Podcast

The Brian Lehrer Show

Brian Lehrer leads the conversation about what matters most now in local and national politics, our own communities and our lives.

Episodes

  • National Politics: Transition of Power, RBG's Replacement and More

    Sep 25 2020

    Seung Min Kim, White House reporter for The Washington Post, talks about the latest national political news, including the president's comments about potentially not accepting a peaceful transition of power. Plus, the forthcoming announcement from President Trump on who he is nominating to be the next Supreme Court Justice of the United States.

  • Ask the Mayor: New COVID Clusters, Schools and More

    Sep 25 2020

    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in NYC.

  • How Is Remote Learning Affecting Your Job?

    Sep 25 2020

    Listeners call in to talk about how helping their kids through remote learning has affected their careers, whether they've had to reduce their hours or even quit their jobs.

  • Brian Lehrer Weekend: The Black Vote; COVID Long Haulers; Claudia Rankine

    Sep 25 2020

    Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. The Black Vote (First) | COVID Long Haulers (Starts at 25:30) | Poet Claudia Rankine (Starts at 47:31) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.

  • Truth

    Sep 24 2020

    Keisha Blain, University of Pittsburgh historian and president of the African American Intellectual History Society and the co-editor with Ibram X. Kendi of the forthcoming Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019 (One World, 2021), looks at the extent of disparities in wealth and income, health, political power and more, and the policies of both parties that have been most responsible for perpetuating those disparities.

  • Reconciliation

    Sep 24 2020

    When you reconcile a financial statement, you determine who owes who what, and where the money actually goes. Barbara Smith, Black feminist scholar and founder of the Combahee River Collective, explores who owes what to whom and where we go from here.

  • Is There A Liberal and Conservative Way to Fight a Pandemic?

    Sep 23 2020

    Avik Roy, president of the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity (FREOPP) discusses balancing the risks of reopening against the risks of community spread of COVID-19. Then, Leana Wen, M.D., emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University, contributing columnist for The Washington Post, and former health commissioner of Baltimore and Asma Khalid, political correspondent for NPR, discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic, and the candidates' approaches to it, could ...more

  • How We're Voting

    Sep 23 2020

    Myrna Pérez, director of the Brennan Center's Voting Rights and Elections Program, and Ari Berman, senior reporter at Mother Jones, covering voting rights and author of Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, talk about how the pandemic is affecting pre-existing voting problems and creating others, and take calls from listeners around the country about the voting situation in their state.   This segment originally aired on the national program America, Are We Ready?...more

  • Colin Quinn's Take on the Not-So-United States

    Sep 22 2020

    Colin Quinn, stand-up comedian, writer, performer and the author of Overstated: A Coast-to-Coast Roast of the 50 States (St. Martin's Press, 2020), offers his distinctive observations on the crazy-quilt design of this country and the contradictions and consternations of the 50 separate, but united, states of America.

  • Tuesday Morning Politics

    Sep 22 2020

    Amber Phillips, Washington Post political reporter and author for The 5-Minute Fix, and Errol Louis, political anchor on Spectrum News NY1, host of Inside City Hall on NY1, host of the podcast You Decide and New York Daily News columnist, discuss the latest national political news—from the Senate jockeying on RBG's replacement to the news that the Justice Department named New York City an "anarchist jurisdiction."

  • (Some) Students With Disabilities Go Back to School

    Sep 22 2020

    Lori Podvesker, director of disability and education policy at INCLUDEnyc, talks about the special challenges students and families in NYC's District 75, which services students with disabilities, face as the new school year begins.

  • Second Wave of COVID-19 and Lockdowns Ahead?

    Sep 22 2020

    Ramanan Laxminarayan, economist, epidemiologist and founder and director of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP), talks about how the COVID-19 pandemic has played out in India, which is on track to surpass the United States as the country with the most cases worldwide — plus in other places around world, including Israel, which recently instituted a second full lockdown.

  • What RBG Meant to You

    Sep 21 2020

    Listeners call in to share what Ruth Bader Ginsburg meant to them—to their lives, careers, families and relationships.

  • The Politics of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Replacement

    Sep 21 2020

    Since Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death late last week, Republicans have vowed to push through her replacement before the election. Sabrina Siddiqui, national politics reporter at The Wall Street Journal and political analyst at CNN, talks about the Republicans who won't go along with it, whether it's enough to prevent it from going through and what the Democrats and Joe Biden may do if they win the presidency and the Senate in November.

  • The Life and Legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

    Sep 21 2020

    Jami Floyd, senior editor for race & justice and legal editor at WNYC, talks about the life and legacy of the late, legendary Supreme Court justice.

  • The Black Vote and the Democratic Party

    Sep 21 2020

    Theodore Johnson, senior fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice, talks about how and why despite holding diverse political opinions, Black Americans vote overwhelmingly for Democrats.

  • Is Trump Really Brokering 'Peace' Around the World?

    Sep 18 2020

    Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post columnist and author of "Today's WorldView," the Post's international affairs newsletter, talks about the latest Trump administration attempts at peacemaking around the world and what, if anything, their impact might be.

  • Fatigue, Headaches, Brain Fog: Some COVID Symptoms Last Beyond 14 Days

    Sep 18 2020

    Dr. Dayna McCarthy, rehabilitation medicine physician at Mount Sinai, talks about working with patients suffering from long term coronavirus symptoms at the Mount Sinai Center for Post-COVID Care, and takes calls from listeners who consider themselves "long haulers." 

  • Claudia Rankine's American Conversation

    Sep 18 2020

    Claudia Rankine, poet, playwright, MacArthur fellow, Yale professor, and author of Citizen: An American Lyric and her latest, Just Us: An American Conversation (Graywolf Press, 2020), talks about her new book that tries to model how Americans can start talking to each other about race.

  • Ask the Mayor: Schools Reopening, Industry City, and More

    Sep 18 2020

    Bill de Blasio, New York City Mayor, takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in New York City, including remote learning, the economy, and more.

  • Brian Lehrer Weekend: Mentally Ill While Black; NJ Cannabis; Maria Hinojosa's Story

    Sep 18 2020

    Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Mentall Ill While Black (First) | Cannabis on the Ballot in NJ (Starts at 35:54) | Maria Hinojosa's Story (Starts at 1:02:37) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.

  • Will NJ Legalize Pot This Fall?

    Sep 17 2020

    After failing to legalize recreational cannabis in New Jersey last year, lawmakers have put the issue on the ballot in November. Mona Zhang, states cannabis policy reporter for POLITICO Pro, talks about the regional and national implications of legalization.   → EVENT: See Mona speak at The CannAtlantic Conference by the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists on September 26. For more information, click here.

  • Men Are From Mars, but Could There Be Intelligent Life on Venus?

    Sep 17 2020

    This weekend scientists announced they had detected the gas phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus, which could be an indication of life. Kenneth Chang, science reporter at The New York Times, breaks down this exciting discovery, and takes your questions.

  • Joe Biden and the Latinx Vote

    Sep 17 2020

    Julio Ricardo Varela, co-host of the In The Thick podcast and founder of Latino Rebels, assesses the Biden campaign's attempts to gain support among Latinx voters.

  • Assessing the Relative Risks of Catching COVID

    Sep 17 2020

    Dr. Leana Wen, emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University, contributing columnist for The Washington Post, and former health commissioner of Baltimore, talks about the risks of attending Black Lives Matter protests and President Trump's rallies - and why the rallies are so much more dangerous to your health, plus other COVID news.

  • What Will Industry City Look Like in the Future?

    Sep 16 2020

    Industry City has proposed a controversial rezoning of the complex to allow more offices, manufacturing and retail shops -- and City Council held a public hearing on it this week. Ben Adler, senior editor for City & State, and freelance journalist Karina Piser talk about what's at stake, the City Council hearing, and take listener calls from the Sunset Park neighborhood. 

  • Remote Learning Advice Roulette

    Sep 16 2020

    From shoddy internet, screen fatigue, and confusing assignments — helping your kid with remote learning can be a headache. On this installment of "advice roulette," your biggest questions and gripes about remote learning, and advice and tips from other listeners. Sometimes it takes a village.  

  • How the Kennedy Campaign Used Tech and Data

    Sep 16 2020

    Jill Lepore, professor of American history at Harvard University, staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of many books, including These Truths: A History of the United States, and her latest, If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future (Liveright, 2020), tells the story of a late-1950s precursor to today's tech marketing companies that was used to sell products, including political candidates, and raised the same questions we face today over manipulation and the use of da...more

  • How Do Prosecutors Decide When to Convict Cops?

    Sep 16 2020

    Emily Bazelon, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, co-host of Slate's Political Gabfest podcast, Truman Capote Fellow for creative writing and law at Yale Law School and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration (Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2020), and Elie Mystal, justice correspondent for The Nation, talk about why so few district attorneys choose to prosecute police officers who some say have very clearly committed unlawful ac...more

  • UWS NIMBYism and Shelter Residents

    Sep 15 2020

    City Council Member Helen Rosenthal (6th District, UWS) and Joshua Goldfein, staff attorney in Legal Aid's Homeless Rights Project, talk about the NIMBY campaign mounted by some residents in the Upper West Side to evict several hundred homeless men living in the Lucerne Hotel and Legal Aid's threatened countersuit to halt the further dislocations.  The relocations are currently halted pending negotiations.

  • Powerful Business Leaders vs. NYC's Mayor

    Sep 15 2020

    Kathryn Wylde, president of the Partnership for New York City, talks about the letter she helped orchestrate, signed by 163 chief executives, which implored the mayor to focus on quality-of-life problems.

  • NYC Schools Prepare to Open

    Sep 15 2020

    As New York City schools are preparing to re-open, WNYC and Gothamist reporter Sophia Chang and WNYC reporter Jessica Gould talk about the hygiene and ventilation conditions in schools, how teachers are feeling and the stats on teachers and COVID cases, so far.

  • Maria Hinojosa's Story

    Sep 15 2020

    Maria Hinojosa, anchor and executive producer of Latino USA, and the author of Once I Was You: A Memoir of Love and Hate in a Torn America (Simon and Schuster, 2020), talks about her own life and where her story intersects with national issues.

  • The Wildfires Are Making the Climate Crisis Impossible to Ignore

    Sep 14 2020

    As the West Coast tragically burns in out-of-control wildfires, Emily Atkin, writer of the newsletter/host of the podcast called HEATED, talks about how the progressively worse fire seasons have made the climate crisis impossible to ignore.

  • Monday Morning Campaign Politics: Door Knocking In A Pandemic

    Sep 14 2020

    Asma Khalid, political correspondent for NPR and co-host of The NPR Politics Podcast, talks about the status of the Biden/Harris campaign and other national political news.

  • Mentally Ill While Black

    Sep 14 2020

    Dr. Ashwin Vasan, epidemiologist and professor at Columbia and CEO of Fountain House, a community-based mental and public health organization, and Christina Sparrock, mental health advocate and Fountain House member, talks about the intersection of mental health and racial justice in light of the Daniel Prude killing, and take calls from Black listeners about mental health stigma, and how it compounds their anxiety around the police.  For all individuals with mental health issues, there’s the ...more

  • COVID-19 Tests are Supposed to Be Free. Why Are People Being Charged Anyway?

    Sep 14 2020

    Sarah Kliff, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, talks about her latest reporting around why some people are receiving bills for COVID-19 testing when Congress sought to ensure that patients would not face costs connected to the virus. Plus, why is it so hard to find tests for children?

  • Brian Lehrer Weekend: Solving the 'Coronavirus Test Mess'; How to Vote in the Tri-State Area; WNYC's Plan to cover Race, Class and Social Justice

    Sep 11 2020

    Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. Solving the 'Coronavirus Test Mess' (First) | How to Vote in the Tri-State Area (Starts at 40:55) |  WNYC's Plan to cover Race, Class and Social Justice (Starts at 1:18:16)

  • Your Back to College Stories

    Sep 11 2020

    Doug Lederman, editor and co-founder of Inside Higher Ed., ticks through the latest reopening plans, new cases, and quarantine procedures at colleges around the country. Plus, your calls on the first weeks back to campus.

  • Peter Strzok and the Russia Investigation

    Sep 11 2020

    Peter Strzok, a 22-year veteran of the FBI and their former deputy assistant director of counterintelligence who headed up the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, now the author of Compromised: Counterintelligence and the Threat of Donald J. Trump (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2020), argues that despite any personal failings or opinions he expressed, his investigation in the ties between the Trump campaign and Russia should be taken seriously.