Podcast

The Brian Lehrer Show

Brian Lehrer leads the conversation about what matters most now in local and national politics, our own communities and our lives.

Episodes

  • Ask the Mayor: Schools Reopening, Industry City, and More

    Sep 18 2020

    Bill de Blasio, New York City Mayor, takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in New York City, including remote learning, the economy, and more.

  • Claudia Rankine's American Conversation

    Sep 18 2020

    Claudia Rankine, poet, playwright, MacArthur fellow, Yale professor, and author of Citizen: An American Lyric and her latest, Just Us: An American Conversation (Graywolf Press, 2020), talks about her new book that tries to model how Americans can start talking to each other about race.

  • Is Trump Really Brokering 'Peace' Around the World?

    Sep 18 2020

    Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post columnist and author of "Today's WorldView," the Post's international affairs newsletter, talks about the latest Trump administration attempts at peacemaking around the world and what, if anything, their impact might be.

  • Fatigue, Headaches, Brain Fog: Some COVID Symptoms Last Beyond 14 Days

    Sep 18 2020

    Dr. Dayna McCarthy, rehabilitation medicine physician at Mount Sinai, talks about working with patients suffering from long term coronavirus symptoms at the Mount Sinai Center for Post-COVID Care, and takes calls from listeners who consider themselves "long haulers." 

  • Brian Lehrer Weekend: Mentally Ill While Black; NJ Cannabis; Maria Hinojosa's Story

    Sep 18 2020

    Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Mentall Ill While Black (First) | Cannabis on the Ballot in NJ (Starts at 35:54) | Maria Hinojosa's Story (Starts at 1:02:37) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.

  • Men Are From Mars, but Could There Be Intelligent Life on Venus?

    Sep 17 2020

    This weekend scientists announced they had detected the gas phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus, which could be an indication of life. Kenneth Chang, science reporter at The New York Times, breaks down this exciting discovery, and takes your questions.

  • Will NJ Legalize Pot This Fall?

    Sep 17 2020

    After failing to legalize recreational cannabis in New Jersey last year, lawmakers have put the issue on the ballot in November. Mona Zhang, states cannabis policy reporter for POLITICO Pro, talks about the regional and national implications of legalization.   → EVENT: See Mona speak at The CannAtlantic Conference by the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists on September 26. For more information, click here.

  • Assessing the Relative Risks of Catching COVID

    Sep 17 2020

    Dr. Leana Wen, emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University, contributing columnist for The Washington Post, and former health commissioner of Baltimore, talks about the risks of attending Black Lives Matter protests and President Trump's rallies - and why the rallies are so much more dangerous to your health, plus other COVID news.

  • Joe Biden and the Latinx Vote

    Sep 17 2020

    Julio Ricardo Varela, co-host of the In The Thick podcast and founder of Latino Rebels, assesses the Biden campaign's attempts to gain support among Latinx voters.

  • What Will Industry City Look Like in the Future?

    Sep 16 2020

    Industry City has proposed a controversial rezoning of the complex to allow more offices, manufacturing and retail shops -- and City Council held a public hearing on it this week. Ben Adler, senior editor for City & State, and freelance journalist Karina Piser talk about what's at stake, the City Council hearing, and take listener calls from the Sunset Park neighborhood. 

  • Remote Learning Advice Roulette

    Sep 16 2020

    From shoddy internet, screen fatigue, and confusing assignments — helping your kid with remote learning can be a headache. On this installment of "advice roulette," your biggest questions and gripes about remote learning, and advice and tips from other listeners. Sometimes it takes a village.  

  • How the Kennedy Campaign Used Tech and Data

    Sep 16 2020

    Jill Lepore, professor of American history at Harvard University, staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of many books, including These Truths: A History of the United States, and her latest, If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future (Liveright, 2020), tells the story of a late-1950s precursor to today's tech marketing companies that was used to sell products, including political candidates, and raised the same questions we face today over manipulation and the use of da...more

  • How Do Prosecutors Decide When to Convict Cops?

    Sep 16 2020

    Emily Bazelon, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, co-host of Slate's Political Gabfest podcast, Truman Capote Fellow for creative writing and law at Yale Law School and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration (Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2020), and Elie Mystal, justice correspondent for The Nation, talk about why so few district attorneys choose to prosecute police officers who some say have very clearly committed unlawful ac...more

  • UWS NIMBYism and Shelter Residents

    Sep 15 2020

    City Council Member Helen Rosenthal (6th District, UWS) and Joshua Goldfein, staff attorney in Legal Aid's Homeless Rights Project, talk about the NIMBY campaign mounted by some residents in the Upper West Side to evict several hundred homeless men living in the Lucerne Hotel and Legal Aid's threatened countersuit to halt the further dislocations.  The relocations are currently halted pending negotiations.

  • Powerful Business Leaders vs. NYC's Mayor

    Sep 15 2020

    Kathryn Wylde, president of the Partnership for New York City, talks about the letter she helped orchestrate, signed by 163 chief executives, which implored the mayor to focus on quality-of-life problems.

  • NYC Schools Prepare to Open

    Sep 15 2020

    As New York City schools are preparing to re-open, WNYC and Gothamist reporter Sophia Chang and WNYC reporter Jessica Gould talk about the hygiene and ventilation conditions in schools, how teachers are feeling and the stats on teachers and COVID cases, so far.

  • Maria Hinojosa's Story

    Sep 15 2020

    Maria Hinojosa, anchor and executive producer of Latino USA, and the author of Once I Was You: A Memoir of Love and Hate in a Torn America (Simon and Schuster, 2020), talks about her own life and where her story intersects with national issues.

  • The Wildfires Are Making the Climate Crisis Impossible to Ignore

    Sep 14 2020

    As the West Coast tragically burns in out-of-control wildfires, Emily Atkin, writer of the newsletter/host of the podcast called HEATED, talks about how the progressively worse fire seasons have made the climate crisis impossible to ignore.

  • Monday Morning Campaign Politics: Door Knocking In A Pandemic

    Sep 14 2020

    Asma Khalid, political correspondent for NPR and co-host of The NPR Politics Podcast, talks about the status of the Biden/Harris campaign and other national political news.

  • Mentally Ill While Black

    Sep 14 2020

    Dr. Ashwin Vasan, epidemiologist and professor at Columbia and CEO of Fountain House, a community-based mental and public health organization, and Christina Sparrock, mental health advocate and Fountain House member, talks about the intersection of mental health and racial justice in light of the Daniel Prude killing, and take calls from Black listeners about mental health stigma, and how it compounds their anxiety around the police.  For all individuals with mental health issues, there’s the ...more

  • COVID-19 Tests are Supposed to Be Free. Why Are People Being Charged Anyway?

    Sep 14 2020

    Sarah Kliff, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, talks about her latest reporting around why some people are receiving bills for COVID-19 testing when Congress sought to ensure that patients would not face costs connected to the virus. Plus, why is it so hard to find tests for children?

  • Brian Lehrer Weekend: Solving the 'Coronavirus Test Mess'; How to Vote in the Tri-State Area; WNYC's Plan to cover Race, Class and Social Justice

    Sep 11 2020

    Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Solving the 'Coronavirus Test Mess' (First) | How to Vote in the Tri-State Area (Starts at 40:55) |  WNYC's Plan to cover Race, Class and Social Justice (Starts at 1:18:16)

  • Your Back to College Stories

    Sep 11 2020

    Doug Lederman, editor and co-founder of Inside Higher Ed., ticks through the latest reopening plans, new cases, and quarantine procedures at colleges around the country. Plus, your calls on the first weeks back to campus.

  • What Led to 9/11

    Sep 11 2020

    Jim O'Grady, WNYC features reporter, talks about hosting the 8-part podcast series, "Blindspot: The Road to 9/11," which tells the story of the decade before the attacks and what signs were missed.

  • Peter Strzok and the Russia Investigation

    Sep 11 2020

    Peter Strzok, a 22-year veteran of the FBI and their former deputy assistant director of counterintelligence who headed up the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, now the author of Compromised: Counterintelligence and the Threat of Donald J. Trump (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020), argues that despite any personal failings or opinions he expressed, his investigation in the ties between the Trump campaign and Russia should be taken seriously.

  • Honoring the 9/11 Anniversary With the Public Advocate

    Sep 11 2020

    New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams talks about the disparate impact of 9/11 on certain New Yorkers, plus other news on school reopenings and more.

  • Trump Called COVID 'Deadly' Despite Publicly Downplaying It

    Sep 10 2020

    According to a new book by the veteran journalist Bob Woodward, President Trump intentionally downplayed the coronavirus threat in early 2020, despite knowing the risks. Jonathan Lemire, White House reporter for the Associated Press and political analyst for MSNBC/NBC News, talks about what this might mean for the president and his re-election chances.

  • It's Census Crunch Time

    Sep 10 2020

    Time is running out to fill out the census. Rossana Rosado, New York State Secretary of State, talks about how New York State's response rate is and what the state is doing to try to increase completion numbers.

  • How Was Your First Day of School?

    Sep 10 2020

    Many school districts in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut had their first day of classes this week whether remote or in-person. Your calls on how it went.

  • How to Vote in the Tri-State Area

    Sep 10 2020

    Henal Patel, director of the Democracy and Justice program at the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice (NJISJ), Laura Smits, vice president of voter services for the League of Women Voters of Connecticut, and Susan Lerner, executive director of Common Cause New York, explain how to vote in the tri-state area and answer listeners' questions about voting and making sure your vote counts.

  • WNYC's Plan to cover Race, Class and Social Justice

    Sep 09 2020

    Jami Floyd, senior editor for race and justice at WNYC, talks about her new job leading WNYC's unit that plans to cover the news through the prism of race, class, and social justice.  

  • The Role 'Nice White Parents' Play in School Segregation

    Sep 09 2020

    Chana Joffe-Walt, producer for This American Life and host of the new podcast Nice White Parents, and Dr. Rachel Lissy, senior Program Officer at Ramapo for Children, talk about investigating the relationship between white parents and segregation at one New York City school.

  • Solving the 'Coronavirus Test Mess'

    Sep 09 2020

    Atul Gawande, staff writer for The New Yorker, surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, argues testing capacity in the United States could be scaled up to control the coronavirus pandemic, with effective national leadership.

  • Arthur Avenue Restaurateurs Plead for Indoor Dining

    Sep 09 2020

    New York City Council Member Ritchie Torres (15th District - Bronx), Democratic candidate for U.S. Representative, and Peter Madonia, chairman of the Belmont Business Improvement District, and the owner of Madonia Bakery on Arthur Avenue, call on the mayor and governor to allow for indoor dining -- otherwise, they say small restaurants and other mom-and-pop establishments in The Bronx will not be able to stay in business.

  • Tuesday Morning 2020 Politics: Polls and Partisans

    Sep 08 2020

    Amy Walter, national editor at the Cook Political Report and the host of Politics with Amy Walter on WNYC's The Takeaway (on Fridays), talks about the latest 2020 campaign news and looks at where the polls stand as the election heats up, on the day after Labor Day.

  • Day-After-Labor-Day Local News Roundup

    Sep 08 2020

    Jeffery Mays, New York Times reporter on the Metro Desk, and Brigid Bergin, WNYC City Hall and politics reporter, talk about the latest local news, including the reopening of school buildings for teachers to prepare; the City's COVID-19 budget woes and the state and federal governments' responses; and the unofficial start to the 2021 municipal campaigns. 

  • Are You Moving to the Suburbs?

    Sep 08 2020

    Since the pandemic began, the suburbs around New York City, from New Jersey to Westchester County to Connecticut to Long Island, have been experiencing a huge demand for homes of all prices. Matthew Haag, a reporter on the Metro desk at The New York Times where he covers the intersection of real estate and politics, talks about whether the increased demand is evidence of a mass urban exodus or something else.

  • Alternatives to Completely Shutting Down

    Sep 08 2020

    Greg Ip, Wall Street Journal's chief economics commentator and the author of Foolproof: Why Safety Can Be Dangerous and How Danger Makes Us Safe (Little, Brown and Company, 2015), talks about possible alternatives to completely shutting down the economy, in case of future outbreaks.

  • Brian Lehrer Weekend: Young Poll Workers Needed, How To Work Out Relatively Safely, Tech and Human Relationships

    Sep 04 2020

    Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. (Young) Poll Workers Needed (First) | How to Work Out Relatively Safely in the Gym (starts at 24:35) | Technology and Human Relationships (Starts at 47:20) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.