Coronavirus Task Force briefing, saying the virus is projected to kill at least 100,000 Americans in the months to come. John Yang reports.

  • How Miami Mayor Francis Suarez hopes to avoid an 'apocalyptic' scenario

    Apr 01 2020

    Miami Mayor Francis Suarez is a public official who has battled COVID-19 on a personal level. Recently out of quarantine, Suarez is now trying to lead his city through the coronavirus crisis. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss ramping up testing for the virus, trying to increase hospital capacity quickly and why he feels mortgage and rent relief are critical to avoiding an "apocalyptic" scenario.

  • Strategies from hospitals on the front lines of the COVID-19 fight

    Apr 01 2020

    COVID-19 is a huge challenge for many U.S. hospitals, from large cities to rural areas. The next few weeks are expected to be especially difficult, as critical supplies dwindle and health care workers are stressed. William Brangham talks to Dr. Phillip Coule, chief medical officer for Georgia's Augusta University Health System, and Michael Dowling, president and CEO of New York's Northwell Health.

  • News Wrap: U.S. believes China vastly understated its COVID-19 death toll

    Apr 01 2020

    In our news wrap Wednesday, U.S. intelligence believes that China vastly understated its own death toll in the COVID-19 pandemic. Two senior U.S. officials say the true number of dead in Wuhan, where the outbreak began, could be 10 times what was reported. Also, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani says the U.S. is missing a historic opportunity to ease tensions with sanctions relief.

  • Should everyone be wearing a mask to protect against coronavirus?

    Apr 01 2020

    Face masks are critical protection for medical workers caring for COVID-19 patients, but should everyone else also be wearing them? So far, federal health officials have warned against the general public wearing face masks when outside the home, but that guidance could be changing soon. Amid a global shortage of these masks, William Brangham reports on the conflicting debate.

  • Asian Americans report rise in racist attacks amid pandemic

    Apr 01 2020

    As coronavirus has spread across the U.S., so have reports of violence against people of Asian descent, and the FBI warns a surge in hate crimes could be yet to come. These fears have led to the creation of a website for reporting such attacks -- and it has registered more than 1,000 incidents in less than two weeks. Amna Nawaz talks to Cynthia Choi of Chinese for Affirmative Action.

  • Taiwan's aggressive efforts are paying off in fight against COVID-19

    Apr 01 2020

    As the coronavirus pandemic spreads around the world, Taiwan seems to have it under control. The island is only 80 miles off the coast of mainland China and very near to where the virus originated; plus there were many daily flights to it from Wuhan. But Taiwan has only 329 confirmed cases of COVID-19, and only five people have died from it. Nick Schifrin reports on this COVID-19 success story.

  • Trump puts focus on national security and data models amid coronavirus outbreak

    Apr 01 2020

    President Trump was in the White House briefing room again Wednesday evening for what has become a regular discussion of his administration's response to COVID-19. He was joined by other political leaders and health officials -- and this time, by prominent national security figures, as well. Yamiche Alcindor was there, and she joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • Despite social isolation, these Americans have found new ways to connect

    Apr 01 2020

    The coronavirus pandemic has forced people to change how they interact with each other and seek out new ways to connect and celebrate. Lisa Desjardins shares a few stories of Americans' new normal.

  • This unusual Charleston college produces educated artisans

    Apr 01 2020

    An unusual college in Charleston, South Carolina, offers a four-year liberal arts education while students also earn certification in one of eight artisan trades. The blended approach enhances students' capabilities -- and helps replenish the domestic pipeline of craftspeople. Jeffrey Brown visited the school's campus for Canvas, our arts and culture series, before the coronavirus pandemic hit.

  • U.S. restrictions on movement likely to persist as death toll tops China's

    Mar 31 2020

    The U.S. death toll from novel coronavirus has now exceeded that of China. While Italy and Spain have recorded many more deaths, the U.S. has the most confirmed cases of the illness. Dozens of states have limited residents' movement outside their homes. And in New York, the national epicenter of the outbreak, a convention center has been converted into an overflow hospital. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • News Wrap: Dow Jones concludes worst quarter since 1987

    Mar 31 2020

    In our news wrap Tuesday, Wall Street ended a brutal first quarter with fresh losses. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 23 percent during the first three months of 2020 -- the largest percentage decline since 1987. Also, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell claimed that President Trump's impeachment trial earlier this year diverted government attention from the looming coronavirus crisis.

