Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app.

Episodes

  • U.S. officials urge adherence to social distancing as NY infections slow

    Apr 08 2020

    The human cost of the novel coronavirus pandemic is still rising worldwide, but infections may be leveling off in Italy, Spain and New York, which lost nearly 800 people to the disease Tuesday. U.S. officials at both the state and federal levels are urging people to remain vigilant about social distancing even as its adoption appears to be flattening the curve of new cases. John Yang reports.

  • Sherrod Brown on the influence of Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign

    Apr 08 2020

    Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders suspended his campaign for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination on Wednesday after enduring a series of disappointing results in state primary elections. But many of the positions on which Sanders campaigned still resonate with the liberal wing of the party. Lisa Desjardins reports, and Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

  • News Wrap: Mnuchin says Americans will start receiving coronavirus money next week

    Apr 08 2020

    In our news wrap Wednesday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told House Democrats Americans will start receiving direct deposits of COVID-19 aid next week. He also pressed Congress to add $250 billion to the Payroll Protection Program for small businesses. Also, the Afghan government freed 100 Taliban prisoners, saying the release was part of an agreement between the insurgent group and the U.S.

  • Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on why he hasn't issued a stay-at-home order

    Apr 08 2020

    Arkansas is one of only five U.S. states without a stay-at-home order in place despite the coronavirus pandemic. Its number of confirmed COVID-19 cases passed 1,000 on Wednesday. Gov. Asa Hutchinson joins Judy Woodruff to discuss his state's "very targeted response" to the illness, why he thinks Arkansas residents are effectively social distancing already and the effort to secure more PPE.

  • This ER doctor survived COVID-19. Here's her advice

    Apr 08 2020

    New York state has roughly 150,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19. That's more than any country in the world other than the United States. Health care workers in New York are feeling the pressure of the pandemic -- as well as concerns for their own wellbeing. Amna Nawaz speaks with Dr. Dara Kass, an emergency medicine physician who has herself tested positive for, and recovered from, COVID-19.

  • The challenge of protecting homeless populations amid COVID-19

    Apr 08 2020

    In order to protect themselves and their communities from the novel coronavirus outbreak, Americans across the country are staying home. But what happens to those who don't have one? Stephanie Sy reports on how people experiencing homelessness are uniquely vulnerable and what's being done in some states to help them through the pandemic.

  • How the U.S. Navy handled a tumultuous week

    Apr 08 2020

    The U.S. Navy has had a tumultuous week, beginning with a request from the captain of the USS Theodore Roosevelt to evacuate most of his ship due to a COVID-19 outbreak, and culminating with the resignation of the Navy secretary who fired him. Nick Schifrin talks to retired Adm. Michael Mullen, who served as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the George W. Bush and Obama administrations.

  • How Sweden and Denmark represent opposite Scandinavian COVID-19 responses

    Apr 08 2020

    In Scandinavia, Sweden is experiencing a rising death toll from COVID-19 -- as well as growing doubt about the country's more relaxed approach to handling it. Meanwhile, neighboring Denmark is set to ease some of its lockdown restrictions after a drop in numbers of infections and deaths. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant, who lived in Copenhagen for seven years, reports from outside London.

  • New York sees signs of virus plateau; in China, Wuhan lockdown finally lifted

    Apr 07 2020

    The coronavirus has claimed more than 12,000 lives in the U.S., but signs of hope are emerging. The number of patients being hospitalized in New York, the nation's top virus hot spot, has dropped, in an indication that physical distancing measures are working. Across the globe in Wuhan, the Chinese city where the outbreak originated, an 11-week lockdown has finally lifted. Stephanie Sy reports.

  • Bill Gates on where the COVID-19 pandemic will hurt the most

    Apr 07 2020

    Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates has spent the last few decades working to improve global health through his philanthropic organization, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. One area of focus has been reducing the spread of infectious disease -- a mission taking on new significance amid the global COVID-19 pandemic. Gates joins Judy Woodruff to discuss vaccine outlook, economic impact and more.

  • Why Larry Hogan is proud of fellow governors' response to COVID-19

    Apr 07 2020

    Governors across the country are working together to ensure frontline medical workers receive the protective gear that can keep them from contracting or transmitting COVID-19. Maryland's Larry Hogan is the chairman of the National Governors Association, and he joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the ongoing effort to "catch up" to the crisis and why he feels proud of how U.S. governors are responding.

  • News Wrap: Acting Navy Secretary Modly resigns after controversy

    Apr 07 2020

    In our news wrap Tuesday, acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly has resigned after a tirade against the former captain of a warship hit by COVID-19. Modly had said that fired Captain Brett Crozier was "too naive or too stupid" to hold his post. Also, White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham is leaving her post to become the first lady's chief of staff. She never held a formal press briefing.

  • What these New York EMTs are seeing as they respond to COVID-19 cases

    Apr 07 2020

    New York remains the epicenter of the U.S. coronavirus outbreak. Medical teams there are facing a surge of seriously ill patients, and doing so while concerned about their own level of protection from the disease. William Brangham talks to Adam Bliden and Pearse Matthews, EMTs in the state's Rockland County, about the "terrifying" ordeal of knowing that many patients they pick up won't survive.

