Podcast

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Don't have time for a full news hour? Listen to the PBS NewsHour, segment by segment. Our full coverage of politics, science, arts, health, national and international news is included in this feed in easy-to-digest 5 to 10 minute segments. Segments are published each night by 9 p.m. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full show, Shields and Brooks, Politics Monday, Brief but Spectacular, and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS ...more

Episodes

  • Senate debate intensifies ahead of critical votes on Biden's COVID relief bill

    Mar 05 2021

    The latest jobs report showed a surprising rebound in the labor market, with employers adding a net of 379,000 new jobs in February. And the unemployment rate fell a tenth of a percentage point, to 6.2 percent. The dip in unemployment comes as the Senate debates a massive coronavirus relief bill, poised to bring economic aid to millions struggling during the pandemic. Lisa Desjardins reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Rep. Swalwell files lawsuit against Trump and his allies over Capitol attack

    Mar 05 2021

    In our news wrap Friday, House impeachment manager and California Democrat Rep. Eric Swalwell filed a lawsuit against former President Trump and several of his allies for inciting the Capitol insurrection, a new CDC study sheds light on how mask mandates and other rules have slowed COVID infections and deaths, and a Black woman will be officiating games for the first time in NFL history. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on the need to go big with COVID relief

    Mar 05 2021

    As the debate over an economic relief bill continues in the Senate, the surge in hiring in February suggests that the prospects of a better spring ahead for the U.S. economy. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest and how it might affect the debate over the size and scope of the COVID relief package. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Pope Francis makes first-ever papal visit to Iraq amid violent threats and a deadly virus

    Mar 05 2021

    It was a pilgrimage never seen before, in the face of violent threats and a deadly virus. Pope Francis arrived on Friday in Baghdad for the first-ever papal visit to Iraq. Nick Schifrin reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Minneapolis on edge as the trial in the police killing of George Floyd approaches

    Mar 05 2021

    The trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is set to begin soon. Chauvin is accused of murder in last May's killing of George Floyd -- a death that set off nationwide unrest. As special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, the city is bracing for what's to come. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Brooks and Capehart on the COVID relief debate and the political divide on voting rights

    Mar 05 2021

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the battle over voting rights, the lifting of pandemic restrictions in some states, and wrangling over the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Honoring 5 remarkable people who lost their lives to the coronavirus

    Mar 05 2021

    Even as hope for an end to the pandemic grows, more than 520,000 people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19. We take a moment to remember five remarkable individuals lost to this disease. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Capitol Police ask the National Guard to remain deployed for two more months

    Mar 04 2021

    In our news wrap Thursday, Capitol Police asked for National Guard troops to remain deployed there for two more months, U.S. Senate begins debate on President Biden's COVID relief package, the U.S is now vaccinating more than 2 million people per day, protests continue in Myanmar a day after security forces killed 38 people, and U.S. jobless claims climbed higher last week. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Sen. John Thune on COVID relief: 'this is a big, wasteful, bloated bill'

    Mar 04 2021

    As the U.S. Senate moves toward floor debate on this next round of stimulus, we get the perspective of South Dakota Republican Sen. John Thune. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss some of the components of the legislation and other debates in Congress, including unemployment insurance, state and local aid, and the federal minimum wage. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Sen. Bernie Sanders: COVID relief bill 'addresses the crises facing working families'

    Mar 04 2021

    For an opposing perspective on COVID relief and the congressional agenda we turn to Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who chairs the Senate's budget committee. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the minimum wage, the Republican response to President Biden's agenda, and the need for federal aid for local and state governments during the pandemic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Georgia's new election legislation highlights stark divide on voting access

    Mar 04 2021

    Republican state legislatures across the country are moving rapidly to pass new voting laws, amid former President Donald Trump's continued false claims of election fraud. Lisa Desjardins takes us to the battleground state of Georgia and explains the raging debate. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • House Democrats pass sweeping elections bill and major legislation on overhauling police

    Mar 04 2021

    House Democrats passed a landmark bill Wednesday that would expand voting rights and another key piece of legislation on police reform through the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act -- something Democrats have been pushing for since the death of George Floyd sparked nationwide protests last year. Lisa Desjardins joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • COVID-19 lockdown compounds Lebanon's economic crises

    Mar 04 2021

    Protests erupted again this week in Lebanon, as a spiraling currency crisis led to violence in the streets. A strict COVID-19 lockdown has crushed the economy, causing many Lebanese to go months without an income. And as special correspondent Leila Molana-Allen reports from Tripoli, many now are left with nothing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Asian Americans face a wave of discrimination during the pandemic