  • Amid economic crisis, food banks are struggling to keep all the newly hungry fed

    Mar 31 2020

    With unemployment soaring, the COVID-19 outbreak is taking a staggering toll on workers. Food banks are ramping up their services to meet the rising demand, even as donations, volunteers and supplies are limited. Meanwhile, organizations worry about keeping their own workers safe from the virus. Stephanie Sy reports as part of our Chasing the Dream series on poverty and opportunity in America.

  • How learning changes when school happens at home and online

    Mar 31 2020

    More than 55 million American students are staying home amid the coronavirus pandemic. The impacts are huge -- affecting students, parents and teachers. Learning is happening with a host of new challenges. Kate Gardoqui of the Great Schools Partnership joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • Why scientists need to learn more about how COVID-19 behaves within a human body

    Mar 31 2020

    How much do we know about COVID-19, the virus spreading misery across the globe? Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss understanding the dynamics of the virus within people it has infected, why some experience much more severe forms of illness than others, how we can limit asymptomatic transmission and the need to buy medical researchers time to develop treatments.

  • Why Trump wants to relax automotive fuel efficiency standards now

    Mar 31 2020

    The Trump administration wants to roll back another federal regulation intended to reduce global warming. Obama-era automobile fuel efficiency rules require U.S. vehicles to increase mileage standards by an average of 5 percent per year from 2021 through 2026. Tuesday's move would reduce the improvement threshold to 1.5 percent. The Washington Post's Juliet Eilperin joins John Yang to discuss.

  • Trump warns of more 'very tough' days ahead as death toll passes that of 9/11

    Mar 31 2020

    President Trump's Coronavirus Task Force held a briefing Tuesday evening to provide an update on the U.S. fight against COVID-19. The tone at the news conference was sober, as Trump urged Americans to prepare for a "very tough" period ahead. Yamiche Alcindor joins Judy Woodruff to discuss how Trump's pandemic messaging has evolved and what might be in the next piece of crisis legislation.

  • U.S. Navy says it won't evacuate ship housing infected sailors

    Mar 31 2020

    The USS Theodore Roosevelt, a Pacific-based aircraft carrier, is facing its own outbreak of the novel coronavirus. With several sailors testing positive, the ship's captain made the extraordinary request for it to be almost entirely evacuated. But the admiral in charge of the U.S. Pacific Fleet says that maintaining military readiness comes first. Nick Schifrin joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • 'Inheritance' author Dani Shapiro answers your questions

    Mar 31 2020

  • Astronaut Christina Koch on women in space and 11 months without gravity

    Mar 31 2020

    For nearly a year, astronaut Christina Koch was away from the planet, working on the International Space Station and orbiting Earth more than 5,200 times. Her mission was the longest continuous spaceflight by a woman and the second longest for any U.S. astronaut ever. Koch joins Amna Nawaz to discuss how her body reacted to 11 months without gravity and what it means to see more women in space.

  • More U.S. states lock populations down as COVID-19 cases climb

    Mar 30 2020

    The coronavirus pandemic keeps burning through the U.S. population. The country now has 160,000 confirmed cases of the illness and 2,900 deaths -- and infections are still rising. In New York state, the nation's worst hot spot, Gov. Andrew Cuomo continues to appeal for outside help. But health care systems across the country are straining to support the surge in patients. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • Why the U.S. is still 'severely constrained' in ability to test for COVID-19

    Mar 30 2020

    Despite recent signs of advancement, many health experts say the U.S. capacity to test for the novel coronavirus remains too limited and progress too slow. President Trump has previously claimed anyone could be tested -- but that isn't what we're hearing from people who have tried. Jennifer Nuzzo, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • 'Everyone is afraid' as Illinois virus cases spike

    Mar 30 2020

    Illinois has become another national hot spot for coronavirus, with a surging number of confirmed cases. Most are in Cook County, the region that is home to Chicago. William Brangham talks to Dr. Claudia Fegan, chief medical officer for Cook County Health, about how her employees are holding up amid the stress and why they continue to worry about a shortage of critical medical supplies.

  • At Greek refugee camp, there are few defenses against COVID-19 threat

    Mar 30 2020

    Human rights activists and medical nonprofits are calling on the Greek government to evacuate overcrowded refugee camps on islands in the Aegean Sea, where an outbreak of COVID-19 would likely cause humanitarian catastrophe. Concerns are especially grave regarding Moria camp on the island of Lesbos. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports.

  • News Wrap: Van Gogh painting stolen from Dutch museum

    Mar 30 2020

    In our news wrap Monday, police in the Netherlands are searching for a Vincent van Gogh painting, "The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring (1884)." Investigators say thieves stole the artwork from the Singer Laren museum east of Amsterdam after breaking in by smashing a glass door. Also, Afghanistan began releasing some 10,000 prisoners; members of the Taliban were not among them.