  • Patients dying of COVID-19 are disproportionately black. Chicago's mayor isn't surprised

    Apr 07 2020

    According to early data about the scope of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S., COVID-19 is hitting Americans of color especially hard. The CDC has not published racial breakdowns of deaths, but some states are -- and they show that patients dying of the disease are disproportionately black. That trend is evident in Chicago, whose mayor, Lori Lightfoot, joins Yamiche Alcindor to discuss.

  • 2 views on Wisconsin's decision to hold in-person voting Tuesday

    Apr 07 2020

    The coronavirus pandemic has delayed many presidential primaries, but Wisconsin is going forward with its own on Tuesday. It's the first state to hold a major election with in-person voting amid a stay-at-home order -- and much legal jostling preceded the decision. Amna Nawaz talks to the state's lieutenant governor, Mandela Barnes, and Ronna McDaniel, chair of the Republican National Committee.

  • Special podcast episode: Voices from coronavirus isolation

    Apr 06 2020

    As the coronavirus pandemic continues, one thing most of us are struggling with, regardless of where or who we are, is an overwhelming feeling of isolation. In this special episode, correspondent Lisa Desjardins and digital arts editor Joshua Barajas talk to listeners -- a school principal without students, a domestic worker with no work, a business owner without a business, and a comedian without a crowd -- about how they're coping. Plus, we hear from some of you.

  • U.S. death toll passes 10,000; British prime minister in ICU

    Apr 06 2020

    The U.S. death toll from coronavirus has passed 10,000, as public health officials warn Americans to brace for a sad and somber week. Although cases appear to be leveling off in New York, they are surging in Michigan and other parts of the country. Meanwhile, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been hospitalized and moved to the ICU. John Yang and special correspondent Ryan Chilcote report.

  • New HHS survey reveals the COVID-19 challenges U.S. hospitals face

    Apr 06 2020

    A new report from the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services offers a snapshot of what hospitals are facing nationwide as the coronavirus spreads. A survey of more than 320 hospitals found week-long waits for COVID-19 test results, insufficient staff to run ventilators and shortages of basic cleaning supplies. Assistant Inspector General Ann Maxwell joins Judy Woodruff.

  • Kentucky governor calls COVID-19 response 'a test of our humanity'

    Apr 06 2020

    Gov. Andy Beshear of Kentucky is one of the many leaders across the U.S. competing with the federal government and with other states to secure critical medical equipment during the coronavirus pandemic. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the sacrifices he sees Kentuckians making, what the state government is doing to try to increase health care capacity and a "bad system" of bidding for supplies.

  • News Wrap: Ousted intelligence inspector general urges other watchdogs to speak up

    Apr 06 2020

    In our news wrap Monday, the former inspector general for U.S. intelligence is urging other watchdogs not to be muzzled by his ouster. Michael Atkinson was fired by President Trump Friday for passing along the whistleblower complaint that led to Trump's impeachment. Also, the State Department has designated a Russian white supremacist group a terror organization, charging it has trained neo-Nazis.

  • What's it like to be pregnant amid a pandemic? New and prospective mothers share stories

    Apr 06 2020

    Across the U.S., expectant parents and those who have recently given birth are confronting an unanticipated layer of stress due to coronavirus. Health care providers have had to rethink how best to offer prenatal care at a time people are being told to stay home. And some hospitals have barred visitors -- including partners -- during delivery due to the virus' contagiousness. Amna Nawaz reports.

  • Pritzker: Federal government has delivered less than 10 percent of PPE Illinois requested

    Apr 06 2020

    Roughly 10 weeks ago, a woman in Chicago became the second known case of novel coronavirus in the U.S. Now, the number of confirmed infections in Illinois is nearing 12,000, and more than 300 people have died. The state's governor, J.B. Pritzker, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss how officials are increasing hospital capacity in Illinois and why testing for COVID-19 continues to be a problem.

  • How the fragile health care systems of the Middle East are bracing for COVID-19

    Apr 06 2020

    The number of coronavirus cases in the Middle East has risen to nearly 60,000, doubling in a single week. Governments in the region are scrambling to try to prevent the virus' spread, knowing that their fragile health care systems stand little chance against a disease that has overwhelmed the world's most medically advanced countries. Special correspondent Jane Ferguson reports from Beirut.

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on postponed primaries, Trump-Biden call

    Apr 06 2020

    NPR's Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Lisa Desjardins to discuss the latest political news, including the fallout from postponing so many 2020 primary elections, a phone call between President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden about coronavirus response and the fallout from Trump's firing of the intelligence community inspector general.

  • What this inside look at Facebook says about Mark Zuckerberg and his business priorities

    Apr 06 2020

    Wired magazine's Steven Levy has reported on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg for years. In his new book, "Facebook: The Inside Story," Levy draws upon that familiarity, as well as a young Zuckerberg's recently unearthed journals, for an intimate look at the social media giant -- including its reluctance to acknowledge warning signs due to a relentless focus on growth. Levy joins John Yang to discuss.