    Mar 04 2021

    A string of brutal attacks on elderly Asian Americans has brought new attention to the rise of violence and harassment of Asian Americans. Since the pandemic began, more than 3,000 anti-Asian "hate incidents" have been reported in the U.S. according to the group, "Stop AAPI Hate." Asian American and Pacific Islander activist Helen Zia and Rise founder Amanda Nguyen join Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Senate battle begins over Biden's relief plan amid new security concerns at the Capitol

    Mar 03 2021

    With the Senate set to debate the details of the COVID relief bill, members of Congress received new information about the ongoing security threats facing the Capitol. All of this comes to a head as security officials raise new questions about what went wrong during the Jan. 6 insurrection. Congressional correspondent Lisa Desjardins and foreign affairs correspondent Nick Schifrin report. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Biden denounces loosening of COVID restrictions in some states

    Mar 03 2021

    In our news wrap Wednesday, President Biden denounced decisions some state leaders are making to loosen COVID restrictions a day after Texas and Mississippi lifted mask mandates, the U.S. House moved to pass major election changes, at least 34 protesters were shot dead in Myanmar amid a crackdown by security forces, and rockets struck a U.S. base in Iraq. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Secretary of State Antony Blinken on the Biden administration's foreign policy priorities

    Mar 03 2021

    In his first speech as secretary of state, Antony Blinken on Wednesday unveiled the Biden administration's top foreign policy priorities, including containing COVID and putting Americans first. Judy Woodruff spoke with Blinken about those topics as well as vaccine diplomacy, China's human rights record, Iran nuclear talks, U.S.-Saudi Arabia relations, and U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Answering viewers' questions about COVID-19 vaccines

    Mar 03 2021

    Although the U.S. should have enough vaccines on hand for all adults by the end of May, it may take longer to inoculate enough Americans to provide adequate protection. There are many reasons for that, but key among them, lingering concerns and skepticism about the vaccine. Dr. Kimberly Manning of the Emory University School of Medicine joins Amna Nawaz to discuss and answer viewers' questions. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Millions of Americans saddled with student debt as debate continues over relief

    Mar 03 2021

    As Washington debates how to provide economic aid during the pandemic, many say one critical component should be part of future deals: forgiving student debt. But determining how much could or should be forgiven is a complicated question. Paul Solman looks at the pressure to make changes for our series, "Making Sense." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Dolly Parton on the importance of getting vaccinated against COVID-19

    Mar 03 2021

    Beloved country star Dolly Parton, who helped fund the Moderna vaccine, received her COVID-19 shot Tuesday, getting what she called "a dose of her own medicine." In a video posted to social media, she encourages us all to do the same. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • FBI director sounds the alarm on the growing threat of domestic terrorism

    Mar 02 2021

    For the first time since the January insurrection, FBI director Christopher Wray faced lawmakers on Tuesday, reflecting on the Capitol attack and the growing challenges of domestic terrorism. The hearing came as authorities make near-daily arrests related to those attacks. Lisa Desjardins reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Texas lifts COVID mask mandate, ends limits on indoor dining

    Mar 02 2021

    In our news wrap Tuesday, Texas lifted its COVID mask mandate and Gov. Greg Abbott ended limits on indoor dining at restaurants, President Biden pitched his $1.9 trillion relief bill to Senate Democrats, the U.S. is imposing economic sanctions over Alexei Navalny's poisoning and jailing in Russia, and three female media workers in Afghanistan were shot dead in attacks. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Supreme Court hears challenges to two Arizona election laws

    Mar 02 2021

    State legislatures across the country are trying to rewrite election laws after the contentious 2020 election. And as John Yang reports, a U.S. Supreme Court case argued Tuesday will determine how courts will assess those new laws. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Lawmakers look at expanding child tax credits to help low-income families

    Mar 02 2021

    The U.S. Senate is trying to pass a $1.9 trillion package for COVID and economic-related relief, with one key section providing assistance to families with children by expanding tax credits. Many families could receive a $3,000 credit per child. We hear from parents who say they are looking for help, and Elaine Maag, of the Urban Institute, joins Yamiche Alcindor to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Widespread skepticism and misinformation hamper India's vaccine rollout

    Mar 02 2021

    As countries across the globe scramble to obtain COVID-19 vaccines, India has access to millions of doses with plans to vaccinate 300 million people by August. But vaccine hesitancy and skepticism are hampering efforts, with the nation reaching just 14 million people since the drive began more than a month ago. Special correspondent Neha Poonia reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders